Date   

*Re: Vselyub/Wsielub Belarus #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Susan Silberstein wrote:

Can anyone tell me if the above village still in exists?
Yep, it still exists :)
Go to:
http://www.expediamaps.com/results.asp?Place=Vselyub
and you will get a nice map showing where it is

Since we are on the subject of searching shtetls, for those who are
interested in the area called "Great Hungary"
(Hungary-Slovakia-Transylvannia and a portion of Croacia), I found two new
resources.

If you need to find the names of shtetls in *Hungarian*, as they were
called in 1910, go to:
http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/vmlista.htm
where you can look and download *excellent* county maps of most Hungarian
counties.

If you prefer a search engine, boy, this one is really great: it's a *FREE*
software called KIUT ("way out" in Hungarian). It seems to have a huge
database of all villages, hamlets, towns in Great Hungary, allowing to
search for their names in Hungarian, Slovak and German forms.

Download it at (click on version 4)
http://proteo.soroscj.ro/kiut/
There only one catch: this software can be configured in 4 languages
(Hungarian, Romanian, German and Ukrainian), NO English! If you wish to
read a brief English outline of how it works and how to install it, go to:
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Bluffs/9548/kiut4.html

_Great_ resources! Good shtetl hunt :)
Tom

Tom Venetianer


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen *Re: Vselyub/Wsielub Belarus #general

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Susan Silberstein wrote:

Can anyone tell me if the above village still in exists?
Yep, it still exists :)
Go to:
http://www.expediamaps.com/results.asp?Place=Vselyub
and you will get a nice map showing where it is

Since we are on the subject of searching shtetls, for those who are
interested in the area called "Great Hungary"
(Hungary-Slovakia-Transylvannia and a portion of Croacia), I found two new
resources.

If you need to find the names of shtetls in *Hungarian*, as they were
called in 1910, go to:
http://lazarus.elte.hu/hun/maps/1910/vmlista.htm
where you can look and download *excellent* county maps of most Hungarian
counties.

If you prefer a search engine, boy, this one is really great: it's a *FREE*
software called KIUT ("way out" in Hungarian). It seems to have a huge
database of all villages, hamlets, towns in Great Hungary, allowing to
search for their names in Hungarian, Slovak and German forms.

Download it at (click on version 4)
http://proteo.soroscj.ro/kiut/
There only one catch: this software can be configured in 4 languages
(Hungarian, Romanian, German and Ukrainian), NO English! If you wish to
read a brief English outline of how it works and how to install it, go to:
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Bluffs/9548/kiut4.html

_Great_ resources! Good shtetl hunt :)
Tom

Tom Venetianer


Re: Yiddish/Hebrew/English Given Names #general

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

Don Mopsick <mophandl@idworld.net> wrote:

I recently obtained a copy of the hard-to-find "Yiddish
English-Hebrew Dictionary" by Alexander Harkavy, 1928/1988,
YIVO and Schocken Books (ISBN 0-8052-4027-6).

On pp. 525-530 is a section on Yiddish/Hebrew names along
with the author's suggestions on their English equivalents.
The dictionary was written in 1928 as an aid to native
Yiddish speakers emigrating to the US, and the name section
was included with this in mind and as an aid to naming
their newborn children.

Harkavy is certainly not the last word on this subject (see
esp. Rabbi Shmuel Gorr), but the name section is certainly
worth looking through >from a genealogy point of view, if
only to gain insight into our ancestors' thought process.
Harkavy's dictionary won't help us gain insight into our
ancestors' thought process; it helps us gain insight into
Harkavy's thought process.

His list of Yiddish names is quite valuable as a source of
Yiddish nicknames and what their root name is.

But the English "translative equivalents" of Yiddish names
are his own fanciful suggestions -- some of which are quite
amusing. For example, as an English name for "Golda"
he suggests "Aurelia" (both mean "gold"); for "Zissl",
he suggests "Dulcia" (both mean "sweet"); for "Zelig",
he suggests "Felix" (both mean "happy"); for "Sheina",
he suggests "Pulcheria"; for "Mattl", "Virginia"; for
"Uri" and "Shraga", he suggests "Phoebus"; and for
"Shprintza", he suggests "Hope".

Not many immigrants took Harkavy's suggestions...
In my study of Hebrew and English given names on over 10,000
tombstones in early 20th-century landsmanshaft cemeteries in
New York and Boston, NONE of these name pairs appeared!
The overwhelming majority of the English names are simple
"sound-alikes"; names bearing a phonetic similarity with
the Hebrew or Yiddish name, often no more than the same
initial sound or letter.

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish/Hebrew/English Given Names #general

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

Don Mopsick <mophandl@idworld.net> wrote:

I recently obtained a copy of the hard-to-find "Yiddish
English-Hebrew Dictionary" by Alexander Harkavy, 1928/1988,
YIVO and Schocken Books (ISBN 0-8052-4027-6).

On pp. 525-530 is a section on Yiddish/Hebrew names along
with the author's suggestions on their English equivalents.
The dictionary was written in 1928 as an aid to native
Yiddish speakers emigrating to the US, and the name section
was included with this in mind and as an aid to naming
their newborn children.

Harkavy is certainly not the last word on this subject (see
esp. Rabbi Shmuel Gorr), but the name section is certainly
worth looking through >from a genealogy point of view, if
only to gain insight into our ancestors' thought process.
Harkavy's dictionary won't help us gain insight into our
ancestors' thought process; it helps us gain insight into
Harkavy's thought process.

His list of Yiddish names is quite valuable as a source of
Yiddish nicknames and what their root name is.

But the English "translative equivalents" of Yiddish names
are his own fanciful suggestions -- some of which are quite
amusing. For example, as an English name for "Golda"
he suggests "Aurelia" (both mean "gold"); for "Zissl",
he suggests "Dulcia" (both mean "sweet"); for "Zelig",
he suggests "Felix" (both mean "happy"); for "Sheina",
he suggests "Pulcheria"; for "Mattl", "Virginia"; for
"Uri" and "Shraga", he suggests "Phoebus"; and for
"Shprintza", he suggests "Hope".

Not many immigrants took Harkavy's suggestions...
In my study of Hebrew and English given names on over 10,000
tombstones in early 20th-century landsmanshaft cemeteries in
New York and Boston, NONE of these name pairs appeared!
The overwhelming majority of the English names are simple
"sound-alikes"; names bearing a phonetic similarity with
the Hebrew or Yiddish name, often no more than the same
initial sound or letter.

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


Re: Lietuva #general

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

Joan S. Gross <JoanSGross@aol.com> wrote:

In researching a very old newspaper article, I learned that a
relative (I think) came to the USA in ca 1870 >from Lietuva.

I looked in WOWW for Lietuva and it is listed as "not a town,
but a region of Lithuania". What are some of the towns in this
region? Are Kovno, Kalvaria, Cheikescheck, Veiseij, Lazdijie
or Serej in Lietuva?
"Lietuva" is the Lithuanian word for Lithuania.

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Lietuva #general

Warren Blatt <wblatt@...>
 

Joan S. Gross <JoanSGross@aol.com> wrote:

In researching a very old newspaper article, I learned that a
relative (I think) came to the USA in ca 1870 >from Lietuva.

I looked in WOWW for Lietuva and it is listed as "not a town,
but a region of Lithuania". What are some of the towns in this
region? Are Kovno, Kalvaria, Cheikescheck, Veiseij, Lazdijie
or Serej in Lietuva?
"Lietuva" is the Lithuanian word for Lithuania.

Warren

Warren Blatt
Boston, MA
<wblatt@jewishgen.org>


Adressbook of Shanghai #general

Edgar Ruetten <EdgarRuetten@...>
 

Does anyone know, if an adressbook of the Ghetto in Shanghai exists?
Edgar Ruetten

MODERATOR NOTE: You may find an answer to your
question at the Jewish Community of Shanghai
website: http://www.chinajewish.org


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Adressbook of Shanghai #general

Edgar Ruetten <EdgarRuetten@...>
 

Does anyone know, if an adressbook of the Ghetto in Shanghai exists?
Edgar Ruetten

MODERATOR NOTE: You may find an answer to your
question at the Jewish Community of Shanghai
website: http://www.chinajewish.org


Dryszczow, Dryshchuv, Poland #general

Henley, Julie B. <juliehenley@...>
 

Does anyone know where I can find vital records for citizens of
Dryszczow (or Dryshchuv), Poland? There is a reference in "Where We
Once Walked" directing the reader to Podlesnoye, Ukraine. I've located
Podlesnoye on a map of Ukraine, but have not had luck in locating any
other information. Thanks for any info you can send my way.
Julie Bier Henley


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Dryszczow, Dryshchuv, Poland #general

Henley, Julie B. <juliehenley@...>
 

Does anyone know where I can find vital records for citizens of
Dryszczow (or Dryshchuv), Poland? There is a reference in "Where We
Once Walked" directing the reader to Podlesnoye, Ukraine. I've located
Podlesnoye on a map of Ukraine, but have not had luck in locating any
other information. Thanks for any info you can send my way.
Julie Bier Henley


Re: Russian Characters - Teraspol listing #general

MarkGrekin <markgrekin@...>
 

Arlene Sachs wrote:

Miriam Weiner just sent me 55 printed pages of names of burials in >Teraspol,
Transnistra region between Ukraine and Moldova. Unfortunately the names >are
written in Russian Characters, so I need some volunteers to retype the
information. There are basically 6 columns of data:
cemetery plot location columns of words which I assume are first name, >last
name and ? date of birth or date of death
If someone can scan this data and then can make it change that would be a
great help, but I don't know any way to do that.
I hope someone can type this to help the cemetery project.
Thanks, Arline mailto:sachs@AXSAMER.ORG
Shalom Arline,

Send me those pages for translation
Mark Grekin
14850 Hesby Street Apt. 103
Sherman Oaks, CA 91403

P. S. By the way, the proper spelling of that city name is "Tiraspol' "
While living in the Ukraine I visited this city at least two times per year.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Russian Characters - Teraspol listing #general

MarkGrekin <markgrekin@...>
 

Arlene Sachs wrote:

Miriam Weiner just sent me 55 printed pages of names of burials in >Teraspol,
Transnistra region between Ukraine and Moldova. Unfortunately the names >are
written in Russian Characters, so I need some volunteers to retype the
information. There are basically 6 columns of data:
cemetery plot location columns of words which I assume are first name, >last
name and ? date of birth or date of death
If someone can scan this data and then can make it change that would be a
great help, but I don't know any way to do that.
I hope someone can type this to help the cemetery project.
Thanks, Arline mailto:sachs@AXSAMER.ORG
Shalom Arline,

Send me those pages for translation
Mark Grekin
14850 Hesby Street Apt. 103
Sherman Oaks, CA 91403

P. S. By the way, the proper spelling of that city name is "Tiraspol' "
While living in the Ukraine I visited this city at least two times per year.


Re: Sir Philip Sassoon #general

Nick Landau <nick@...>
 

DAVID ROSEN wrote:

Neil Rosenstein < NEIL185@aol.com> wrote:

Trying to find out who Sir Philip Sassoon was married to and
if there was issue.
While indexing the Boston Jewish Advocate obituaries, I came across a
news item on the death of Sir Philip Sassoon. The item appeared in the
issue of June 9, 1939. I think he was married to a Rothschild. You
might look up other major newspapers for that week for more complete
details.
I cannot comment on the issue question.

I think that he lived at Trent Park near Cockfosters Underground Station
(North London) which is near I grew up.

I believe that Trent Park was used to interrogate German POW's in WWII. It
is now occupied by part of Middlesex University.

If you are in London, Trent Park is within walking distance of Cockfosters
tube and makes for a nice Sunday afternoon walk.

Nick

Nick Landau
nick@n-landau.demon.co.uk


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Sir Philip Sassoon #general

Nick Landau <nick@...>
 

DAVID ROSEN wrote:

Neil Rosenstein < NEIL185@aol.com> wrote:

Trying to find out who Sir Philip Sassoon was married to and
if there was issue.
While indexing the Boston Jewish Advocate obituaries, I came across a
news item on the death of Sir Philip Sassoon. The item appeared in the
issue of June 9, 1939. I think he was married to a Rothschild. You
might look up other major newspapers for that week for more complete
details.
I cannot comment on the issue question.

I think that he lived at Trent Park near Cockfosters Underground Station
(North London) which is near I grew up.

I believe that Trent Park was used to interrogate German POW's in WWII. It
is now occupied by part of Middlesex University.

If you are in London, Trent Park is within walking distance of Cockfosters
tube and makes for a nice Sunday afternoon walk.

Nick

Nick Landau
nick@n-landau.demon.co.uk


Public Record Office #general

David Fielker <david@...>
 

Further to Naidia Mosher's enthusiastic note about finding her
grandfather's naturalisation papers at the Public Record Office at Kew, I
have to point out that not all records give you the same information.

Judging by some of those I have found, pre-1900 records include an age, a
country or perhaps a gubernia where born, and perhaps names and ages of
'under-age' children, but not necessarily of wife. Up to about WWI you can
expect a date of birth, a town, parents' names, names and ages of children
and name of wife but not necessarily maiden name. >from about 1920 onwards
you also get details of family abroad, perhaps something about the
applicant's education and military service, and if you are lucky his
mother's maiden name.

However, officially these records are confidential for 100 years, so for
anything younger you have to apply to the Home Office, and prove your
relationship, in order to go and see the records. In my own case this took
some doing because I was originally told that the records I wanted had been
destroyed. (For full details see my article "Hounding the Home Office" in
Shemot, October 1994.) Even more strangely, the records I inspected at the
Home Office appeared afterwards at Kew for everyone to see!

David Fielker
London, UK


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Public Record Office #general

David Fielker <david@...>
 

Further to Naidia Mosher's enthusiastic note about finding her
grandfather's naturalisation papers at the Public Record Office at Kew, I
have to point out that not all records give you the same information.

Judging by some of those I have found, pre-1900 records include an age, a
country or perhaps a gubernia where born, and perhaps names and ages of
'under-age' children, but not necessarily of wife. Up to about WWI you can
expect a date of birth, a town, parents' names, names and ages of children
and name of wife but not necessarily maiden name. >from about 1920 onwards
you also get details of family abroad, perhaps something about the
applicant's education and military service, and if you are lucky his
mother's maiden name.

However, officially these records are confidential for 100 years, so for
anything younger you have to apply to the Home Office, and prove your
relationship, in order to go and see the records. In my own case this took
some doing because I was originally told that the records I wanted had been
destroyed. (For full details see my article "Hounding the Home Office" in
Shemot, October 1994.) Even more strangely, the records I inspected at the
Home Office appeared afterwards at Kew for everyone to see!

David Fielker
London, UK


Birlad Roumania #general

Kuitman <kuitman@...>
 

Please help me to find information on this community
Kuitman@europemail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Birlad Roumania #general

Kuitman <kuitman@...>
 

Please help me to find information on this community
Kuitman@europemail.com


Re: Serei(?), Poland #general

Dick Plotz
 

I, too, was interested in Max Apple's connection to Sereje, especially since I
had ancestors there (TRILLING or TRYLING), and one of his characters,
LEVINSKY, shares a name with one of my ancestors (>from Lazdei, not Sereje). I
e-mailed Mr Apple, who replied that his LEVINSKY is a pseudonym. Too bad.

Sereje is now Seirijai, Lithuania, not far >from Kalvarija, near the Polish
border. A detailed map should show it.

Dick Plotz
Providence RI


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Serei(?), Poland #general

Dick Plotz
 

I, too, was interested in Max Apple's connection to Sereje, especially since I
had ancestors there (TRILLING or TRYLING), and one of his characters,
LEVINSKY, shares a name with one of my ancestors (>from Lazdei, not Sereje). I
e-mailed Mr Apple, who replied that his LEVINSKY is a pseudonym. Too bad.

Sereje is now Seirijai, Lithuania, not far >from Kalvarija, near the Polish
border. A detailed map should show it.

Dick Plotz
Providence RI