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Re: I Want My Trees To Outlive Me #general

David Mason
 

Richard Werbin –

 

External CD/DVD drives for laptops and desktops remain an option.  Plus most desktops still have 5.25” bays, plus SATA power and data connectors, so internal drives are easily added. 

 

If the day arrives when you need to move to a system without these options, then it’s time to copy data to some other medium.

 

Meanwhile, I would certainly want long-lived storage that I can retain (several copies) and easily distribute additional copies, that does not heavily depend on “the kindness of strangers”.  Neither magnetic nor “flash” media are reliable enough for the long haul. 

 

Archival paper -- printed with toner rather than ink – is another option, but it isn’t reliably machine-readable.  I have used OCR for both English and Russian text.  The output has ALWAYS needed careful proofing and correction.

 

-David Mason


Re: How to correct information in Jewishgen Databases / Polish letters #records #poland

Stephen Weinstein
 

On Fri, Aug 28, 2020 at 06:42 AM, Miriam Bulwar David-Hay wrote:
in Polish there is a stroke through the l
That's not an "L" with a stroke; it's a completely different letter that just looks like an L with a stroke.

The letter L (uppercase) / l (lowercase) looks the same in English and Polish.  See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_alphabet#Letters

The letter Ł (uppercase) / ł (lowercase) is another letter.  In Polish, it is pronounced similarly to the letter W in English.  See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C5%81

Stephen Weinstein
Camarillo, CA, USA


Coalition of Guardians Launched--a Project Dealing with Jewish Cemeteries All Over Poland #announcements #poland

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

A new initiative: Coalition of Guardians of Jewish Cemeteries in Poland was announced by Foundation for the Preservation of Jewish Heritage in Poland. It includes a map with all the Jewish cemeteries located in Poland. Each cemetery has its own subpage where one can check who looks after the place.  https://cmentarzezydowskie.org/

 

Note: I am taking the word of “all” from their website. I was not able to find my ancestral towns’ cemeteries listed.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


I Want My Trees To Outlive Me #general

YaleZuss@...
 

Like anything reproducible you want to preserve, the best approach is diversification, i.e., multiple copies on paper, on the computer, on a service, etc.  Another place to preserve your data is by sending it periodically to family members who have expressed an interest in it.  That gives you copies on other computers and/or hard copy in other places.

I developed my own formatter for my trees, so I can print it out as hard copy or to a .pdf which can then be sent to my mailing list of relatives.  At the request of various cousins, I don't post it online.  I have one chart and mailing list for each of my great-grandparents; anyone descended from any of them who has expressed interest gets a copy of any tree on which (s)he appears. 
 
There are about two dozen copies of each of the trees floating around in different combinations of the US, Europe, Israel, South America, and the Pacific.  Barring simultaneous loss of interest by all of these people, or an Andromeda Strain-type pathogen, the only remaining contingency not addressed is earth being struck by an asteroid.  I'm working on that.
 
Yale Zussman


Two Dawid APOTHEKER on Sugihara List-Only One Reached Japan-An Enigma #holocaust #lithuania #poland

YaleZuss@...
 

Jacob,

This process is discussed at length in "The Fugu Plan: The Untold Story of the Japanese and the Jews During World War II" by Marvin Tokayer and Mary Swartz (1979).  While it may not give you the information you're looking for, it will certainly lay out the context in a way that may identify sources you should check.
 
Yale Zussman


Re: Were there markings on headstones that identify who the stonecutters were? #unitedkingdom

Rodney Eisfelder
 

Jacquie asked "Were there markings on Jewish headstones that identify who the stonecutters were?"
The answer has to be "sometimes".

Some Jewish headstones have markings identifying the stonemason. It is common in some cemeteries, in some periods, but it is not a universal practice. It may be more a matter of the business practices of the (usually non-jewish) stonemason than anything else.
Looking at my photos from one of the Jewish sections of St Kilda Cemetery here in Melbourne, I can see several stones with the stone mason identified either by a little metal plaque or a small engraving.

Rodney Eisfelder
Melbourne, Australia


Re: Were there markings on headstones that identify who the stonecutters were? #unitedkingdom

geoffrey
 

Here in Melbourne, Australia it is common practice for the stone mason to leave a small plaque with his contact details in a discreet place on the tombstone. Usually in the lower corner of the plinth or base of the setting that surrounds the grave.

Geoffrey Ackerman


Re: legal name change in New York. #general

ewkent@...
 

Dear Allan Jordan/"A. E. Jordan",

have not contacted the court involved with my grandfather's name change -- and have not found the name change file.

(I'm not as diligent as many other with respect to genealogy.)

I do not quite understand what you said in your final paragraph with respect to the New York City Department of Health and birth certificates: I'm not (myself) certain that it could be said that the birth certificate was "reissued" (as I stated, I saw on the microfilm the original certificate with some material added (mostly as hand-stamped text).

My research at Ancestry.com (and my impression from what little my father said about this when he was alive) lead me to believe that although (legally) the name change had been completed by September of 1940, neither my grandfather, my grandmother (who probably never used the name "Kent" for herself), nor my father or his 2 brothers publicly used "Kent" until at least 1948 -- so I suspect (although I do not know) that my grandfather (or a lawyer representing him) contacted the Health Department when he finally decided to publicly use his new name -- and that that is what prompted the Health Department to amend the birth certificate to what I saw on the microfilm a few years ago (not "they needed it for something [unspecified] else", then).

Ethan W. Kent
New York City.


Re: Other names for Yitzchak? #names

Jeff Miller
 

Many names depending on original location of the family. Variations can include Icek for instance. I’m named after Avraham Yitzhak from the part of Russia that is now Lithuania.

Jeff Miller
Maryland


Re: I Want My Trees To Outlive Me #general

Joan Parker
 

DVDs are not a long term option.
Today most laptops & desktops no longer include a DVD / CD reader. It is considered to be an obsolete options and is no longer supported.

Yes, that is true but an external DVD player can be bought (mine from Best Buy).  I've had mine for about two years and it works very well and is inexpensive.. I also bought much earlier an external hard drive.  


Joan Parker
Past President/Archivist
JGS of Greater Miami, Inc.
1) GOLDBERG/ GOULD, GOODSTEIN/GUDSTEIN, BERGER, GERBER/CRAWFORD, JAGODA-Lipno, Plonsk, Plock, Poland-Russia; Warsaw, Poland-Russia; Galveston, TX; Bronx and Brooklyn, NY, Portland, OR, Los Angeles/Hollywood, CA.
2)  PARKER/PINKUS, WINOGRAD, (GERSHO-BEROVNA?)., R0SEN, -Brest (Litovsk), Belarus; Grodno, Russia; Bronx and Brooklyn, NY. WEISS, NEIKRUG, DEL PINO--Brooklyn, NY.  RABWIN--Hollywood, CA, Salt Lake City, UT. CLAYTON-California.
3) GELFAND, KRITZOFF, KATZ, TROCK --Berezin/Bresin, Kodima, Minsk, Belarus, Bronx, NY, Miami and Miami Beach, FL.



Seeking Volunteer for Hungarian Burial Records #hungary #slovakia #austria-czech

Vivian Kahn
 

Nolan Altman was contacted by a woman in Austria who has taken a batch of pictures of matzevot in Jewish cemeteries including Frauenkirchen, Eisenstadt, Dobra Voda and Rusovce.  We’re looking for a volunteer to review the photos, some of which include non-Jewish burials, pick out the ones that may be Jewish and enter records into the JOWBR spreadsheet. Nolan can find help for translating those in Hebrew. Please contact me off-list if you are interested in helping with this effort.
--
Vivian Kahn, Santa Rosa, California
JewishGen Hungarian Research Director


#romania #hungary #romania #hungary

Vivian Kahn
 

Nolan Altman was contacted by a woman in Austria who has taken a batch of pictures of matzevot in Jewish cemeteries in formerly Hungarian areas in Transylvania, now Romania, including Alsojara (Iara), Szilagycseh (Cehu Silvaniei), and Hidalmas.  We’re looking for a volunteer to review the photos, some of which include non-Jewish burials, pick out the ones that may be Jewish and enter records into the JOWBR spreadsheet. Nolan can find help for translating those in Hebrew. Please contact me off-list if you are interested in helping with this effort.
--
Vivian Kahn, Santa Rosa, California
JewishGen Hungarian Research Director


Seeking Volunteer for Hungarian Burial Records #hungary #records

Vivian Kahn
 

Nolan Altman was contacted by a woman in Austria who has taken a batch of pictures of matzevot in Jewish cemeteries including Gyekenes in Somogy and Pecs.  We’re looking for a volunteer to review the photos, some of which include non-Jewish burials, pick out the ones that may be Jewish and enter records into the JOWBR spreadsheet. Nolan can find help for translating those in Hebrew. Please contact me off-list if you are interested in helping with this effort.
--
Vivian Kahn, Santa Rosa, California
JewishGen Hungarian Research Director


Re: Searching Hamburg lists for family groups #records

erikagottfried53@...
 

On Fri, Aug 28, 2020 at 09:39 AM, Alan Reische wrote:
Hamburg
Are you certain that they embarked from Hamburg?  Family Search 's Wiki includes links to databases for Bremen, for example.  ( https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Bremen_Emigration/Immigration#Online_Databases ) Part of my own family departed from Cherbourg.  

Another thing to consider is that it was common for many immigrants to sail to England first.  My grandfather, for example, sailed from Liverpool. What port he left from to get to Liverpool is anyone's guess.  The passenger record I found for him is a U.S. document, but it occurs to me just now that his passage may also have been noted in English passenger records as well (going to follow up on that as soon as I log off!).  I have encountered instances for other people in which they appeared in English passenger records but not in U.S. records.
 
--
Erika Gottfried
Teaneck, New Jersey


Re: Were there markings on headstones that identify who the stonecutters were? #unitedkingdom

Susan&David
 

As a regular contributor to tombstone translations on JewishGen's Viewmate (there are more than 7,000 examples) I have seen most of them.  I don't remember ever having seen one.  

David Rosen
Boston, MA


On 8/29/2020 12:34 PM, Our Jewish Family History Research via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
Hi all:

Perhaps a member has knowledge of the following:
Were there markings on Jewish headstones that identify who the stonecutters were?
Many thanks in advance.

Jacquie

Jacqueline GRUSZECKI
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Researching IUZIS and POPPEL/POPEL/POPIL
from Dorohoi, București, Herța and Panciu


Translation from old German Siddur or Machsor #translation

Marion Bank
 

 I found a very old prayer book, from the 1800's, with a handwritten inscription in German. I am unable to read it and would appreciate it if someone could translate it for me.
It was submitted to Viewmate with ID 84993.
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
Marion Stolzenberg Bank


Re: Were there markings on headstones that identify who the stonecutters were? #unitedkingdom

Neil Kominsky
 

I have never seen markings identifying the stonecutter, and I have looked at a lot of headstones.
 
Rabbi Neil Kominsky
Brookline, MA


Re: I Want My Trees To Outlive Me #general

erikagottfried53@...
 

Peter, I could not agree with you more, and you've described this problem so well and succinctly.  

My experience as archivist for a special historical collection for more than three decades completely bears out your too-valid fears about preservation of digital data.  Entire databases I created using mainstream software are no longer accessible or readable.  And I've seen online data disappear. This is what keeps me up at night (or used to before the pandemic became my number one worry).  The digital dark ages is a threat to more than genealogical data.

I'm also with you about keeping genealogical information and family histories online and/or in digital form as well as on paper.

My own question, though, is -- how best to preserve genealogies and family history in print when most of the data you've gathered has been stored either online and/or on your computer within a software program?  I think that's situation that many, if not most of us, are facing. Most of the data I've collected, for example, I've stored in Family Treemaker.   FTM does have a report format, but its reports don't appear contain all of the information that I've saved into FTM, and I would like to retain every bit of that information that I can.  And converting that information into a formal book is a daunting prospect.  Also, I would want to be able to update the information easily and as often as necessary (I'm envisioning an annual or semi-annual print out) so my descendants would have the most recent data I had available--but a book is static.

What would be the best way to preserve all of the data in print that would be efficient and clear, but not as a book? Something serviceable, but not necessarily smooth and pretty!  (This foregoing is another thing that has keep me up at night!) Any advice from you or anyone else on this question would be welcome.  

Re electronic genealogies, I believe that Family Search would be the best bet for attempting to preserve genealogies digitally because of its institutional affiliation with the Mormon church.  The Church has been, and I think is likely to continue to be a more stable entity than any online company--commercial companies come and go, but major religions tend to stick around longer.   Also, because of genealogy's central role in Mormonism the motivation for making sure the data is protected and continues to be available and accessible is greater than that of commercial enterprises.


Erika Gottfried
Teaneck, New Jersey


Re: Other names for Yitzchak? #names

Marcel Apsel
 

Eisig and Ayzik

Marcel Apsel


Re: How to correct information in Jewishgen Databases #records

karen.silver@juno.com
 

I agree with Dani and will provide a true example.  My paternal grandmother's headstone says that she was born on May 30, 1895.  When we unveiled the headstone in 1983, my grandfather asked if my father approved of the birth date he chose.  My grandfather explained that they had lied so much about the date that he didn't remember the truth so he decided to make her younger for eternity.  
 
Many immigrants like my paternal grandmother had no documentation of their birth.  She knew she was born in the spring so she chose May 30th, Decoration Day later called Memorial Day, because she wanted her birthday to always fall on a holiday.  No one has any idea what the exact date was.
 
Karen Silver

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