Date   

Re: belarus digest: August 07, 1998 #belarus

mms@...
 

#2: Belarus maps

I posted on my site <http://members.tripod.com/~mmsh/belarus/> 3 maps.

Moshe Shavit
Israel
mms@actcom.co.il

Searching: KATZ, WAGER >from Davidgrodek, now Belarus

Moderator's Note: Moshe, we would like to link your map site to our new
Belarus SIG web page.


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: belarus digest: August 07, 1998 #belarus

mms@...
 

#2: Belarus maps

I posted on my site <http://members.tripod.com/~mmsh/belarus/> 3 maps.

Moshe Shavit
Israel
mms@actcom.co.il

Searching: KATZ, WAGER >from Davidgrodek, now Belarus

Moderator's Note: Moshe, we would like to link your map site to our new
Belarus SIG web page.


Re: jewishgen digest: August 08, 1998 #general

David Gordon <dgordon@...>
 

Arthur Eisenberg asked which guberniya Pinsk is in. I believe that
the answer is the Minsk guberniya.
In addition, I would like to recommend a book--which I am virtually
certain is still in print--that I have found useful on countless
occasions. Paul R. Magocsi has edited/written a book called Historical
Atlas of East Central Europe (it is vol I of "A History of East Central
Europe, which is a terrific set of histories of the region, published by
the University of Washington Press, Seattle.) It covers the period from
prehistory to 1992 and has an extraordinary wealth of superb maps and
related information. The maps cover such "ordinary" things as political
boundaries (including within countries--such as guberniyas) as well as
education, religion, language, cultural/educational institutions. Fully
one-third or more of the book covers the period >from the 18th through
the early 20th centuries. He has written excellent essays to accompany
and explain each map and the book also has a solid bibliography and
excellent index. Hope this helps others as it has helped me.
Good luck!
David Gordon
dgordon@interaccess.com
Chicago, Illinois


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: jewishgen digest: August 08, 1998 #general

David Gordon <dgordon@...>
 

Arthur Eisenberg asked which guberniya Pinsk is in. I believe that
the answer is the Minsk guberniya.
In addition, I would like to recommend a book--which I am virtually
certain is still in print--that I have found useful on countless
occasions. Paul R. Magocsi has edited/written a book called Historical
Atlas of East Central Europe (it is vol I of "A History of East Central
Europe, which is a terrific set of histories of the region, published by
the University of Washington Press, Seattle.) It covers the period from
prehistory to 1992 and has an extraordinary wealth of superb maps and
related information. The maps cover such "ordinary" things as political
boundaries (including within countries--such as guberniyas) as well as
education, religion, language, cultural/educational institutions. Fully
one-third or more of the book covers the period >from the 18th through
the early 20th centuries. He has written excellent essays to accompany
and explain each map and the book also has a solid bibliography and
excellent index. Hope this helps others as it has helped me.
Good luck!
David Gordon
dgordon@interaccess.com
Chicago, Illinois


attn: Ed EHRLICH in Israel #general

Carol Skydell <skydell@...>
 

Sorry to post this to the entire list, but our failure to
reach Ed EHRLICH at eehrlich@shani.net was explained this
morning when Ben Noach posted to the discussion group that
shani.net had crashed financially and was cut off >from the
net around July 2....

Ed, or anybody knowing how to reach him, please advise we
are trying to get in touch.

Many thanks
Carol Skydell
JewishGen, Inc.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen attn: Ed EHRLICH in Israel #general

Carol Skydell <skydell@...>
 

Sorry to post this to the entire list, but our failure to
reach Ed EHRLICH at eehrlich@shani.net was explained this
morning when Ben Noach posted to the discussion group that
shani.net had crashed financially and was cut off >from the
net around July 2....

Ed, or anybody knowing how to reach him, please advise we
are trying to get in touch.

Many thanks
Carol Skydell
JewishGen, Inc.


Looking in Pittsburgh for Sue MANN ? #general

Ron Baraff <rbaraff@...>
 

I am trying to locate the former Sue MANN (now HIRSH, I believe) in Pgh.,
PA. If she, or anyone one who knows her is on-;ine, please contact me at:
rbaraff@earthlink.net

Thanks

Ron and Christy Baraff
1331 Fallowfield Ave.
Pittsburgh, PA 15216
(412)563-5282


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking in Pittsburgh for Sue MANN ? #general

Ron Baraff <rbaraff@...>
 

I am trying to locate the former Sue MANN (now HIRSH, I believe) in Pgh.,
PA. If she, or anyone one who knows her is on-;ine, please contact me at:
rbaraff@earthlink.net

Thanks

Ron and Christy Baraff
1331 Fallowfield Ave.
Pittsburgh, PA 15216
(412)563-5282


Single women and Ellis Island #general

Norman Feldman <felvelnic@...>
 

Do we have a clear and definitive answer to the question of whether a
single woman was permitted to enter the US >from Ellis Island? Was it a
matter of law, policy or whim?Did it change over the years?

So much hangs on the answers to such simple questions! Thanks for your
help.

Norman Feldman
Albuquerque, NM


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Single women and Ellis Island #general

Norman Feldman <felvelnic@...>
 

Do we have a clear and definitive answer to the question of whether a
single woman was permitted to enter the US >from Ellis Island? Was it a
matter of law, policy or whim?Did it change over the years?

So much hangs on the answers to such simple questions! Thanks for your
help.

Norman Feldman
Albuquerque, NM


Activities for a introductory workshop on genealogy? #general

Claire Petersky <petersky@...>
 

I belong to a progressive Jewish organization (Kadima, in Seattle, WA
(USA)) that promotes education for its members, both adults and children.
Another member was going to host a workshop on Jewish genealogy and later
backed out; I volunteered to substitute.

Now I'm thinking about what kinds of things we should do as a part of the
workshop. I'd really like to have some resources available for the
workshop just for people to look at, so I'll reserve some books >from the
library to have available. I'll also see if I can bring a computer and a
net connection, so people can look around the http://www.jewishgen.org/
site. I also can testify to the general helpfulness of the genealogy
librarian at the downtown branch of the library.

One of the things I was thinking about doing is having a great deal of
space to work in and do the following: to divide the room first up into
four areas: North America, Europe, Rest of the World, and Don't Know. Each
of these places would be mapped out according the geography of these
places. (So that Florida would be in one corner of the North America
space, and California across >from it, and then Alaska/West coast of Canada
across >from that, and so on.) Then have each person choose the lineage
that they know the most about the furthest back (for me, this would be my
father's mother's mother's father, for example). Then go back, decade by
decade and have people say who they are, and where exactly they are
standing. So the first "turn", is now, and everyone would be standing in
place, in Seattle. The next turn, it'd be 1990, and maybe most people
would be in Seattle, but maybe some others, wouldn't. By 1940, most of us
would no longer be us, we'd be our parents, standing perhaps mostly in
other places in North America. By 1910, most of us would be our
grandparents, and some would be standing in Europe, some in North America.
By 1880, probably most of us would be our great-grandparents, standing in
Europe -- and probably a fair portion would be standing in the "I don't
know" region of the room. A generation further back, and who would still
be outside the "I don't know"?

I was thinking of doing this, because as people move about the room, they
get a real physical sense of how we, and those before us, moved around.

I was also thinking of having people put pins in a map, maybe with
different colors for different generations, to illustrate this in a
different way -- to be able to show all the places we have been and have
come from. As the child of an interfaith marriage, I've also thought of
maybe different pins in some way for those ancestors that are not Jewish.
Kadima has a very inclusive philosophy and is very accepting of interfaith
marriages. So I'd like to include the non-Jewish ancestors for those who
have them. At the same time, the history of these non-Jewish ancestors are
different than the Jewish ones, and I'd like to have them differentiated
in some way. Or is this being too divisive for a group with such strongly
stated inclusive values?

Beyond this, I'm not sure of what to offer. I'm very new at this genealogy
thing myself, so it isn't like I have great resources personally or great
discoveries to share.

Because this group has been so very helpful to me in the past (and thank
you all again, for the assistance you've rendered me), I was hoping you
had additional ideas for me for this workshop.

--
Claire Petersky (petersky@halcyon.com)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Activities for a introductory workshop on genealogy? #general

Claire Petersky <petersky@...>
 

I belong to a progressive Jewish organization (Kadima, in Seattle, WA
(USA)) that promotes education for its members, both adults and children.
Another member was going to host a workshop on Jewish genealogy and later
backed out; I volunteered to substitute.

Now I'm thinking about what kinds of things we should do as a part of the
workshop. I'd really like to have some resources available for the
workshop just for people to look at, so I'll reserve some books >from the
library to have available. I'll also see if I can bring a computer and a
net connection, so people can look around the http://www.jewishgen.org/
site. I also can testify to the general helpfulness of the genealogy
librarian at the downtown branch of the library.

One of the things I was thinking about doing is having a great deal of
space to work in and do the following: to divide the room first up into
four areas: North America, Europe, Rest of the World, and Don't Know. Each
of these places would be mapped out according the geography of these
places. (So that Florida would be in one corner of the North America
space, and California across >from it, and then Alaska/West coast of Canada
across >from that, and so on.) Then have each person choose the lineage
that they know the most about the furthest back (for me, this would be my
father's mother's mother's father, for example). Then go back, decade by
decade and have people say who they are, and where exactly they are
standing. So the first "turn", is now, and everyone would be standing in
place, in Seattle. The next turn, it'd be 1990, and maybe most people
would be in Seattle, but maybe some others, wouldn't. By 1940, most of us
would no longer be us, we'd be our parents, standing perhaps mostly in
other places in North America. By 1910, most of us would be our
grandparents, and some would be standing in Europe, some in North America.
By 1880, probably most of us would be our great-grandparents, standing in
Europe -- and probably a fair portion would be standing in the "I don't
know" region of the room. A generation further back, and who would still
be outside the "I don't know"?

I was thinking of doing this, because as people move about the room, they
get a real physical sense of how we, and those before us, moved around.

I was also thinking of having people put pins in a map, maybe with
different colors for different generations, to illustrate this in a
different way -- to be able to show all the places we have been and have
come from. As the child of an interfaith marriage, I've also thought of
maybe different pins in some way for those ancestors that are not Jewish.
Kadima has a very inclusive philosophy and is very accepting of interfaith
marriages. So I'd like to include the non-Jewish ancestors for those who
have them. At the same time, the history of these non-Jewish ancestors are
different than the Jewish ones, and I'd like to have them differentiated
in some way. Or is this being too divisive for a group with such strongly
stated inclusive values?

Beyond this, I'm not sure of what to offer. I'm very new at this genealogy
thing myself, so it isn't like I have great resources personally or great
discoveries to share.

Because this group has been so very helpful to me in the past (and thank
you all again, for the assistance you've rendered me), I was hoping you
had additional ideas for me for this workshop.

--
Claire Petersky (petersky@halcyon.com)


Re: Herzogtum Bukowiner Lodge #general

Qedetc@...
 

Dan,

You may want to try sending an inquiry to JGSNY@aol.com. The Jewish
Genealogy Society of New York is assembling a database of societies
and their associated cemetery plots as well as gathering information
on the societies themselves.
They were very helpfull to me when I sent them a post.

Best of luck,

Tracy Lewis
Anchorage, AK


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Herzogtum Bukowiner Lodge #general

Qedetc@...
 

Dan,

You may want to try sending an inquiry to JGSNY@aol.com. The Jewish
Genealogy Society of New York is assembling a database of societies
and their associated cemetery plots as well as gathering information
on the societies themselves.
They were very helpfull to me when I sent them a post.

Best of luck,

Tracy Lewis
Anchorage, AK


Re: teaching kids #general

Carol Skydell <skydell@...>
 

Our JGS is looking at possibly talking to the religious schools about jewish
genealogy. We would hope to get them excited as well as involve their
parents. Has anyone done this who we could talk to?

Abby,
This has been on our list of TO Do's for well over a year. Just recently
I've been in communication with a teacher who is interested in curricula
for secular as well as religious schools...JewishGen may have an entire
curriculum in the very near future....stay tuned!

We would also be interested in hearing >from anybody who has done any work
along these lines...

Carol Skydell
JewishGen, Inc.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen re:teaching kids #general

Carol Skydell <skydell@...>
 

Our JGS is looking at possibly talking to the religious schools about jewish
genealogy. We would hope to get them excited as well as involve their
parents. Has anyone done this who we could talk to?

Abby,
This has been on our list of TO Do's for well over a year. Just recently
I've been in communication with a teacher who is interested in curricula
for secular as well as religious schools...JewishGen may have an entire
curriculum in the very near future....stay tuned!

We would also be interested in hearing >from anybody who has done any work
along these lines...

Carol Skydell
JewishGen, Inc.


Re: locating Ushatz #belarus

Carol Skydell <skydell@...>
 

Zachary L. Grayson
Cherry Hill, NJ
zgrayson@wolfblock.com writes he knows that the village of Ushatz is
near Borisov but has not been able to find it...

Zach,
If you haven't already done so, try the JewishGen ShtetlSeeker
You can not only search towns, but find towns within specified distances
of a central location.

Forgive me for being pedantic, but one never knows the level of expertise
of the person asking the question....additionally this message may be of
some help to people just starting out with this addiction we all hold in
common! <grin>

First, find the coordinates for Borisov...here's how:

In the ShtetlSeekr, scroll down 'til you see the Functions...click on "towns"

1. enter the name Borisov, country Belarus in the ShtetlSeeker
search field.
2. select PRECISE spelling since you're sure of it and start the search
3. the report will give you the exact coordinates (which if you click on,
the program will display a map with a star at the exact location of Borisov!)

Go back to the Functions section and this time select "distances"
1. enter the coordinates for Borisov
2. start by selecting a distance parameter...(when you say near
Borisov..."near" is a value judgement, so you need to play with it in terms
of selecting distances)
3. enter Ushatz...and since you could never find it, it could be spelled
completely differently, so select the Daitch-Mokotoff soundex for the
search parameter which will print out all the
towns that sound like Ushatz for whatever distance you selected. If
nothing turns up, enlarge the distance...hopefully you will end up with a
selection of towns that sound like Ushatz, and you can begin to narrow your
search >from that point.

Hope this helps you and others to move forward in your research by using
the tools JewishGen provides.

Carol Skydell
JewishGen Support Team


Belarus SIG #Belarus re: locating Ushatz #belarus

Carol Skydell <skydell@...>
 

Zachary L. Grayson
Cherry Hill, NJ
zgrayson@wolfblock.com writes he knows that the village of Ushatz is
near Borisov but has not been able to find it...

Zach,
If you haven't already done so, try the JewishGen ShtetlSeeker
You can not only search towns, but find towns within specified distances
of a central location.

Forgive me for being pedantic, but one never knows the level of expertise
of the person asking the question....additionally this message may be of
some help to people just starting out with this addiction we all hold in
common! <grin>

First, find the coordinates for Borisov...here's how:

In the ShtetlSeekr, scroll down 'til you see the Functions...click on "towns"

1. enter the name Borisov, country Belarus in the ShtetlSeeker
search field.
2. select PRECISE spelling since you're sure of it and start the search
3. the report will give you the exact coordinates (which if you click on,
the program will display a map with a star at the exact location of Borisov!)

Go back to the Functions section and this time select "distances"
1. enter the coordinates for Borisov
2. start by selecting a distance parameter...(when you say near
Borisov..."near" is a value judgement, so you need to play with it in terms
of selecting distances)
3. enter Ushatz...and since you could never find it, it could be spelled
completely differently, so select the Daitch-Mokotoff soundex for the
search parameter which will print out all the
towns that sound like Ushatz for whatever distance you selected. If
nothing turns up, enlarge the distance...hopefully you will end up with a
selection of towns that sound like Ushatz, and you can begin to narrow your
search >from that point.

Hope this helps you and others to move forward in your research by using
the tools JewishGen provides.

Carol Skydell
JewishGen Support Team


The Search Continues... #general

Ricki L. Zunk <rickiz@...>
 

First, I want to thank ALL of you who wrote to tell me how to find my
maternal ggparents in Philly. Unfortunately, I've tried just about
everything you have all suggested.

On Thursday, I spent 9 hours straight in the Miami-Dade Public Library,
going through the Philadelphia City Directories >from 1890 thru 1928 --
looking for anything that could help me with locating Ida Raizel
Levinsky COHAN and her husband Hyman/Haskell COHAN. I tried to glean as
much info as possible >from those directories. Here's what I found:

The family spelled their name C-O-H-A-N, but in every directory, it was
spelled C-O-H-E-N. No once was it spelled with an "A" in any of the
directories.

There were lots of Hyman Cohans there, but usually spelled H-Y-M-E-N.
I'm not sure what that meant.

In the 1910 directory, I found a listing for "COHEN, Ida widow, 523
Kater St., Phila., PA. THAT was my mggm! FINALLY, I thought that my
years of frustration were at an end. Immediately, I located the
enumeration district number for the 1910 census, and went directly to
the listing for 523 Kater St. My hand was shaking as I reeled through
the film. I just was so excited. And then... and then... and then I
got to the page with 523 Kater St. and found a HUGE family of Italians
living at that address. Not one COHAN or COHEN to be found anywhere.
The census data was recorded on April 15, 1910. Ida and her three
children were not living there when the census folks dropped by. I felt
totally crushed. My first real lead in more than two decades, and when
I get to the listing in the census they weren't there.

In the 1918 directory, I found a listing for George COHEN at 317 Cross
St. in Philly. George was my mgm's middle brother. In 1917 Louis, the
oldest child died, leaving George to head the family. Great!
Unfortunately, there were no census people around then to fill in the
blanks. Again, I crashed head first into a brick wall. Always just in
sight, but never quite getting there.

The only other bit of information I have is my mgm's marriage license
application. At that time (April 1924) she listed 917 Cross St. as her
home address. Right! Still no more information than that.

YES, I've written to every cemetery in business in by 1900. YES, I got
negative responses >from all of them. YES, I'd love to find a synagogue
with "life cycle" records >from that era, but I have no idea which one,
if any, my mggm belonged to. YES, I have thought about looking for
naturalization records, but I don't believe that my mggf lived in the
USA long enough to have applied. I know that his wife never did. YES,
I checked the information >from the death certificates of both of my
mgm's brothers, but nothing of help is found there. NO, the family did
not change their names in Philly -- only the City Directories have the
surname misspelled but all other records I have found >from my mgm and on
her oldest brother's death certificate and tombstone are correctly
spelled.

NOW WHAT????????? I'm feeling pretty well punched out! I wouldn't be
asking for help if I hadn't used ALL of the resources you all have
mentioned to me. In 20+ years, I've tried some pretty strange stuff,
believe me. If I lived in Philly, I'd probably spend weeks at the Balch
and many of the other locations where poor Jewish immigrants would have
gone for help in the 1890s thru 1920s. But I live in the suburbs of
Miami, FL, and the commute would cost a bit more than I can afford.

IF ANYONE has a NEW suggestions, please write to me privately.

TIA,
Ricki Randall Zunk
<rickiz@mindspring.com>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Search Continues... #general

Ricki L. Zunk <rickiz@...>
 

First, I want to thank ALL of you who wrote to tell me how to find my
maternal ggparents in Philly. Unfortunately, I've tried just about
everything you have all suggested.

On Thursday, I spent 9 hours straight in the Miami-Dade Public Library,
going through the Philadelphia City Directories >from 1890 thru 1928 --
looking for anything that could help me with locating Ida Raizel
Levinsky COHAN and her husband Hyman/Haskell COHAN. I tried to glean as
much info as possible >from those directories. Here's what I found:

The family spelled their name C-O-H-A-N, but in every directory, it was
spelled C-O-H-E-N. No once was it spelled with an "A" in any of the
directories.

There were lots of Hyman Cohans there, but usually spelled H-Y-M-E-N.
I'm not sure what that meant.

In the 1910 directory, I found a listing for "COHEN, Ida widow, 523
Kater St., Phila., PA. THAT was my mggm! FINALLY, I thought that my
years of frustration were at an end. Immediately, I located the
enumeration district number for the 1910 census, and went directly to
the listing for 523 Kater St. My hand was shaking as I reeled through
the film. I just was so excited. And then... and then... and then I
got to the page with 523 Kater St. and found a HUGE family of Italians
living at that address. Not one COHAN or COHEN to be found anywhere.
The census data was recorded on April 15, 1910. Ida and her three
children were not living there when the census folks dropped by. I felt
totally crushed. My first real lead in more than two decades, and when
I get to the listing in the census they weren't there.

In the 1918 directory, I found a listing for George COHEN at 317 Cross
St. in Philly. George was my mgm's middle brother. In 1917 Louis, the
oldest child died, leaving George to head the family. Great!
Unfortunately, there were no census people around then to fill in the
blanks. Again, I crashed head first into a brick wall. Always just in
sight, but never quite getting there.

The only other bit of information I have is my mgm's marriage license
application. At that time (April 1924) she listed 917 Cross St. as her
home address. Right! Still no more information than that.

YES, I've written to every cemetery in business in by 1900. YES, I got
negative responses >from all of them. YES, I'd love to find a synagogue
with "life cycle" records >from that era, but I have no idea which one,
if any, my mggm belonged to. YES, I have thought about looking for
naturalization records, but I don't believe that my mggf lived in the
USA long enough to have applied. I know that his wife never did. YES,
I checked the information >from the death certificates of both of my
mgm's brothers, but nothing of help is found there. NO, the family did
not change their names in Philly -- only the City Directories have the
surname misspelled but all other records I have found >from my mgm and on
her oldest brother's death certificate and tombstone are correctly
spelled.

NOW WHAT????????? I'm feeling pretty well punched out! I wouldn't be
asking for help if I hadn't used ALL of the resources you all have
mentioned to me. In 20+ years, I've tried some pretty strange stuff,
believe me. If I lived in Philly, I'd probably spend weeks at the Balch
and many of the other locations where poor Jewish immigrants would have
gone for help in the 1890s thru 1920s. But I live in the suburbs of
Miami, FL, and the commute would cost a bit more than I can afford.

IF ANYONE has a NEW suggestions, please write to me privately.

TIA,
Ricki Randall Zunk
<rickiz@mindspring.com>