Date   

Searching: ZABARTE, Navarra, Spain #general

Lemuel G. Abarte <lemuel@...>
 

I am looking for family ties in Navarra, Spain for my ancestors ZABARTE/ABARTE in the area. Any help is highly appreciated.
Regards,

Lemuel


Volpa, Belarus (in Grodno Gubernia) #general

Robert Meyer <BobEllen@...>
 

Do any Jewish Genners have a clue as to whether Volpa, a small
shtetl in the gubernia of Grodo, could be "Walf, Grodno" on the
naturalization papers of my grandfather, Moses SHERESHEVSKY (Shaffer), as
his place of birth? I am stymied by the "Walf" and what it could possibly
mean. I can find no shtetl with that name, but do know that "Volpa" could
mean "wolf" (at least, I believe, in Italian and possibly other languages).

Thank you.

Ellen Shaffer Meyer
Wilmington, Delaware
bobellen@compuserve.com

Searching:SHERESHEVSKY >from Grodno, Augustow, Tauragge or Slonim, Belarus;
THALENFELD/TALENFELD >from Kalish, Galicia; FEUERMANN from
Kolomea, Slovakia; THOMBACHER /THOMBERG, FINKELSTEIN and KATZENELLENBOGEN

from Augustow; ZALLE and GOLDSTEIN >from Slovakia;


The Beadle and the Shammes and how they differ #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 98-10-11 21:20:23 EDT, djbyrne@athenet.net writes:

<< Is the role of a beadle in a schul also about enforcing rules and
keeping order and tradition? >>

==No, a beadle is a beadle. British, church and law court. A low-ranking
officer with certain fairly routine duties.

==Hebrew has Shamash, (Yiddish: Shammes), who pens the schul, lights the
lamps, cleans the silver, mends the books, invites members to the reading of
the Torah, reminds them of Yahrzeit, often leads morning and evening prayers
when it's not shabbat or Festival, collects fees and donations. All at the
request of the rabbi, president or treasurer of the schul. 19th Century
British Jews, who felt uncomfortable at being thought too unBritish, termed
the "Shammes" the "Beadle."

Michael Bernet
*****************************
seeking:

BERNET, BERNAT, BAERNET etc >from Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg, (Bavaria)
KONIGSHOFER: Welbhausen, Konigshofen, Furth (S. Germany)
ALTMANN: Kattowitz, Breslau, Poznan, Beuthen--Upper Silesia/Poland
WOLF(F): Frankfurt, Wurzburg, Furth, Yugoslavia, Westchester


Kiev gubernia voter lists on microfilms. #general

Vcharny@...
 

While I was in Boston last month I had a chance to spend couple hours at
Harvard in the microfilms library. I new that there are microfilms with
copy of the old Russian official newspaper -- "Kievskie Gubernskie Vedomosti".
All my and my wife's ancestors lived during XIXc in Minsk Gubernia and only
one my grandmother was born in Dymer, Kiev Gubernia to the ALPERT/POLONSKY
family.

I hoped to find the voters list for elections of State Duma in 1906, 1907
and 1912 of Kiev Gubernia. I found some of the lists but not all of them
and unfortunately there weren=92t records >from Dymer. I check copies of
couple other similar regional editions and situation was the same. The
lists on microfilms not complete.

At least now I know where to look for the lists in such newspapers and what
to expect >from the lists. Nice information was available in the lists of
1905 - not only full name (with patronymic, but not in all cases) but also
reason to be a voter - size of estate or income and in some cases (City of
Kiev) even address. Yes, not every man of 21 and older could be a voter -
you have to pass one of four types of "tsenz" - limitations.

It was interesting that I first time saw in such old papers that people was
written with nationality as ethnic bacground (common things in soviet time)
- people was shown as Jews not by religion (iudei) but by ethnic background
(evrei) along with Russian, Poles, Germans, Tatarians (instead of Orthodox,
Catholic Lutheran, Muslim).

Below I list of some towns of Kiev Gubernia where Jews lived that time (or
have property) and some records available >from the lists possible to find
on the microfilms. Data of some voter lists of 1905.

Zvenigorod[ka] uyezd (district):
Shpolya, Vinograd, Yekaterinopol', Kaligorka,
Ol'shanaya, Lysyanka, Erki (Yerki), Ryzhanovka, Boyarka.

Tarashcha uyezd:
Stavishche, Tetiev, Zhashkov, Lobachov, Voronoe,
Zhivotov, Koshevata, Pyatigory.

Vasil'kov uyezd:
Belaya Tserkov', Fastov, Chigirin, Borova, Trushki,
Ol'shanitsa, Teleshovka, Kazennaya Motovilovka, Ostrov.

Radomysl' uyezd:
Brusilov, Chernobyl' Khabno, Ivankov, Gornostaypol',
Terekhi, Malin, Starovichi,

Skvira uyezd: (where I didn't find my other relatives - Vokhgel't)
Volodarka, Pavoloch, Velikie Golyaki, Yaropovichi, Lipki,
Borshchagovka, Brovki, Ruzhin, Chubintsy, Kharleevka,
Verbov, Popel'nya, Karobchiev, Khodorkov.

Lipovets uyezd:
Kitaugorod, Monastyrishche, Il'intsi, Dashev, Zozov, Zozovka,
Tsybulev, Lukashevka, Sarny, Balabanovka, Kal'nik, Vasilevka,
Todorovka.

Cherkassy uyezd:
Smela, Belozer'ye, Orlovets, Russkaya Vol. (some names shortened),
Raygorod, Vyazovok, Zhabotin, Les'ki, Rotmistrov, Khlystunovka,
Sagulovka, Khudiki, Gorodishche, Mezhirich, Matusov, Mokievka,
Pleskachevka.

Kanev uyezd:
Korsun', Stepantsi, Mironovka, Maslovka, Rssava, Shotok, Nikolaevka,

In 1906 found several lists with corrections, additions, exclusions.

1907 have nice lists for Lipovets uyezd and Uman' uyezd and again
corrections to previous lists etc.

There were just few such documents for 1912.
Lists were issued mainly as addition to newspapers,
and they were possibly missing >from the original set of newspapers?
Corrections were printed in newspapers itself and mostly could be found
on the microfilms, some newspaper issue I didn't find at all.

Besides of voter lists there were other helpful information with a lot of
names: list of killed and wounded >from fronts of Russian-Japanese War,
lists of recruits - deserters (where some probably gone for America),
lists of court jurors, lists of auctioning and many others god to be
documented. But I have no time.

My appreciation to Warren Blatt who help me to find the library
and microfilms location that save me time.

Vitaly Charny
Birmingham, AL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: ZABARTE, Navarra, Spain #general

Lemuel G. Abarte <lemuel@...>
 

I am looking for family ties in Navarra, Spain for my ancestors ZABARTE/ABARTE in the area. Any help is highly appreciated.
Regards,

Lemuel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Volpa, Belarus (in Grodno Gubernia) #general

Robert Meyer <BobEllen@...>
 

Do any Jewish Genners have a clue as to whether Volpa, a small
shtetl in the gubernia of Grodo, could be "Walf, Grodno" on the
naturalization papers of my grandfather, Moses SHERESHEVSKY (Shaffer), as
his place of birth? I am stymied by the "Walf" and what it could possibly
mean. I can find no shtetl with that name, but do know that "Volpa" could
mean "wolf" (at least, I believe, in Italian and possibly other languages).

Thank you.

Ellen Shaffer Meyer
Wilmington, Delaware
bobellen@compuserve.com

Searching:SHERESHEVSKY >from Grodno, Augustow, Tauragge or Slonim, Belarus;
THALENFELD/TALENFELD >from Kalish, Galicia; FEUERMANN from
Kolomea, Slovakia; THOMBACHER /THOMBERG, FINKELSTEIN and KATZENELLENBOGEN

from Augustow; ZALLE and GOLDSTEIN >from Slovakia;


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Beadle and the Shammes and how they differ #general

MBernet@...
 

In a message dated 98-10-11 21:20:23 EDT, djbyrne@athenet.net writes:

<< Is the role of a beadle in a schul also about enforcing rules and
keeping order and tradition? >>

==No, a beadle is a beadle. British, church and law court. A low-ranking
officer with certain fairly routine duties.

==Hebrew has Shamash, (Yiddish: Shammes), who pens the schul, lights the
lamps, cleans the silver, mends the books, invites members to the reading of
the Torah, reminds them of Yahrzeit, often leads morning and evening prayers
when it's not shabbat or Festival, collects fees and donations. All at the
request of the rabbi, president or treasurer of the schul. 19th Century
British Jews, who felt uncomfortable at being thought too unBritish, termed
the "Shammes" the "Beadle."

Michael Bernet
*****************************
seeking:

BERNET, BERNAT, BAERNET etc >from Frensdorf, Bamberg, Nurnberg, (Bavaria)
KONIGSHOFER: Welbhausen, Konigshofen, Furth (S. Germany)
ALTMANN: Kattowitz, Breslau, Poznan, Beuthen--Upper Silesia/Poland
WOLF(F): Frankfurt, Wurzburg, Furth, Yugoslavia, Westchester


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kiev gubernia voter lists on microfilms. #general

Vcharny@...
 

While I was in Boston last month I had a chance to spend couple hours at
Harvard in the microfilms library. I new that there are microfilms with
copy of the old Russian official newspaper -- "Kievskie Gubernskie Vedomosti".
All my and my wife's ancestors lived during XIXc in Minsk Gubernia and only
one my grandmother was born in Dymer, Kiev Gubernia to the ALPERT/POLONSKY
family.

I hoped to find the voters list for elections of State Duma in 1906, 1907
and 1912 of Kiev Gubernia. I found some of the lists but not all of them
and unfortunately there weren=92t records >from Dymer. I check copies of
couple other similar regional editions and situation was the same. The
lists on microfilms not complete.

At least now I know where to look for the lists in such newspapers and what
to expect >from the lists. Nice information was available in the lists of
1905 - not only full name (with patronymic, but not in all cases) but also
reason to be a voter - size of estate or income and in some cases (City of
Kiev) even address. Yes, not every man of 21 and older could be a voter -
you have to pass one of four types of "tsenz" - limitations.

It was interesting that I first time saw in such old papers that people was
written with nationality as ethnic bacground (common things in soviet time)
- people was shown as Jews not by religion (iudei) but by ethnic background
(evrei) along with Russian, Poles, Germans, Tatarians (instead of Orthodox,
Catholic Lutheran, Muslim).

Below I list of some towns of Kiev Gubernia where Jews lived that time (or
have property) and some records available >from the lists possible to find
on the microfilms. Data of some voter lists of 1905.

Zvenigorod[ka] uyezd (district):
Shpolya, Vinograd, Yekaterinopol', Kaligorka,
Ol'shanaya, Lysyanka, Erki (Yerki), Ryzhanovka, Boyarka.

Tarashcha uyezd:
Stavishche, Tetiev, Zhashkov, Lobachov, Voronoe,
Zhivotov, Koshevata, Pyatigory.

Vasil'kov uyezd:
Belaya Tserkov', Fastov, Chigirin, Borova, Trushki,
Ol'shanitsa, Teleshovka, Kazennaya Motovilovka, Ostrov.

Radomysl' uyezd:
Brusilov, Chernobyl' Khabno, Ivankov, Gornostaypol',
Terekhi, Malin, Starovichi,

Skvira uyezd: (where I didn't find my other relatives - Vokhgel't)
Volodarka, Pavoloch, Velikie Golyaki, Yaropovichi, Lipki,
Borshchagovka, Brovki, Ruzhin, Chubintsy, Kharleevka,
Verbov, Popel'nya, Karobchiev, Khodorkov.

Lipovets uyezd:
Kitaugorod, Monastyrishche, Il'intsi, Dashev, Zozov, Zozovka,
Tsybulev, Lukashevka, Sarny, Balabanovka, Kal'nik, Vasilevka,
Todorovka.

Cherkassy uyezd:
Smela, Belozer'ye, Orlovets, Russkaya Vol. (some names shortened),
Raygorod, Vyazovok, Zhabotin, Les'ki, Rotmistrov, Khlystunovka,
Sagulovka, Khudiki, Gorodishche, Mezhirich, Matusov, Mokievka,
Pleskachevka.

Kanev uyezd:
Korsun', Stepantsi, Mironovka, Maslovka, Rssava, Shotok, Nikolaevka,

In 1906 found several lists with corrections, additions, exclusions.

1907 have nice lists for Lipovets uyezd and Uman' uyezd and again
corrections to previous lists etc.

There were just few such documents for 1912.
Lists were issued mainly as addition to newspapers,
and they were possibly missing >from the original set of newspapers?
Corrections were printed in newspapers itself and mostly could be found
on the microfilms, some newspaper issue I didn't find at all.

Besides of voter lists there were other helpful information with a lot of
names: list of killed and wounded >from fronts of Russian-Japanese War,
lists of recruits - deserters (where some probably gone for America),
lists of court jurors, lists of auctioning and many others god to be
documented. But I have no time.

My appreciation to Warren Blatt who help me to find the library
and microfilms location that save me time.

Vitaly Charny
Birmingham, AL


Q: Book on Kolemeja #general

Elaine Lyon <elainel@...>
 

A cousin of mine who lives in Israel has asked me to find a book written in
English on the town/people of Kolemeja ( she also spelled it Kolemaya). It
was part of the Austro Hungarian empire before WWI, then became Poland and
is now the Ukraine. It is not far >from Lemberg. It is the birthplace of
her father.
I have checked the Jewishgen archives under these two spellings but not
under all of the others listed when I looked at alternative names in the
shetl seeker. Frankly I thought this discussion forum might be faster and
more productive! I have also checked the Library of Congress site as well as
Books in Print.
Does anyone know of such a book? (She has one that is written in Yiddish
but it is taking too long to read and understand).
Thank you in advance for your help.



Elaine Lyon
De Witt NY


Possible Source for non-indexed passenger arrivals #general

ItinerantScribe@...
 

To all those who read my request for information about a listing of
passenger arrivals during the non-indexed years, 1847-1897--and I
particularly include the dozen or more fellow JewishGenners who asked
me to please share anything I might learn, I am pleased to pass along
the following information that the ever-reliable Warren Blatt was kind
enough to send me:

"There are several published works which index the 1847-1897
New York passenger lists -- but none are comprehensive.
Each covers a particular ethnic group or other focus group
for a small set of years.

"The two most important series for Jewish research are:
- 'Germans to America' edited by Ira Glazier, which covers
arrivals of German passengers for Jan 1850 - May 1891.
Ongoing series (60 volumes since 1988)
- 'Migration >from the Russian Empire', edited by Ira Glazier,
covering Russian (and Polish and Finnish) arrivals.
Ongoing series (4 volumes since 1995), thus far
containing arrivals for Jan 1875 - May 1889."

"These books are available at major libraries. See the
JewishGen FAQ ("Frequently Asked Questions") document at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html>, section
on "Passenger Lists" for more details."

On behalf of all of us, Thank you, Warren.

David Linden


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Q: Book on Kolemeja #general

Elaine Lyon <elainel@...>
 

A cousin of mine who lives in Israel has asked me to find a book written in
English on the town/people of Kolemeja ( she also spelled it Kolemaya). It
was part of the Austro Hungarian empire before WWI, then became Poland and
is now the Ukraine. It is not far >from Lemberg. It is the birthplace of
her father.
I have checked the Jewishgen archives under these two spellings but not
under all of the others listed when I looked at alternative names in the
shetl seeker. Frankly I thought this discussion forum might be faster and
more productive! I have also checked the Library of Congress site as well as
Books in Print.
Does anyone know of such a book? (She has one that is written in Yiddish
but it is taking too long to read and understand).
Thank you in advance for your help.



Elaine Lyon
De Witt NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Possible Source for non-indexed passenger arrivals #general

ItinerantScribe@...
 

To all those who read my request for information about a listing of
passenger arrivals during the non-indexed years, 1847-1897--and I
particularly include the dozen or more fellow JewishGenners who asked
me to please share anything I might learn, I am pleased to pass along
the following information that the ever-reliable Warren Blatt was kind
enough to send me:

"There are several published works which index the 1847-1897
New York passenger lists -- but none are comprehensive.
Each covers a particular ethnic group or other focus group
for a small set of years.

"The two most important series for Jewish research are:
- 'Germans to America' edited by Ira Glazier, which covers
arrivals of German passengers for Jan 1850 - May 1891.
Ongoing series (60 volumes since 1988)
- 'Migration >from the Russian Empire', edited by Ira Glazier,
covering Russian (and Polish and Finnish) arrivals.
Ongoing series (4 volumes since 1995), thus far
containing arrivals for Jan 1875 - May 1889."

"These books are available at major libraries. See the
JewishGen FAQ ("Frequently Asked Questions") document at
<http://www.jewishgen.org/infofiles/faq.html>, section
on "Passenger Lists" for more details."

On behalf of all of us, Thank you, Warren.

David Linden


Volozhin #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

I received the following message and want to pass it along for the
benefit of those of you who are researching Volozhin.

David Fox
fox@erols.com
Arnold, MD
Belarus SIG Coordinator
*******************************************


Subject: Volozhin
Sent: 10/10/98 3:10 PM
Received: 10/11/98 1:18 PM
From: Oleg Perzashkevich, minskhist@yahoo.com
To: David Fox, fox@erols.com

Dear David,

hope to get ready with Minsk District Summaries soon, but now one hot
new. The old building of famous Volozhin Yeshibot was returned to
Belarusian Jewish community. Now they are working on restoration of
it. Could you inform your group or those, who have any relation to
Volozhin about it. If somebody would like to share this project or
want to get more details about it, please, use the following fax ##:
375-17-2345612
375-17-2343360

Best Regards,

Oleg Perzashkevich


Belarus SIG #Belarus Volozhin #belarus

David M. Fox <fox@...>
 

I received the following message and want to pass it along for the
benefit of those of you who are researching Volozhin.

David Fox
fox@erols.com
Arnold, MD
Belarus SIG Coordinator
*******************************************


Subject: Volozhin
Sent: 10/10/98 3:10 PM
Received: 10/11/98 1:18 PM
From: Oleg Perzashkevich, minskhist@yahoo.com
To: David Fox, fox@erols.com

Dear David,

hope to get ready with Minsk District Summaries soon, but now one hot
new. The old building of famous Volozhin Yeshibot was returned to
Belarusian Jewish community. Now they are working on restoration of
it. Could you inform your group or those, who have any relation to
Volozhin about it. If somebody would like to share this project or
want to get more details about it, please, use the following fax ##:
375-17-2345612
375-17-2343360

Best Regards,

Oleg Perzashkevich


Getting info from Murska Sobota #hungary

D Larson <d_larson@...>
 

Hello everyone,
Thank you for answering so well a question that I did not have the wisdom to
ask in a really intelligent way. It is intriguing to find a possibility of Jewishness
in a family tree I had never thought to find it.
I have a question regarding the Morgenstern branch of my family tree. My
grandfather came >from Murska Sobota in what is now Slovenia. My ggf was
mayor (or whatever the appropriate name would be) of what was then a small
village. How would I go about obtaining records of this branch of my family tree?
Do they even exist?

Best wishes,
Denise Larson


Hungary SIG #Hungary Getting info from Murska Sobota #hungary

D Larson <d_larson@...>
 

Hello everyone,
Thank you for answering so well a question that I did not have the wisdom to
ask in a really intelligent way. It is intriguing to find a possibility of Jewishness
in a family tree I had never thought to find it.
I have a question regarding the Morgenstern branch of my family tree. My
grandfather came >from Murska Sobota in what is now Slovenia. My ggf was
mayor (or whatever the appropriate name would be) of what was then a small
village. How would I go about obtaining records of this branch of my family tree?
Do they even exist?

Best wishes,
Denise Larson


Re: What are banns? #general

Harold Pollins <pollins@...>
 

A bann is a proclamation of marriage. My family tree CD refers to banns in
the section on certificates. But I have only heard of their usage in
connection with Christian marriage where the banns are read in church three
times before the wedding ceremony.

Perhaps everyone in Poland was required to undertake the exercise?

Harold Pollins
Oxford England


On my gg-grandparent's marriage certificate, it is written:

"... declared that before them today (sixteenth day of February)
was performed a religious marriage between "a" and "b", which was
preceded by three banns, ...

What were these banns? Where can I find more information about this?

Sandra Lilienthal
MODERATOR'S NOTE: I believe the reading of banns in the parish churches of
both parties replaced the need for a licence >from whatever state authority
was responsible. They were an announcement of the parties intention to
marry and allowed anyone objecting to the marriage an opportunity to voice
that objection (presumably not in the church) prior to marriage. The
wedding usually took place the week after the third reading. Banns expired
either 3 or 6 months after the last reading.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What are banns? #general

Harold Pollins <pollins@...>
 

A bann is a proclamation of marriage. My family tree CD refers to banns in
the section on certificates. But I have only heard of their usage in
connection with Christian marriage where the banns are read in church three
times before the wedding ceremony.

Perhaps everyone in Poland was required to undertake the exercise?

Harold Pollins
Oxford England


On my gg-grandparent's marriage certificate, it is written:

"... declared that before them today (sixteenth day of February)
was performed a religious marriage between "a" and "b", which was
preceded by three banns, ...

What were these banns? Where can I find more information about this?

Sandra Lilienthal
MODERATOR'S NOTE: I believe the reading of banns in the parish churches of
both parties replaced the need for a licence >from whatever state authority
was responsible. They were an announcement of the parties intention to
marry and allowed anyone objecting to the marriage an opportunity to voice
that objection (presumably not in the church) prior to marriage. The
wedding usually took place the week after the third reading. Banns expired
either 3 or 6 months after the last reading.


Travel to Riga #general

Barry Silver <hiiho@...>
 

If anyone is travelling to Riga, Latvia, I would appreciate if you could
relay a message to an individual there.
Barry Silver in Los Angeles


MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please reply privately.


Latvia:A Personal Journey Part I #general

Barbara Siegel <bsiegel@...>
 

Dear Jewishgenners,
I always find myself very interested in the foreign research travel
experiences of others. After my post-Seminar trip to Latvia in the summer of
1997, I wrote a short piece describing my journey. I feel that the sharing
of these adventures can be helpful, informative and inspiring for other
travellers. However, it turned out to be too long for inclusion in the
Jewishgen Digest. Therefore, I am following the example of another Latvian
tripper, and am submitting it now in "serial" form.

"Where once they walked": A visit to my ancesteral towns in Latvia after the
Paris 97 Seminar.

During all of my growing up years I kept hearing references to "Kurland",
the birthplace of my maternal grandparents and paternal grandmother
(paternal grandfather hailed >from Tolchien in the Ukraine and was somewhat
of an outsider}. There was a certain mystique and elan associated with
these Kurlanders, a pride in their Germanic traditions and language. Family
members always spoke glowingly of the many positive attributes of these
Kurlanders, their refinement, education and overall "superior"
characteristics. A big thing was always made of any friends or
acquaintances who had the good fortune to be Kurlanders and it was a source
of great jubilation when a family member married another Kurlander, as if
this were a certificate of quality.

Most of my family >from Kurland, the Levinsons, Friedlanders and Hertzbergs,
arrived in the U.S. during the 1880's, and unfortunately we grandchildren
were privy to very few family tales about life in the "old country", aside
from the repeated allusions as to the "specialness" of Kurlanders. And so
it was that I was always curious about this area of Latvia in Eastern
Europe, at first wondering, "what did these places look like?", and then
later on, exactly what kind of lives did these grandparents of mine live in
these far away shtetlach?
About 10 years ago my interest in these things intensified, and I began my
genealogical searches. By this time there were few persons left to
question, but I did manage to come up with a few rudimentary details, albeit
monumental blanks. I had references to the towns of Tukums,
Windau(Ventspils), Goldingen (Kuldiga), Pilten, Libau(Liepaja), and then
Grobin. I had a pressing desire to visit these places, to see for myself
"where they walked". I kept looking for "roots" trips to Latvia but found
none. Then, BINGO! Paris 97 and Beyond- one of the post seminar trips was
scheduled for Latvia. In the end it turned out to be mostly a "do it
yourself" adventure. Only 5 of us ended up in Latvia and 4 of these
travellers had their own itineraries and guides.

Undaunted, I was determined to finally see "my towns", and spent the 6 days
in Latvia alone with my guide and driver in a search for information about
my family history. What did these towns look like? What kind of lives did
they live? Who stayed behind when most of the family left for the U.S.?
What happened to them? Who were my greatgrandparents? etc. What follows is
a purely personal account of my experiences, impressions and opinions.

As far as comfort and amenities go, the trip was much easier than I had
anticipated. I was headquartered in Riga in a charming, smallish 4 star
hotel with very helpful English speaking staff. The roads were good and the
drivers well mannered and law abiding. Although restrooms in stores and
restaurants were either non-existant or impossibly primitive, those in gas
stations were surprisingly elegant. Riga itself is a beautiful medieval city
with many parks and boulevards. However, much of the housing stock has been
badly neglected, and buildings which in the West would have long ago been
torn down are often standing next to an upscale rehab or exquisite
historical structure. In Riga I visited the Gogol St. shul monument, site
of a horrendous massacre; the old Jewish cemetery now empty; the Chabad
shul, the only functioning synagogue in Riga; the large, impressive Chabad
School; the Bikur Holim Hospital, which appeared primitive by Western
standards; the Jewish Community Center with its small but interesting
museum; and the old Jewish quarter which was the site of the barbed wire
Jewish ghetto with its mass killings. Also in Riga are the Central State
Historical Archives. For details of my experiences at the Archives please
see my article on "Practical Tips" in the Jewishgen Digest.
It is estimated that there are now 14-16,000 Jews left in Latvia, most of
them living in Riga. Many are >from other areas of the former USSR,
intermarried and/or secular.

To be continued.

Barbara Siegel
Jerusalem