Date   

Re: Large Railway Accident - East Coast 1940's early 1950's #general

GelmanED <gelmaned@...>
 

In the early 1950's, there was an accidnet on the Long Island Railroad in which
72 persons were killed. Most newspaper libraries should have some record of the
extensive coverage of that accident.
DAVID GELMAN


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Large Railway Accident - East Coast 1940's early 1950's #general

GelmanED <gelmaned@...>
 

In the early 1950's, there was an accidnet on the Long Island Railroad in which
72 persons were killed. Most newspaper libraries should have some record of the
extensive coverage of that accident.
DAVID GELMAN


Re: Are there KLEINS in your family tree? #hungary

Cfenyvesi@...
 

Klein is probably the most common Jewish name in Hungary. But I'll add what I
know about my paternal ancestors, which is not much. My grandfather, David
Klein, was probably born in Kassa (now Kosice, in Slovakia) around 1850. He
married a Viennese Jew by the name of Rosa (or Roza) Kosch, and they had five
children: Jeno, Menyhert, Gizella, Erzsebet and Aladar (who was my father,
born in 1892, definitely in Kassa). Stories about my father's family are not
very reliable, I am afraid. But what I have heard is that Grandpa David was
one of 12 or perhaps 15 children, some of whom Hungarianized their name (David
certainly did). Hence Fenyvesi.
This is close to everything I know. Regards, Charles Fenyvesi


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Are there KLEINS in your family tree? #hungary

Cfenyvesi@...
 

Klein is probably the most common Jewish name in Hungary. But I'll add what I
know about my paternal ancestors, which is not much. My grandfather, David
Klein, was probably born in Kassa (now Kosice, in Slovakia) around 1850. He
married a Viennese Jew by the name of Rosa (or Roza) Kosch, and they had five
children: Jeno, Menyhert, Gizella, Erzsebet and Aladar (who was my father,
born in 1892, definitely in Kassa). Stories about my father's family are not
very reliable, I am afraid. But what I have heard is that Grandpa David was
one of 12 or perhaps 15 children, some of whom Hungarianized their name (David
certainly did). Hence Fenyvesi.
This is close to everything I know. Regards, Charles Fenyvesi


The Auschwitz-Birkenau Archives, 1940-1945 #hungary

Margarita <uzidog@...>
 

Dear H-siggers,

Someone sent me a link to a Web Page about Poland. I only thought of looking
at it because it had the words "Austrian Ancestors". The complete title is
"Russian, German, and Austrian Ancestors in Poland".
http://www.ancestry.com/magazine/articles/poland.htm

Almost at the end of the page, there is a link to the State Archives in
Warsaw. Following further links, I got to the following page:

The Auschwitz-Birkenau Archives, 1940-1945
http://ciuw.warman.net.pl/alf/archiwa/memo/auschwiteng.htm

Margarita Lackó
Belgrano
uzidog@post1.com


Hanus falva #hungary

Marian Brown <mbrown@...>
 

Deborah Z. wrote:

From: "Deborah Z." <dzaccaro@hotmail.com>
To: h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org
Subject:
Content-Type: text/plain
Date: Thu, 08 Oct 1998 15:58:48 EDT

awhile back I remember the town of Hanus falva being mentioned, I have
the name "Hanus" on the Slovak side of my family and am interested in
any and all information,
Debora -

I posted the original inquiry because the town Hanus falva turned up as
the birthplace in 1809 of my ggggf, Moses Huebschman. I received
various suggestions as to the current name, but the one I think is
correct is now Spisske Hanusovce -- largely because it is so close to
Circ, Slovakia, where Moses and his children and grandchildren lived.
The latter emigrated to Cleveland about 1883. Helpful?
--
Marian Brown
Cincinnati, Ohio

Searching SLOVAKIA: GLUECK, Kohanovce/Presov > Cleveland, OH 1879;
HUEBSCHMAN, Circ/Presov > Cleveland, OH 1879; HEIMOWITZ, Huncovce >
Cleveland, OH 1873; HOLSTEIN, Kosice > New York, NY 1887; LISSAUER,
Kosice > Oklahoma/Texas 1883; NEWMAN, Vychodna > Cleveland, OH 1873;
PAUKER (PARKER,) Dravce/Huncovce; TURK > Oklahoma 1879; ZINNER, Spisska
Nova Ves > New York City & Oklahoma 1895


Hungary SIG #Hungary The Auschwitz-Birkenau Archives, 1940-1945 #hungary

Margarita <uzidog@...>
 

Dear H-siggers,

Someone sent me a link to a Web Page about Poland. I only thought of looking
at it because it had the words "Austrian Ancestors". The complete title is
"Russian, German, and Austrian Ancestors in Poland".
http://www.ancestry.com/magazine/articles/poland.htm

Almost at the end of the page, there is a link to the State Archives in
Warsaw. Following further links, I got to the following page:

The Auschwitz-Birkenau Archives, 1940-1945
http://ciuw.warman.net.pl/alf/archiwa/memo/auschwiteng.htm

Margarita Lackó
Belgrano
uzidog@post1.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Hanus falva #hungary

Marian Brown <mbrown@...>
 

Deborah Z. wrote:

From: "Deborah Z." <dzaccaro@hotmail.com>
To: h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org
Subject:
Content-Type: text/plain
Date: Thu, 08 Oct 1998 15:58:48 EDT

awhile back I remember the town of Hanus falva being mentioned, I have
the name "Hanus" on the Slovak side of my family and am interested in
any and all information,
Debora -

I posted the original inquiry because the town Hanus falva turned up as
the birthplace in 1809 of my ggggf, Moses Huebschman. I received
various suggestions as to the current name, but the one I think is
correct is now Spisske Hanusovce -- largely because it is so close to
Circ, Slovakia, where Moses and his children and grandchildren lived.
The latter emigrated to Cleveland about 1883. Helpful?
--
Marian Brown
Cincinnati, Ohio

Searching SLOVAKIA: GLUECK, Kohanovce/Presov > Cleveland, OH 1879;
HUEBSCHMAN, Circ/Presov > Cleveland, OH 1879; HEIMOWITZ, Huncovce >
Cleveland, OH 1873; HOLSTEIN, Kosice > New York, NY 1887; LISSAUER,
Kosice > Oklahoma/Texas 1883; NEWMAN, Vychodna > Cleveland, OH 1873;
PAUKER (PARKER,) Dravce/Huncovce; TURK > Oklahoma 1879; ZINNER, Spisska
Nova Ves > New York City & Oklahoma 1895


Re: Searching: SAMPSON #general

Harold Pollins <pollins@...>
 

I have come across a Joseph SAMPSON in my late wife's family. He was
married to Dinah SOLOMON and at his daughter's marriage on 4 November 1868
he is described as deceased. His daughter was Rose SAMPSON and was born 16
October 1839. She married a man called Joseph SOESAN. They were Londoners.
I do not know of any NY connections.

Harold Pollins
Oxford England

pollins@globalnet.co.uk


I am researching the SAMPSON family - in London UK early 19th C with
connections in NY where some children were born before returning to UK .

Aubrey Jacobus


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Searching: SAMPSON #general

Harold Pollins <pollins@...>
 

I have come across a Joseph SAMPSON in my late wife's family. He was
married to Dinah SOLOMON and at his daughter's marriage on 4 November 1868
he is described as deceased. His daughter was Rose SAMPSON and was born 16
October 1839. She married a man called Joseph SOESAN. They were Londoners.
I do not know of any NY connections.

Harold Pollins
Oxford England

pollins@globalnet.co.uk


I am researching the SAMPSON family - in London UK early 19th C with
connections in NY where some children were born before returning to UK .

Aubrey Jacobus


Mezuzzah #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Walking around the square we found in one doorway with a cut in the masonry,
which by height and angle was obviously where the muzzah (sp?) was placed.
>Howard L. Rosen

Howard:

Your story was interesting and very moving; thank you for sharing it with us.

In response to your query about the spelling of "muzzah," I just can't
resist quipping: "Wish they were all as E-Z as this one!" In other words
you were missing only those two letters! The correct transliteration
from the original Hebrew is "MEZUZZAH." The word (found several times in
the Bible, but most importantly at Deuteronomy 6:9 and 11:20) originally
meant the "doorpost" itself rather than the device that we attach to it --
but it has come to denote the container with its contents, a tiny parchment
scroll on which are written by hand the two passages >from Deuteronomy that
include the verses cited above, which prescribe the placing of "these
words" on the doorposts of one's house.

While on the subject, there has recently developed an alarming tendency to
double the WRONG "Z" -- thereby misspelling the word as "mezzuzah." This
is not an acceptable spelling, as technical reasons of Hebrew orthography
require doubling the SECOND Z -- and NOT the first one -- hence,
MEZUZZAH. (Anyone who cares to know why, please feel free to e-mail me
privately!)

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Mezuzzah #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Walking around the square we found in one doorway with a cut in the masonry,
which by height and angle was obviously where the muzzah (sp?) was placed.
>Howard L. Rosen

Howard:

Your story was interesting and very moving; thank you for sharing it with us.

In response to your query about the spelling of "muzzah," I just can't
resist quipping: "Wish they were all as E-Z as this one!" In other words
you were missing only those two letters! The correct transliteration
from the original Hebrew is "MEZUZZAH." The word (found several times in
the Bible, but most importantly at Deuteronomy 6:9 and 11:20) originally
meant the "doorpost" itself rather than the device that we attach to it --
but it has come to denote the container with its contents, a tiny parchment
scroll on which are written by hand the two passages >from Deuteronomy that
include the verses cited above, which prescribe the placing of "these
words" on the doorposts of one's house.

While on the subject, there has recently developed an alarming tendency to
double the WRONG "Z" -- thereby misspelling the word as "mezzuzah." This
is not an acceptable spelling, as technical reasons of Hebrew orthography
require doubling the SECOND Z -- and NOT the first one -- hence,
MEZUZZAH. (Anyone who cares to know why, please feel free to e-mail me
privately!)

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


A beadle is a "SHAMMAS" #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Subject: beadle
From: gayle riley <key2pst@pacbell.net>
>Does anyone know what a "beadle" did?
"Beadle" is an old-fashioned English word originally denoting a minor
official -- often a/k/a "sexton" -- who kept order in a church. He was
roughly the equivalent of the synagogue's so-called "SHAMMAS" (more
correctly, SHAMMASH).

So what's a Shammas? My Webster gives (as meaning #2 for "sexton"): "an
official in a synagogue who manages its day-to-day affairs" (like keeping
the place tidy, and seeing that prayerbooks and prayershawls etc. are set
out conveniently for the use of congregants. In the old days, in the
shtetl (as attested by writers like Sholem Aleikhem and Shai Agnon), he
was also a general handyman and gopher, responsible for tapping on
people's windows at the crack of dawn to wake them up for the weekday early
morning minyan -- and even for lighting the stove to heat the shul before
the worshippers arrived. (On Shabbat, they would resort to the services
of a "shabbas-goy" for this job.)

A principal function of today's "beadle" or Shammas is to act as usher,
especially on the High Holy Days. Remember the old joke? A man arrives
at the Shul door on Yom Kippur without a seat ticket, begging to be let in
to deliver a very urgent business message for a Mr. Cohen somewhere
inside. The Shammas refuses to let him in for free with no ticket. But
the man keeps insisting that it will be a total disaster if Mr. Cohen
doesn't get the message at once. Eventually the Shammas gives in to his
pleas, saying: "O.K., O.K., I'll let you in, but only to deliver the
business message. So help me, if I catch you praying even for a minute,
I'll kick you out right away!"

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A beadle is a "SHAMMAS" #general

Judith Romney Wegner
 

Subject: beadle
From: gayle riley <key2pst@pacbell.net>
>Does anyone know what a "beadle" did?
"Beadle" is an old-fashioned English word originally denoting a minor
official -- often a/k/a "sexton" -- who kept order in a church. He was
roughly the equivalent of the synagogue's so-called "SHAMMAS" (more
correctly, SHAMMASH).

So what's a Shammas? My Webster gives (as meaning #2 for "sexton"): "an
official in a synagogue who manages its day-to-day affairs" (like keeping
the place tidy, and seeing that prayerbooks and prayershawls etc. are set
out conveniently for the use of congregants. In the old days, in the
shtetl (as attested by writers like Sholem Aleikhem and Shai Agnon), he
was also a general handyman and gopher, responsible for tapping on
people's windows at the crack of dawn to wake them up for the weekday early
morning minyan -- and even for lighting the stove to heat the shul before
the worshippers arrived. (On Shabbat, they would resort to the services
of a "shabbas-goy" for this job.)

A principal function of today's "beadle" or Shammas is to act as usher,
especially on the High Holy Days. Remember the old joke? A man arrives
at the Shul door on Yom Kippur without a seat ticket, begging to be let in
to deliver a very urgent business message for a Mr. Cohen somewhere
inside. The Shammas refuses to let him in for free with no ticket. But
the man keeps insisting that it will be a total disaster if Mr. Cohen
doesn't get the message at once. Eventually the Shammas gives in to his
pleas, saying: "O.K., O.K., I'll let you in, but only to deliver the
business message. So help me, if I catch you praying even for a minute,
I'll kick you out right away!"

Judith Romney Wegner
jrw@brown.edu


Port of Departure #lithuania

Dr Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

I had personally not been aware of Klaipeda being used a a departure
Port. But Ann Rabinowitz is visiting me and has been telling me of work
she is doing with Danish records, and it seems likely that some of the
ships going >from Libau (undoubtedly the main point of embarkation) also
stopped at Klaipeda. This may have been for a short period of time only,
and was a Russian based fleet.

I have just looked at Lloyd P. Gartner 'The Jewish Immigrant in England
1870-1914' George Allen and Unwin 1960 and at a Ph. D. Thesis by Riva
Krut, SOAS 1985 ( unpublished) on ThBuilding a Home and a Community: The
Jewish community in Johannesburg 1886-1914. Both deal extensively with
Eastern European Migration. I cannot find a specific reference to
Klaipeda.

Krut's thesis states that despite extensive searches by several peoplein
different archives no trace has been found of shipping records relating
to ports of departure in Lithuania.

I personally have looked at The British Consular records for Riga (
there does not seem to have been a consul in Libau) and found nothing of
relevance. I have also enquired at the national Maritime Museum archives
in Greenwich and found nothing.

Aubrey Newman, writing on The Poor Jew's Temporary Shelter in patterns
of Migration 1850-1914 ( Proceedings of a Conference 1993 only notes
emigration through Libau. Quoting >from a report on Kovno and Vilna
prepared for the Jewish Colonial Association in September 1906 henotes
that 'The number of emigrants embarking at Libau grows each year, and in
this regard the current year exceeds all precedents. At least two boats
a week depart >from Libau, each of these boats conveying 300-350 migrants
at the least.'

Libau had the advantage of being an all weather port. Definitely Riga
was iced over for part of the year, and presumably Klaipeda also freezes
over. My impression (and I may be wrong) is that Klaipeda probably does
not have deep water facilities. Look it up on the web.

Even today Klaipeda is a small town and is unlikely to have much
shipping traffic other than local barge and ferry traffic. It is
possible to take a boat >from Kovno to Klaipeda on a daily basis.

Saul


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Port of Departure #lithuania

Dr Saul Issroff <saul@...>
 

I had personally not been aware of Klaipeda being used a a departure
Port. But Ann Rabinowitz is visiting me and has been telling me of work
she is doing with Danish records, and it seems likely that some of the
ships going >from Libau (undoubtedly the main point of embarkation) also
stopped at Klaipeda. This may have been for a short period of time only,
and was a Russian based fleet.

I have just looked at Lloyd P. Gartner 'The Jewish Immigrant in England
1870-1914' George Allen and Unwin 1960 and at a Ph. D. Thesis by Riva
Krut, SOAS 1985 ( unpublished) on ThBuilding a Home and a Community: The
Jewish community in Johannesburg 1886-1914. Both deal extensively with
Eastern European Migration. I cannot find a specific reference to
Klaipeda.

Krut's thesis states that despite extensive searches by several peoplein
different archives no trace has been found of shipping records relating
to ports of departure in Lithuania.

I personally have looked at The British Consular records for Riga (
there does not seem to have been a consul in Libau) and found nothing of
relevance. I have also enquired at the national Maritime Museum archives
in Greenwich and found nothing.

Aubrey Newman, writing on The Poor Jew's Temporary Shelter in patterns
of Migration 1850-1914 ( Proceedings of a Conference 1993 only notes
emigration through Libau. Quoting >from a report on Kovno and Vilna
prepared for the Jewish Colonial Association in September 1906 henotes
that 'The number of emigrants embarking at Libau grows each year, and in
this regard the current year exceeds all precedents. At least two boats
a week depart >from Libau, each of these boats conveying 300-350 migrants
at the least.'

Libau had the advantage of being an all weather port. Definitely Riga
was iced over for part of the year, and presumably Klaipeda also freezes
over. My impression (and I may be wrong) is that Klaipeda probably does
not have deep water facilities. Look it up on the web.

Even today Klaipeda is a small town and is unlikely to have much
shipping traffic other than local barge and ferry traffic. It is
possible to take a boat >from Kovno to Klaipeda on a daily basis.

Saul


Ship passage from Klaipeda (Memel)? #lithuania

ELGOLD1@...
 

In reply to Norman Feldman, I am not aware of people leaving >from Klaipeda
(Memel) directly for America, although some ships may have left there for
other ports. Some of my relatives >from Dorbian (Darbenai), nearby, left from
the port of Libau (Liepaja) in Latvia, not far up the coast >from Klaipeda.
Even passage >from Libau was not direct, and they had to change ships in
Southampton, England. Other realtives >from this same area traveled overland to
Hamburg and then by ship. Memel was a German city and I assume it was well
connected by rail to locations in Germany.
Hope this helps. Maybe others can add more...
Eric Goldstein
ELGOLD1@aol.com


Re: Fw: Port of Departure #lithuania

Ikesspot@...
 

Klaipeda in Lithuania used to be called, I believe, Memel. As such, it was at
various times in East Prussia (Germany) and was one of the claims made by
Hitler as an excuse for his Eastward aggression. As to emigration >from Memel,
I can tell you nothing; although it's location would have made it one of the
ports for serving the Baltic portions of the Russian enpire.


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Ship passage from Klaipeda (Memel)? #lithuania

ELGOLD1@...
 

In reply to Norman Feldman, I am not aware of people leaving >from Klaipeda
(Memel) directly for America, although some ships may have left there for
other ports. Some of my relatives >from Dorbian (Darbenai), nearby, left from
the port of Libau (Liepaja) in Latvia, not far up the coast >from Klaipeda.
Even passage >from Libau was not direct, and they had to change ships in
Southampton, England. Other realtives >from this same area traveled overland to
Hamburg and then by ship. Memel was a German city and I assume it was well
connected by rail to locations in Germany.
Hope this helps. Maybe others can add more...
Eric Goldstein
ELGOLD1@aol.com


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Fw: Port of Departure #lithuania

Ikesspot@...
 

Klaipeda in Lithuania used to be called, I believe, Memel. As such, it was at
various times in East Prussia (Germany) and was one of the claims made by
Hitler as an excuse for his Eastward aggression. As to emigration >from Memel,
I can tell you nothing; although it's location would have made it one of the
ports for serving the Baltic portions of the Russian enpire.