Date   

Searching for Sadkin surnames from Vitebsk #belarus

Logan M Lockabey <LOGANISJUDD@...>
 

Searching for relatives >from Vitebsk and Polotsk, Belarus. Seek
descendants of SCHEMUEL BLOCKOFF, born 1850, >from Polotsk, Belarus. Also
seek many families >from Vitebsk with the surnames: SADKIN, SATKIN,
ZADKIN, ZATKIN, ZETKIN, TZADKIN. The preferred surname is spelled
TZADKIN. Families settled in USA, Canada, England, South Africa, Israel.

Logan Lockabey
Tzuri Shadai ben Avraham
loganisjudd@prodigy.net

Moderator's Note: Please turn off MIME when sending messages to the group.
If you don't, it messes up the content on the server and your message may
not get through or may have to be rejected. The listserv has certain
limitations which JewishGen is addressing so we don't have problems in the
future


Belarus SIG #Belarus Searching for Sadkin surnames from Vitebsk #belarus

Logan M Lockabey <LOGANISJUDD@...>
 

Searching for relatives >from Vitebsk and Polotsk, Belarus. Seek
descendants of SCHEMUEL BLOCKOFF, born 1850, >from Polotsk, Belarus. Also
seek many families >from Vitebsk with the surnames: SADKIN, SATKIN,
ZADKIN, ZATKIN, ZETKIN, TZADKIN. The preferred surname is spelled
TZADKIN. Families settled in USA, Canada, England, South Africa, Israel.

Logan Lockabey
Tzuri Shadai ben Avraham
loganisjudd@prodigy.net

Moderator's Note: Please turn off MIME when sending messages to the group.
If you don't, it messes up the content on the server and your message may
not get through or may have to be rejected. The listserv has certain
limitations which JewishGen is addressing so we don't have problems in the
future


New name in my family: Adler! #hungary

Margarita <uzidog@...>
 

Yesterday I showed my aunt and uncle (xxx times removed) several family
branches that I printed, for them to see and make corrections. There were just
a few mistakes in the sense of who is married to whom. The problem is that
there are three pairs of first cousins with the same surname.

Anyway, I found out that the uncle of my father was not Henrik SAS. He was
born as Hernik ADLER and probably changed his name when everyone else did. He
was a watchmaker in Gyor and married Esther LEICHT (probably >from Dunajska
Streda). They perished in the Holocaust, together with their son Feri. One
daughter, Magda, survived.

Margarita Lackó
Belgrano
uzidog@post1.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary New name in my family: Adler! #hungary

Margarita <uzidog@...>
 

Yesterday I showed my aunt and uncle (xxx times removed) several family
branches that I printed, for them to see and make corrections. There were just
a few mistakes in the sense of who is married to whom. The problem is that
there are three pairs of first cousins with the same surname.

Anyway, I found out that the uncle of my father was not Henrik SAS. He was
born as Hernik ADLER and probably changed his name when everyone else did. He
was a watchmaker in Gyor and married Esther LEICHT (probably >from Dunajska
Streda). They perished in the Holocaust, together with their son Feri. One
daughter, Magda, survived.

Margarita Lackó
Belgrano
uzidog@post1.com


Visits to the archives in Bratislava #hungary

Dolph Klein <kledolph@...>
 

Last July, my son, Robert, and I travelled to western Slovakia for the
purpose of visiting our ancestral home towns. Instead of talking details
about my family, I want to share with you the experiences we gained from
our visits to the regional archive of Bratislava (Statny oblastny archiv v
Bratislave). Then, in a later posting, Robert will describe his experience
while visiting the national archive (Slovensky Narodny Archiv).

Just inside the entrance of the regional archives at Krizkova ulica, cislo
7 and to the right of a small foyer is the receptionist cubicle and a
sign-in book. Slovak and German, but not English, are the languages of
communication. Fortunately, I showed a copy of a letterhead >from the
Archives, so that the reception understood which of the several agencies in
the building we wished to visit.

After signing in, we proceeded to room 202 and were greeted by a woman who
neither spoke nor understood English. Instead, she directed us to her
associate, Tomas (pronounced, To'mash), who spoke reasonably good English
and proved to be extremely helpful. He had us fill out forms for
registration and for recording the microfilm rolls and subsections within
each roll.

Unlike the open-shelf archives in the States, all the rolls are stored in
locked cabinets. The reading room is rather small with open shelves of
books along the side wall facing the opposite wall with unshaded windows
overlooking the street. The locked cabinets with glass doors with its
rolls in individual boxes stand along the back wall. Crowded within the
small room are six long tables, but only three of them have a film reader.
Despite the ambient light coming in >from the unshaded windows and the
overhead lamps that are always on, we had little difficulty in looking at
the microfilm images on a rather large screen.

Finding information involves an interesting procedure. To get the roll that
might have the record in question, for example, we told Tomas that we were
looking for the birth record of one of my two cousins whose birthplace was
in Pezinok and birth year in the late 1920's. With this information, Tomas
paged through a catalog for the numbers of the roll and subsection within
the roll that contained records for Jewish births occurring in Pezinok in
the late 1920's. The particular reel that Tomas gave us contained seven
subsections, numbers 1734 through 1740. Our subsection of interest was
number 1738. Each of the other subsections on the same roll contained
birth, marriage, or death records >from Pezinok at various periods of time
and >from different sources Jewish and non-Jewish. We succeeded in finding
the birth record of the younger of two cousins, but upon searching through
another reel, we were unable to find the birth record of the older sister
who was born in Trnava in 1928.

We were charged 20 Slovak Crowns, about $0.57, per subsection viewed, not
per roll. In other words, had we scanned the entire reel of seven
subsections, we would have paid a total of 140 SK crowns or about $4.00.

Searching through the subsections of rolls was somewhat difficult and
puzzling. The dates of the event, for example, were not always in
chronological order. Even Tomas could not understand the discontinuities.
Secondly, in some years, only a mere handful of events were recorded.
Surely, for a large town such as Trnava with a sizable Jewish population in
the 1920's, there had to be a number of Jewish births for the year 1928
that exceeded the one or two births that were actually recorded. Either
such records were recorded elsewhere, destroyed, not microfilmed, or never
existed. Thirdly, some records had incomplete information such as no day of
birth or the given name of the mother.

I returned to the Archives four days later to do a more intensive search.
Looking through several rolls and many subsections for specific birth,
marriage and death records, I did see the records of my relatives, that
the Archives had mailed to me a year ago, but no other records that the
archivist may have missed.

While I was researching at the regional archives, Robert went to the
National Archives in another part of the city looking for census records
and other documents on our relatives. His research proved to be extremely
productive and well worth the time and expense of our trip to Slovakia.
There, he found information on our relatives >from the Nazi census records
of 1941-42 and >from the Slovak "List of Jews" (Supis Zidov) that was
prepared for the Nazis prior to deportations out of Slovakia in 1942.

Parenthetically, I just recently received documents >from the Slovak
national archives through the auspices of the American Red Cross. Some of
the documents duplicated what Robert had already found. But, there was at
least two new documents >from the national archives which Robert was not
aware of.

One document (Kartotekovy listok) >from 1942 gave one of my uncles special
permission not to be deported >from the region of Malacky because he was a
doctor of herbal medicine. The other document (Zprava o zadrzani a
zatknuti), prepared in 1944, was a report of the detention and arrest of
the same uncle because he helped other Jews to escape overseas. The
document gave a detailed description of my uncle, Markus, with regard to
his occupation, address in Malacky, birth date, birthplace, color and
pattern of clothing, the shape of his head, the color of his eyes and hair,
the features of his nose, his height, and even noted the absence of teeth
and a mustache. The document goes on and gives the names of his spouse,
parents, and siblings including that of my father who emigrated to the
States in 1922. >from this document, I learned also that Markus spoke and
understood Slovak, Hungarian, German, Hebrew and English. Quite a document
for one page of information.

Last year while researching at Yad Vashem, Robert found the International
Tracing Service (ITS) cards on Markus and his wife which indicated in
August, 1944 that they were sent to KZ Sered and then transferred to
Theresienstadt where they were liberated in May, 1945. They returned to
Malacky to resume the herbal business and then emigrated in 1949 to Israel
where they lived until their deaths in the 1970's.

Our short stay of seven days was topped off with a visit to Dolne Oresany,
the village of my father's boyhood days. With the help of the village
mayor, we located a 75-year old woman who was a neighbor to several Kleins
living in the same house until their deportation and subsequent demise in
1942. She did not know a word of English, yet we were able to communicate
with her and through the use of a tape recorder, later learned about the
last days of my ancestors in Dolne Oresany. She remembered Markus and the
fact that he escaped >from concentration camps on two occasions. I never
knew my uncle when he was alive, but these heroic accounts of his make me
very proud of him.

I hope that this posting has given you some insights on the kinds of
resources and types of information that exist out there for genealogical
research. As other H-siggers have noted in their postings, there is a
desire by all of us to have you share your experiences >from overseas trips
to archives, cemeteries and the like. The more we all learn about the
existence of documentations and other resources of information, the better
our chances will be to uncover the roots of our ancestry. So, please do
make the effort to post your experiences.

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Robert Klein
Be'er Sheva, Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary Visits to the archives in Bratislava #hungary

Dolph Klein <kledolph@...>
 

Last July, my son, Robert, and I travelled to western Slovakia for the
purpose of visiting our ancestral home towns. Instead of talking details
about my family, I want to share with you the experiences we gained from
our visits to the regional archive of Bratislava (Statny oblastny archiv v
Bratislave). Then, in a later posting, Robert will describe his experience
while visiting the national archive (Slovensky Narodny Archiv).

Just inside the entrance of the regional archives at Krizkova ulica, cislo
7 and to the right of a small foyer is the receptionist cubicle and a
sign-in book. Slovak and German, but not English, are the languages of
communication. Fortunately, I showed a copy of a letterhead >from the
Archives, so that the reception understood which of the several agencies in
the building we wished to visit.

After signing in, we proceeded to room 202 and were greeted by a woman who
neither spoke nor understood English. Instead, she directed us to her
associate, Tomas (pronounced, To'mash), who spoke reasonably good English
and proved to be extremely helpful. He had us fill out forms for
registration and for recording the microfilm rolls and subsections within
each roll.

Unlike the open-shelf archives in the States, all the rolls are stored in
locked cabinets. The reading room is rather small with open shelves of
books along the side wall facing the opposite wall with unshaded windows
overlooking the street. The locked cabinets with glass doors with its
rolls in individual boxes stand along the back wall. Crowded within the
small room are six long tables, but only three of them have a film reader.
Despite the ambient light coming in >from the unshaded windows and the
overhead lamps that are always on, we had little difficulty in looking at
the microfilm images on a rather large screen.

Finding information involves an interesting procedure. To get the roll that
might have the record in question, for example, we told Tomas that we were
looking for the birth record of one of my two cousins whose birthplace was
in Pezinok and birth year in the late 1920's. With this information, Tomas
paged through a catalog for the numbers of the roll and subsection within
the roll that contained records for Jewish births occurring in Pezinok in
the late 1920's. The particular reel that Tomas gave us contained seven
subsections, numbers 1734 through 1740. Our subsection of interest was
number 1738. Each of the other subsections on the same roll contained
birth, marriage, or death records >from Pezinok at various periods of time
and >from different sources Jewish and non-Jewish. We succeeded in finding
the birth record of the younger of two cousins, but upon searching through
another reel, we were unable to find the birth record of the older sister
who was born in Trnava in 1928.

We were charged 20 Slovak Crowns, about $0.57, per subsection viewed, not
per roll. In other words, had we scanned the entire reel of seven
subsections, we would have paid a total of 140 SK crowns or about $4.00.

Searching through the subsections of rolls was somewhat difficult and
puzzling. The dates of the event, for example, were not always in
chronological order. Even Tomas could not understand the discontinuities.
Secondly, in some years, only a mere handful of events were recorded.
Surely, for a large town such as Trnava with a sizable Jewish population in
the 1920's, there had to be a number of Jewish births for the year 1928
that exceeded the one or two births that were actually recorded. Either
such records were recorded elsewhere, destroyed, not microfilmed, or never
existed. Thirdly, some records had incomplete information such as no day of
birth or the given name of the mother.

I returned to the Archives four days later to do a more intensive search.
Looking through several rolls and many subsections for specific birth,
marriage and death records, I did see the records of my relatives, that
the Archives had mailed to me a year ago, but no other records that the
archivist may have missed.

While I was researching at the regional archives, Robert went to the
National Archives in another part of the city looking for census records
and other documents on our relatives. His research proved to be extremely
productive and well worth the time and expense of our trip to Slovakia.
There, he found information on our relatives >from the Nazi census records
of 1941-42 and >from the Slovak "List of Jews" (Supis Zidov) that was
prepared for the Nazis prior to deportations out of Slovakia in 1942.

Parenthetically, I just recently received documents >from the Slovak
national archives through the auspices of the American Red Cross. Some of
the documents duplicated what Robert had already found. But, there was at
least two new documents >from the national archives which Robert was not
aware of.

One document (Kartotekovy listok) >from 1942 gave one of my uncles special
permission not to be deported >from the region of Malacky because he was a
doctor of herbal medicine. The other document (Zprava o zadrzani a
zatknuti), prepared in 1944, was a report of the detention and arrest of
the same uncle because he helped other Jews to escape overseas. The
document gave a detailed description of my uncle, Markus, with regard to
his occupation, address in Malacky, birth date, birthplace, color and
pattern of clothing, the shape of his head, the color of his eyes and hair,
the features of his nose, his height, and even noted the absence of teeth
and a mustache. The document goes on and gives the names of his spouse,
parents, and siblings including that of my father who emigrated to the
States in 1922. >from this document, I learned also that Markus spoke and
understood Slovak, Hungarian, German, Hebrew and English. Quite a document
for one page of information.

Last year while researching at Yad Vashem, Robert found the International
Tracing Service (ITS) cards on Markus and his wife which indicated in
August, 1944 that they were sent to KZ Sered and then transferred to
Theresienstadt where they were liberated in May, 1945. They returned to
Malacky to resume the herbal business and then emigrated in 1949 to Israel
where they lived until their deaths in the 1970's.

Our short stay of seven days was topped off with a visit to Dolne Oresany,
the village of my father's boyhood days. With the help of the village
mayor, we located a 75-year old woman who was a neighbor to several Kleins
living in the same house until their deportation and subsequent demise in
1942. She did not know a word of English, yet we were able to communicate
with her and through the use of a tape recorder, later learned about the
last days of my ancestors in Dolne Oresany. She remembered Markus and the
fact that he escaped >from concentration camps on two occasions. I never
knew my uncle when he was alive, but these heroic accounts of his make me
very proud of him.

I hope that this posting has given you some insights on the kinds of
resources and types of information that exist out there for genealogical
research. As other H-siggers have noted in their postings, there is a
desire by all of us to have you share your experiences >from overseas trips
to archives, cemeteries and the like. The more we all learn about the
existence of documentations and other resources of information, the better
our chances will be to uncover the roots of our ancestry. So, please do
make the effort to post your experiences.

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Robert Klein
Be'er Sheva, Israel


Articles Needed for The Galitzianer #general

Bkhait@...
 

Have you uncovered new sources of information about researching roots in
Galicia? Have you traveled to your ancestral towns there? Have you made any
discoveries through the Family Finders? Do you have research tips that might
be useful to others?

If the answer is yes, please consider submitting an article for the upcoming
issue of THE GALITZIANER. Due out in October, the editorial deadline is
September 15. Please e-mail submissions to me at bkhait@aol.com. We'd like to
hear >from you!

Barbara Khait
bkhait@aol.com
Editor, THE GALITZIANER


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Articles Needed for The Galitzianer #general

Bkhait@...
 

Have you uncovered new sources of information about researching roots in
Galicia? Have you traveled to your ancestral towns there? Have you made any
discoveries through the Family Finders? Do you have research tips that might
be useful to others?

If the answer is yes, please consider submitting an article for the upcoming
issue of THE GALITZIANER. Due out in October, the editorial deadline is
September 15. Please e-mail submissions to me at bkhait@aol.com. We'd like to
hear >from you!

Barbara Khait
bkhait@aol.com
Editor, THE GALITZIANER


World's Fair #general

Morris Gold <trgold@...>
 

In trying to find information about my grandfather's early life, I have
been trying to find out as much as possible about his brother's life.
This brother left no descendents and was a loner, moving away >from the
rest of the family in the Newark, NJ area to Wilkes-Barre, PA. A distant
relative remembers him dying in PA after attending the World's Fair with
the family, some time in the 1940's. Does anyone have any idea how to go
about finding out what year(s) there were World's Fairs in the greater
New York area? I feel very stumped with this aspect of my search.

Tamar Gold
Elizabeth, NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen World's Fair #general

Morris Gold <trgold@...>
 

In trying to find information about my grandfather's early life, I have
been trying to find out as much as possible about his brother's life.
This brother left no descendents and was a loner, moving away >from the
rest of the family in the Newark, NJ area to Wilkes-Barre, PA. A distant
relative remembers him dying in PA after attending the World's Fair with
the family, some time in the 1940's. Does anyone have any idea how to go
about finding out what year(s) there were World's Fairs in the greater
New York area? I feel very stumped with this aspect of my search.

Tamar Gold
Elizabeth, NJ


Death Certificate From Israel #general

Alfred Klein <dcas17@...>
 

Hi Adelle,

A branch of the Interior Ministry (Misrad Ha'pnim) handles death
certificates. I will try to get you the address sometime soon.

In the meantime, you can try the Israeli consulate in Chicago:
Address: 111 E. Wacker Dr. Suite 1308, Chicago IL, 60601
Telephone: (312) 565-3300 Fax: (312) 565-3871
Email: Chicago@israel.org

Alfred Klein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Death Certificate From Israel #general

Alfred Klein <dcas17@...>
 

Hi Adelle,

A branch of the Interior Ministry (Misrad Ha'pnim) handles death
certificates. I will try to get you the address sometime soon.

In the meantime, you can try the Israeli consulate in Chicago:
Address: 111 E. Wacker Dr. Suite 1308, Chicago IL, 60601
Telephone: (312) 565-3300 Fax: (312) 565-3871
Email: Chicago@israel.org

Alfred Klein


Re: Which guberniya? #general

MarkGrekin <markgrekin@...>
 

Hi David,
You were right. Both places in Arthur letter: Pinsk and Telechan (the proper
spelling is Telekhany in Russian) were (are) located in Minsk gubernia not far
away >from the border of Minsk and Grodno gubernia. Now they are Minsk and
Grodno oblast'.
SOURCE: old prerevolutionary Russian encyclopedia in 40 volumes by the name
"Brockgause and Ephron" published in 1897-1907 (it took 10 years for all
volumes to be assembled).
mark Grekin


Searching: SCHLACHET #general

Peter Blood <BLOODP1@...>
 

Please contact me if you are searching this surname.

Peter Blood


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Which guberniya? #general

MarkGrekin <markgrekin@...>
 

Hi David,
You were right. Both places in Arthur letter: Pinsk and Telechan (the proper
spelling is Telekhany in Russian) were (are) located in Minsk gubernia not far
away >from the border of Minsk and Grodno gubernia. Now they are Minsk and
Grodno oblast'.
SOURCE: old prerevolutionary Russian encyclopedia in 40 volumes by the name
"Brockgause and Ephron" published in 1897-1907 (it took 10 years for all
volumes to be assembled).
mark Grekin


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: SCHLACHET #general

Peter Blood <BLOODP1@...>
 

Please contact me if you are searching this surname.

Peter Blood


Listings of Rabbis or a Formal Rabbinical Assoc. for Philadelphia, PA #general

Ricki L. Zunk <rickiz@...>
 

My maternal great grandfather was "Rebbe Yechezekiel Ha'Cohanim" [Hyman
COHAN in English]. He and his wife and two sons arrived in America in
1895, and settled in Philadelphia, PA. He died shortly after the birth
of his only daughter (my grandmother). She was born in April 1898
(according to her City of Phila. marriage license). So, we figure that
Rebbe Yechezekiel (Hyman) probably died some time between the summer of
1898 and 1903. It is possible that The Rebbe was a practicing rabbi in
Philly in that era ["the turn of the century"].

Is there/was there an organization or fraternity of rabbis in Philly at
that time? Please advise. Perhaps they have records which might help
me to find more information about my great grandfather.

TIA,
Ricki Randall Zunk
Miami, FL


Batya Unteschatz/Search Bureau for Missing Persons/Jerusalem #general

Irwin Siegel <imsiegel@...>
 

Dear Jewishgenners:
During the past several weeks I have been sending messages to the regional
Jewish Genealogy Societies and Special Interest Groups re the uncertain
future of the Search Bureau for Missing Persons in Jerusalem which has been,
and hopefully will continue to be, in the very capable hands of Batya
Unterschatz. I have been experiencing some technical difficulties with my
computer, and as a result some of you have probably received multiple
messages while others remain undelivered.

To those of you who have received duplicate messages, I apologize for the
redundancy. If you have not as yet been contacted, or would like to receive
information as to plans for protecting this invaluable resource for Jewish
genealogists, please contact me privately at <bsiegel@netmedia.net.il>.

Barbara Siegel E-mail: bsiegel@netmedia.net.il


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Listings of Rabbis or a Formal Rabbinical Assoc. for Philadelphia, PA #general

Ricki L. Zunk <rickiz@...>
 

My maternal great grandfather was "Rebbe Yechezekiel Ha'Cohanim" [Hyman
COHAN in English]. He and his wife and two sons arrived in America in
1895, and settled in Philadelphia, PA. He died shortly after the birth
of his only daughter (my grandmother). She was born in April 1898
(according to her City of Phila. marriage license). So, we figure that
Rebbe Yechezekiel (Hyman) probably died some time between the summer of
1898 and 1903. It is possible that The Rebbe was a practicing rabbi in
Philly in that era ["the turn of the century"].

Is there/was there an organization or fraternity of rabbis in Philly at
that time? Please advise. Perhaps they have records which might help
me to find more information about my great grandfather.

TIA,
Ricki Randall Zunk
Miami, FL


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Batya Unteschatz/Search Bureau for Missing Persons/Jerusalem #general

Irwin Siegel <imsiegel@...>
 

Dear Jewishgenners:
During the past several weeks I have been sending messages to the regional
Jewish Genealogy Societies and Special Interest Groups re the uncertain
future of the Search Bureau for Missing Persons in Jerusalem which has been,
and hopefully will continue to be, in the very capable hands of Batya
Unterschatz. I have been experiencing some technical difficulties with my
computer, and as a result some of you have probably received multiple
messages while others remain undelivered.

To those of you who have received duplicate messages, I apologize for the
redundancy. If you have not as yet been contacted, or would like to receive
information as to plans for protecting this invaluable resource for Jewish
genealogists, please contact me privately at <bsiegel@netmedia.net.il>.

Barbara Siegel E-mail: bsiegel@netmedia.net.il