Date   

Oct. 15 memorial ceremony at Bahnsteig 17, Berlin. #general

Yvonne Stern
 

A memorial service in honor of the thousands of Jews deported from
Berlin will be held at the Track 17 Memorial Bahnhof Grunewald, on
Thursday, October 15.

The first Berlin "Osttransport" with 1,089 Jewish children, women
and men left >from the Grunewald railway station to "Litzmannstadt"
(Lodz) on 18 October 1941. >from 1942 on, deportation trains also
drove >from Anhalter station and the freight station Moabit. The
transports headed to ghettos, concentration and extermination
camps in Minsk, Kaunas, Riga, Piaski, Warsaw, Theresienstadt,
Sobibor, Rasik, Auschwitz and Sachsenhausen.

Yvonne Stern
Rio de Janeiro - Brasil


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Oct. 15 memorial ceremony at Bahnsteig 17, Berlin. #general

Yvonne Stern
 

A memorial service in honor of the thousands of Jews deported from
Berlin will be held at the Track 17 Memorial Bahnhof Grunewald, on
Thursday, October 15.

The first Berlin "Osttransport" with 1,089 Jewish children, women
and men left >from the Grunewald railway station to "Litzmannstadt"
(Lodz) on 18 October 1941. >from 1942 on, deportation trains also
drove >from Anhalter station and the freight station Moabit. The
transports headed to ghettos, concentration and extermination
camps in Minsk, Kaunas, Riga, Piaski, Warsaw, Theresienstadt,
Sobibor, Rasik, Auschwitz and Sachsenhausen.

Yvonne Stern
Rio de Janeiro - Brasil


ViewMate Translation Request - Polish #general

Marilyn Silva <marilynsilva32@...>
 

Genners,

I have posted a birth record in Polish for which I need a
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address.

www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33604 .

Thank you
Marilyn Silva

KISTENBERG, TREITER/TRAYDER, GRZEBIN, ZALOSZYNSKI
- all >from Warsaw Gubernia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen ViewMate Translation Request - Polish #general

Marilyn Silva <marilynsilva32@...>
 

Genners,

I have posted a birth record in Polish for which I need a
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address.

www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM33604 .

Thank you
Marilyn Silva

KISTENBERG, TREITER/TRAYDER, GRZEBIN, ZALOSZYNSKI
- all >from Warsaw Gubernia


Find LEVINE U.S. Naturalization Records #general

Edward Levine <edxaide@...>
 

Dear Friends,

I am hoping you can give me some advise. I am doing family research
and I have, I think, established that 2 of my grandparents were born
in Grodno, Belarus and one in Minsk, Belarus. The last grandfather,
Samuel LEVINE, is noted as being born in Yletz, Russia which might be
Yelets, Russia or Yels'k, Belarus. Also he is buried in a plot part of
the First Paltover Society which would indicate a connection to
Poltava, Ukraine.

At this point I am trying to locate his naturalization papers in hopes
that it will shed some additional light on his hometown and other
useful information. There is a pencil note on one of his papers
indicating naturalization in 1914. In addition his birthname was
something like Krivchenko. I also have a SS# for my grandfather Samuel.
Below is a sample >from the list of Samuel Levine on the index

SURNAME First Name Dec Vol Dec Page Year Pet Vol Pet Page
Soundex Comments

Levine Samuel 121 94 1916 164 66
L150

Ed Levine
Chesapeake Region, USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Find LEVINE U.S. Naturalization Records #general

Edward Levine <edxaide@...>
 

Dear Friends,

I am hoping you can give me some advise. I am doing family research
and I have, I think, established that 2 of my grandparents were born
in Grodno, Belarus and one in Minsk, Belarus. The last grandfather,
Samuel LEVINE, is noted as being born in Yletz, Russia which might be
Yelets, Russia or Yels'k, Belarus. Also he is buried in a plot part of
the First Paltover Society which would indicate a connection to
Poltava, Ukraine.

At this point I am trying to locate his naturalization papers in hopes
that it will shed some additional light on his hometown and other
useful information. There is a pencil note on one of his papers
indicating naturalization in 1914. In addition his birthname was
something like Krivchenko. I also have a SS# for my grandfather Samuel.
Below is a sample >from the list of Samuel Levine on the index

SURNAME First Name Dec Vol Dec Page Year Pet Vol Pet Page
Soundex Comments

Levine Samuel 121 94 1916 164 66
L150

Ed Levine
Chesapeake Region, USA


Re: Smithsonian Article On Why Names Were Not Changed At Ellis Island #general

Joel Weintraub
 

Hi Group,

Since I have a major section in talks I give on the myth of name changes at
Ellis Island, and we are having an interesting discussion on this, I want to
add some information.

1. Most tickets were sold by agents to potential immigrants. As part of
that process they filled out, in advance, the answers to questions on the
manifest. The agent then submitted the lists to the shipping agency. Thus
the clerks that actually prepared the manifest (notice that the handwriting
on each page was usually the same for all entries) worked >from those lists
and probably didn't interact with the immigrants directly. That's why if
the person did not sail, their name was crossed off the already existing
list. Thus although there is a possibility of error in the rewriting of a
name, it reduces errors >from not hearing correctly the name of a person.

2. Some countries required papers for immigrants to exit their borders.
Forged papers or using papers of someone else could lead to that name on the
manifest because that was the name the ticket was bought under.

3. There was no reason for the staff at the immigration centers (Ellis
Island the main one with 70% of incoming immigrants) to change a person's
name. They had limited time (seconds really for each individual) for the
horde of immigrants they faced to ask simple questions like: who bought your
ticket, where are you going, how much $$ do you have, do you have friends or
relatives here, do you have employment. This is to decide whether to put
people in detention. About 20% of Ellis Island immigrants ended up on the
detention lists, 6% of all immigrants went to "Special Inquiry", and 2% of
total immigrants were deported for things like LPC (Likely Public Charge...
no $$, no contacts in the U.S.), or CL (Contract Laborer, since it was
illegal for U.S. companies to have offered a job in advance to the
immigrants). That's why "who paid for your ticket" was asked since many
immigrants couldn't afford one, and they had to be very careful how they
responded.

4. Before the immigrant stepped on Ellis Island, they were given tags with
their name on it, and the Manifest page and line number. They were to pin
the tag on their outer clothing. It also sped up the process as the
inspectors had the manifest in front of them when questioning an immigrant,
and the immigrants were separated into ship, and manifest page. So the
inspectors at Ellis Island did not have to ask them what their names were...
they could have read it >from the tags directly. (Most but not all pictures
of immigrants at the Island show them wearing the tags). The immigrants
did not have to show or be literate until a literacy requirement was put
into effect in 1917. For most of the years that Ellis Island was
operating, the immigrants were not required to show proof of who they were.
They only had their "good name" on the manifest, on their medical card, and
on their landing tag and their wits about them to get through the U.S.
immigration entry process.

5. Although the manifest may show some modifications of names, this was not
a requirement of the inspectors, nor did they have any paperwork to
formalize that procedure. The immigrant probably could ask for modification
of names.

6. There was no requirement that the immigrant use the name on the manifest
once they entered the United States proper.

Now, there IS a case of a person's name being changed at Ellis Island. It's
the exception that proves the rule. Frank Woodhull's name was changed to
Mary Johnson. See:
http://www.nypl.org/blog/2013/07/02/name-changes-ellis-island

Joel Weintraub
Dana Point, CA
census1950@cox.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Smithsonian Article On Why Names Were Not Changed At Ellis Island #general

Joel Weintraub
 

Hi Group,

Since I have a major section in talks I give on the myth of name changes at
Ellis Island, and we are having an interesting discussion on this, I want to
add some information.

1. Most tickets were sold by agents to potential immigrants. As part of
that process they filled out, in advance, the answers to questions on the
manifest. The agent then submitted the lists to the shipping agency. Thus
the clerks that actually prepared the manifest (notice that the handwriting
on each page was usually the same for all entries) worked >from those lists
and probably didn't interact with the immigrants directly. That's why if
the person did not sail, their name was crossed off the already existing
list. Thus although there is a possibility of error in the rewriting of a
name, it reduces errors >from not hearing correctly the name of a person.

2. Some countries required papers for immigrants to exit their borders.
Forged papers or using papers of someone else could lead to that name on the
manifest because that was the name the ticket was bought under.

3. There was no reason for the staff at the immigration centers (Ellis
Island the main one with 70% of incoming immigrants) to change a person's
name. They had limited time (seconds really for each individual) for the
horde of immigrants they faced to ask simple questions like: who bought your
ticket, where are you going, how much $$ do you have, do you have friends or
relatives here, do you have employment. This is to decide whether to put
people in detention. About 20% of Ellis Island immigrants ended up on the
detention lists, 6% of all immigrants went to "Special Inquiry", and 2% of
total immigrants were deported for things like LPC (Likely Public Charge...
no $$, no contacts in the U.S.), or CL (Contract Laborer, since it was
illegal for U.S. companies to have offered a job in advance to the
immigrants). That's why "who paid for your ticket" was asked since many
immigrants couldn't afford one, and they had to be very careful how they
responded.

4. Before the immigrant stepped on Ellis Island, they were given tags with
their name on it, and the Manifest page and line number. They were to pin
the tag on their outer clothing. It also sped up the process as the
inspectors had the manifest in front of them when questioning an immigrant,
and the immigrants were separated into ship, and manifest page. So the
inspectors at Ellis Island did not have to ask them what their names were...
they could have read it >from the tags directly. (Most but not all pictures
of immigrants at the Island show them wearing the tags). The immigrants
did not have to show or be literate until a literacy requirement was put
into effect in 1917. For most of the years that Ellis Island was
operating, the immigrants were not required to show proof of who they were.
They only had their "good name" on the manifest, on their medical card, and
on their landing tag and their wits about them to get through the U.S.
immigration entry process.

5. Although the manifest may show some modifications of names, this was not
a requirement of the inspectors, nor did they have any paperwork to
formalize that procedure. The immigrant probably could ask for modification
of names.

6. There was no requirement that the immigrant use the name on the manifest
once they entered the United States proper.

Now, there IS a case of a person's name being changed at Ellis Island. It's
the exception that proves the rule. Frank Woodhull's name was changed to
Mary Johnson. See:
http://www.nypl.org/blog/2013/07/02/name-changes-ellis-island

Joel Weintraub
Dana Point, CA
census1950@cox.net


Re: Emigration from Germany, 1933 #general

Eva Lawrence
 

Subject: Emigration >from Germany to Palestine in 1933
From: Liz Hanellin <liz_hanellin@yahoo.com>

... does anyone know whether the date of September 10, 1933 is of
particular significance >from a German or German Jewish perspective?
A brother of Ludwig's emmigrated to Luxembourg on the same date.
Hitler became Reichs Chancellor on January 30th 1933, and the National
Socialist (NAZI) Party gained a majority in the Reichstag election of March
5th 1933. In April there was an organised boycott of Jewish businesses. A
large number of Jews left Germany that year

But I'd say that the choice of September 10th for emigration would simply
be a matter of family circumstances: eg there might be the sale of a
house to arrange.

Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Emigration from Germany, 1933 #general

Eva Lawrence
 

Subject: Emigration >from Germany to Palestine in 1933
From: Liz Hanellin <liz_hanellin@yahoo.com>

... does anyone know whether the date of September 10, 1933 is of
particular significance >from a German or German Jewish perspective?
A brother of Ludwig's emmigrated to Luxembourg on the same date.
Hitler became Reichs Chancellor on January 30th 1933, and the National
Socialist (NAZI) Party gained a majority in the Reichstag election of March
5th 1933. In April there was an organised boycott of Jewish businesses. A
large number of Jews left Germany that year

But I'd say that the choice of September 10th for emigration would simply
be a matter of family circumstances: eg there might be the sale of a
house to arrange.

Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK


Re: Get Your Akt Together #general

Michael Shade
 

It's me :-)

Michael Shade
Brighton, UK

On 4 Oct 2015, at 03:09, moishe.miller@totalben.com wrote:
I have a printout called "Get your Akt together" that describes, over
the course of 11 pages, how to find actual images of Jewish records from
the Polish State Archives. ... Anyone have any ideas where this may
have originated?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Get Your Akt Together #general

Michael Shade
 

It's me :-)

Michael Shade
Brighton, UK

On 4 Oct 2015, at 03:09, moishe.miller@totalben.com wrote:
I have a printout called "Get your Akt together" that describes, over
the course of 11 pages, how to find actual images of Jewish records from
the Polish State Archives. ... Anyone have any ideas where this may
have originated?


Re: Smithsonian Article On Why Names Were Not Changed at Ellis Island #general

A. E. Jordan
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Jan Meisels Allen

To add to the library of articles that says the names
were not changed at Ellis Island is this article from
the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC.
The Smithsonian article reminds me to point out some other
issues about names which were not in that article. It is
also apropos of a posting this week where someone was asking
about a possible passenger list but was pointing to
discrepancies both in spelling and date.

First people were not as precise 100 plus years ago with
spelling and a lot of the people were not familiar with the
Latin alphabet that we use in the west. Even some of the
immigrants (my gggf included) while considered learned did not
read and write in the Latin alphabet. (I have my ggf's
naturalization papers >from 1902 which include "his mark"
instead of a signature.)

The other thing is the clerks at the docks in Germany, Holland,
Antwerp, etc. were not as familiar with the easterners and the
various languages/dialects coming at them. I have always
believed that some of the issues we see on the passenger lists
are the result of what the clerks thought they heard and wrote
down as they were making out the passenger lists or maybe even
earlier when they were selling the tickets to the immigrants.
At Ellis Island they used interpreters but I am not sure if the
shipping lines had those skills and especially on the ships.

I have always believed if names where unwittingly changed it
most likely happened at the point of origin not at
disembarkation at Ellis Island or any other arrival port/station.

But since the immigrants were being identified by the names on
the list, the immigration clerks had to match up what the person
was saying with the list they were given by the ship. Also the
other point that gets surfaced in this discussion is if the
immigrant had their name unwillingly changed why didn't they
revert back to their original name once they had settled into the USA.

Also regarding the date discrepancies, immigrants were notoriously
bad at recalling the dates or changing them to suit the moment.
For example prior to the arrival certificates or the INS efforts
to confirm arrivals immigrants could easily say I am here five
years (often the waiting period) and no one checked. Or they
said I have been here for years and the clerks said close enough
and back dated the form five years or .... or the immigrants
simply did not remember the dates with any precision. Especially
when someone came knocking at their door asking for details (ie
the census takers) and they were put on the spot to give precise details.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Smithsonian Article On Why Names Were Not Changed at Ellis Island #general

A. E. Jordan
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Jan Meisels Allen

To add to the library of articles that says the names
were not changed at Ellis Island is this article from
the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC.
The Smithsonian article reminds me to point out some other
issues about names which were not in that article. It is
also apropos of a posting this week where someone was asking
about a possible passenger list but was pointing to
discrepancies both in spelling and date.

First people were not as precise 100 plus years ago with
spelling and a lot of the people were not familiar with the
Latin alphabet that we use in the west. Even some of the
immigrants (my gggf included) while considered learned did not
read and write in the Latin alphabet. (I have my ggf's
naturalization papers >from 1902 which include "his mark"
instead of a signature.)

The other thing is the clerks at the docks in Germany, Holland,
Antwerp, etc. were not as familiar with the easterners and the
various languages/dialects coming at them. I have always
believed that some of the issues we see on the passenger lists
are the result of what the clerks thought they heard and wrote
down as they were making out the passenger lists or maybe even
earlier when they were selling the tickets to the immigrants.
At Ellis Island they used interpreters but I am not sure if the
shipping lines had those skills and especially on the ships.

I have always believed if names where unwittingly changed it
most likely happened at the point of origin not at
disembarkation at Ellis Island or any other arrival port/station.

But since the immigrants were being identified by the names on
the list, the immigration clerks had to match up what the person
was saying with the list they were given by the ship. Also the
other point that gets surfaced in this discussion is if the
immigrant had their name unwillingly changed why didn't they
revert back to their original name once they had settled into the USA.

Also regarding the date discrepancies, immigrants were notoriously
bad at recalling the dates or changing them to suit the moment.
For example prior to the arrival certificates or the INS efforts
to confirm arrivals immigrants could easily say I am here five
years (often the waiting period) and no one checked. Or they
said I have been here for years and the clerks said close enough
and back dated the form five years or .... or the immigrants
simply did not remember the dates with any precision. Especially
when someone came knocking at their door asking for details (ie
the census takers) and they were put on the spot to give precise details.

Allan Jordan


JGS (NY) Meeting - Sunday, October 11 #general

Harriet Mayer
 

Jewish Genealogical Society (NY) Meeting

Sunday, October 11 at 2 PM

At The Village Temple,
33 East 12th St.(between Broadway and University Place, near Union Square)

Program: ">from the Steppes to the Pampas: The Migration of Eastern
European Jews to South America."

Speaker: Victor Armony

Victor Armony will speak about Jewish immigration to South America and, in particular, to Argentina, home of the
6th largest Jewish community in the world. Topics will include the arrival and settlement of tens of thousands of
Eastern European Jews in Buenos Aires at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century, the remarkable
story of the Jewish "cowboys" in the rural colonies of the Pampas, the different patterns of Jewish migration in
the surrounding Spanish-language countries (Chile, Bolivia, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay), and efforts to uncover and
preserve records >from Jewish cemeteries all over that region during the 1990s and early 2000s.

In addition, he will talk about available resources and databases in South America, and share some memories and experiences in his own
quest to connect his Jewish-Polish ancestry, his personal Hispanic cultural background, and his children's
French Canadian identity.

A sociology professor at the University of Quebec in Montreal, Dr. Armony was born in Argentina. He has been
researching his family roots since he was a teenager. His late father, Paul Armony, was the founding president
of Argentina's Jewish Genealogical Association.

No charge for members; guests are welcome - $5 at the door.

More information at www.jgsny.org and at our Facebook page.

Submitted by
Harriet Mayer
JGS VP Communications
New York NY


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS (NY) Meeting - Sunday, October 11 #general

Harriet Mayer
 

Jewish Genealogical Society (NY) Meeting

Sunday, October 11 at 2 PM

At The Village Temple,
33 East 12th St.(between Broadway and University Place, near Union Square)

Program: ">from the Steppes to the Pampas: The Migration of Eastern
European Jews to South America."

Speaker: Victor Armony

Victor Armony will speak about Jewish immigration to South America and, in particular, to Argentina, home of the
6th largest Jewish community in the world. Topics will include the arrival and settlement of tens of thousands of
Eastern European Jews in Buenos Aires at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century, the remarkable
story of the Jewish "cowboys" in the rural colonies of the Pampas, the different patterns of Jewish migration in
the surrounding Spanish-language countries (Chile, Bolivia, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay), and efforts to uncover and
preserve records >from Jewish cemeteries all over that region during the 1990s and early 2000s.

In addition, he will talk about available resources and databases in South America, and share some memories and experiences in his own
quest to connect his Jewish-Polish ancestry, his personal Hispanic cultural background, and his children's
French Canadian identity.

A sociology professor at the University of Quebec in Montreal, Dr. Armony was born in Argentina. He has been
researching his family roots since he was a teenager. His late father, Paul Armony, was the founding president
of Argentina's Jewish Genealogical Association.

No charge for members; guests are welcome - $5 at the door.

More information at www.jgsny.org and at our Facebook page.

Submitted by
Harriet Mayer
JGS VP Communications
New York NY


Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland #general

sjhoi@...
 

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland will be held
Wednesday, October 7 starting at 7:30 P.M. in the Miller Boardroom at
Menorah Park Center for Senior Living, 27100 Cedar Rd. in Beachwood.

Cynthia Turk and Laura Hine will present an in-depth demonstration of the
newly-remodeled Cuyahoga County Genweb site.

For further information contact me at 440-473-5364.

Stewart Hoicowitz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland #general

sjhoi@...
 

The next meeting of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Cleveland will be held
Wednesday, October 7 starting at 7:30 P.M. in the Miller Boardroom at
Menorah Park Center for Senior Living, 27100 Cedar Rd. in Beachwood.

Cynthia Turk and Laura Hine will present an in-depth demonstration of the
newly-remodeled Cuyahoga County Genweb site.

For further information contact me at 440-473-5364.

Stewart Hoicowitz


JGS of Greater Philadelphia - October Meeting #general

Lois Sernoff
 

JGS of Greater Philadelphia - October Meeting

Second Annual Steve Schecter Memorial Lecture
Honoring the memory of our esteemed member, Steve Schecter z"l.

Date: Monday, October 12, 2015

Time: 7:30 PM

Place: Main Line Reform Temple-Beth Elohim ,
410 Montgomery Avenue
Wynnewood, PA 19096

Speaker: Stephen P. Morse

Topic: One-Step Webpages: A Potpourri of Genealogical Search Tools

Stephen Morse is the creator of the One-Step Website. He's received both the
Lifetime Achievement and the Outstanding Contribution Award >from the IAJGS, Award of
Merit >from the National Genealogical Society, first-ever Excellence Award >from the
Association of Professional Genealogists, and two awards >from Polish genealogical
societies.

Morse is a computer professional with a doctorate in electrical engineering.
He's best known as the architect of Intel's 8086, which sparked the PC revolution 30 years
ago. His "One Step" Search Pages are widely used by genealogists all over the world. One-Step
website started out as an aid for finding passengers in the Ellis Island database. It was
expanded to help with searching in the 1930 census. Over the years it has continued to evolve and
today includes about 200 web-based tools ranging >from genealogical searches to last-minute
bidding on eBay.

This presentation will describe the range of tools available and give the
highlights of each one.

Mentors will also be available >from 7:00 PM until the start of the meeting
to help with your research efforts.

JGSGP website - http://www.jgsgp.org - is now available with latest news,
upcoming meeting notices, and links to Philadelphia resources.

We can also be found on Facebook.

Please note that JGSGP has a Speaker's Bureau which is available to local
groups on the various subjects concerning genealogy.

Lois Sernoff [JGS Greater Philadelphia]


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS of Greater Philadelphia - October Meeting #general

Lois Sernoff
 

JGS of Greater Philadelphia - October Meeting

Second Annual Steve Schecter Memorial Lecture
Honoring the memory of our esteemed member, Steve Schecter z"l.

Date: Monday, October 12, 2015

Time: 7:30 PM

Place: Main Line Reform Temple-Beth Elohim ,
410 Montgomery Avenue
Wynnewood, PA 19096

Speaker: Stephen P. Morse

Topic: One-Step Webpages: A Potpourri of Genealogical Search Tools

Stephen Morse is the creator of the One-Step Website. He's received both the
Lifetime Achievement and the Outstanding Contribution Award >from the IAJGS, Award of
Merit >from the National Genealogical Society, first-ever Excellence Award >from the
Association of Professional Genealogists, and two awards >from Polish genealogical
societies.

Morse is a computer professional with a doctorate in electrical engineering.
He's best known as the architect of Intel's 8086, which sparked the PC revolution 30 years
ago. His "One Step" Search Pages are widely used by genealogists all over the world. One-Step
website started out as an aid for finding passengers in the Ellis Island database. It was
expanded to help with searching in the 1930 census. Over the years it has continued to evolve and
today includes about 200 web-based tools ranging >from genealogical searches to last-minute
bidding on eBay.

This presentation will describe the range of tools available and give the
highlights of each one.

Mentors will also be available >from 7:00 PM until the start of the meeting
to help with your research efforts.

JGSGP website - http://www.jgsgp.org - is now available with latest news,
upcoming meeting notices, and links to Philadelphia resources.

We can also be found on Facebook.

Please note that JGSGP has a Speaker's Bureau which is available to local
groups on the various subjects concerning genealogy.

Lois Sernoff [JGS Greater Philadelphia]

79821 - 79840 of 654950