Date   

Can't find anything on these ROMBRO relatives in NYC #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

Dear Jewishgenners--I have been doing this for years but have hit a brick
wall with this one family.

Listed in the 1900 census are Rachel ROMBRO (born 1845), Annie ROMBRO
(born 1875) and Rosie Rombro (born 1872).

Annie is listed as a daughter of Rachel and Rosie is listed as a boarder.

I do not think that Rachel and Annie are the mother and daughter of
Yakov ROMBRO (aka Philip KRANTZ). No dates seem to really match up, but
I am keeping an open mind.

Rachel is a widower. In the 1898 City Directory for New York City is
listed ROMBRO, Rachel widow of Isaac, 31 Montgomery Street. It seems that
Rachel immigrated to the US as a widow.

I can't find any information, especially on Rosie. Can anyone offer
any suggestions?

Is there a reverse city directory for 1898 so I can see who is listed
as living at 31 Montgomery?

Many thanks in advance,

Carol Rombro Rider
Baltimore, Maryland USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Can't find anything on these ROMBRO relatives in NYC #general

Carol Rombro Rider
 

Dear Jewishgenners--I have been doing this for years but have hit a brick
wall with this one family.

Listed in the 1900 census are Rachel ROMBRO (born 1845), Annie ROMBRO
(born 1875) and Rosie Rombro (born 1872).

Annie is listed as a daughter of Rachel and Rosie is listed as a boarder.

I do not think that Rachel and Annie are the mother and daughter of
Yakov ROMBRO (aka Philip KRANTZ). No dates seem to really match up, but
I am keeping an open mind.

Rachel is a widower. In the 1898 City Directory for New York City is
listed ROMBRO, Rachel widow of Isaac, 31 Montgomery Street. It seems that
Rachel immigrated to the US as a widow.

I can't find any information, especially on Rosie. Can anyone offer
any suggestions?

Is there a reverse city directory for 1898 so I can see who is listed
as living at 31 Montgomery?

Many thanks in advance,

Carol Rombro Rider
Baltimore, Maryland USA


Ancestry Celebrates Canada Day With Free Access to all Canadian Records Through July 2 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

In celebration of Canada Day, Ancestry.ca is offering free access to all of
its 260 million Canadian records through July 2 11:59PM ET. This includes
border crossings to the US and ships' manifests where the ship stops in
Canada >from Europe en route to the US. You may find ancestors in the
Canadian records you did not expect! You will need to register with your
name, email address and password. No credit card information is required. Go
to: http://www.ancestry.ca/canadaday. Note the fine print says through July
2, 2013 but I tried it and it works in 2016!

To start your search fill in the name and location in Canada of your
ancestor. With the results click on the record you want. Once you are
registered you can access the actual record. NOTE: if you click on "Start a
Free Trial" that is an invitation to subscribe and you are required to
provide credit card information-this is not the free trial for Canada Day.
If you search other than the Canadian collection you will be prompted to
subscribe.

I have no affiliation with Ancestry and am posting this solely for the
information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ancestry Celebrates Canada Day With Free Access to all Canadian Records Through July 2 #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

In celebration of Canada Day, Ancestry.ca is offering free access to all of
its 260 million Canadian records through July 2 11:59PM ET. This includes
border crossings to the US and ships' manifests where the ship stops in
Canada >from Europe en route to the US. You may find ancestors in the
Canadian records you did not expect! You will need to register with your
name, email address and password. No credit card information is required. Go
to: http://www.ancestry.ca/canadaday. Note the fine print says through July
2, 2013 but I tried it and it works in 2016!

To start your search fill in the name and location in Canada of your
ancestor. With the results click on the record you want. Once you are
registered you can access the actual record. NOTE: if you click on "Start a
Free Trial" that is an invitation to subscribe and you are required to
provide credit card information-this is not the free trial for Canada Day.
If you search other than the Canadian collection you will be prompted to
subscribe.

I have no affiliation with Ancestry and am posting this solely for the
information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Seeking Information about ENDE / MOSS family #general

CHUCK GORDON
 

I have posted a photo of members of the ENDE / MOSS family >from Sokolow
Malopolski, Poland, located at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=48042 .

There were 6 Ende brothers who may have lived in neighboring villages,
one was named Sinai, another may have been known as Abraham Samuel.
I am researching on behalf of Dr. Norman Ende, who is Sinai's grandson.

Many Thanks for your kind attention,

Charles Gordon, NJ/ USA

MODERATOR: Please communicate directly with Charles, or use the form
on the ViewMate site.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking Information about ENDE / MOSS family #general

CHUCK GORDON
 

I have posted a photo of members of the ENDE / MOSS family >from Sokolow
Malopolski, Poland, located at
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=48042 .

There were 6 Ende brothers who may have lived in neighboring villages,
one was named Sinai, another may have been known as Abraham Samuel.
I am researching on behalf of Dr. Norman Ende, who is Sinai's grandson.

Many Thanks for your kind attention,

Charles Gordon, NJ/ USA

MODERATOR: Please communicate directly with Charles, or use the form
on the ViewMate site.


Searching: HERSCHBERG and LANDAU family from Nadvorna #general

Genealogy Researcher
 

I am trying to find out any information about the following HERSCHBERG
and LANDAU family >from the town of Nadworna.

The following information I got >from records I found on jri-Poland.

Moshe Herschberg was born in Nadvorna in 1878 to Chaim Herschberg &
Jente nee LANDAU.

His siblings which I know >from the records are as follows. 1) Chaya
died in 1877 at the age of 2 years old, 2) Shlomo Leib born in 1877
and died at the age of 5 weeks, 3) Moshe Aron born in 1878, 4) Yisroel
Noach died in 1880 at the age of 7 months old, 5) Yehuda Mendel died
in 1883 at the age of 1 year and 1 month old, 6) Leah BIKEL nee
Herschberg died in 1901 at the age of 46 [she had children].

Chaim Herschberg was the son of Mechel & Jutte Herschberg. Chaim died
in 1907 at the age of 70 years old. In the death record registered in
Nadworna it says that he died in Kalusz. His house # was 261.

There is a death record in Nadworna in 1875 for Mechel Herschberg at
the age of 3 years old. I assume that it's the son of Chaim & Yenta.
If so then Chaim's father Mechel passed away before 1872.

I have copies of all original records which I found on jri-Poland but
I did not translate them yet. The information I know is >from the
jri-Poland index.

I also found on the All Galicia database on the landowner list of
Nadworna in 1848 that the owner of the above house # 261 where Chaim
Herschberg lived later (when he died in 1907) was "Hitel Landau". I
don't know who this is, but I highly assume that it is a close
relative to Jente Herschberg nee Landau. Very possible her parents.
Any help resolving this mystery would be greatly appreciated.

In the family stories I heard that Moshe Herschberg was a descendant
of the famous "Noda Beyehuda" Rabbi Yechezkel Landau.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yechezkel_Landau. We never knew how
and we never verified it. Now that I know that his mother was a Landau
it makes sense. I surely assume that Yenta's father was a paternal
descendant of the Noda Beyehuda.

Moshe Herschberg lived after his marriage in the town of Stryy, and
the whole town was killed out in the holocaust. We assume that he was
also killed together with the whole town.

Any additional information about this family will be greatly appreciated!!!

Thanks Everyone!!!

Moshe Adler
New York, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: HERSCHBERG and LANDAU family from Nadvorna #general

Genealogy Researcher
 

I am trying to find out any information about the following HERSCHBERG
and LANDAU family >from the town of Nadworna.

The following information I got >from records I found on jri-Poland.

Moshe Herschberg was born in Nadvorna in 1878 to Chaim Herschberg &
Jente nee LANDAU.

His siblings which I know >from the records are as follows. 1) Chaya
died in 1877 at the age of 2 years old, 2) Shlomo Leib born in 1877
and died at the age of 5 weeks, 3) Moshe Aron born in 1878, 4) Yisroel
Noach died in 1880 at the age of 7 months old, 5) Yehuda Mendel died
in 1883 at the age of 1 year and 1 month old, 6) Leah BIKEL nee
Herschberg died in 1901 at the age of 46 [she had children].

Chaim Herschberg was the son of Mechel & Jutte Herschberg. Chaim died
in 1907 at the age of 70 years old. In the death record registered in
Nadworna it says that he died in Kalusz. His house # was 261.

There is a death record in Nadworna in 1875 for Mechel Herschberg at
the age of 3 years old. I assume that it's the son of Chaim & Yenta.
If so then Chaim's father Mechel passed away before 1872.

I have copies of all original records which I found on jri-Poland but
I did not translate them yet. The information I know is >from the
jri-Poland index.

I also found on the All Galicia database on the landowner list of
Nadworna in 1848 that the owner of the above house # 261 where Chaim
Herschberg lived later (when he died in 1907) was "Hitel Landau". I
don't know who this is, but I highly assume that it is a close
relative to Jente Herschberg nee Landau. Very possible her parents.
Any help resolving this mystery would be greatly appreciated.

In the family stories I heard that Moshe Herschberg was a descendant
of the famous "Noda Beyehuda" Rabbi Yechezkel Landau.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yechezkel_Landau. We never knew how
and we never verified it. Now that I know that his mother was a Landau
it makes sense. I surely assume that Yenta's father was a paternal
descendant of the Noda Beyehuda.

Moshe Herschberg lived after his marriage in the town of Stryy, and
the whole town was killed out in the holocaust. We assume that he was
also killed together with the whole town.

Any additional information about this family will be greatly appreciated!!!

Thanks Everyone!!!

Moshe Adler
New York, USA


ViewMate translation request - Russian #general

Genealogy Researcher
 

I've posted a vital record in Russian for which I need a translation.
It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM44114

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.
M. Adler


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate translation request - Russian #general

Genealogy Researcher
 

I've posted a vital record in Russian for which I need a translation.
It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM44114

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.
M. Adler


Re: Rachel WOLFUS (Wieliczka or Klasno) #general

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

Sacha Curie writes: < I am looking for any information about my
grandmother (deceased) Rachel Wolfus. She was born in the Krakow
area (Wieliczka) around 1912 but moved to Palestine in 1936 and then
onto Australia in 1951. Any help would be appreciated. >

Posting publicly because this may help others.

Sacha, this is a very broad query. What information are you looking
for? Do you want to know about her early life and her ancestors in
Poland? About her immigration to Palestine and/or her time there?
About her immigration to Australia and/or her life there? Each of
these questions will involve research in different places and
different resources.

But, firstly, have you done the groundwork? Namely, have you spoken to
any relatives who might have information, documents and/or photos? If
not, that is absolutely the place to start. Gather as much as you can
from them.
Then turn to the publicly and easily available online resources to see
what you can find: JRI-Poland, JewishGen's assorted databases,
Ancestry, Familysearch, various cemetery, telephone directory and
newspaper websites, just to start with. Don't forget to Google - you
never know what you might find!

And then more specific sources:

Do you want your grandmother's birth or her relatives'
birth/marriage/death records >from Poland? If so, you will need to
write to the offices there to inquire about and order such documents.
(JRI-Poland doesn't necessarily have indexes or links for all the
years you want.) For her birth record and for any other documents more
than 100 years old, you'd want the Polish State Archives branch. For
documents less than 100 years old (such as a marriage document, for
example, if she married before leaving Poland), you'd want to write to
the local civil records office (urzad stanu cywilnego) in the town
where the event took place. Check Miriam Weiner's Routes to Roots
Foundation website - www.rtrfoundation.org/index.shtml - to get an
idea of which documents are held where. You can find addresses/emails
in the RTR website or by Googling. You're advised to write to any
office in Poland in Polish. They'll tell you what they find and the
charges (tip: order as many documents as you can in one hit to avoid
paying bank transfer fees each time).

Do you want records of her immigration to Palestine? If so, you can
ask for a search of the Central Zionist Archives records --
http://www.zionistarchives.org.il/en/familyresearch/Pages/about-family-research.aspx
[or http://tinyurl.com/hmld9wy - MODERATOR]. (The cost is 180 shekels
whether or not they find anything.)

And you can search the websites of the Israel Genealogical Research
Association - http://genealogy.org.il/ - and the Israel Genealogical
Society - www.isragen.org.il - for free, although to see documents
you need to be a paid-up member (which may or may not be worth your
while, depending on what you find there). The websites are all in
English, but I'd strongly advise searching in Hebrew as well as
English as names often become mangled in translation. If you know
where she lived in Israel, there may also be something in municipal
records.

Do you want information about her in Australia? Then check the
National Archives of Australia website -
http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/search/index.aspx - and the state
and municipal archives in the area she lived.

Just out of curiosity, I Googled the name Rachel WOLFUS and received
an immediate hit in the Billiongraves website - https://billiongraves.com/
- which has a picture of her tombstone in the Brighton cemetery.
The tombstone gives her name as Rachel WOLFUS KHOURY, her dates of
birth and death (1912-1993) and the names of her children and
grandchildren, including you, Sacha.

I then went to the National Archives of Australia website and searched
the name Rachel WOLFUS, which turned up nothing, and then the name
Rachel KHOURY, which shows that there is a naturalization file there
for her >from 1958. The contents are not public and to see them you'd
need to order the file (for a fee).

So that should give you a few places to start looking!

Good luck,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Rachel WOLFUS (Wieliczka or Klasno) #general

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

Sacha Curie writes: < I am looking for any information about my
grandmother (deceased) Rachel Wolfus. She was born in the Krakow
area (Wieliczka) around 1912 but moved to Palestine in 1936 and then
onto Australia in 1951. Any help would be appreciated. >

Posting publicly because this may help others.

Sacha, this is a very broad query. What information are you looking
for? Do you want to know about her early life and her ancestors in
Poland? About her immigration to Palestine and/or her time there?
About her immigration to Australia and/or her life there? Each of
these questions will involve research in different places and
different resources.

But, firstly, have you done the groundwork? Namely, have you spoken to
any relatives who might have information, documents and/or photos? If
not, that is absolutely the place to start. Gather as much as you can
from them.
Then turn to the publicly and easily available online resources to see
what you can find: JRI-Poland, JewishGen's assorted databases,
Ancestry, Familysearch, various cemetery, telephone directory and
newspaper websites, just to start with. Don't forget to Google - you
never know what you might find!

And then more specific sources:

Do you want your grandmother's birth or her relatives'
birth/marriage/death records >from Poland? If so, you will need to
write to the offices there to inquire about and order such documents.
(JRI-Poland doesn't necessarily have indexes or links for all the
years you want.) For her birth record and for any other documents more
than 100 years old, you'd want the Polish State Archives branch. For
documents less than 100 years old (such as a marriage document, for
example, if she married before leaving Poland), you'd want to write to
the local civil records office (urzad stanu cywilnego) in the town
where the event took place. Check Miriam Weiner's Routes to Roots
Foundation website - www.rtrfoundation.org/index.shtml - to get an
idea of which documents are held where. You can find addresses/emails
in the RTR website or by Googling. You're advised to write to any
office in Poland in Polish. They'll tell you what they find and the
charges (tip: order as many documents as you can in one hit to avoid
paying bank transfer fees each time).

Do you want records of her immigration to Palestine? If so, you can
ask for a search of the Central Zionist Archives records --
http://www.zionistarchives.org.il/en/familyresearch/Pages/about-family-research.aspx
[or http://tinyurl.com/hmld9wy - MODERATOR]. (The cost is 180 shekels
whether or not they find anything.)

And you can search the websites of the Israel Genealogical Research
Association - http://genealogy.org.il/ - and the Israel Genealogical
Society - www.isragen.org.il - for free, although to see documents
you need to be a paid-up member (which may or may not be worth your
while, depending on what you find there). The websites are all in
English, but I'd strongly advise searching in Hebrew as well as
English as names often become mangled in translation. If you know
where she lived in Israel, there may also be something in municipal
records.

Do you want information about her in Australia? Then check the
National Archives of Australia website -
http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/search/index.aspx - and the state
and municipal archives in the area she lived.

Just out of curiosity, I Googled the name Rachel WOLFUS and received
an immediate hit in the Billiongraves website - https://billiongraves.com/
- which has a picture of her tombstone in the Brighton cemetery.
The tombstone gives her name as Rachel WOLFUS KHOURY, her dates of
birth and death (1912-1993) and the names of her children and
grandchildren, including you, Sacha.

I then went to the National Archives of Australia website and searched
the name Rachel WOLFUS, which turned up nothing, and then the name
Rachel KHOURY, which shows that there is a naturalization file there
for her >from 1958. The contents are not public and to see them you'd
need to order the file (for a fee).

So that should give you a few places to start looking!

Good luck,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel


(UK) Forces War Records Offers Free Access Battle of the Somme Troop Movements Through July 3rd #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Battle of Somme, World War l, was fought by British and French armies
between 1 July and 18 November 1916. It was the largest battle on the
Western Front fought in the war. It was also one of the bloodiest battles in
history with over one million men wounded or killed.

To commemorate the Battle of Somme, Forces War Records is offering free
access through July 3rd to troop movements based on the Order of Battle
Divisions (ORBATS). The ORBATS data was transcribed by Forces War Records
which was used to produce the audio-visual interactive map which tracks the
progress of the units throughout the war.

You will have to register with your name, address and password. If you
try to access their other collections, you will be prompted to subscribe.

Go to: https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/ww1-troop-movements [or
http://tinyurl.com/jso6hf6 - MODERATOR] where you can watch the demo or
download the free guide. If you know the battalion your army ancestor
was in, you can locate where he was based and track the unit's manoeuvers
and read and listen to what happened at each station.

I have no affiliation with Forces War Records and am posting this solely for
the information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

MODERATOR: Troops >from the empires of both France and England (eg. the
Commonwealth) were also participants in the Battle of the Somme.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (UK) Forces War Records Offers Free Access Battle of the Somme Troop Movements Through July 3rd #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Battle of Somme, World War l, was fought by British and French armies
between 1 July and 18 November 1916. It was the largest battle on the
Western Front fought in the war. It was also one of the bloodiest battles in
history with over one million men wounded or killed.

To commemorate the Battle of Somme, Forces War Records is offering free
access through July 3rd to troop movements based on the Order of Battle
Divisions (ORBATS). The ORBATS data was transcribed by Forces War Records
which was used to produce the audio-visual interactive map which tracks the
progress of the units throughout the war.

You will have to register with your name, address and password. If you
try to access their other collections, you will be prompted to subscribe.

Go to: https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/ww1-troop-movements [or
http://tinyurl.com/jso6hf6 - MODERATOR] where you can watch the demo or
download the free guide. If you know the battalion your army ancestor
was in, you can locate where he was based and track the unit's manoeuvers
and read and listen to what happened at each station.

I have no affiliation with Forces War Records and am posting this solely for
the information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

MODERATOR: Troops >from the empires of both France and England (eg. the
Commonwealth) were also participants in the Battle of the Somme.


ViewMate: German or Yiddish Letter in Hebrew Script #general

Ralph Baer
 

Although I think that I thanked all the respondents to my recent Viewmate
posting #48010 as well as those who responded by e-mail individually, I want
to thank all of them again. I think that I now know all of the names on the
list, although I still don't know who the people were besides for my
3rd-great-grandfather, his brother, and their wives.

In this regard, the list is on the reverse side of a letter written to my
great-great grandmother Babette (Bunle) BAER nee KLEIN by a brother. Besides
for the greeting which I can read, the letter is apparently written in
German using Hebrew script in 1825 which was prior to her marriage. I am
interested in a transliteration/translation, or if not possible then what
the letter is about.

The link is http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49135 .
Please respond on ViewMate or by e-mail.

Thank you.

Ralph N. Baer
RalphNBaer@aol.com
Washington, DC


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate: German or Yiddish Letter in Hebrew Script #general

Ralph Baer
 

Although I think that I thanked all the respondents to my recent Viewmate
posting #48010 as well as those who responded by e-mail individually, I want
to thank all of them again. I think that I now know all of the names on the
list, although I still don't know who the people were besides for my
3rd-great-grandfather, his brother, and their wives.

In this regard, the list is on the reverse side of a letter written to my
great-great grandmother Babette (Bunle) BAER nee KLEIN by a brother. Besides
for the greeting which I can read, the letter is apparently written in
German using Hebrew script in 1825 which was prior to her marriage. I am
interested in a transliteration/translation, or if not possible then what
the letter is about.

The link is http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49135 .
Please respond on ViewMate or by e-mail.

Thank you.

Ralph N. Baer
RalphNBaer@aol.com
Washington, DC


1849 Cadastral Map of Krzeczowice on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #galicia

Jay Osborn <jay.osborn@...>
 

New on the Gesher Galicia Map Room today: the complete 1849 cadastral
map of Krzeczowice, a beautiful lithographed image of this small town just
5km (3mi) east of Kanczuga in today's southeast Poland:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/krzeczowice-1849/

Our copy of the map includes a large number of redline revisions based on
a later 19th-century survey, which show significant changes in the property
lines and built structure of the town. Today the town is quite stable; it's
easy to see many features of the historical map in a modern satellite image:

https://goo.gl/maps/kSSBrnZV1k72

Acquisition of the map scan images and assembly of this browsable map
were made possible by Gesher Galicia member contributions to the
Kanczuga Nearby Villages Project, an element of our Galician Archival
Records Project (GARP); more info about the Kanczuga Nearby Villages
Project is available here:
http://kanczuga.org/research/nearby/
Work on this important project continues.

The original paper map sheets are preserved by the Polish Historical
Archives in Przemysl:
http://www.przemysl.ap.gov.pl/index.php?lang=en

The GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Digital Map Manager
Warsaw, Poland
maps@geshergalicia.org


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia 1849 Cadastral Map of Krzeczowice on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #galicia

Jay Osborn <jay.osborn@...>
 

New on the Gesher Galicia Map Room today: the complete 1849 cadastral
map of Krzeczowice, a beautiful lithographed image of this small town just
5km (3mi) east of Kanczuga in today's southeast Poland:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/krzeczowice-1849/

Our copy of the map includes a large number of redline revisions based on
a later 19th-century survey, which show significant changes in the property
lines and built structure of the town. Today the town is quite stable; it's
easy to see many features of the historical map in a modern satellite image:

https://goo.gl/maps/kSSBrnZV1k72

Acquisition of the map scan images and assembly of this browsable map
were made possible by Gesher Galicia member contributions to the
Kanczuga Nearby Villages Project, an element of our Galician Archival
Records Project (GARP); more info about the Kanczuga Nearby Villages
Project is available here:
http://kanczuga.org/research/nearby/
Work on this important project continues.

The original paper map sheets are preserved by the Polish Historical
Archives in Przemysl:
http://www.przemysl.ap.gov.pl/index.php?lang=en

The GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Digital Map Manager
Warsaw, Poland
maps@geshergalicia.org


Polish Translation Book Signing #lodz #poland

Scott Meyer
 

Judith R. Frazin, author of A Translation Guide to 19th-Century
Polish-Language Civil-Registration Documents (including Birth,
Marriage and Death Records), will have a book signing at the IAJGS
Conference in Seattle in the Exhibitors Hall immediately after her
presentation, which will occur on Tuesday, August 9 between 1:30 and
2:45 p.m. in the Madrona Room. A limited number of books will be
available at the Conference For more information, go to www.jgsi.org

Scott E. Meyer
Skokie, IL


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Polish Translation Book Signing #poland #lodz

Scott Meyer
 

Judith R. Frazin, author of A Translation Guide to 19th-Century
Polish-Language Civil-Registration Documents (including Birth,
Marriage and Death Records), will have a book signing at the IAJGS
Conference in Seattle in the Exhibitors Hall immediately after her
presentation, which will occur on Tuesday, August 9 between 1:30 and
2:45 p.m. in the Madrona Room. A limited number of books will be
available at the Conference For more information, go to www.jgsi.org

Scott E. Meyer
Skokie, IL

65381 - 65400 of 654834