Date   

Re: Rachel WOLFUS (Wieliczka or Klasno) #general

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

Sacha Curie writes: < I am looking for any information about my
grandmother (deceased) Rachel Wolfus. She was born in the Krakow
area (Wieliczka) around 1912 but moved to Palestine in 1936 and then
onto Australia in 1951. Any help would be appreciated. >

Posting publicly because this may help others.

Sacha, this is a very broad query. What information are you looking
for? Do you want to know about her early life and her ancestors in
Poland? About her immigration to Palestine and/or her time there?
About her immigration to Australia and/or her life there? Each of
these questions will involve research in different places and
different resources.

But, firstly, have you done the groundwork? Namely, have you spoken to
any relatives who might have information, documents and/or photos? If
not, that is absolutely the place to start. Gather as much as you can
from them.
Then turn to the publicly and easily available online resources to see
what you can find: JRI-Poland, JewishGen's assorted databases,
Ancestry, Familysearch, various cemetery, telephone directory and
newspaper websites, just to start with. Don't forget to Google - you
never know what you might find!

And then more specific sources:

Do you want your grandmother's birth or her relatives'
birth/marriage/death records >from Poland? If so, you will need to
write to the offices there to inquire about and order such documents.
(JRI-Poland doesn't necessarily have indexes or links for all the
years you want.) For her birth record and for any other documents more
than 100 years old, you'd want the Polish State Archives branch. For
documents less than 100 years old (such as a marriage document, for
example, if she married before leaving Poland), you'd want to write to
the local civil records office (urzad stanu cywilnego) in the town
where the event took place. Check Miriam Weiner's Routes to Roots
Foundation website - www.rtrfoundation.org/index.shtml - to get an
idea of which documents are held where. You can find addresses/emails
in the RTR website or by Googling. You're advised to write to any
office in Poland in Polish. They'll tell you what they find and the
charges (tip: order as many documents as you can in one hit to avoid
paying bank transfer fees each time).

Do you want records of her immigration to Palestine? If so, you can
ask for a search of the Central Zionist Archives records --
http://www.zionistarchives.org.il/en/familyresearch/Pages/about-family-research.aspx
[or http://tinyurl.com/hmld9wy - MODERATOR]. (The cost is 180 shekels
whether or not they find anything.)

And you can search the websites of the Israel Genealogical Research
Association - http://genealogy.org.il/ - and the Israel Genealogical
Society - www.isragen.org.il - for free, although to see documents
you need to be a paid-up member (which may or may not be worth your
while, depending on what you find there). The websites are all in
English, but I'd strongly advise searching in Hebrew as well as
English as names often become mangled in translation. If you know
where she lived in Israel, there may also be something in municipal
records.

Do you want information about her in Australia? Then check the
National Archives of Australia website -
http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/search/index.aspx - and the state
and municipal archives in the area she lived.

Just out of curiosity, I Googled the name Rachel WOLFUS and received
an immediate hit in the Billiongraves website - https://billiongraves.com/
- which has a picture of her tombstone in the Brighton cemetery.
The tombstone gives her name as Rachel WOLFUS KHOURY, her dates of
birth and death (1912-1993) and the names of her children and
grandchildren, including you, Sacha.

I then went to the National Archives of Australia website and searched
the name Rachel WOLFUS, which turned up nothing, and then the name
Rachel KHOURY, which shows that there is a naturalization file there
for her >from 1958. The contents are not public and to see them you'd
need to order the file (for a fee).

So that should give you a few places to start looking!

Good luck,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Rachel WOLFUS (Wieliczka or Klasno) #general

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay
 

Sacha Curie writes: < I am looking for any information about my
grandmother (deceased) Rachel Wolfus. She was born in the Krakow
area (Wieliczka) around 1912 but moved to Palestine in 1936 and then
onto Australia in 1951. Any help would be appreciated. >

Posting publicly because this may help others.

Sacha, this is a very broad query. What information are you looking
for? Do you want to know about her early life and her ancestors in
Poland? About her immigration to Palestine and/or her time there?
About her immigration to Australia and/or her life there? Each of
these questions will involve research in different places and
different resources.

But, firstly, have you done the groundwork? Namely, have you spoken to
any relatives who might have information, documents and/or photos? If
not, that is absolutely the place to start. Gather as much as you can
from them.
Then turn to the publicly and easily available online resources to see
what you can find: JRI-Poland, JewishGen's assorted databases,
Ancestry, Familysearch, various cemetery, telephone directory and
newspaper websites, just to start with. Don't forget to Google - you
never know what you might find!

And then more specific sources:

Do you want your grandmother's birth or her relatives'
birth/marriage/death records >from Poland? If so, you will need to
write to the offices there to inquire about and order such documents.
(JRI-Poland doesn't necessarily have indexes or links for all the
years you want.) For her birth record and for any other documents more
than 100 years old, you'd want the Polish State Archives branch. For
documents less than 100 years old (such as a marriage document, for
example, if she married before leaving Poland), you'd want to write to
the local civil records office (urzad stanu cywilnego) in the town
where the event took place. Check Miriam Weiner's Routes to Roots
Foundation website - www.rtrfoundation.org/index.shtml - to get an
idea of which documents are held where. You can find addresses/emails
in the RTR website or by Googling. You're advised to write to any
office in Poland in Polish. They'll tell you what they find and the
charges (tip: order as many documents as you can in one hit to avoid
paying bank transfer fees each time).

Do you want records of her immigration to Palestine? If so, you can
ask for a search of the Central Zionist Archives records --
http://www.zionistarchives.org.il/en/familyresearch/Pages/about-family-research.aspx
[or http://tinyurl.com/hmld9wy - MODERATOR]. (The cost is 180 shekels
whether or not they find anything.)

And you can search the websites of the Israel Genealogical Research
Association - http://genealogy.org.il/ - and the Israel Genealogical
Society - www.isragen.org.il - for free, although to see documents
you need to be a paid-up member (which may or may not be worth your
while, depending on what you find there). The websites are all in
English, but I'd strongly advise searching in Hebrew as well as
English as names often become mangled in translation. If you know
where she lived in Israel, there may also be something in municipal
records.

Do you want information about her in Australia? Then check the
National Archives of Australia website -
http://www.naa.gov.au/collection/search/index.aspx - and the state
and municipal archives in the area she lived.

Just out of curiosity, I Googled the name Rachel WOLFUS and received
an immediate hit in the Billiongraves website - https://billiongraves.com/
- which has a picture of her tombstone in the Brighton cemetery.
The tombstone gives her name as Rachel WOLFUS KHOURY, her dates of
birth and death (1912-1993) and the names of her children and
grandchildren, including you, Sacha.

I then went to the National Archives of Australia website and searched
the name Rachel WOLFUS, which turned up nothing, and then the name
Rachel KHOURY, which shows that there is a naturalization file there
for her >from 1958. The contents are not public and to see them you'd
need to order the file (for a fee).

So that should give you a few places to start looking!

Good luck,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel


(UK) Forces War Records Offers Free Access Battle of the Somme Troop Movements Through July 3rd #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Battle of Somme, World War l, was fought by British and French armies
between 1 July and 18 November 1916. It was the largest battle on the
Western Front fought in the war. It was also one of the bloodiest battles in
history with over one million men wounded or killed.

To commemorate the Battle of Somme, Forces War Records is offering free
access through July 3rd to troop movements based on the Order of Battle
Divisions (ORBATS). The ORBATS data was transcribed by Forces War Records
which was used to produce the audio-visual interactive map which tracks the
progress of the units throughout the war.

You will have to register with your name, address and password. If you
try to access their other collections, you will be prompted to subscribe.

Go to: https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/ww1-troop-movements [or
http://tinyurl.com/jso6hf6 - MODERATOR] where you can watch the demo or
download the free guide. If you know the battalion your army ancestor
was in, you can locate where he was based and track the unit's manoeuvers
and read and listen to what happened at each station.

I have no affiliation with Forces War Records and am posting this solely for
the information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

MODERATOR: Troops >from the empires of both France and England (eg. the
Commonwealth) were also participants in the Battle of the Somme.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (UK) Forces War Records Offers Free Access Battle of the Somme Troop Movements Through July 3rd #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The Battle of Somme, World War l, was fought by British and French armies
between 1 July and 18 November 1916. It was the largest battle on the
Western Front fought in the war. It was also one of the bloodiest battles in
history with over one million men wounded or killed.

To commemorate the Battle of Somme, Forces War Records is offering free
access through July 3rd to troop movements based on the Order of Battle
Divisions (ORBATS). The ORBATS data was transcribed by Forces War Records
which was used to produce the audio-visual interactive map which tracks the
progress of the units throughout the war.

You will have to register with your name, address and password. If you
try to access their other collections, you will be prompted to subscribe.

Go to: https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/ww1-troop-movements [or
http://tinyurl.com/jso6hf6 - MODERATOR] where you can watch the demo or
download the free guide. If you know the battalion your army ancestor
was in, you can locate where he was based and track the unit's manoeuvers
and read and listen to what happened at each station.

I have no affiliation with Forces War Records and am posting this solely for
the information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

MODERATOR: Troops >from the empires of both France and England (eg. the
Commonwealth) were also participants in the Battle of the Somme.


ViewMate: German or Yiddish Letter in Hebrew Script #general

Ralph Baer
 

Although I think that I thanked all the respondents to my recent Viewmate
posting #48010 as well as those who responded by e-mail individually, I want
to thank all of them again. I think that I now know all of the names on the
list, although I still don't know who the people were besides for my
3rd-great-grandfather, his brother, and their wives.

In this regard, the list is on the reverse side of a letter written to my
great-great grandmother Babette (Bunle) BAER nee KLEIN by a brother. Besides
for the greeting which I can read, the letter is apparently written in
German using Hebrew script in 1825 which was prior to her marriage. I am
interested in a transliteration/translation, or if not possible then what
the letter is about.

The link is http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49135 .
Please respond on ViewMate or by e-mail.

Thank you.

Ralph N. Baer
RalphNBaer@aol.com
Washington, DC


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate: German or Yiddish Letter in Hebrew Script #general

Ralph Baer
 

Although I think that I thanked all the respondents to my recent Viewmate
posting #48010 as well as those who responded by e-mail individually, I want
to thank all of them again. I think that I now know all of the names on the
list, although I still don't know who the people were besides for my
3rd-great-grandfather, his brother, and their wives.

In this regard, the list is on the reverse side of a letter written to my
great-great grandmother Babette (Bunle) BAER nee KLEIN by a brother. Besides
for the greeting which I can read, the letter is apparently written in
German using Hebrew script in 1825 which was prior to her marriage. I am
interested in a transliteration/translation, or if not possible then what
the letter is about.

The link is http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49135 .
Please respond on ViewMate or by e-mail.

Thank you.

Ralph N. Baer
RalphNBaer@aol.com
Washington, DC


1849 Cadastral Map of Krzeczowice on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #galicia

Jay Osborn <jay.osborn@...>
 

New on the Gesher Galicia Map Room today: the complete 1849 cadastral
map of Krzeczowice, a beautiful lithographed image of this small town just
5km (3mi) east of Kanczuga in today's southeast Poland:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/krzeczowice-1849/

Our copy of the map includes a large number of redline revisions based on
a later 19th-century survey, which show significant changes in the property
lines and built structure of the town. Today the town is quite stable; it's
easy to see many features of the historical map in a modern satellite image:

https://goo.gl/maps/kSSBrnZV1k72

Acquisition of the map scan images and assembly of this browsable map
were made possible by Gesher Galicia member contributions to the
Kanczuga Nearby Villages Project, an element of our Galician Archival
Records Project (GARP); more info about the Kanczuga Nearby Villages
Project is available here:
http://kanczuga.org/research/nearby/
Work on this important project continues.

The original paper map sheets are preserved by the Polish Historical
Archives in Przemysl:
http://www.przemysl.ap.gov.pl/index.php?lang=en

The GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Digital Map Manager
Warsaw, Poland
maps@geshergalicia.org


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia 1849 Cadastral Map of Krzeczowice on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #galicia

Jay Osborn <jay.osborn@...>
 

New on the Gesher Galicia Map Room today: the complete 1849 cadastral
map of Krzeczowice, a beautiful lithographed image of this small town just
5km (3mi) east of Kanczuga in today's southeast Poland:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/krzeczowice-1849/

Our copy of the map includes a large number of redline revisions based on
a later 19th-century survey, which show significant changes in the property
lines and built structure of the town. Today the town is quite stable; it's
easy to see many features of the historical map in a modern satellite image:

https://goo.gl/maps/kSSBrnZV1k72

Acquisition of the map scan images and assembly of this browsable map
were made possible by Gesher Galicia member contributions to the
Kanczuga Nearby Villages Project, an element of our Galician Archival
Records Project (GARP); more info about the Kanczuga Nearby Villages
Project is available here:
http://kanczuga.org/research/nearby/
Work on this important project continues.

The original paper map sheets are preserved by the Polish Historical
Archives in Przemysl:
http://www.przemysl.ap.gov.pl/index.php?lang=en

The GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Digital Map Manager
Warsaw, Poland
maps@geshergalicia.org


Polish Translation Book Signing #lodz #poland

Scott Meyer
 

Judith R. Frazin, author of A Translation Guide to 19th-Century
Polish-Language Civil-Registration Documents (including Birth,
Marriage and Death Records), will have a book signing at the IAJGS
Conference in Seattle in the Exhibitors Hall immediately after her
presentation, which will occur on Tuesday, August 9 between 1:30 and
2:45 p.m. in the Madrona Room. A limited number of books will be
available at the Conference For more information, go to www.jgsi.org

Scott E. Meyer
Skokie, IL


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Polish Translation Book Signing #poland #lodz

Scott Meyer
 

Judith R. Frazin, author of A Translation Guide to 19th-Century
Polish-Language Civil-Registration Documents (including Birth,
Marriage and Death Records), will have a book signing at the IAJGS
Conference in Seattle in the Exhibitors Hall immediately after her
presentation, which will occur on Tuesday, August 9 between 1:30 and
2:45 p.m. in the Madrona Room. A limited number of books will be
available at the Conference For more information, go to www.jgsi.org

Scott E. Meyer
Skokie, IL


Link to monument in Warsaw Cemetery #poland

דוד נ.א.
 

My previous post I forgot to add the link monument, there is:
http://cemetery.jewish.org.pl/id_45442/info/back_1:0/__Adler.html

David Nesher
Israel


JRI Poland #Poland Link to monument in Warsaw Cemetery #poland

דוד נ.א.
 

My previous post I forgot to add the link monument, there is:
http://cemetery.jewish.org.pl/id_45442/info/back_1:0/__Adler.html

David Nesher
Israel


Tour of the cemetery in Warsaw-help orientation #poland

דוד נ.א.
 

Hello

Two years ago, I was able to find a bargain exciting - Tomb of the
brother of my great-grandfather, who was killed in the Warsaw ghetto
and was buried along with his son, who was killed a week after. Just
in time to have a common monument. The grave has survived all these
years without my great-grandfather knew existed, all the years he knew
there was nothing left big family after the Holocaust, no trace.
Now, the next step is to visit the place. Unfortunately, it
encountered difficulties.

I have a cousin who traveled to Warsaw, once a year, she has already
been there twice, each time she visited the cemetery - but could not
find the grave.

We have the information (number of sectors, line, etc.), but to
navigate a very difficult there. Great place, full of a rampant
growth, especially this season, and she comes for a limited number of
hours.

This week she goes again. I really want to try to get information that
will facilitate her orientation.

If I had the opportunity to obtain a quality map, specific to this
grave (beyond what you get in the office there), or if anyone knows
there and was where he was giving pictures or even Videos of strategic
locations as signposts - maybe the task was easier.

It should be noted that even a small tombstone low as you can see in
the picture.
If you write me I can send you a link monument I'm talking about,
maybe there is someone who is there and can help?
Maybe exact coordinates of the grave in GPS?
There are now only add that she could visit only on Friday, and
cemetery workers may be less around there then.

I can not count on her to ask where the office or personnel, etc. - it
could not until now.

I would be very happy for any help up front to
improve the chances of success of this attempt.

Thank you
David Nesher
Israel

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


JRI Poland #Poland Tour of the cemetery in Warsaw-help orientation #poland

דוד נ.א.
 

Hello

Two years ago, I was able to find a bargain exciting - Tomb of the
brother of my great-grandfather, who was killed in the Warsaw ghetto
and was buried along with his son, who was killed a week after. Just
in time to have a common monument. The grave has survived all these
years without my great-grandfather knew existed, all the years he knew
there was nothing left big family after the Holocaust, no trace.
Now, the next step is to visit the place. Unfortunately, it
encountered difficulties.

I have a cousin who traveled to Warsaw, once a year, she has already
been there twice, each time she visited the cemetery - but could not
find the grave.

We have the information (number of sectors, line, etc.), but to
navigate a very difficult there. Great place, full of a rampant
growth, especially this season, and she comes for a limited number of
hours.

This week she goes again. I really want to try to get information that
will facilitate her orientation.

If I had the opportunity to obtain a quality map, specific to this
grave (beyond what you get in the office there), or if anyone knows
there and was where he was giving pictures or even Videos of strategic
locations as signposts - maybe the task was easier.

It should be noted that even a small tombstone low as you can see in
the picture.
If you write me I can send you a link monument I'm talking about,
maybe there is someone who is there and can help?
Maybe exact coordinates of the grave in GPS?
There are now only add that she could visit only on Friday, and
cemetery workers may be less around there then.

I can not count on her to ask where the office or personnel, etc. - it
could not until now.

I would be very happy for any help up front to
improve the chances of success of this attempt.

Thank you
David Nesher
Israel

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Polish Translation Book Signing #poland

Scott Meyer
 

Judith R. Frazin, author of A Translation Guide to 19th-Century
Polish-Language Civil-Registration Documents (including Birth,
Marriage and Death Records), will have a book signing at the IAJGS
Conference in Seattle in the Exhibitors Hall immediately after her
presentation, which will occur on Tuesday, August 9 between 1:30 and
2:45 p.m. in the Madrona Room. A limited number of books will be
available at the Conference For more information, go to www.jgsi.org

Scott E. Meyer
Skokie, IL


JRI Poland #Poland Polish Translation Book Signing #poland

Scott Meyer
 

Judith R. Frazin, author of A Translation Guide to 19th-Century
Polish-Language Civil-Registration Documents (including Birth,
Marriage and Death Records), will have a book signing at the IAJGS
Conference in Seattle in the Exhibitors Hall immediately after her
presentation, which will occur on Tuesday, August 9 between 1:30 and
2:45 p.m. in the Madrona Room. A limited number of books will be
available at the Conference For more information, go to www.jgsi.org

Scott E. Meyer
Skokie, IL


1849 Cadastral Map of Krzeczowice on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #poland

Jay Osborn <jay.osborn@...>
 

New on the Gesher Galicia Map Room today: the complete 1849 cadastral
map of Krzeczowice, a beautiful lithographed image of this small town
just 5km (3mi) east of Kanczuga in today's southeast Poland:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/krzeczowice-1849/

Our copy of the map includes a large number of redline revisions based
on a later 19th-century survey, which show significant changes in the
property lines and built structure of the town. Today the town is
quite stable; it's easy to see many features of the historical map in
a modern satellite image:

https://goo.gl/maps/kSSBrnZV1k72

Acquisition of the map scan images and assembly of this browsable map
were made possible by Gesher Galicia member contributions to the
Kanczuga Nearby Villages Project, an element of our Galician Archival
Records Project (GARP); more info about the Kanczuga Nearby Villages
Project is available here:
http://kanczuga.org/research/nearby/
Work on this important project continues.

The original paper map sheets are preserved by the Polish Historical
Archives in Przemysl:
http://www.przemysl.ap.gov.pl/index.php?lang=en

The GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Digital Map Manager
Warsaw, Poland
maps@geshergalicia.org


JRI Poland #Poland 1849 Cadastral Map of Krzeczowice on the Gesher Galicia Map Room #poland

Jay Osborn <jay.osborn@...>
 

New on the Gesher Galicia Map Room today: the complete 1849 cadastral
map of Krzeczowice, a beautiful lithographed image of this small town
just 5km (3mi) east of Kanczuga in today's southeast Poland:

http://maps.geshergalicia.org/cadastral/krzeczowice-1849/

Our copy of the map includes a large number of redline revisions based
on a later 19th-century survey, which show significant changes in the
property lines and built structure of the town. Today the town is
quite stable; it's easy to see many features of the historical map in
a modern satellite image:

https://goo.gl/maps/kSSBrnZV1k72

Acquisition of the map scan images and assembly of this browsable map
were made possible by Gesher Galicia member contributions to the
Kanczuga Nearby Villages Project, an element of our Galician Archival
Records Project (GARP); more info about the Kanczuga Nearby Villages
Project is available here:
http://kanczuga.org/research/nearby/
Work on this important project continues.

The original paper map sheets are preserved by the Polish Historical
Archives in Przemysl:
http://www.przemysl.ap.gov.pl/index.php?lang=en

The GG Map Room home page: http://maps.geshergalicia.org/

Jay Osborn
Gesher Galicia Digital Map Manager
Warsaw, Poland
maps@geshergalicia.org


Re: Russian Poland #poland

antopolski <mantopolski1@...>
 

This may answer your question:

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~polwgw/ausgeruss.html


Subject: Russian Poland
From: Carol Sicherman <csicher@msn.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 18:01:20 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1

Could someone explain the origin and geography of the phrase
"Russian Poland"?

Thank you, Carol Sicherman


JRI Poland #Poland RE: Russian Poland #poland

antopolski <mantopolski1@...>
 

This may answer your question:

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~polwgw/ausgeruss.html


Subject: Russian Poland
From: Carol Sicherman <csicher@msn.com>
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 2016 18:01:20 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1

Could someone explain the origin and geography of the phrase
"Russian Poland"?

Thank you, Carol Sicherman

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