Date   

None #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Review h-sig


Hungary SIG #Hungary None #hungary

Tom Venetianer <tom.vene@...>
 

Review h-sig


"Vilenskoj" uezed #lithuania

ELGOLD1@...
 

In response to Israel Lenzner's question about "Vilenskoj" uezd, this refers
to Vilna uezd of Vilna gubernia. Often the names of uezds and gubernias will
be given with this type of ending, i.e. "Kovenskoj" for Kovna, etc.

Eric Goldstein
Research Group Coordinator, LitvakSIG


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania "Vilenskoj" uezed #lithuania

ELGOLD1@...
 

In response to Israel Lenzner's question about "Vilenskoj" uezd, this refers
to Vilna uezd of Vilna gubernia. Often the names of uezds and gubernias will
be given with this type of ending, i.e. "Kovenskoj" for Kovna, etc.

Eric Goldstein
Research Group Coordinator, LitvakSIG


Re: Adolph Zucor #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <lmagyar@...>
 

Dear Bernice,

I am realted to Adolph Zuckor and have copies of the two biographies written
on him: The House that Shadows Built, and The Public Is Never Wrong
(allegedly autobiograhical, but I doubt it). I returned >from a three week
stay in Hungary about 14 hours ago so if I appear a bit groggy its because,
unlike Stella, I haven't yet found my groove.

Louis Schonfeld

Please visit our website at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Hungary/

-----Original Message-----
From: Bernice Shoobe [mailto:bshoobe@pol.net]
Sent: Saturday, August 15, 1998 8:27 AM
To: Hungarian SIG
Subject: Adolph Zucor


Is anyone related to Adolph Zukor or do you know any of his
family? bshoobe@pol.com

This SIG (h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org
---
You are currently subscribed to h-sig as: $subst('PurgeID')
To unsubscribe send email to $subst('Email.Unsub')


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: Adolph Zucor #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <lmagyar@...>
 

Dear Bernice,

I am realted to Adolph Zuckor and have copies of the two biographies written
on him: The House that Shadows Built, and The Public Is Never Wrong
(allegedly autobiograhical, but I doubt it). I returned >from a three week
stay in Hungary about 14 hours ago so if I appear a bit groggy its because,
unlike Stella, I haven't yet found my groove.

Louis Schonfeld

Please visit our website at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/Hungary/

-----Original Message-----
From: Bernice Shoobe [mailto:bshoobe@pol.net]
Sent: Saturday, August 15, 1998 8:27 AM
To: Hungarian SIG
Subject: Adolph Zucor


Is anyone related to Adolph Zukor or do you know any of his
family? bshoobe@pol.com

This SIG (h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org
---
You are currently subscribed to h-sig as: $subst('PurgeID')
To unsubscribe send email to $subst('Email.Unsub')


Munkacs information #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <lmagyar@...>
 

In response to Dennis Baer's question to me about information >from Munkacs
and others who would like additional specific information about the recent
roots journeys:

According to Rabbi Chaim Shlomo Hoffman of Munkacs he has a copy of burial
information >from the original Munkacs cemetery that was destroyed by the
Soviets in the early 1960s. According to Rabbi Hoffman, all the names and
dates that would be shown on the tombstones would be on that listing. The
information is now in Israel being entered into a database by one of his
sons, and he says that I can obtain a copy on my next trip to Israel
(planned before the end of 1999). The database will be in Hebrew only. The
original cemetery was founded in the later half of the nineteenth century.
At this time I don't know if that information will be available gratis or
not. Those wishing to contribute to funding a translation of the database
into English should contact me at my e-mail address: lmagyar@en.com


These tours are not your typical "white shoe" tours through the capitals of
Europe. We climbed hills, crawled through narrow openings and in some
cases, where cemeteries had not been visited for years or are otherwise
neglected we hacked our way through jungle type vegetation (the cemetery at
Gaboltov to name the most egregious example). Physical recovery and
emotional gestation may take more time than many expect. However, the
information >from the tour participants as well as >from myself will be
forthcoming during the next few weeks.

Louis Schonfeld


Hungary SIG #Hungary Munkacs information #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <lmagyar@...>
 

In response to Dennis Baer's question to me about information >from Munkacs
and others who would like additional specific information about the recent
roots journeys:

According to Rabbi Chaim Shlomo Hoffman of Munkacs he has a copy of burial
information >from the original Munkacs cemetery that was destroyed by the
Soviets in the early 1960s. According to Rabbi Hoffman, all the names and
dates that would be shown on the tombstones would be on that listing. The
information is now in Israel being entered into a database by one of his
sons, and he says that I can obtain a copy on my next trip to Israel
(planned before the end of 1999). The database will be in Hebrew only. The
original cemetery was founded in the later half of the nineteenth century.
At this time I don't know if that information will be available gratis or
not. Those wishing to contribute to funding a translation of the database
into English should contact me at my e-mail address: lmagyar@en.com


These tours are not your typical "white shoe" tours through the capitals of
Europe. We climbed hills, crawled through narrow openings and in some
cases, where cemeteries had not been visited for years or are otherwise
neglected we hacked our way through jungle type vegetation (the cemetery at
Gaboltov to name the most egregious example). Physical recovery and
emotional gestation may take more time than many expect. However, the
information >from the tour participants as well as >from myself will be
forthcoming during the next few weeks.

Louis Schonfeld


Piotrkow Trybunalski and Belchatow neighbors -- a shiddach #poland

Ronisl@...
 

Since these two shtetls are so close (Belchatow is only 13 miles WEST of
Piotrkow Trybunalski (not east as previously posted), Roni and Marla, Jewish
Records Indexing, Shtetl CO-OP coordinators, figured their ancestors could
very well have known each other. As it turns out, the Baleboosteh Ruchel
from B and the Yenta Cweitla >from PT shopped together for flayshedig at the
same shuk. Rumour also has it that Ruchel's daughter, the maideleh Tante
Ester, in B fell for great Zeyde Moishe in PT, but in order to see each
other, they snuck off to Lodz some 25 miles north for their rendevous for
fear of causing a big tumel. Ester's Bobbeh wanted her granddaughter to
marry the son of the great Rebbe. While this was going on, papa Shloime from
B and papa Mendel >from PT were enjoying their schnaps, oblivious to what their
kinderlach were up to. But it all turned out goot and Ester and Moishe were
married after all.

Roni and Marla figured if their ancestors could work things out and have a
mitzvah together, so could they. Since our shtetls are so close and many of
the same people are researching both, we have decided to stay in close contact
and help each other out. We both realize the truth of the article in
Avotaynu (spring 1998) which emphasized the importance of reaching out in
every direction when doing shtetl-based research. So we have reached out to
each other and, although we are just beginning our journeys, we like the idea
of making connections with others in nearby shtetls. Roni is thankful to have
Marla as a neighbor to turn to for advice since the PT CO-OP started a number
of months before the newly formed B CO-OP. So even before getting deeply
into our responsibilities as the leaders of our Shtetl CO-OPs, we've
recognized that it will be helpful to share ideas about how to organize this
endeavour.

We urge all of you to go ahead and start your own Shtetl CO-OPs through
Jewish Records Indexing. It's really alot of fun working with others who
are going through the same process. We'll be here for you too--maybe only 2
steps ahead, but we'll all be able to learn together. Check to see what towns
near yours already have Shtetl CO-OPs and contact the coordinators. Who
knows, there may even be mishpocheh there.
Yours,
Marla Waltman Daschko
Piotrkow Trybunalski CO-OP Coordinator
waltman@fox.nstn.ca
and
Roni Seibel Liebowitz
Belchatow Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
ronisl@aol.com


JRI Poland #Poland Piotrkow Trybunalski and Belchatow neighbors -- a shiddach #poland

Ronisl@...
 

Since these two shtetls are so close (Belchatow is only 13 miles WEST of
Piotrkow Trybunalski (not east as previously posted), Roni and Marla, Jewish
Records Indexing, Shtetl CO-OP coordinators, figured their ancestors could
very well have known each other. As it turns out, the Baleboosteh Ruchel
from B and the Yenta Cweitla >from PT shopped together for flayshedig at the
same shuk. Rumour also has it that Ruchel's daughter, the maideleh Tante
Ester, in B fell for great Zeyde Moishe in PT, but in order to see each
other, they snuck off to Lodz some 25 miles north for their rendevous for
fear of causing a big tumel. Ester's Bobbeh wanted her granddaughter to
marry the son of the great Rebbe. While this was going on, papa Shloime from
B and papa Mendel >from PT were enjoying their schnaps, oblivious to what their
kinderlach were up to. But it all turned out goot and Ester and Moishe were
married after all.

Roni and Marla figured if their ancestors could work things out and have a
mitzvah together, so could they. Since our shtetls are so close and many of
the same people are researching both, we have decided to stay in close contact
and help each other out. We both realize the truth of the article in
Avotaynu (spring 1998) which emphasized the importance of reaching out in
every direction when doing shtetl-based research. So we have reached out to
each other and, although we are just beginning our journeys, we like the idea
of making connections with others in nearby shtetls. Roni is thankful to have
Marla as a neighbor to turn to for advice since the PT CO-OP started a number
of months before the newly formed B CO-OP. So even before getting deeply
into our responsibilities as the leaders of our Shtetl CO-OPs, we've
recognized that it will be helpful to share ideas about how to organize this
endeavour.

We urge all of you to go ahead and start your own Shtetl CO-OPs through
Jewish Records Indexing. It's really alot of fun working with others who
are going through the same process. We'll be here for you too--maybe only 2
steps ahead, but we'll all be able to learn together. Check to see what towns
near yours already have Shtetl CO-OPs and contact the coordinators. Who
knows, there may even be mishpocheh there.
Yours,
Marla Waltman Daschko
Piotrkow Trybunalski CO-OP Coordinator
waltman@fox.nstn.ca
and
Roni Seibel Liebowitz
Belchatow Shtetl CO-OP Coordinator
ronisl@aol.com


Symposium Relating to Holocaust-era Assets #hungary

CASHEL3776@...
 

Found this on the NARA web site, tohought it was interesting.
Ley



Symposium on Records and Research
Relating to Holocaust-era Assets

National Archives at College Park, Maryland

December 4, 1998




The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) will host on Dece=
mber=0A4, 1998, a Symposium on Records and Research Relating to Holocaust=
-era Assets.=0AThis day-long symposium, to be held at the National Archiv=
es at College Park,=0AMaryland, will address the many facets of Holocaust=
-era assets including=0Asources for research, and research conducted, not=
only at NARA, but throughout=0Athe United States and abroad.

The symposium will be comprised of fifteen panels, featuring over 50 spea=
kers.=0AIssues to be addressed include, but are not limited to:

=95looted gold (including non-monetary gold), and its recovery and restit=
ution=0A=95looted art, including its recovery and restitution =95foreign =
dormant bank=0Aaccounts =95unpaid insurance policies =95wartime trade, bo=
th foreign and domestic=0A=95heirless assets in the United States, includ=
ing dormant bank accounts=0A=95refugees, including United States policy =
=95slave labor =95military, financial=0Aand diplomatic records at NARA th=
at contain information relating to various=0Afacets of Holocaust-era asse=
ts =95archives as a source for journalists writing=0Aabout Holocaust-era =
assets

Panelists include:

=95United States and foreign government officials =95art historians =95ar=
chivists=0A=95academic and Federal historians =95Congressional staffers =
=95journalists=0A=95representatives of non-governmental organizations =95=
members of law firms

A complete listing of the symposium schedule, including panels and speake=
rs,=0Awill be available in September. Advance registration is required. T=
he=0Aregistration fee, which also includes catered lunch and coffee break=
s, is=0A$75.00. Checks or money orders should be made out to the:

National Archives Trust Fund (NATF)


and mailed to Ms. Damishia Foster at the following address:

Textual Archives Services Division (NWCT) - Room 2600
National Archives and Records Administration
8601 Adelphi Road
College Park, MD 20740-6001
Attn: Damishia Foster


For more information on conference sessions, participants and registratio=
n,=0Aplease contact the symposium organizing committee by e-mail at:=0Aho=
loc.assets@arch2.nara.gov

Direct telephone calls to: Greg Bradsher (301-713-7250 ext. 245) or David=
Van=0ATassel (301-713-7230 ext. 258).=0A


Hungary SIG #Hungary Symposium Relating to Holocaust-era Assets #hungary

CASHEL3776@...
 

Found this on the NARA web site, tohought it was interesting.
Ley



Symposium on Records and Research
Relating to Holocaust-era Assets

National Archives at College Park, Maryland

December 4, 1998




The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) will host on Dece=
mber=0A4, 1998, a Symposium on Records and Research Relating to Holocaust=
-era Assets.=0AThis day-long symposium, to be held at the National Archiv=
es at College Park,=0AMaryland, will address the many facets of Holocaust=
-era assets including=0Asources for research, and research conducted, not=
only at NARA, but throughout=0Athe United States and abroad.

The symposium will be comprised of fifteen panels, featuring over 50 spea=
kers.=0AIssues to be addressed include, but are not limited to:

=95looted gold (including non-monetary gold), and its recovery and restit=
ution=0A=95looted art, including its recovery and restitution =95foreign =
dormant bank=0Aaccounts =95unpaid insurance policies =95wartime trade, bo=
th foreign and domestic=0A=95heirless assets in the United States, includ=
ing dormant bank accounts=0A=95refugees, including United States policy =
=95slave labor =95military, financial=0Aand diplomatic records at NARA th=
at contain information relating to various=0Afacets of Holocaust-era asse=
ts =95archives as a source for journalists writing=0Aabout Holocaust-era =
assets

Panelists include:

=95United States and foreign government officials =95art historians =95ar=
chivists=0A=95academic and Federal historians =95Congressional staffers =
=95journalists=0A=95representatives of non-governmental organizations =95=
members of law firms

A complete listing of the symposium schedule, including panels and speake=
rs,=0Awill be available in September. Advance registration is required. T=
he=0Aregistration fee, which also includes catered lunch and coffee break=
s, is=0A$75.00. Checks or money orders should be made out to the:

National Archives Trust Fund (NATF)


and mailed to Ms. Damishia Foster at the following address:

Textual Archives Services Division (NWCT) - Room 2600
National Archives and Records Administration
8601 Adelphi Road
College Park, MD 20740-6001
Attn: Damishia Foster


For more information on conference sessions, participants and registratio=
n,=0Aplease contact the symposium organizing committee by e-mail at:=0Aho=
loc.assets@arch2.nara.gov

Direct telephone calls to: Greg Bradsher (301-713-7250 ext. 245) or David=
Van=0ATassel (301-713-7230 ext. 258).=0A


review Sig Members #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <lmagyar@...>
 

Review h-sig


Hungary SIG #Hungary review Sig Members #hungary

Louis Schonfeld <lmagyar@...>
 

Review h-sig


Searching for Sadkin surnames from Vitebsk #belarus

Logan M Lockabey <LOGANISJUDD@...>
 

Searching for relatives >from Vitebsk and Polotsk, Belarus. Seek
descendants of SCHEMUEL BLOCKOFF, born 1850, >from Polotsk, Belarus. Also
seek many families >from Vitebsk with the surnames: SADKIN, SATKIN,
ZADKIN, ZATKIN, ZETKIN, TZADKIN. The preferred surname is spelled
TZADKIN. Families settled in USA, Canada, England, South Africa, Israel.

Logan Lockabey
Tzuri Shadai ben Avraham
loganisjudd@prodigy.net

Moderator's Note: Please turn off MIME when sending messages to the group.
If you don't, it messes up the content on the server and your message may
not get through or may have to be rejected. The listserv has certain
limitations which JewishGen is addressing so we don't have problems in the
future


Belarus SIG #Belarus Searching for Sadkin surnames from Vitebsk #belarus

Logan M Lockabey <LOGANISJUDD@...>
 

Searching for relatives >from Vitebsk and Polotsk, Belarus. Seek
descendants of SCHEMUEL BLOCKOFF, born 1850, >from Polotsk, Belarus. Also
seek many families >from Vitebsk with the surnames: SADKIN, SATKIN,
ZADKIN, ZATKIN, ZETKIN, TZADKIN. The preferred surname is spelled
TZADKIN. Families settled in USA, Canada, England, South Africa, Israel.

Logan Lockabey
Tzuri Shadai ben Avraham
loganisjudd@prodigy.net

Moderator's Note: Please turn off MIME when sending messages to the group.
If you don't, it messes up the content on the server and your message may
not get through or may have to be rejected. The listserv has certain
limitations which JewishGen is addressing so we don't have problems in the
future


New name in my family: Adler! #hungary

Margarita <uzidog@...>
 

Yesterday I showed my aunt and uncle (xxx times removed) several family
branches that I printed, for them to see and make corrections. There were just
a few mistakes in the sense of who is married to whom. The problem is that
there are three pairs of first cousins with the same surname.

Anyway, I found out that the uncle of my father was not Henrik SAS. He was
born as Hernik ADLER and probably changed his name when everyone else did. He
was a watchmaker in Gyor and married Esther LEICHT (probably >from Dunajska
Streda). They perished in the Holocaust, together with their son Feri. One
daughter, Magda, survived.

Margarita Lackó
Belgrano
uzidog@post1.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary New name in my family: Adler! #hungary

Margarita <uzidog@...>
 

Yesterday I showed my aunt and uncle (xxx times removed) several family
branches that I printed, for them to see and make corrections. There were just
a few mistakes in the sense of who is married to whom. The problem is that
there are three pairs of first cousins with the same surname.

Anyway, I found out that the uncle of my father was not Henrik SAS. He was
born as Hernik ADLER and probably changed his name when everyone else did. He
was a watchmaker in Gyor and married Esther LEICHT (probably >from Dunajska
Streda). They perished in the Holocaust, together with their son Feri. One
daughter, Magda, survived.

Margarita Lackó
Belgrano
uzidog@post1.com


Visits to the archives in Bratislava #hungary

Dolph Klein <kledolph@...>
 

Last July, my son, Robert, and I travelled to western Slovakia for the
purpose of visiting our ancestral home towns. Instead of talking details
about my family, I want to share with you the experiences we gained from
our visits to the regional archive of Bratislava (Statny oblastny archiv v
Bratislave). Then, in a later posting, Robert will describe his experience
while visiting the national archive (Slovensky Narodny Archiv).

Just inside the entrance of the regional archives at Krizkova ulica, cislo
7 and to the right of a small foyer is the receptionist cubicle and a
sign-in book. Slovak and German, but not English, are the languages of
communication. Fortunately, I showed a copy of a letterhead >from the
Archives, so that the reception understood which of the several agencies in
the building we wished to visit.

After signing in, we proceeded to room 202 and were greeted by a woman who
neither spoke nor understood English. Instead, she directed us to her
associate, Tomas (pronounced, To'mash), who spoke reasonably good English
and proved to be extremely helpful. He had us fill out forms for
registration and for recording the microfilm rolls and subsections within
each roll.

Unlike the open-shelf archives in the States, all the rolls are stored in
locked cabinets. The reading room is rather small with open shelves of
books along the side wall facing the opposite wall with unshaded windows
overlooking the street. The locked cabinets with glass doors with its
rolls in individual boxes stand along the back wall. Crowded within the
small room are six long tables, but only three of them have a film reader.
Despite the ambient light coming in >from the unshaded windows and the
overhead lamps that are always on, we had little difficulty in looking at
the microfilm images on a rather large screen.

Finding information involves an interesting procedure. To get the roll that
might have the record in question, for example, we told Tomas that we were
looking for the birth record of one of my two cousins whose birthplace was
in Pezinok and birth year in the late 1920's. With this information, Tomas
paged through a catalog for the numbers of the roll and subsection within
the roll that contained records for Jewish births occurring in Pezinok in
the late 1920's. The particular reel that Tomas gave us contained seven
subsections, numbers 1734 through 1740. Our subsection of interest was
number 1738. Each of the other subsections on the same roll contained
birth, marriage, or death records >from Pezinok at various periods of time
and >from different sources Jewish and non-Jewish. We succeeded in finding
the birth record of the younger of two cousins, but upon searching through
another reel, we were unable to find the birth record of the older sister
who was born in Trnava in 1928.

We were charged 20 Slovak Crowns, about $0.57, per subsection viewed, not
per roll. In other words, had we scanned the entire reel of seven
subsections, we would have paid a total of 140 SK crowns or about $4.00.

Searching through the subsections of rolls was somewhat difficult and
puzzling. The dates of the event, for example, were not always in
chronological order. Even Tomas could not understand the discontinuities.
Secondly, in some years, only a mere handful of events were recorded.
Surely, for a large town such as Trnava with a sizable Jewish population in
the 1920's, there had to be a number of Jewish births for the year 1928
that exceeded the one or two births that were actually recorded. Either
such records were recorded elsewhere, destroyed, not microfilmed, or never
existed. Thirdly, some records had incomplete information such as no day of
birth or the given name of the mother.

I returned to the Archives four days later to do a more intensive search.
Looking through several rolls and many subsections for specific birth,
marriage and death records, I did see the records of my relatives, that
the Archives had mailed to me a year ago, but no other records that the
archivist may have missed.

While I was researching at the regional archives, Robert went to the
National Archives in another part of the city looking for census records
and other documents on our relatives. His research proved to be extremely
productive and well worth the time and expense of our trip to Slovakia.
There, he found information on our relatives >from the Nazi census records
of 1941-42 and >from the Slovak "List of Jews" (Supis Zidov) that was
prepared for the Nazis prior to deportations out of Slovakia in 1942.

Parenthetically, I just recently received documents >from the Slovak
national archives through the auspices of the American Red Cross. Some of
the documents duplicated what Robert had already found. But, there was at
least two new documents >from the national archives which Robert was not
aware of.

One document (Kartotekovy listok) >from 1942 gave one of my uncles special
permission not to be deported >from the region of Malacky because he was a
doctor of herbal medicine. The other document (Zprava o zadrzani a
zatknuti), prepared in 1944, was a report of the detention and arrest of
the same uncle because he helped other Jews to escape overseas. The
document gave a detailed description of my uncle, Markus, with regard to
his occupation, address in Malacky, birth date, birthplace, color and
pattern of clothing, the shape of his head, the color of his eyes and hair,
the features of his nose, his height, and even noted the absence of teeth
and a mustache. The document goes on and gives the names of his spouse,
parents, and siblings including that of my father who emigrated to the
States in 1922. >from this document, I learned also that Markus spoke and
understood Slovak, Hungarian, German, Hebrew and English. Quite a document
for one page of information.

Last year while researching at Yad Vashem, Robert found the International
Tracing Service (ITS) cards on Markus and his wife which indicated in
August, 1944 that they were sent to KZ Sered and then transferred to
Theresienstadt where they were liberated in May, 1945. They returned to
Malacky to resume the herbal business and then emigrated in 1949 to Israel
where they lived until their deaths in the 1970's.

Our short stay of seven days was topped off with a visit to Dolne Oresany,
the village of my father's boyhood days. With the help of the village
mayor, we located a 75-year old woman who was a neighbor to several Kleins
living in the same house until their deportation and subsequent demise in
1942. She did not know a word of English, yet we were able to communicate
with her and through the use of a tape recorder, later learned about the
last days of my ancestors in Dolne Oresany. She remembered Markus and the
fact that he escaped >from concentration camps on two occasions. I never
knew my uncle when he was alive, but these heroic accounts of his make me
very proud of him.

I hope that this posting has given you some insights on the kinds of
resources and types of information that exist out there for genealogical
research. As other H-siggers have noted in their postings, there is a
desire by all of us to have you share your experiences >from overseas trips
to archives, cemeteries and the like. The more we all learn about the
existence of documentations and other resources of information, the better
our chances will be to uncover the roots of our ancestry. So, please do
make the effort to post your experiences.

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Robert Klein
Be'er Sheva, Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary Visits to the archives in Bratislava #hungary

Dolph Klein <kledolph@...>
 

Last July, my son, Robert, and I travelled to western Slovakia for the
purpose of visiting our ancestral home towns. Instead of talking details
about my family, I want to share with you the experiences we gained from
our visits to the regional archive of Bratislava (Statny oblastny archiv v
Bratislave). Then, in a later posting, Robert will describe his experience
while visiting the national archive (Slovensky Narodny Archiv).

Just inside the entrance of the regional archives at Krizkova ulica, cislo
7 and to the right of a small foyer is the receptionist cubicle and a
sign-in book. Slovak and German, but not English, are the languages of
communication. Fortunately, I showed a copy of a letterhead >from the
Archives, so that the reception understood which of the several agencies in
the building we wished to visit.

After signing in, we proceeded to room 202 and were greeted by a woman who
neither spoke nor understood English. Instead, she directed us to her
associate, Tomas (pronounced, To'mash), who spoke reasonably good English
and proved to be extremely helpful. He had us fill out forms for
registration and for recording the microfilm rolls and subsections within
each roll.

Unlike the open-shelf archives in the States, all the rolls are stored in
locked cabinets. The reading room is rather small with open shelves of
books along the side wall facing the opposite wall with unshaded windows
overlooking the street. The locked cabinets with glass doors with its
rolls in individual boxes stand along the back wall. Crowded within the
small room are six long tables, but only three of them have a film reader.
Despite the ambient light coming in >from the unshaded windows and the
overhead lamps that are always on, we had little difficulty in looking at
the microfilm images on a rather large screen.

Finding information involves an interesting procedure. To get the roll that
might have the record in question, for example, we told Tomas that we were
looking for the birth record of one of my two cousins whose birthplace was
in Pezinok and birth year in the late 1920's. With this information, Tomas
paged through a catalog for the numbers of the roll and subsection within
the roll that contained records for Jewish births occurring in Pezinok in
the late 1920's. The particular reel that Tomas gave us contained seven
subsections, numbers 1734 through 1740. Our subsection of interest was
number 1738. Each of the other subsections on the same roll contained
birth, marriage, or death records >from Pezinok at various periods of time
and >from different sources Jewish and non-Jewish. We succeeded in finding
the birth record of the younger of two cousins, but upon searching through
another reel, we were unable to find the birth record of the older sister
who was born in Trnava in 1928.

We were charged 20 Slovak Crowns, about $0.57, per subsection viewed, not
per roll. In other words, had we scanned the entire reel of seven
subsections, we would have paid a total of 140 SK crowns or about $4.00.

Searching through the subsections of rolls was somewhat difficult and
puzzling. The dates of the event, for example, were not always in
chronological order. Even Tomas could not understand the discontinuities.
Secondly, in some years, only a mere handful of events were recorded.
Surely, for a large town such as Trnava with a sizable Jewish population in
the 1920's, there had to be a number of Jewish births for the year 1928
that exceeded the one or two births that were actually recorded. Either
such records were recorded elsewhere, destroyed, not microfilmed, or never
existed. Thirdly, some records had incomplete information such as no day of
birth or the given name of the mother.

I returned to the Archives four days later to do a more intensive search.
Looking through several rolls and many subsections for specific birth,
marriage and death records, I did see the records of my relatives, that
the Archives had mailed to me a year ago, but no other records that the
archivist may have missed.

While I was researching at the regional archives, Robert went to the
National Archives in another part of the city looking for census records
and other documents on our relatives. His research proved to be extremely
productive and well worth the time and expense of our trip to Slovakia.
There, he found information on our relatives >from the Nazi census records
of 1941-42 and >from the Slovak "List of Jews" (Supis Zidov) that was
prepared for the Nazis prior to deportations out of Slovakia in 1942.

Parenthetically, I just recently received documents >from the Slovak
national archives through the auspices of the American Red Cross. Some of
the documents duplicated what Robert had already found. But, there was at
least two new documents >from the national archives which Robert was not
aware of.

One document (Kartotekovy listok) >from 1942 gave one of my uncles special
permission not to be deported >from the region of Malacky because he was a
doctor of herbal medicine. The other document (Zprava o zadrzani a
zatknuti), prepared in 1944, was a report of the detention and arrest of
the same uncle because he helped other Jews to escape overseas. The
document gave a detailed description of my uncle, Markus, with regard to
his occupation, address in Malacky, birth date, birthplace, color and
pattern of clothing, the shape of his head, the color of his eyes and hair,
the features of his nose, his height, and even noted the absence of teeth
and a mustache. The document goes on and gives the names of his spouse,
parents, and siblings including that of my father who emigrated to the
States in 1922. >from this document, I learned also that Markus spoke and
understood Slovak, Hungarian, German, Hebrew and English. Quite a document
for one page of information.

Last year while researching at Yad Vashem, Robert found the International
Tracing Service (ITS) cards on Markus and his wife which indicated in
August, 1944 that they were sent to KZ Sered and then transferred to
Theresienstadt where they were liberated in May, 1945. They returned to
Malacky to resume the herbal business and then emigrated in 1949 to Israel
where they lived until their deaths in the 1970's.

Our short stay of seven days was topped off with a visit to Dolne Oresany,
the village of my father's boyhood days. With the help of the village
mayor, we located a 75-year old woman who was a neighbor to several Kleins
living in the same house until their deportation and subsequent demise in
1942. She did not know a word of English, yet we were able to communicate
with her and through the use of a tape recorder, later learned about the
last days of my ancestors in Dolne Oresany. She remembered Markus and the
fact that he escaped >from concentration camps on two occasions. I never
knew my uncle when he was alive, but these heroic accounts of his make me
very proud of him.

I hope that this posting has given you some insights on the kinds of
resources and types of information that exist out there for genealogical
research. As other H-siggers have noted in their postings, there is a
desire by all of us to have you share your experiences >from overseas trips
to archives, cemeteries and the like. The more we all learn about the
existence of documentations and other resources of information, the better
our chances will be to uncover the roots of our ancestry. So, please do
make the effort to post your experiences.

Dolph Klein
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Robert Klein
Be'er Sheva, Israel