Date   

request of a favor from a New Yorker #general

Louise Corman <CormanL@...>
 

I would be very grateful if one of you who lives near Queens, New York, could visit a
cemetary there and send me a translation of my great-great grandfather's gravestone or
else send me a picture that I could have translated. I live some distance away and know
little about this man and feel this could be an important clue to my family history.

His name is Israel Wolpert (Wolpe). He was a rabbi and died on October 26, 1903. He is
buried in Mt. Zion Cemetary in Queens. The grave location is as follows:

United Hebrew Community of New York
Path 28, right side of cemetary

Thank you most sincerely. Louise Corman


Re: Baron Byng High, Montreal #general

Vivian Salama <salassoc@...>
 

Re Marion Werle's list >from Baron Byng High in Montreal...this was a very
well known school in what was then the old Jewish neighborhood, where many
of Montreal's later to become well known and successful Jews lived and went
to school, including Mordecai Richler, amongst others.
Vivian Brieger Salama
Hillsborough, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen request of a favor from a New Yorker #general

Louise Corman <CormanL@...>
 

I would be very grateful if one of you who lives near Queens, New York, could visit a
cemetary there and send me a translation of my great-great grandfather's gravestone or
else send me a picture that I could have translated. I live some distance away and know
little about this man and feel this could be an important clue to my family history.

His name is Israel Wolpert (Wolpe). He was a rabbi and died on October 26, 1903. He is
buried in Mt. Zion Cemetary in Queens. The grave location is as follows:

United Hebrew Community of New York
Path 28, right side of cemetary

Thank you most sincerely. Louise Corman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Baron Byng High, Montreal #general

Vivian Salama <salassoc@...>
 

Re Marion Werle's list >from Baron Byng High in Montreal...this was a very
well known school in what was then the old Jewish neighborhood, where many
of Montreal's later to become well known and successful Jews lived and went
to school, including Mordecai Richler, amongst others.
Vivian Brieger Salama
Hillsborough, CA


FW: info on the Ukraine #general

Ruth Grant <rgrant1@...>
 

Hello JG'rs,
I'm forwarding this message on the off chance that any member searching for
family in any part of the Ukraine may find some new address or site they
haven't had before. I hope this may be of help to many of you; it has given
me some new contacts.

Ruth Grant
Scarborough, ME

-----Original Message-----
From: Vera Klinkowsky [mailto:vnk100@psu.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 1998 11:58 PM
To: rgrant1@maine.rr.com
Subject: info on the Ukraine



Hi Ruth!

I have come across some addresses you might be interested in.
Red Cross in Kiev
252004 Kiev
vul. Pushkinska, 30
Ukraine

Central State Historical Archives (main office)
24 Solomenskaya Street
Kiev 252601 Ukraine
Attn: Georgiy Papakin, Head of the International Dept.

Central State Historical Archives (office in western Ukraine)
3a Sobornaya Square
Lviv 290008 Ukraine
Attn: Orest Matsiuk, Director

I just added your name to my mailing list. You should be getting a message
from Listbot soon. They'll send you a message to confirm you want to be on
the list.

My second message hasn't been archived yet, but I'll summarize it for you.
I added a forum where you can correspond with other people searching for
missing relatives. The forum address is
http://www.dejanews.com/[LB=http://www.geocities.com/~familyunite/,LBT
http://www.geocities.com/~familyunite]/group/dejanews.members.fam.vera1.lost
-family

I added a related websites page that lists 5 websites that offer free add
postings about missing persons. That page address is
http://www.geocities.com/~familyunite/linkpage.htm.

I also told about a program I saw on Dateline NBC about a woman who found
her brother, who was missing for 53 years, through the Red Cross.
Ironically her brother was Ukrainian like your family members. If you're
still having troubles with your local Red Cross, then write directly to the
Red Cross in Kiev.

Here's the first message of my mailing list:

Hi!
Thank you for joining my mailing list! Your interest is appreciated. I
made several additions yesterday to Operation: Family Unite.

The additions are:
Online Bookstore- 15 books related to searching for missing persons are
listed.
Directories Page- reorganized and updated.
Discussion Groups Page- updated with 30 more newsgroups.
European Government Services Page- lists services by governments
throughout Europe to help people find their family.

Operation: Family Unite Services- two people have offered services related
to finding missing persons.

US Embassies Page- provides links to all the US embassies online.
US Government Services- lists services >from the US government that can
help you find your relatives if they are living in the US

Guestbook-just added.

Vera


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen FW: info on the Ukraine #general

Ruth Grant <rgrant1@...>
 

Hello JG'rs,
I'm forwarding this message on the off chance that any member searching for
family in any part of the Ukraine may find some new address or site they
haven't had before. I hope this may be of help to many of you; it has given
me some new contacts.

Ruth Grant
Scarborough, ME

-----Original Message-----
From: Vera Klinkowsky [mailto:vnk100@psu.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 1998 11:58 PM
To: rgrant1@maine.rr.com
Subject: info on the Ukraine



Hi Ruth!

I have come across some addresses you might be interested in.
Red Cross in Kiev
252004 Kiev
vul. Pushkinska, 30
Ukraine

Central State Historical Archives (main office)
24 Solomenskaya Street
Kiev 252601 Ukraine
Attn: Georgiy Papakin, Head of the International Dept.

Central State Historical Archives (office in western Ukraine)
3a Sobornaya Square
Lviv 290008 Ukraine
Attn: Orest Matsiuk, Director

I just added your name to my mailing list. You should be getting a message
from Listbot soon. They'll send you a message to confirm you want to be on
the list.

My second message hasn't been archived yet, but I'll summarize it for you.
I added a forum where you can correspond with other people searching for
missing relatives. The forum address is
http://www.dejanews.com/[LB=http://www.geocities.com/~familyunite/,LBT
http://www.geocities.com/~familyunite]/group/dejanews.members.fam.vera1.lost
-family

I added a related websites page that lists 5 websites that offer free add
postings about missing persons. That page address is
http://www.geocities.com/~familyunite/linkpage.htm.

I also told about a program I saw on Dateline NBC about a woman who found
her brother, who was missing for 53 years, through the Red Cross.
Ironically her brother was Ukrainian like your family members. If you're
still having troubles with your local Red Cross, then write directly to the
Red Cross in Kiev.

Here's the first message of my mailing list:

Hi!
Thank you for joining my mailing list! Your interest is appreciated. I
made several additions yesterday to Operation: Family Unite.

The additions are:
Online Bookstore- 15 books related to searching for missing persons are
listed.
Directories Page- reorganized and updated.
Discussion Groups Page- updated with 30 more newsgroups.
European Government Services Page- lists services by governments
throughout Europe to help people find their family.

Operation: Family Unite Services- two people have offered services related
to finding missing persons.

US Embassies Page- provides links to all the US embassies online.
US Government Services- lists services >from the US government that can
help you find your relatives if they are living in the US

Guestbook-just added.

Vera


Re: Revision List #general

ROBERT WEISS
 

Ilya Zeldes, in his comments on Howard Margol's explanation of the meaning of
Revizskaia Skazka, fails to note that the modern meaning of "skazka" is "fairy
tale" (ref Harper Collins Russian Dictionary,1994).

We genealogists should keep this in mind when we use these records for
researching our ancestors. See AJGS Minigraph #101 "Dead Souls of Satanov-
Genealogical Knowledge >from Documents Concerning the 1830-31's Cholera
Epidemic" by Anatoli Chayesh for an example of what fairy tales these records contain.


Stiefel/April #general

IAN BELLANY <i.bellany@...>
 

Dear Jewishgenners,
I received a marriage certificate today.
It records the marriage of Moses STIEFEL and Dory APRIL in NYC on 13th
Dec. 1882.


Moses's father was Abraham STIEFEL, his mother's maiden name was
LINDENBAUM.

Dory was the daughter of Isaac APRIL and Rachel NUSSBAUM.

Bride and groom both claim to have been born in "Goliciem".I presume
this is Galicia.


I also received the APRIL Federal Census return,1880,in which Dory is
written as being born in Austria
as were her parents and one or two other members of the family, while
some children are written as
being born in Hungary.

I know nothing of the history of Galicia, was it once part of the Austro
Hungarian Empire which could
explain the confusion?
Was it ever a German speaking province?
The Stiefels were thought to have been German Jews, doesn't look as if
they were so I wonder how that
myth arose.

Wendy I Bellany,
i.bellany@lancaster.ac.uk


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Revision List #general

ROBERT WEISS
 

Ilya Zeldes, in his comments on Howard Margol's explanation of the meaning of
Revizskaia Skazka, fails to note that the modern meaning of "skazka" is "fairy
tale" (ref Harper Collins Russian Dictionary,1994).

We genealogists should keep this in mind when we use these records for
researching our ancestors. See AJGS Minigraph #101 "Dead Souls of Satanov-
Genealogical Knowledge >from Documents Concerning the 1830-31's Cholera
Epidemic" by Anatoli Chayesh for an example of what fairy tales these records contain.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Stiefel/April #general

IAN BELLANY <i.bellany@...>
 

Dear Jewishgenners,
I received a marriage certificate today.
It records the marriage of Moses STIEFEL and Dory APRIL in NYC on 13th
Dec. 1882.


Moses's father was Abraham STIEFEL, his mother's maiden name was
LINDENBAUM.

Dory was the daughter of Isaac APRIL and Rachel NUSSBAUM.

Bride and groom both claim to have been born in "Goliciem".I presume
this is Galicia.


I also received the APRIL Federal Census return,1880,in which Dory is
written as being born in Austria
as were her parents and one or two other members of the family, while
some children are written as
being born in Hungary.

I know nothing of the history of Galicia, was it once part of the Austro
Hungarian Empire which could
explain the confusion?
Was it ever a German speaking province?
The Stiefels were thought to have been German Jews, doesn't look as if
they were so I wonder how that
myth arose.

Wendy I Bellany,
i.bellany@lancaster.ac.uk


Re: PART II --TRAVELS IN LITHUANIA &LATVIA WITH FEIGMANIS #general

Carol Lieberman <cmenetwork@...>
 

Yesterday I told you about events that lead up to the trip. I suddenly
realized as I was leaving for Italy that I would arrive in Riga at 11:30PM.
Would the airport be deserted? How could I take a cab if I couldn't ask for
help? So, I faxed the Metropole and they said they would send a car for me
but=91to bring $10 American money to pay him.

As the plane landed in Riga, I thought of the five days that lay ahead and
what I might or might not find. The opportunity to locate some information
about the elusive ggf and my ggm - for whom my mother was named -- had become obsessively important to me. What if I found nothing? I left the plane, noting that it wasn't really even dark (White Nights in the summer) got my luggage and exited customs quickly and easily, finding a driver holding a card with my name. How civilized! Just like New York.

He quickly drove me to the hotel about 9 kilometers away and since we could
not speak to one another, I was able to view the buildings while it finally
got dark. Didn't look particularly strange, so I stopped worrying. I checked in quickly with English speaking and courteous hosts, and was shown to a small single room, without air conditioning. I soon learned that the lack of air conditioning all through the area would be my undoing!

In the morning I called National Auto Rental, the firm that had the best price with no charge per kilometer, and got a fabulous English-speaking young man who planned to bring the car to the hotel. Fabulous. I was to pay $239 flat rate for three day, returning it the fourth morning. Ivar was as good as his word. He brought the car, showed me how it worked and how the security lock functioned and then told me it had no air conditioning. Nothing to do about it, but the air was already getting hotter and damper and I worried about that.

The hotel served a fabulous buffet breakfast. I found it to be true in
Lithuania as well. Four kinds of bread, four kinds of cake, four kinds of meat ( four was the magic number), eggs, sausage, bacon, salad, fish, fruit, enough to keep one going for the whole day. And as we drove south along the coast highway, it became apparent that I was lucky to get that food because the highway stops were not anything an American would stop at in the 1990s. Maybe in 1942!

At 9:30AM Aleksandr Feigmanis showed up. What a surprise. He was young (28
years) a pleasant-faced person, soft-spoken but authoritative young man who immediately made me feel at ease. We initially reviewed our plans to drive south to Klapeida, with a slight detour to Liepaja (Libau) for two ladies who would join us >from another car. We were to tour the Liepaja cemetery and see the Jewish Center.

This was to be a drive of several hours >from Riga. I followed the other car
out of the city, cursing the heat and the gear shift ( I was knowledgeable,
just spoiled) and began driving down the only highway on the west coast of
Latvia towards Libau. It was day time, there were no towns to pass through -- the road didn't even have a line to divide the lanes or any signs -- an=
d so we went. There were no service stations that I could see. Lucky I didn't need gas. We stopped for a break, and found primitive but acceptable toilets.
To get a drink, we purchased bottled water. I noticed that the bottles were
recycles, as the labels and bottles showed signs of significant wear.

Some several hours later we reached Liepaja and immediately drove to the
cemetery through cobble-stoned streets. We passed both old old wooden
buildings that to me looked like they would go up in smoke with one match, as well as cement structure of several stories with a Russian influence. Other buildings were beautiful and must have been very old. As we passed the business parts of town, I noted the lack of modern signs or colors in the area. We parked at the cemetery and went quickly to the office. There we met the family that had been caretakers of the cemetery since its opening in 1886.

I already knew that officially the records for the years I wanted (1850 -
1890) were sketchy at best for Libau, but I found out that the cemetery was
intact. It had been a multi-denominational cemetery and thus the Nazis did not decimate it. Imagine my surprise when we got there to find that the same family had been running it since 1886. Now, there was a young man

SANDRIS UN MAREKS
FURMANI
Betone Kapu Apmales
VAeic Kapu Labiekartosanas Darbus
Organize Beres
Piedave Neseju Brigades Pakalpojumus
Cenkones iela 18, Liepaja

and his mother. They spoke only Russian, it seemed, but Aleksandr was greatly familiar with them, having been there many times. He told me that they were slightly erratic, but that they had been helpful to him. Actually, later Aleksandr told me he had most of the list of all Jewish burials since its opening, and was photographing the stones when he had the chance.

More tomorrow!


Italian Jews #general

Tvllivs <tvllivs@...>
 

I suspect that my maternal great, great grandmother was an Italian Jew. At
present I have no proof. What leads me to believe it is that her name was
Rebecca, a decidedly odd name for a girl born in the Italian south in the first
or second decade of the 19th Century, especially if she were Roman Catholic.
She named her daughter, my great grandmother, Alberinta or possibly Almirenta,
names that are so unique that I've begun to doubt they are Italian.

Great, great grandmother Rebecca D'Elia married Nicola Cantante. His surname
means "singer". In Italy today there are fewer than eighteen families with
this surname. Isn't it odd, I've asked myself, that in a country known for
its singers, that this surname should be so very, very rare? I wonder if
"cantante" might be a direct translation of cantor. Plainly they derive from
the same root and have the same meaning.

Can anyone in the newsgroup help me? Can anyone steer me away >from guessing
and onto more solid ground?

Many thanks in advance,

Alan J. Tullio.
Lynbrook, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: PART II --TRAVELS IN LITHUANIA &LATVIA WITH FEIGMANIS #general

Carol Lieberman <cmenetwork@...>
 

Yesterday I told you about events that lead up to the trip. I suddenly
realized as I was leaving for Italy that I would arrive in Riga at 11:30PM.
Would the airport be deserted? How could I take a cab if I couldn't ask for
help? So, I faxed the Metropole and they said they would send a car for me
but=91to bring $10 American money to pay him.

As the plane landed in Riga, I thought of the five days that lay ahead and
what I might or might not find. The opportunity to locate some information
about the elusive ggf and my ggm - for whom my mother was named -- had become obsessively important to me. What if I found nothing? I left the plane, noting that it wasn't really even dark (White Nights in the summer) got my luggage and exited customs quickly and easily, finding a driver holding a card with my name. How civilized! Just like New York.

He quickly drove me to the hotel about 9 kilometers away and since we could
not speak to one another, I was able to view the buildings while it finally
got dark. Didn't look particularly strange, so I stopped worrying. I checked in quickly with English speaking and courteous hosts, and was shown to a small single room, without air conditioning. I soon learned that the lack of air conditioning all through the area would be my undoing!

In the morning I called National Auto Rental, the firm that had the best price with no charge per kilometer, and got a fabulous English-speaking young man who planned to bring the car to the hotel. Fabulous. I was to pay $239 flat rate for three day, returning it the fourth morning. Ivar was as good as his word. He brought the car, showed me how it worked and how the security lock functioned and then told me it had no air conditioning. Nothing to do about it, but the air was already getting hotter and damper and I worried about that.

The hotel served a fabulous buffet breakfast. I found it to be true in
Lithuania as well. Four kinds of bread, four kinds of cake, four kinds of meat ( four was the magic number), eggs, sausage, bacon, salad, fish, fruit, enough to keep one going for the whole day. And as we drove south along the coast highway, it became apparent that I was lucky to get that food because the highway stops were not anything an American would stop at in the 1990s. Maybe in 1942!

At 9:30AM Aleksandr Feigmanis showed up. What a surprise. He was young (28
years) a pleasant-faced person, soft-spoken but authoritative young man who immediately made me feel at ease. We initially reviewed our plans to drive south to Klapeida, with a slight detour to Liepaja (Libau) for two ladies who would join us >from another car. We were to tour the Liepaja cemetery and see the Jewish Center.

This was to be a drive of several hours >from Riga. I followed the other car
out of the city, cursing the heat and the gear shift ( I was knowledgeable,
just spoiled) and began driving down the only highway on the west coast of
Latvia towards Libau. It was day time, there were no towns to pass through -- the road didn't even have a line to divide the lanes or any signs -- an=
d so we went. There were no service stations that I could see. Lucky I didn't need gas. We stopped for a break, and found primitive but acceptable toilets.
To get a drink, we purchased bottled water. I noticed that the bottles were
recycles, as the labels and bottles showed signs of significant wear.

Some several hours later we reached Liepaja and immediately drove to the
cemetery through cobble-stoned streets. We passed both old old wooden
buildings that to me looked like they would go up in smoke with one match, as well as cement structure of several stories with a Russian influence. Other buildings were beautiful and must have been very old. As we passed the business parts of town, I noted the lack of modern signs or colors in the area. We parked at the cemetery and went quickly to the office. There we met the family that had been caretakers of the cemetery since its opening in 1886.

I already knew that officially the records for the years I wanted (1850 -
1890) were sketchy at best for Libau, but I found out that the cemetery was
intact. It had been a multi-denominational cemetery and thus the Nazis did not decimate it. Imagine my surprise when we got there to find that the same family had been running it since 1886. Now, there was a young man

SANDRIS UN MAREKS
FURMANI
Betone Kapu Apmales
VAeic Kapu Labiekartosanas Darbus
Organize Beres
Piedave Neseju Brigades Pakalpojumus
Cenkones iela 18, Liepaja

and his mother. They spoke only Russian, it seemed, but Aleksandr was greatly familiar with them, having been there many times. He told me that they were slightly erratic, but that they had been helpful to him. Actually, later Aleksandr told me he had most of the list of all Jewish burials since its opening, and was photographing the stones when he had the chance.

More tomorrow!


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Italian Jews #general

Tvllivs <tvllivs@...>
 

I suspect that my maternal great, great grandmother was an Italian Jew. At
present I have no proof. What leads me to believe it is that her name was
Rebecca, a decidedly odd name for a girl born in the Italian south in the first
or second decade of the 19th Century, especially if she were Roman Catholic.
She named her daughter, my great grandmother, Alberinta or possibly Almirenta,
names that are so unique that I've begun to doubt they are Italian.

Great, great grandmother Rebecca D'Elia married Nicola Cantante. His surname
means "singer". In Italy today there are fewer than eighteen families with
this surname. Isn't it odd, I've asked myself, that in a country known for
its singers, that this surname should be so very, very rare? I wonder if
"cantante" might be a direct translation of cantor. Plainly they derive from
the same root and have the same meaning.

Can anyone in the newsgroup help me? Can anyone steer me away >from guessing
and onto more solid ground?

Many thanks in advance,

Alan J. Tullio.
Lynbrook, New York


Nusach Hoari #general

Stuart Richler <stuart@...>
 

Michoel Ronn wrote:

In short, all Nusach HoAri synagogues in America were Lubavitcher
Chassidic synagogues; hence, your ancestors were Lubavitcher Chassidim.
See my circa 1991 article in "Avotaynu" entiteled "Chabad-Lubavitch
Literature as a Genealogical Source."
While it is true that Lubavitcher Chasidim use the "Nusach Hoari", it is
not true that all Nusach Hoari synagogues were Lubavitcher. We have a
Nusach Hoari synagogue here in Montreal that did not start out as a
Lubavitcher synagogue at all.


Shmarya Richler
Montreal, Quebec, Canada stuart@gtrdata.com http://www.gtrdata.com/richler

Researching: RICHLER/REICHLER (Potolych,Rawa Russkaya), EDEL (Zamosc),
HIRSCH,PFEFFERMAN (Hungary), KATZ,DRUKER,POTASHNIK,HOROWITZ (Any)
RAPOPORT (Minsk,Brest), LERNER (Kamenets Podolski),RUBIN (Gdansk - Danzig)
BRAVERMAN (Wyshogrod), SCHMERLER,SCHWAGER (Ivano Frankivsk - Stanislawow,
Solotvina),FROST (Any)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Nusach Hoari #general

Stuart Richler <stuart@...>
 

Michoel Ronn wrote:

In short, all Nusach HoAri synagogues in America were Lubavitcher
Chassidic synagogues; hence, your ancestors were Lubavitcher Chassidim.
See my circa 1991 article in "Avotaynu" entiteled "Chabad-Lubavitch
Literature as a Genealogical Source."
While it is true that Lubavitcher Chasidim use the "Nusach Hoari", it is
not true that all Nusach Hoari synagogues were Lubavitcher. We have a
Nusach Hoari synagogue here in Montreal that did not start out as a
Lubavitcher synagogue at all.


Shmarya Richler
Montreal, Quebec, Canada stuart@gtrdata.com http://www.gtrdata.com/richler

Researching: RICHLER/REICHLER (Potolych,Rawa Russkaya), EDEL (Zamosc),
HIRSCH,PFEFFERMAN (Hungary), KATZ,DRUKER,POTASHNIK,HOROWITZ (Any)
RAPOPORT (Minsk,Brest), LERNER (Kamenets Podolski),RUBIN (Gdansk - Danzig)
BRAVERMAN (Wyshogrod), SCHMERLER,SCHWAGER (Ivano Frankivsk - Stanislawow,
Solotvina),FROST (Any)


Searching GLICKLIN -> Bykhov Mogilevsky G'bania #belarus

JudiTomFox@...
 

Re: A lot of us are new to the Belarus SIG as well as being new to the
Internet and E-Mail and do not know what many abbreviations mean. Example
what is MIME?
Also you mention printing out a form on the screen in order to make
donations, by check, to Jewishgen. What form? How do you get to it? What
address does one use?
I am looking for GLICKLIN. My grandfather was Israel GLICKLIN. He came from
the town of Bykhov Mogilevsky G'bania. His father was Hershel Oreh
GLICKLIN,also known as Zvi Aryeh. ISRAEL had 3 brothers and 2 sisters. Two
of the brothers;Sam and Henry GLICKLIN came to the United States and changed
the name to GLICK. One of the sisters ( Merke?) came to the United States and
married a man by the name of Epstein, >from whom she was later divorced. One
brother and a sister remained behind in Bykhov . It is believed that they
were massacred.
Sometimes people have a hard time getting the name GLICKLIN spelled or
pronounced properly so I am interested in any variation of the name: such
as; GLIKIN, GLIKLIN, GLIEKIN, GLICKLIN. GLUCKLIN, etc. Israel was a teacher.
I am interested in any GLICKLIN anywhere in the USA or anywhere in Belarus I
am especially interested in finding out what happened to Sam and Henry GLICK..
If you have any info on Israel GLICKLIN and /or on his 2 brothers Sam &
Henry GLICKplease let me know. Perhaps we can share information on the
GLICKLINS.

Judith Fox
Juditomfox@aol.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus Searching GLICKLIN -> Bykhov Mogilevsky G'bania #belarus

JudiTomFox@...
 

Re: A lot of us are new to the Belarus SIG as well as being new to the
Internet and E-Mail and do not know what many abbreviations mean. Example
what is MIME?
Also you mention printing out a form on the screen in order to make
donations, by check, to Jewishgen. What form? How do you get to it? What
address does one use?
I am looking for GLICKLIN. My grandfather was Israel GLICKLIN. He came from
the town of Bykhov Mogilevsky G'bania. His father was Hershel Oreh
GLICKLIN,also known as Zvi Aryeh. ISRAEL had 3 brothers and 2 sisters. Two
of the brothers;Sam and Henry GLICKLIN came to the United States and changed
the name to GLICK. One of the sisters ( Merke?) came to the United States and
married a man by the name of Epstein, >from whom she was later divorced. One
brother and a sister remained behind in Bykhov . It is believed that they
were massacred.
Sometimes people have a hard time getting the name GLICKLIN spelled or
pronounced properly so I am interested in any variation of the name: such
as; GLIKIN, GLIKLIN, GLIEKIN, GLICKLIN. GLUCKLIN, etc. Israel was a teacher.
I am interested in any GLICKLIN anywhere in the USA or anywhere in Belarus I
am especially interested in finding out what happened to Sam and Henry GLICK..
If you have any info on Israel GLICKLIN and /or on his 2 brothers Sam &
Henry GLICKplease let me know. Perhaps we can share information on the
GLICKLINS.

Judith Fox
Juditomfox@aol.com


Pinsk - Need Info #belarus

MMBegun@...
 

Many of our BEGUN ancestors have said they are >from Pinsk. However, in the
Chicago area cemteries, they are buried in Landmanshaftn groups >from the towns
of Stolin, Telechany and Lahyshin. (The latter has been spelled several
ways.)
These burials are definitely of our relatives.

So, my question is -- if an individual says he/she is >from Pinsk, is it
possible they are referring to the larger region -- such as the other side of
my family who said they were >from Kiev, when in reality they were >from small
town in Kiev guberniya. In Ukraine in the nineteenth century, it was rare
that a Jew could actually live in the city of Kiev, although there have been
exceptions.

Does anyone have more information on the city of Pinsk and its actual Jewish
population?

Is anyone researching these towns: Pinsk, Stolin, Lahyshin, Telechany?
Family names: BEGUN, ROSENBAUM, KRULL, COLODNY, MELCER, MELTZER.

Thanks --
Mila Orlik Begun
N.Y.C.
(MMBegun@aol.com)

Moderator's Note: If you are trying to find out who else is researching
your names or shtetls, you should go to the JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF)
which is linked to the JewishGen Home page. If you haven't done so
already, you should also add your research information to the JGFF database
so other researchers will be able to find you. Although not a Jewish web
site, there is information about Pinsk at:
<http://jurix.jura.uni-sb.de/~serko/heritage/pinsk.html>;


Belarus SIG #Belarus Pinsk - Need Info #belarus

MMBegun@...
 

Many of our BEGUN ancestors have said they are >from Pinsk. However, in the
Chicago area cemteries, they are buried in Landmanshaftn groups >from the towns
of Stolin, Telechany and Lahyshin. (The latter has been spelled several
ways.)
These burials are definitely of our relatives.

So, my question is -- if an individual says he/she is >from Pinsk, is it
possible they are referring to the larger region -- such as the other side of
my family who said they were >from Kiev, when in reality they were >from small
town in Kiev guberniya. In Ukraine in the nineteenth century, it was rare
that a Jew could actually live in the city of Kiev, although there have been
exceptions.

Does anyone have more information on the city of Pinsk and its actual Jewish
population?

Is anyone researching these towns: Pinsk, Stolin, Lahyshin, Telechany?
Family names: BEGUN, ROSENBAUM, KRULL, COLODNY, MELCER, MELTZER.

Thanks --
Mila Orlik Begun
N.Y.C.
(MMBegun@aol.com)

Moderator's Note: If you are trying to find out who else is researching
your names or shtetls, you should go to the JewishGen Family Finder (JGFF)
which is linked to the JewishGen Home page. If you haven't done so
already, you should also add your research information to the JGFF database
so other researchers will be able to find you. Although not a Jewish web
site, there is information about Pinsk at:
<http://jurix.jura.uni-sb.de/~serko/heritage/pinsk.html>;