Date   

KIELCE LDS records #general

David Price <David_Price@...>
 

Are all the vital records for KIELCE on the LDS microfilms for KIELCE
after 1869 and on the LDS films for CHECINY before that year. Are any of
the CHECINY records on the mainly CHMIELNIK microfilms #1808864 and the
earlier made one.
David Price


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen KIELCE LDS records #general

David Price <David_Price@...>
 

Are all the vital records for KIELCE on the LDS microfilms for KIELCE
after 1869 and on the LDS films for CHECINY before that year. Are any of
the CHECINY records on the mainly CHMIELNIK microfilms #1808864 and the
earlier made one.
David Price


searching for POSNER #general

wazza <wazza@...>
 

Looking for family of Woolf POSNER, (b.London, England 1861), he is my great
Grandfather. His father was a Jacob POSNER born 1829 in Poland, exact
whereabouts unknown. Married a Therese (born 1831 also Poland somewhere.
Jacob and Therese had a family of 9 children, the 2 eldest were born in
Poland and the remainder born in England somewhere. According to a 1891
Census, he a tailor business in High Street kensington where they also
resided.

If anyone recognises these names or can offer some help I would be grateful.

Wayne B. Hodges


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen searching for POSNER #general

wazza <wazza@...>
 

Looking for family of Woolf POSNER, (b.London, England 1861), he is my great
Grandfather. His father was a Jacob POSNER born 1829 in Poland, exact
whereabouts unknown. Married a Therese (born 1831 also Poland somewhere.
Jacob and Therese had a family of 9 children, the 2 eldest were born in
Poland and the remainder born in England somewhere. According to a 1891
Census, he a tailor business in High Street kensington where they also
resided.

If anyone recognises these names or can offer some help I would be grateful.

Wayne B. Hodges


Uri and Shraga WERE Phoebuses! #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Warren Blatt claims that many of the Harkavy's "English" equivalents to
Yiddish names came right out of his head and bore no relationship to
real-life practices. However, Warren's list of examples >from Harkavy
contained at least one case (and perhaps more) of "one of these things is
not like the others." So which was the odd man (or odd men!) out?

Warren said: > for "Uri" and "Shraga", he [Harkavy] suggests "Phoebus"<

_In actual historical fact_ Uri and Shraga _are_ directly connected with
Phoebus. It was not uncommon in the middle ages for an Uri ora Shraga (both
names connote light or torch or flame or shining) to be called Phoebus
(meaning "Shining One"). There was a famous 18th-century printer of Hebrew
books called Uri Phoebus ben Aaron Ha-Levi). In time, Phoebus became
yiddishized to "Feibush/Feivish/Feivel." So "Shraga Feivel" -- a common
combination-- is simply a yiddish version of Shraga Phoebus.

Warren further stated:
In my study of Hebrew and English given names on over 10,000
tombstones in early 20th-century landsmanshaft cemeteries in
New York and Boston, NONE of these name pairs appeared!
Well, maybe no Shraga Phoebus as such , but I bet you found a few Shraga
Feivels -- which is really the same thing, as explained above.

Furthermore, the other examples >from Harkavy struck me as quite plausible
-- even if some took a little figuring out (for instance, Shprintza =
Hope because Shprintza is a yiddish form of Esperanza!) Almost all the
examples were girls' names. Unlike Jewish boys, who (no matter where they
were born) would usually receive a traditional Hebrew/Jewish name at the
bris, we find throughout Jewish history that girls born in countries where
Jews mixed with the population and spoke local languages (e.g. Greek or
Latin in the Hellenistic age, Arabic in the heyday of medieval Islam, and
Italian in the Renaissance) often have female names belonging to that
culture. A medieval Italian Ashkenazi could easily name his/her daughter
"Dulcia" to correspond with the Yiddish name Sissel; and as names often
get passed down the generations, I have actually met a Dulcie whose Jewish
name was Sissel! I think we should avoid focusing narrowly on the
practices of 19th- century East European Jewish immigrants, as though their
practices somehow represent the norm and all others are anomalies!

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Uri and Shraga WERE Phoebuses! #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Warren Blatt claims that many of the Harkavy's "English" equivalents to
Yiddish names came right out of his head and bore no relationship to
real-life practices. However, Warren's list of examples >from Harkavy
contained at least one case (and perhaps more) of "one of these things is
not like the others." So which was the odd man (or odd men!) out?

Warren said: > for "Uri" and "Shraga", he [Harkavy] suggests "Phoebus"<

_In actual historical fact_ Uri and Shraga _are_ directly connected with
Phoebus. It was not uncommon in the middle ages for an Uri ora Shraga (both
names connote light or torch or flame or shining) to be called Phoebus
(meaning "Shining One"). There was a famous 18th-century printer of Hebrew
books called Uri Phoebus ben Aaron Ha-Levi). In time, Phoebus became
yiddishized to "Feibush/Feivish/Feivel." So "Shraga Feivel" -- a common
combination-- is simply a yiddish version of Shraga Phoebus.

Warren further stated:
In my study of Hebrew and English given names on over 10,000
tombstones in early 20th-century landsmanshaft cemeteries in
New York and Boston, NONE of these name pairs appeared!
Well, maybe no Shraga Phoebus as such , but I bet you found a few Shraga
Feivels -- which is really the same thing, as explained above.

Furthermore, the other examples >from Harkavy struck me as quite plausible
-- even if some took a little figuring out (for instance, Shprintza =
Hope because Shprintza is a yiddish form of Esperanza!) Almost all the
examples were girls' names. Unlike Jewish boys, who (no matter where they
were born) would usually receive a traditional Hebrew/Jewish name at the
bris, we find throughout Jewish history that girls born in countries where
Jews mixed with the population and spoke local languages (e.g. Greek or
Latin in the Hellenistic age, Arabic in the heyday of medieval Islam, and
Italian in the Renaissance) often have female names belonging to that
culture. A medieval Italian Ashkenazi could easily name his/her daughter
"Dulcia" to correspond with the Yiddish name Sissel; and as names often
get passed down the generations, I have actually met a Dulcie whose Jewish
name was Sissel! I think we should avoid focusing narrowly on the
practices of 19th- century East European Jewish immigrants, as though their
practices somehow represent the norm and all others are anomalies!

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


Help with Records #lithuania

Wolinsky <wolinsky@...>
 

I have received a batch of documents >from the Kaunas Archives and hoped
more experienced folks could help me interpret some information in there:

--The research was on the Israel and Tumin families, of Slobodka and
Shrednik, respectively.
I noted that the same number was assigned to families >from 1834 through
1898. Such as #35 for the Israels.
But within the #35 in one case were people with apparently different last
names, such as Movsha SEGAL and his brother Borukh,.
Is it likely that the Segals are related to the Israels because they were
listed in that group?

--In 1874, the revision list notes that Girsh Nison Israel lived in his own
wooden house. It gives a location of the 8th section in the 3rd district of
Kaunas. Do maps exist that would pinpoint that location? This is the only
record that notes a person's "own wooden house." What other housing
arrangements were there?
--It mentions that Girsh's father was Peres Israel, a shoemaker. Is Peres a
Hebrew or Yiddish name (a la Shimon Peres?)
--In 1852, the translation fails to list women's names >from the Tumin
family--though the women's names are listed elsewhere. COuld the translator
have overlooked this? Or women's names not taken down in 1852.
--Two family members were listed as "missing." E.G., Itsko Izrael who was
"39 in 1834, missing" in 1850. What does missing mean? Did they go
underground because of the draft? Or were they simply missing and presumed
dead? Any guesses?
--What is the Army Recruitment District List? Are these men eligible for
the military or men in the military?
Any help would be appreciated.

Anyone waiting for records might like to know that the search for these
records was started Dec. 19, 1997 and records were sent out Oct. 2, 1998.

Howard Wolinsky
Flossmoor, IL
searching for ISRAEL in Slobodka, TUMIN in SHrednik and SHRAGON/SRAGON in
Babtai and Kovno


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Help with Records #lithuania

Wolinsky <wolinsky@...>
 

I have received a batch of documents >from the Kaunas Archives and hoped
more experienced folks could help me interpret some information in there:

--The research was on the Israel and Tumin families, of Slobodka and
Shrednik, respectively.
I noted that the same number was assigned to families >from 1834 through
1898. Such as #35 for the Israels.
But within the #35 in one case were people with apparently different last
names, such as Movsha SEGAL and his brother Borukh,.
Is it likely that the Segals are related to the Israels because they were
listed in that group?

--In 1874, the revision list notes that Girsh Nison Israel lived in his own
wooden house. It gives a location of the 8th section in the 3rd district of
Kaunas. Do maps exist that would pinpoint that location? This is the only
record that notes a person's "own wooden house." What other housing
arrangements were there?
--It mentions that Girsh's father was Peres Israel, a shoemaker. Is Peres a
Hebrew or Yiddish name (a la Shimon Peres?)
--In 1852, the translation fails to list women's names >from the Tumin
family--though the women's names are listed elsewhere. COuld the translator
have overlooked this? Or women's names not taken down in 1852.
--Two family members were listed as "missing." E.G., Itsko Izrael who was
"39 in 1834, missing" in 1850. What does missing mean? Did they go
underground because of the draft? Or were they simply missing and presumed
dead? Any guesses?
--What is the Army Recruitment District List? Are these men eligible for
the military or men in the military?
Any help would be appreciated.

Anyone waiting for records might like to know that the search for these
records was started Dec. 19, 1997 and records were sent out Oct. 2, 1998.

Howard Wolinsky
Flossmoor, IL
searching for ISRAEL in Slobodka, TUMIN in SHrednik and SHRAGON/SRAGON in
Babtai and Kovno


IMPORTANT - NEW BEEPER - EMAIL BEEPER NUMBER #lithuania

Harold Rhode <hrhode@...>
 

Effective immediately, I have a new beeper telephone number. In the US,
it is:

1-800-368-2018

If you wish to send me an email beeper message, type
3682018@skytel.com Then type your message. It will appear on my
beeper.


THanks,


Harold Rhode


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania IMPORTANT - NEW BEEPER - EMAIL BEEPER NUMBER #lithuania

Harold Rhode <hrhode@...>
 

Effective immediately, I have a new beeper telephone number. In the US,
it is:

1-800-368-2018

If you wish to send me an email beeper message, type
3682018@skytel.com Then type your message. It will appear on my
beeper.


THanks,


Harold Rhode


Re: Eastern European Maps #general

Jim & Sara Feldman <feldmans@...>
 

We have been using maps published by (curiously enough) American Map of
Maspeth, NY, part of the Leangescheidt Publishing Group. They all use
the general name of <bold>Euro Map</bold>. These are modern country
maps and are available here in Boston in a number of good bookstores.
You might even try <<Amazon.com> I particular, we have a book of maps
on Russia and eastern Europe, maps of Poland, and a city map of Prague.
All provide excellent detail. Even tiny towns (may you be fortunate
enough that they still exist) are there. In general, I have found the
indices useful in locating towns.

Jim

Jim Feldman

Ron Feldman wrote

I am also new to this, and I have been reading the discussion group
for a few weeks now. Everyone talks about different regions, provinces
etc. belonging to different countries at different times. Since I do
not know the names and locations of these provinces I find it hard to
go into shtetlfind and have a list of x number of names in different >provinces and know what I want.
Is there any place I can find a more general overview of Eastern
Europe with countries, regions and provinces for different periods of >time, especially if they are in maps.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re: Eastern European Maps #general

Jim & Sara Feldman <feldmans@...>
 

We have been using maps published by (curiously enough) American Map of
Maspeth, NY, part of the Leangescheidt Publishing Group. They all use
the general name of <bold>Euro Map</bold>. These are modern country
maps and are available here in Boston in a number of good bookstores.
You might even try <<Amazon.com> I particular, we have a book of maps
on Russia and eastern Europe, maps of Poland, and a city map of Prague.
All provide excellent detail. Even tiny towns (may you be fortunate
enough that they still exist) are there. In general, I have found the
indices useful in locating towns.

Jim

Jim Feldman

Ron Feldman wrote

I am also new to this, and I have been reading the discussion group
for a few weeks now. Everyone talks about different regions, provinces
etc. belonging to different countries at different times. Since I do
not know the names and locations of these provinces I find it hard to
go into shtetlfind and have a list of x number of names in different >provinces and know what I want.
Is there any place I can find a more general overview of Eastern
Europe with countries, regions and provinces for different periods of >time, especially if they are in maps.


funeral homes/vicinity ELIZABETH, N.J. #general

Shirley Wilets
 

Trying to find burial locations of my father's cousins who lived in ELIZABETH,
N.J. Their deaths spanned 1992-1983. Does anyone know of funeral homes in that
area that were in existence during those years?

Thank you for any information.

Shirley Wilets
swilets@aol.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen funeral homes/vicinity ELIZABETH, N.J. #general

Shirley Wilets
 

Trying to find burial locations of my father's cousins who lived in ELIZABETH,
N.J. Their deaths spanned 1992-1983. Does anyone know of funeral homes in that
area that were in existence during those years?

Thank you for any information.

Shirley Wilets
swilets@aol.com


Re: Gregorian Calendar #general

Otto Chr. Thygesen <thygesen@...>
 

According to my sources, Poland changed >from Julian to Gregorian
calandar in 1582. 10 days left out between Oct. 4th and Oct. 15th.

May I suggest that you have a look at the program DAYS. It is freeware
and may be downloaded >from www.thygesen.suite.dk

Otto

Otto Chr. Thygesen
thygesen@inet.uni2.dk

MODERATOR NOTE: This thread is now closed.
Any further comments, please send privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Gregorian Calendar #general

Otto Chr. Thygesen <thygesen@...>
 

According to my sources, Poland changed >from Julian to Gregorian
calandar in 1582. 10 days left out between Oct. 4th and Oct. 15th.

May I suggest that you have a look at the program DAYS. It is freeware
and may be downloaded >from www.thygesen.suite.dk

Otto

Otto Chr. Thygesen
thygesen@inet.uni2.dk

MODERATOR NOTE: This thread is now closed.
Any further comments, please send privately.


JGSGW - 10/25 Bruce Kahn #general

Ellen Shindelman <grapevyn@...>
 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1998

At Ohr Kodesh Congregation
8402 Freyman Drive
Chevy Chase, MD 20815
301-589-3880
(directions below)

Social 1:30 pm Meeting 2:00 - 4:00 pm

PROGRAM: Digital Imaging and Genealogy: Principles, Possibilities &
Pitfalls

Speaker: Bruce E. Kahn, Ph.D.

Recent developments in computer and digital imaging technology have created
many new and exciting tools that can be used by genealogists to facilitate
their research. Among the applications of digital imaging in genealogy
which will be discussed and demonstrated are enhancing family trees by
including photographs, use of image databases, and copying and
restoration/retouching old family photographs. There are even digital
imaging tools available to genealogists who don't have computers.

Bruce E. Kahn, Ph.D. is President of the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Rochester (JGSR), a board member of the Association of Jewish Genealogical
Societies (AJGS). He is responsible for the JGSR web pages
(http://jgsr.hq.net), and has written a number of web based genealogical
databases. He travels regularly to Eastern Europe to photograph and
conduct genealogical research. Dr. Kahn is currently a Professor of
Imaging and Photographic Technology at the Rochester Institute of
Technology, and previously worked as a Senior Research Scientist for the
Eastman Kodak Company.

DIRECTIONS:

Ohr Kodesh is located just off East West Highway one block east of Beach
Drive.

Coming >from Silver Spring and communities east of Rock Creek Park, take East
West Highway west to Meadowbrook Lane. Turn right and then left on Freyman
Drive. Ohr Kodesh is on the corner at 8402 Freyman Drive.

Coming >from communities west of Rock Creek Park, take Connecticut Avenue to
East West Highway and turn left, if coming south on Connecticut Ave , or
right,
if coming north on Connecticut Ave. (East West Highway is about midway between
Chevy Chase Circle and the Beltway). Continue on East West Highway past Beach
Drive and make the first left on to Meadowbrook Lane. Make the next left onto
Freyman and Ohr Kodesh is on the left corner, at 8402 Freyman Drive.
Ellen Shindelman
grapevyn@erols.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSGW - 10/25 Bruce Kahn #general

Ellen Shindelman <grapevyn@...>
 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1998

At Ohr Kodesh Congregation
8402 Freyman Drive
Chevy Chase, MD 20815
301-589-3880
(directions below)

Social 1:30 pm Meeting 2:00 - 4:00 pm

PROGRAM: Digital Imaging and Genealogy: Principles, Possibilities &
Pitfalls

Speaker: Bruce E. Kahn, Ph.D.

Recent developments in computer and digital imaging technology have created
many new and exciting tools that can be used by genealogists to facilitate
their research. Among the applications of digital imaging in genealogy
which will be discussed and demonstrated are enhancing family trees by
including photographs, use of image databases, and copying and
restoration/retouching old family photographs. There are even digital
imaging tools available to genealogists who don't have computers.

Bruce E. Kahn, Ph.D. is President of the Jewish Genealogical Society of
Rochester (JGSR), a board member of the Association of Jewish Genealogical
Societies (AJGS). He is responsible for the JGSR web pages
(http://jgsr.hq.net), and has written a number of web based genealogical
databases. He travels regularly to Eastern Europe to photograph and
conduct genealogical research. Dr. Kahn is currently a Professor of
Imaging and Photographic Technology at the Rochester Institute of
Technology, and previously worked as a Senior Research Scientist for the
Eastman Kodak Company.

DIRECTIONS:

Ohr Kodesh is located just off East West Highway one block east of Beach
Drive.

Coming >from Silver Spring and communities east of Rock Creek Park, take East
West Highway west to Meadowbrook Lane. Turn right and then left on Freyman
Drive. Ohr Kodesh is on the corner at 8402 Freyman Drive.

Coming >from communities west of Rock Creek Park, take Connecticut Avenue to
East West Highway and turn left, if coming south on Connecticut Ave , or
right,
if coming north on Connecticut Ave. (East West Highway is about midway between
Chevy Chase Circle and the Beltway). Continue on East West Highway past Beach
Drive and make the first left on to Meadowbrook Lane. Make the next left onto
Freyman and Ohr Kodesh is on the left corner, at 8402 Freyman Drive.
Ellen Shindelman
grapevyn@erols.com


GREENMAN, Nathan and RESNICK,Fannie from Antopol #general

Greenman50@...
 

Dear JewishGenners:

I am looking for anyone who might know about (or be related to) my paternal
grandparents -- who were both >from Antopol and came to New York around the
turn of the century. My dad (now deceased) said that they never spoke of
their families (in the old country)! and I have no other information about
whether or if they had brothers or sisters. He did tell me that as far as he
remembered, Nathan's parents' names were Elkonor Greenman and Chana Resnick
and Fannie's were Shimon Resnick and Rifka Jacobs (they were 4th or 5th
cousins).

I've just started reading the Jewishgen posts and have been intrigued by how
many refer to finding out info thru this source. I hope I can be that lucky!

Thanks in advance.

Linda Greenman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GREENMAN, Nathan and RESNICK,Fannie from Antopol #general

Greenman50@...
 

Dear JewishGenners:

I am looking for anyone who might know about (or be related to) my paternal
grandparents -- who were both >from Antopol and came to New York around the
turn of the century. My dad (now deceased) said that they never spoke of
their families (in the old country)! and I have no other information about
whether or if they had brothers or sisters. He did tell me that as far as he
remembered, Nathan's parents' names were Elkonor Greenman and Chana Resnick
and Fannie's were Shimon Resnick and Rifka Jacobs (they were 4th or 5th
cousins).

I've just started reading the Jewishgen posts and have been intrigued by how
many refer to finding out info thru this source. I hope I can be that lucky!

Thanks in advance.

Linda Greenman