Date   

LitvakSIG 2016 Election of Board of Directors #lithuania

Barry Halpern
 

The Nominating Task Force has put forth three candidates to fill three
open seats on the Board of Directors of LitvakSIG. The nominees are:
Jill Anderson, Russ Maurer and Garri Regev. They have provided
statements about their qualifications which have been posted on the
Members Only website at
https://litvaksigmembersonlysite.shutterfly.com/litvaksigdocuments
(you need to login to access the page).

The election will take place by email ballot between July 23 and
August 11, 2016. LitvakSIG members in good standing (those who paid $50
dues for 2016) will receive an email ballot, which they must return by
Saturday, August 6th at 11:59 PM Eastern Daylight Time, to
litvaksigvote@gmail.com. Please make sure your SPAM filter will allow
mail received >from litvaksigvote@gmail.com so you can receive your
electronic ballot.

Members may vote in person instead at the beginning of the LitvakSIG
annual meeting during the IAJGS Conference on Jewish Genealogy in
Seattle, Washington, on Thursday, August 11th, 2016.

The Bylaws require that a quorum of at least 10% of the members must
vote. Directors are elected who receive a plurality of the votes cast.
Each member may vote for three candidates.

Please review the statements of each of the candidates before casting
your vote. Members will receive an email ballot on July 23, 2016.
Please do not submit any votes prior to July 23.

New members may still join and vote in the election. The Treasurer
must receive your dues payment by August 1, 2016 at 11:59 PM Eastern
Time in order to vote by electronic (email) ballot. Please don't wait
until the last moment to pay your dues if you would like to vote in
this year's election.

Dues payment received by the Treasurer between August 2 and August 8
at 11:59 PM allow for in person voting only at the beginning of the
annual meeting in Seattle.

If you would like to join LitvakSIG in order to participate in this
election and to support the ongoing work of LitvakSIG, annual dues are
US $50.00 and they may be paid online by going to:
http://www.litvaksig.org/contribute.

Dues may also be mailed to LitvakSIG, Inc., c/o Eden Joachim,
Treasurer, 41 Country Club Lane, Pomona, NY 10970 USA. Checks must be
drawn in $US and made payable toLitvakSIG, Inc.


Submitted by Barry Halpern, Chair, Election Committee 2016
Amy Wachs, Member, Elecdtion Committee 2016


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania LitvakSIG 2016 Election of Board of Directors #lithuania

Barry Halpern
 

The Nominating Task Force has put forth three candidates to fill three
open seats on the Board of Directors of LitvakSIG. The nominees are:
Jill Anderson, Russ Maurer and Garri Regev. They have provided
statements about their qualifications which have been posted on the
Members Only website at
https://litvaksigmembersonlysite.shutterfly.com/litvaksigdocuments
(you need to login to access the page).

The election will take place by email ballot between July 23 and
August 11, 2016. LitvakSIG members in good standing (those who paid $50
dues for 2016) will receive an email ballot, which they must return by
Saturday, August 6th at 11:59 PM Eastern Daylight Time, to
litvaksigvote@gmail.com. Please make sure your SPAM filter will allow
mail received >from litvaksigvote@gmail.com so you can receive your
electronic ballot.

Members may vote in person instead at the beginning of the LitvakSIG
annual meeting during the IAJGS Conference on Jewish Genealogy in
Seattle, Washington, on Thursday, August 11th, 2016.

The Bylaws require that a quorum of at least 10% of the members must
vote. Directors are elected who receive a plurality of the votes cast.
Each member may vote for three candidates.

Please review the statements of each of the candidates before casting
your vote. Members will receive an email ballot on July 23, 2016.
Please do not submit any votes prior to July 23.

New members may still join and vote in the election. The Treasurer
must receive your dues payment by August 1, 2016 at 11:59 PM Eastern
Time in order to vote by electronic (email) ballot. Please don't wait
until the last moment to pay your dues if you would like to vote in
this year's election.

Dues payment received by the Treasurer between August 2 and August 8
at 11:59 PM allow for in person voting only at the beginning of the
annual meeting in Seattle.

If you would like to join LitvakSIG in order to participate in this
election and to support the ongoing work of LitvakSIG, annual dues are
US $50.00 and they may be paid online by going to:
http://www.litvaksig.org/contribute.

Dues may also be mailed to LitvakSIG, Inc., c/o Eden Joachim,
Treasurer, 41 Country Club Lane, Pomona, NY 10970 USA. Checks must be
drawn in $US and made payable toLitvakSIG, Inc.


Submitted by Barry Halpern, Chair, Election Committee 2016
Amy Wachs, Member, Elecdtion Committee 2016


Searching for a small village near Szrensk #poland

J G
 

Hi all

In a record >from Szrensk recording a death taking place in 1846,
the person noted was recorded as residing in Smulni at the time
of death. I presume Smulni must have been located near Szrensk
for the death to have been recorded in the Szrensk records, and
Smulni did not have its own record keeping.

Any help/clues would be greatly appreciated.

I would also like to thank Judy Golan and Jean-Gerard who most kindly
responded to my request for translations of Polish records. Their help
has been beyond valuable. Three generations of family now found and
more.

Regards

Joe Glass

Researching in Poland:

BERLIN/HAMBURGER and others: Szrensk
EISENBERG/TYK and others: Nowe Miasto


JRI Poland #Poland Searching for a small village near Szrensk #poland

J G
 

Hi all

In a record >from Szrensk recording a death taking place in 1846,
the person noted was recorded as residing in Smulni at the time
of death. I presume Smulni must have been located near Szrensk
for the death to have been recorded in the Szrensk records, and
Smulni did not have its own record keeping.

Any help/clues would be greatly appreciated.

I would also like to thank Judy Golan and Jean-Gerard who most kindly
responded to my request for translations of Polish records. Their help
has been beyond valuable. Three generations of family now found and
more.

Regards

Joe Glass

Researching in Poland:

BERLIN/HAMBURGER and others: Szrensk
EISENBERG/TYK and others: Nowe Miasto


Sub-Carpathia Trip Report -- 2016 "Tour de Carpat" #subcarpathia

Marshall Katz
 

Sub-Carpathia Trip Report -- 2016 "Tour de Carpat"
by Marshall Katz, Camp Hill, PA

[ http://www.JewishGen.org/Sub-Carpathia/ ]

For general travel hints and other information, please refer to my
earlier 2011-2015 trip reports found at the Sub-Carpathia SIG "Portal"
or by searching in the JewishGen list archive.

[ http://www.jewishgen.org/Sub-Carpathia ] See: Travel Planning/Trip
Reports.

In Sub-Carpathia, it was business as usual. Tourism rebounded this year,
primarily due to the mineral and salt bath spas people visit for
medicinal purposes >from all over Ukraine, Hungary, Romania, Slovakia and
other European countries as well as Russia. Also, there are key tourist
attractions throughout Sub-Carpathia, such as Palanok Castle in
Mukacheve. There is a lot to see and experience, and the hospitality is
unmatched. The panoramic views in the mountains are unparalleled.

This year's "Tour de Carpat" was quite an experience. The weather was
unseasonably cool and wet throughout April, most of May and into June.
It did not get warm until mid-June. The winter was very mild here again
with very little snowfall, except in the mountains. The locals were
amazed at the extreme winter in the U.S. this year, saying it was equal
to or greater than a Siberian winter. In some areas of the U.S., the
local residents would agree. I had over a meter (40 in.) of snow >from
one storm at my house, in Pennsylvania.

My first order of business was to visit the Sub-Carpathia (formerly,
Transcarpathia) Governor's office in Uzhhorod (Ungvar) and, thorough my
contacts, receive a comprehensive list of all the cites, towns and
villages found in Sub-Carpathia today to ensure I have not missed any
places to visit. Last year, I received lists, after translating them,
they were not the lists I needed. The new list also shows the regional
town halls for multiple villages in some areas. I also learned that
several of the co-located villages have been combined into one large
village with one name or nearby villages have been absorbed by the
larger towns, but the locals still refer to the villages separately by
their original names. I also learned that several villages along the
border with Hungary voted to change their village name back to the
former Hungarian name for the village. Ultimately, my goal was to
visit every former Hungarian-named place in Sub-Carpathia.

For the third year, a conference was held in Berehove (Beregszasz), on
21 June 2016, sponsored by the Shalom Foundation of Berehove
(Beregszasz) at the small Orthodox synagogue on Zrini Street. This
year, the goal was to dedicate a memorial wall with over 4,000 names of
Holocaust victims of >from Berehove (Beregszasz). It was attended by
dignitaries >from Hungary, Ukraine and the U.S., as well as survivors and
descendants >from Hungary, Ukraine, Israel and the U.S. Two rabbis led
the mourner's prayer in front of the memorial and there was a candle-
lighting ceremony afterwards. Everyone in attendance placed a
visitation stone at the base of the memorial wall. It was a very
emotional event for everyone. Members of my family >from Beregszasz
(Berehove) who perished in Auschwitz were also listed on the "Wall of
Remembrance - Never Forget."

Another highlight of the conference was the newly created Museum of
Sub-Carpathian Jewry, located on the second floor of the synagogue.
As I travel around Sub-Carpathia, I ask the older residents of the
villages if they have anything that was left behind by the Jews after
they were taken to the ghettos and later deported, in 1944. This year,
surprisingly, I was able to purchase prayer books again that had been
left behind. It amazes me that the locals preserved these artifacts.
I also donated striped concentration camp clothing to the museum, that
was brought back to the U.S. after a camp had been liberated by the
U.S. Army as well as old Hungarian currency and coins (pengo).

I passed by the cemetery in the Uglya (Uylya) and was surprised to see
the cemetery gate doors had been reinstalled since last year. This is
the cemetery I paid to have cleared last year so we could photograph
the tombstones; sadly, the cemetery is overgrown again this year.

Like last year, several cemeteries that I visited were a very long walk
--- up and far back in the mountains---and once located, access to the
tombstones was difficult. Most all cemeteries are overgrown and
neglected. Often times, we see cows, horses and goats in the cemeteries.
Their grazing keeps the vegetation in check, albeit not perfectly.

One cemetery we could not locate in 2015 was Novobarovo (Ujbard), but
thanks to a very enthusiastic lady and another man in the village
interested in helping us, we all walked up the mountain and they showed us
the cemetery. No wonder we could not find it last year: it is on a very
steep part of the mountain and extremely overgrown. It was very
difficult to access the tombstones. When we returned to the lady's house,
she gave us a much appreciated and refreshing glass of cold apple juice.
We also tried her cherry "compot," which was a delight. The lady's
daughter was learning English and this gave her an opportunity to practice
with us during the time we spent with them.

This year, I stayed in Vylok (Tisza-Ujlak) and my hosts speak virtually no
English. My Hungarian, Ukrainian and Russian is limited, but I am thankful
for the translator program on my mobile phone which was a life saver.
Everything worked out better than expected during my stay, and I even
added to my Hungarian, Ukrainian and Russian vocabulary.

As in previous years, something humorous always happens during my travels.
My host's wife showed me two bottles of something that was clear liquid,
which I thought was vodka, or the local moonshine called "Szilvo Palinko."
She opened a bottle and apparently wanted me to smell the contents, but I
understood her to be saying “try some.” After swallowing, I quickly
learned that it was clear cooking oil. That gave her a good laugh.

We were in Kolochava (Alsokalocsa) and the shortest route to Nimec'ka
Mokra (Nemetmokra) was via an unpaved mountain road. We rented a four-
wheel drive (Russian) Jeep and set off. The mountain spring water and
water run-off after a rain covered the road in many places, creating
deep muddy holes. After getting almost stuck twice, we realized the road
was hopelessly impassable, we gave up and returned to Kolochava. The
only other way to reach Nimec'ka Mokra is via Ust-Chorna (Kiralymezo),
and as you may recall >from an earlier trip report, this road is the
"Gold Medal" road of Sub-Carpathia, having the most pot holes. This
year, it took almost three hours to slowly navigate the road for 57
miles (about 92 km). When we arrived in Nimec'ka Mokra, we learned
that Jewish burials occurred in nearby Rus'ka Mokra which had already
been visited and its cemetery photographed.

Speaking of cemeteries, the transcription of 224 cemeteries photographed
in the past is now 100% complete thanks to a wonderful team of 22
volunteers. That leaves only those photographed this year to be
completed, some of which have already been transcribed.

Since I had free time during my stay, I visited Lviv (Lemberg) with my
friend Joseph Vays. Lviv is the largest city in western Ukraine and the
seventh largest city in the country overall. It is also one of the main
cultural centers of Ukraine. Many students >from Sub-Carpathia have
attended the universities in Lviv. I had two guides who spoke perfect
English. Lviv was very busy with tourists >from Ukraine, Poland, Germany
and I even met some >from Canada. It has a rich Jewish history and there
are over 100 things to see and do with a Jewish interest. I had lunch
at a Jewish-style restaurant---owned by Jews---and it well deserves its
5-star rating. The lunch was light, and very tasty. If you like sitting
at outdoor cafes, you will find several on every street of the downtown
area of Lviv. Some tour guides were dressed in period clothing. The
hotel accommodation was great, in the center of the city, near the Opera
House. I was very happy to have had the opportunity to visit Lviv and can
recommend its addition to your personal "Bucket List."

While visiting Lviv, I took a side trip to Zhovka which had a very large
Jewish community and is the place of the first Jewish publishing house(s)
in Eastern Europe. The synagogue, which still stands, was built in the
17th century and was one of the largest in Europe. In the Jewish quarter,
you can still see where the Mezuzas were attached to the doorposts. The
synagogue is but a shell today, and there are plans to restore the
exterior. Before work can start, there is a current archeological dig in
progress and many artifacts have been found and are now on display in the
castle museum. The cemetery was destroyed and today is a very large
bazaar, but a mausoleum (Ohel) remains and there are two tombstones found
in one part of the original wall. A very old wooden church can be found
here. Zhovka is a very interesting and a very historically Jewish place
to visit.

Today, after six years, I have been to all the cities, towns and villages
of Sub-Carpathia which had a former Hungarian name, a grand total of 632
places, passing through many of them multiple times during my travels.
(Note: The official number is 609 because, as mentioned earlier, some of
the smaller villages have been absorbed by the larger nearby villages
and/or towns, but the locals still refer to them by their former names.)

To summarize this year's trip, I traveled to 24 villages and found and
photographed five more new cemeteries and all the tombstones therein,
following in alphabetical order by their Ukrainian name.

Where one reads a number of images below, this indicates we found a
cemetery there and the number of images taken, but the number of images
does not equal the number of tombstones because we always take multiple
photos of each tombstone to assist with the transcription and a few
panoramas of each cemetery.

Where one reads "No cemetery," in most all cases, we learned that people
were buried in the next larger village or town with a Jewish cemetery.

Where one reads "See:" this indicates that we learned that burials
occurred in a different, and nearby, village or town.

Where one reads "Cemetery destroyed," we found the site of the cemetery,
but today there are no tombstones because these cemeteries have been
destroyed for residential, commercial or agricultural use---often blamed
on the Soviet period.

Where one reads "Jurassic Park," the cemetery was extremely overgrown
and very difficult to access.

Notes: Due to earlier camera issues, we returned to four places this
year to re-photograph the tombstones to be replaced on their respective
web site. In Sub-Carpathia (and Ukraine), you can find places with the
same place name. In those cases, I added a number 1, 2, etc. to
differentiate them and you will need to use their former Hungarian name
to identify the place you are researching.

Key: Ukrainian (Hungarian) names - Sub-Carpathian raion - number of
images and/or comments

Bukovets' 2 (Bukkospatak) Mizhhirsky - Re-photographed the tombstones

Grbivtsi (Gombash) Mukachivsky - No cemetery

Hlynyanyy (Hlinyani) Tiachivsky - No cemetery

Horbky (Rakospatak) Vynohradivsky - No cemetery

Hrunyky (Gruny) Tiachivsky - No cemetery

Hustec' (Hustecpatak) Khustsky - No cemetery

Izky (Iszka) Mizhhirsky - 3 images (found earlier by another person)

Kichereli (Kisherela) Khustsky - No cemetery

Korolevo (Kiralyhaza) Vynohradivsky - Cemetery destroyed; See Veryatsya

Kostylivka (Barnabas) Rakhivsky - No cemetery

Kryva 1 (Nagykirva) Tiachivsky - Returned to take village photos only

Kvasy (Tisza-Borkut) Rakhivsky - 41 images

Lypcha (Lipcse) Khustsky - Returned and did not find a second Jewish
cemetery as reported

Nimec'ka Mokra (Nemetmokra) Tiachivsky - No cemetery

Nizniyy Remeta (Alsoremete) Berehivsky - 3 images - Cemetery destroyed;
now in agricultural use, but one stone was uncovered outside of the
cemetery

Novobarovo (Ujbard) Tiachivsky - 5 images - This cemetery is a "Jurassic
Park"

Nyzhniy Studenyy (Alsohidegpatak) Mizhhirsky - Cemetery destroyed

Nyzhnye Solotvyno (Alsoszlatina) Uzhhorodsky - Re-photographed the
tombstones

Rativtsi (Rat) Uzhhorodsky - No cemetery

Serednye Vodyane (Kozepapsa) Rakhivsky - Returned to take village/cemetery
views

Tur"ya-Bystra (Turjasebesh) Perechynsky - 122 images

Uhlya (Uglya) Tiachivsky - Photographed the cemetery doors that were
re-installed

Velyikyiy Bychkiv (Nagybocsko) Rakhivsky - Re-photographed the tombstones

Veryatsya (Verece) Vynohradivsky - Re-photographed the tombstones

I plan to send out a separate e-mail with all of the places in
Sub-Carpathia that were visited 2011-2016, citing the number of
tombstones found by place name and/or other appropriate comments, such
as "no cemetery," "cemetery destroyed," "mass grave," "See: place name
(where burials occurred)," etc.

Marshall Katz


Subcarpathia SIG #Subcarpathia Sub-Carpathia Trip Report -- 2016 "Tour de Carpat" #subcarpathia

Marshall Katz
 

Sub-Carpathia Trip Report -- 2016 "Tour de Carpat"
by Marshall Katz, Camp Hill, PA

[ http://www.JewishGen.org/Sub-Carpathia/ ]

For general travel hints and other information, please refer to my
earlier 2011-2015 trip reports found at the Sub-Carpathia SIG "Portal"
or by searching in the JewishGen list archive.

[ http://www.jewishgen.org/Sub-Carpathia ] See: Travel Planning/Trip
Reports.

In Sub-Carpathia, it was business as usual. Tourism rebounded this year,
primarily due to the mineral and salt bath spas people visit for
medicinal purposes >from all over Ukraine, Hungary, Romania, Slovakia and
other European countries as well as Russia. Also, there are key tourist
attractions throughout Sub-Carpathia, such as Palanok Castle in
Mukacheve. There is a lot to see and experience, and the hospitality is
unmatched. The panoramic views in the mountains are unparalleled.

This year's "Tour de Carpat" was quite an experience. The weather was
unseasonably cool and wet throughout April, most of May and into June.
It did not get warm until mid-June. The winter was very mild here again
with very little snowfall, except in the mountains. The locals were
amazed at the extreme winter in the U.S. this year, saying it was equal
to or greater than a Siberian winter. In some areas of the U.S., the
local residents would agree. I had over a meter (40 in.) of snow >from
one storm at my house, in Pennsylvania.

My first order of business was to visit the Sub-Carpathia (formerly,
Transcarpathia) Governor's office in Uzhhorod (Ungvar) and, thorough my
contacts, receive a comprehensive list of all the cites, towns and
villages found in Sub-Carpathia today to ensure I have not missed any
places to visit. Last year, I received lists, after translating them,
they were not the lists I needed. The new list also shows the regional
town halls for multiple villages in some areas. I also learned that
several of the co-located villages have been combined into one large
village with one name or nearby villages have been absorbed by the
larger towns, but the locals still refer to the villages separately by
their original names. I also learned that several villages along the
border with Hungary voted to change their village name back to the
former Hungarian name for the village. Ultimately, my goal was to
visit every former Hungarian-named place in Sub-Carpathia.

For the third year, a conference was held in Berehove (Beregszasz), on
21 June 2016, sponsored by the Shalom Foundation of Berehove
(Beregszasz) at the small Orthodox synagogue on Zrini Street. This
year, the goal was to dedicate a memorial wall with over 4,000 names of
Holocaust victims of >from Berehove (Beregszasz). It was attended by
dignitaries >from Hungary, Ukraine and the U.S., as well as survivors and
descendants >from Hungary, Ukraine, Israel and the U.S. Two rabbis led
the mourner's prayer in front of the memorial and there was a candle-
lighting ceremony afterwards. Everyone in attendance placed a
visitation stone at the base of the memorial wall. It was a very
emotional event for everyone. Members of my family >from Beregszasz
(Berehove) who perished in Auschwitz were also listed on the "Wall of
Remembrance - Never Forget."

Another highlight of the conference was the newly created Museum of
Sub-Carpathian Jewry, located on the second floor of the synagogue.
As I travel around Sub-Carpathia, I ask the older residents of the
villages if they have anything that was left behind by the Jews after
they were taken to the ghettos and later deported, in 1944. This year,
surprisingly, I was able to purchase prayer books again that had been
left behind. It amazes me that the locals preserved these artifacts.
I also donated striped concentration camp clothing to the museum, that
was brought back to the U.S. after a camp had been liberated by the
U.S. Army as well as old Hungarian currency and coins (pengo).

I passed by the cemetery in the Uglya (Uylya) and was surprised to see
the cemetery gate doors had been reinstalled since last year. This is
the cemetery I paid to have cleared last year so we could photograph
the tombstones; sadly, the cemetery is overgrown again this year.

Like last year, several cemeteries that I visited were a very long walk
--- up and far back in the mountains---and once located, access to the
tombstones was difficult. Most all cemeteries are overgrown and
neglected. Often times, we see cows, horses and goats in the cemeteries.
Their grazing keeps the vegetation in check, albeit not perfectly.

One cemetery we could not locate in 2015 was Novobarovo (Ujbard), but
thanks to a very enthusiastic lady and another man in the village
interested in helping us, we all walked up the mountain and they showed us
the cemetery. No wonder we could not find it last year: it is on a very
steep part of the mountain and extremely overgrown. It was very
difficult to access the tombstones. When we returned to the lady's house,
she gave us a much appreciated and refreshing glass of cold apple juice.
We also tried her cherry "compot," which was a delight. The lady's
daughter was learning English and this gave her an opportunity to practice
with us during the time we spent with them.

This year, I stayed in Vylok (Tisza-Ujlak) and my hosts speak virtually no
English. My Hungarian, Ukrainian and Russian is limited, but I am thankful
for the translator program on my mobile phone which was a life saver.
Everything worked out better than expected during my stay, and I even
added to my Hungarian, Ukrainian and Russian vocabulary.

As in previous years, something humorous always happens during my travels.
My host's wife showed me two bottles of something that was clear liquid,
which I thought was vodka, or the local moonshine called "Szilvo Palinko."
She opened a bottle and apparently wanted me to smell the contents, but I
understood her to be saying “try some.” After swallowing, I quickly
learned that it was clear cooking oil. That gave her a good laugh.

We were in Kolochava (Alsokalocsa) and the shortest route to Nimec'ka
Mokra (Nemetmokra) was via an unpaved mountain road. We rented a four-
wheel drive (Russian) Jeep and set off. The mountain spring water and
water run-off after a rain covered the road in many places, creating
deep muddy holes. After getting almost stuck twice, we realized the road
was hopelessly impassable, we gave up and returned to Kolochava. The
only other way to reach Nimec'ka Mokra is via Ust-Chorna (Kiralymezo),
and as you may recall >from an earlier trip report, this road is the
"Gold Medal" road of Sub-Carpathia, having the most pot holes. This
year, it took almost three hours to slowly navigate the road for 57
miles (about 92 km). When we arrived in Nimec'ka Mokra, we learned
that Jewish burials occurred in nearby Rus'ka Mokra which had already
been visited and its cemetery photographed.

Speaking of cemeteries, the transcription of 224 cemeteries photographed
in the past is now 100% complete thanks to a wonderful team of 22
volunteers. That leaves only those photographed this year to be
completed, some of which have already been transcribed.

Since I had free time during my stay, I visited Lviv (Lemberg) with my
friend Joseph Vays. Lviv is the largest city in western Ukraine and the
seventh largest city in the country overall. It is also one of the main
cultural centers of Ukraine. Many students >from Sub-Carpathia have
attended the universities in Lviv. I had two guides who spoke perfect
English. Lviv was very busy with tourists >from Ukraine, Poland, Germany
and I even met some >from Canada. It has a rich Jewish history and there
are over 100 things to see and do with a Jewish interest. I had lunch
at a Jewish-style restaurant---owned by Jews---and it well deserves its
5-star rating. The lunch was light, and very tasty. If you like sitting
at outdoor cafes, you will find several on every street of the downtown
area of Lviv. Some tour guides were dressed in period clothing. The
hotel accommodation was great, in the center of the city, near the Opera
House. I was very happy to have had the opportunity to visit Lviv and can
recommend its addition to your personal "Bucket List."

While visiting Lviv, I took a side trip to Zhovka which had a very large
Jewish community and is the place of the first Jewish publishing house(s)
in Eastern Europe. The synagogue, which still stands, was built in the
17th century and was one of the largest in Europe. In the Jewish quarter,
you can still see where the Mezuzas were attached to the doorposts. The
synagogue is but a shell today, and there are plans to restore the
exterior. Before work can start, there is a current archeological dig in
progress and many artifacts have been found and are now on display in the
castle museum. The cemetery was destroyed and today is a very large
bazaar, but a mausoleum (Ohel) remains and there are two tombstones found
in one part of the original wall. A very old wooden church can be found
here. Zhovka is a very interesting and a very historically Jewish place
to visit.

Today, after six years, I have been to all the cities, towns and villages
of Sub-Carpathia which had a former Hungarian name, a grand total of 632
places, passing through many of them multiple times during my travels.
(Note: The official number is 609 because, as mentioned earlier, some of
the smaller villages have been absorbed by the larger nearby villages
and/or towns, but the locals still refer to them by their former names.)

To summarize this year's trip, I traveled to 24 villages and found and
photographed five more new cemeteries and all the tombstones therein,
following in alphabetical order by their Ukrainian name.

Where one reads a number of images below, this indicates we found a
cemetery there and the number of images taken, but the number of images
does not equal the number of tombstones because we always take multiple
photos of each tombstone to assist with the transcription and a few
panoramas of each cemetery.

Where one reads "No cemetery," in most all cases, we learned that people
were buried in the next larger village or town with a Jewish cemetery.

Where one reads "See:" this indicates that we learned that burials
occurred in a different, and nearby, village or town.

Where one reads "Cemetery destroyed," we found the site of the cemetery,
but today there are no tombstones because these cemeteries have been
destroyed for residential, commercial or agricultural use---often blamed
on the Soviet period.

Where one reads "Jurassic Park," the cemetery was extremely overgrown
and very difficult to access.

Notes: Due to earlier camera issues, we returned to four places this
year to re-photograph the tombstones to be replaced on their respective
web site. In Sub-Carpathia (and Ukraine), you can find places with the
same place name. In those cases, I added a number 1, 2, etc. to
differentiate them and you will need to use their former Hungarian name
to identify the place you are researching.

Key: Ukrainian (Hungarian) names - Sub-Carpathian raion - number of
images and/or comments

Bukovets' 2 (Bukkospatak) Mizhhirsky - Re-photographed the tombstones

Grbivtsi (Gombash) Mukachivsky - No cemetery

Hlynyanyy (Hlinyani) Tiachivsky - No cemetery

Horbky (Rakospatak) Vynohradivsky - No cemetery

Hrunyky (Gruny) Tiachivsky - No cemetery

Hustec' (Hustecpatak) Khustsky - No cemetery

Izky (Iszka) Mizhhirsky - 3 images (found earlier by another person)

Kichereli (Kisherela) Khustsky - No cemetery

Korolevo (Kiralyhaza) Vynohradivsky - Cemetery destroyed; See Veryatsya

Kostylivka (Barnabas) Rakhivsky - No cemetery

Kryva 1 (Nagykirva) Tiachivsky - Returned to take village photos only

Kvasy (Tisza-Borkut) Rakhivsky - 41 images

Lypcha (Lipcse) Khustsky - Returned and did not find a second Jewish
cemetery as reported

Nimec'ka Mokra (Nemetmokra) Tiachivsky - No cemetery

Nizniyy Remeta (Alsoremete) Berehivsky - 3 images - Cemetery destroyed;
now in agricultural use, but one stone was uncovered outside of the
cemetery

Novobarovo (Ujbard) Tiachivsky - 5 images - This cemetery is a "Jurassic
Park"

Nyzhniy Studenyy (Alsohidegpatak) Mizhhirsky - Cemetery destroyed

Nyzhnye Solotvyno (Alsoszlatina) Uzhhorodsky - Re-photographed the
tombstones

Rativtsi (Rat) Uzhhorodsky - No cemetery

Serednye Vodyane (Kozepapsa) Rakhivsky - Returned to take village/cemetery
views

Tur"ya-Bystra (Turjasebesh) Perechynsky - 122 images

Uhlya (Uglya) Tiachivsky - Photographed the cemetery doors that were
re-installed

Velyikyiy Bychkiv (Nagybocsko) Rakhivsky - Re-photographed the tombstones

Veryatsya (Verece) Vynohradivsky - Re-photographed the tombstones

I plan to send out a separate e-mail with all of the places in
Sub-Carpathia that were visited 2011-2016, citing the number of
tombstones found by place name and/or other appropriate comments, such
as "no cemetery," "cemetery destroyed," "mass grave," "See: place name
(where burials occurred)," etc.

Marshall Katz


Hachschara training farm at Neuendorf iIn Sande #general

Peter Wollinski
 

Hi
Looking for suggestions as to where I can find information on the
Hachschara training farm located at Neuendorf iIn Sande Germany
between 1936 and 1938.

In particular looking for information on the following questions:
How was a trainee selected to attend such training farms to obtain
qualifications which enabled them to emigrate?
Was there a process as to which training farm a trainee was sent too?
What was the daily routine of trainees at Neuendorf Im Sande?
Who assisted the trainees to be able to emigrate to a particular country?

Assistance will be appreciated.

Best Wishes
Peter Wolllinski


Jadow Yizkor Book Updates #yizkorbooks

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

My thanks to Lance Ackerfeld for enlisting volunteer translator Yocheved
Klausner to work on a number of translations >from the Jadow Yizkor book.
They are now online and can be read by choosing the appropriate links at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/jadow/jadow.html .

The new translation are: Pages 224-226, Pages 282-284 and Pages 337-340.

Only two researchers have ever made any financial contributions toward the
translation of the book, so the bulk of what is online is a result of
volunteer translations.

Any additional translations will be suspended until new funding is received.
It is only fair that other books benefit >from the work of volunteers also.

Eden Joachim
Jadow Yizkor Book Coordinator


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Hachschara training farm at Neuendorf iIn Sande #general

Peter Wollinski
 

Hi
Looking for suggestions as to where I can find information on the
Hachschara training farm located at Neuendorf iIn Sande Germany
between 1936 and 1938.

In particular looking for information on the following questions:
How was a trainee selected to attend such training farms to obtain
qualifications which enabled them to emigrate?
Was there a process as to which training farm a trainee was sent too?
What was the daily routine of trainees at Neuendorf Im Sande?
Who assisted the trainees to be able to emigrate to a particular country?

Assistance will be appreciated.

Best Wishes
Peter Wolllinski


Yizkor Books #YizkorBooks Jadow Yizkor Book Updates #yizkorbooks

Eden Joachim <esjoachim@...>
 

My thanks to Lance Ackerfeld for enlisting volunteer translator Yocheved
Klausner to work on a number of translations >from the Jadow Yizkor book.
They are now online and can be read by choosing the appropriate links at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/jadow/jadow.html .

The new translation are: Pages 224-226, Pages 282-284 and Pages 337-340.

Only two researchers have ever made any financial contributions toward the
translation of the book, so the bulk of what is online is a result of
volunteer translations.

Any additional translations will be suspended until new funding is received.
It is only fair that other books benefit >from the work of volunteers also.

Eden Joachim
Jadow Yizkor Book Coordinator


Kozienice, Poland Yizkor Book translation published #general

Joel Alpert <jalp@...>
 

JewishGen's Yizkor-Books-In-Print is pleased to announce the
publication of the 880-page translation of the Kozienice Yizkor Book.

It is available >from Amazon for a discounted price of $53. See
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Kozienice.html for details.

A special reduced price of $35 per book is available for orders of 5 or
more books to one address in the US, UK, Australia or Canada. Please
email ybip@jewishgen.org for details.

Nearby Jewish Communities:

Warka 21 miles NW
Garbatka 7 miles SSE
Maciejowice 8 miles N
Sieciechow 8 miles ESE
Stezyca 9 miles E
Sobolew 11 miles NNE
Glowaczow 11 miles WNW
Deblin 12 miles E
Gniewoszow 13 miles SE
Irena 13 miles E
Granica 13 miles SE
Magnuszew 15 miles NNW
Laskarzew 15 miles N
Bobrowniki 16 miles E
Ryki 16 miles ENE
Zwolen 16 miles S
Jedlinsk 20 miles WSW

To see the other 46 Yizkorbooks in translation that we have published,
see http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor Books in Print Project


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Kozienice, Poland Yizkor Book translation published #general

Joel Alpert <jalp@...>
 

JewishGen's Yizkor-Books-In-Print is pleased to announce the
publication of the 880-page translation of the Kozienice Yizkor Book.

It is available >from Amazon for a discounted price of $53. See
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Kozienice.html for details.

A special reduced price of $35 per book is available for orders of 5 or
more books to one address in the US, UK, Australia or Canada. Please
email ybip@jewishgen.org for details.

Nearby Jewish Communities:

Warka 21 miles NW
Garbatka 7 miles SSE
Maciejowice 8 miles N
Sieciechow 8 miles ESE
Stezyca 9 miles E
Sobolew 11 miles NNE
Glowaczow 11 miles WNW
Deblin 12 miles E
Gniewoszow 13 miles SE
Irena 13 miles E
Granica 13 miles SE
Magnuszew 15 miles NNW
Laskarzew 15 miles N
Bobrowniki 16 miles E
Ryki 16 miles ENE
Zwolen 16 miles S
Jedlinsk 20 miles WSW

To see the other 46 Yizkorbooks in translation that we have published,
see http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

Joel Alpert, Coordinator of the Yizkor Books in Print Project


Request for transliteration/translation #galicia

Inacio Steinhardt
 

I have found a two page letter writen to my late father by my
grandfather, Hersz Mendel Steinhardt, >from Tarnow, at the beginning
of WWI. It is writen in German, as it was spoken in Galicia, and I have
difficulty in understanding the contents. I've posted it in on ViewMate
at the following addresses

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49381
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49382

I will appreciate if some kind person could make a transcription for
me and eventually a translation.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

Inacio Steinhardt

http://www.steinhardts.com/STEINHARDT/index.html


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Request for transliteration/translation #galicia

Inacio Steinhardt
 

I have found a two page letter writen to my late father by my
grandfather, Hersz Mendel Steinhardt, >from Tarnow, at the beginning
of WWI. It is writen in German, as it was spoken in Galicia, and I have
difficulty in understanding the contents. I've posted it in on ViewMate
at the following addresses

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49381
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM49382

I will appreciate if some kind person could make a transcription for
me and eventually a translation.

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

Inacio Steinhardt

http://www.steinhardts.com/STEINHARDT/index.html


documents in Russian #general

J G
 

Hi All

I have a number of birth, death, marriage records >from Szrensk Poland
written in Russian script. If there is anyone who might help with extracting
the information, such as dates, names, professions, that help would be
greatly appreciated. Full word for word translation is not needed unless
there is an important comment in the document. The copies are very
clear and I can send you .jpg files you can enlarge quite easily if needed.

Please reply privately.

Thanks.

Joe Glass

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

This week's excerpt is >from the Yizkor book of Podhajce, a town in
Ukraine about 30 miles northeast of Stanislawow. The passage is >from
a long chapter titled "Experiences and Figures >from the Recent Past"
by Dr. Baruch Milch. In it, he talks about the custom of giving a
nickname to almost all residents of the town.

https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1137556442933176:0

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen documents in Russian #general

J G
 

Hi All

I have a number of birth, death, marriage records >from Szrensk Poland
written in Russian script. If there is anyone who might help with extracting
the information, such as dates, names, professions, that help would be
greatly appreciated. Full word for word translation is not needed unless
there is an important comment in the document. The copies are very
clear and I can send you .jpg files you can enlarge quite easily if needed.

Please reply privately.

Thanks.

Joe Glass

MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen Facebook page #general

Bruce Drake <BDrake@...>
 

This week's excerpt is >from the Yizkor book of Podhajce, a town in
Ukraine about 30 miles northeast of Stanislawow. The passage is >from
a long chapter titled "Experiences and Figures >from the Recent Past"
by Dr. Baruch Milch. In it, he talks about the custom of giving a
nickname to almost all residents of the town.

https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/1137556442933176:0

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring, MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK
Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Unidentified town/village name in Bessarabia #bessarabia

Martha Hobby <mabelthedog@...>
 

Hi,

My great great grandfather and his family moved to the UK >from Bessarabia in 1901. I have recently
discovered the town/village they lived in whilst in Bessarabia was called RINAVOOTS.

However, I have been able to find no reference to this town? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

Many thanks,
Martha Hobby

mabelthedog@yahoo.co.uk
England


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Unidentified town/village name in Bessarabia #bessarabia

Martha Hobby <mabelthedog@...>
 

Hi,

My great great grandfather and his family moved to the UK >from Bessarabia in 1901. I have recently
discovered the town/village they lived in whilst in Bessarabia was called RINAVOOTS.

However, I have been able to find no reference to this town? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

Many thanks,
Martha Hobby

mabelthedog@yahoo.co.uk
England

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