Date   

step mother in marriage record? #general

pauline rosenberg
 

Hi all,

My great grandmother Chaya Kupka was born in 1866 in Poland, According to her birth
record, her mother is Szajndla Mlynarsky. However, in her marriage record in 1885,
her mother is Szajndla Borenshtajn. Is it possible this second name belongs to her
step mother, because her real mother died? I can't figure out why there are two
different surnames for her mother. Neither surname looks like a patronymic.

Pauline Rosenberg


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen step mother in marriage record? #general

pauline rosenberg
 

Hi all,

My great grandmother Chaya Kupka was born in 1866 in Poland, According to her birth
record, her mother is Szajndla Mlynarsky. However, in her marriage record in 1885,
her mother is Szajndla Borenshtajn. Is it possible this second name belongs to her
step mother, because her real mother died? I can't figure out why there are two
different surnames for her mother. Neither surname looks like a patronymic.

Pauline Rosenberg


Re: Why are some records in Russian Empire in Polish? #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Pauline Rosenberg wrote:
My great grandmother was born in 1866 in Pinczow, Poland and her birth record was
in Polish. However, she married in 1885 in Wodzislaw and her marriage record
was in Russian. Did some Jewish communities continue to keep their records in
Polish even when they were part of the Russian Empire? Why is it that others, like
Wodzislaw, kept their records in Russian?


Pauline,

from the beginning in 1808, the civil registers were kept in the Polish language.
However, an unsuccessful Polish uprising in 1863 led to reprisals by the Russian
government. Among these was a requirement to keep public records, including civil
registration books, in the Russian language as of April 1868.

Best

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Why are some records in Russian Empire in Polish? #general

Alexander Sharon
 

Pauline Rosenberg wrote:
My great grandmother was born in 1866 in Pinczow, Poland and her birth record was
in Polish. However, she married in 1885 in Wodzislaw and her marriage record
was in Russian. Did some Jewish communities continue to keep their records in
Polish even when they were part of the Russian Empire? Why is it that others, like
Wodzislaw, kept their records in Russian?


Pauline,

from the beginning in 1808, the civil registers were kept in the Polish language.
However, an unsuccessful Polish uprising in 1863 led to reprisals by the Russian
government. Among these was a requirement to keep public records, including civil
registration books, in the Russian language as of April 1868.

Best

Alexander Sharon
Calgary, AB


Re: 1930 Romania Census #romania

Sorin Goldenberg <soring0412@...>
 

from what I know, Romania did not preserve most of its censuses raw data.
I am not sure if it is true for the 1930 census - you can inquire with
the Romanian National institute for statistics -
http://www.insse.ro/cms/ro/content/servicii-de-informare.
Even if the material is available, it will be considered confidential
for 100 years.

Regards,

Sorin Goldenberg

Israel

On Mon, Sep 28, 2015 at 10:00 PM, Matthew Thomas Herzog
matthewherzog85@gmail.com <rom-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:
Hello,
Does anyone have any success with obtaining information about
individuals >from the 1930 general population census of Romania? I
searched online and got a lot of good statistics, but no individual
families were listed. According to the FamilySearch wiki, the records
are located in the National Archives. That information is found here:
https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Romania_Census
I just want to know more about your experiences working with the
National Archives as it related to genealogical information,
specifically with regards to the census. Any steps related to
contacting and requesting research there will also be helpful.
Thank you,

Matthew
Orlando, Florida

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


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to the JewishGen Romania SIG Funds
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Romania SIG #Romania Re: 1930 Romania Census #romania

Sorin Goldenberg <soring0412@...>
 

from what I know, Romania did not preserve most of its censuses raw data.
I am not sure if it is true for the 1930 census - you can inquire with
the Romanian National institute for statistics -
http://www.insse.ro/cms/ro/content/servicii-de-informare.
Even if the material is available, it will be considered confidential
for 100 years.

Regards,

Sorin Goldenberg

Israel

On Mon, Sep 28, 2015 at 10:00 PM, Matthew Thomas Herzog
matthewherzog85@gmail.com <rom-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org> wrote:
Hello,
Does anyone have any success with obtaining information about
individuals >from the 1930 general population census of Romania? I
searched online and got a lot of good statistics, but no individual
families were listed. According to the FamilySearch wiki, the records
are located in the National Archives. That information is found here:
https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Romania_Census
I just want to know more about your experiences working with the
National Archives as it related to genealogical information,
specifically with regards to the census. Any steps related to
contacting and requesting research there will also be helpful.
Thank you,

Matthew
Orlando, Florida

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~=
~~~
Watch JewishGen=E2=80=99s video =E2=80=93 click here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DnASSn4rDXh4
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Support the work of YOUR Romania-SIG with a contribution
to the JewishGen Romania SIG Funds
HELP US TO HELP YOU
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=
=3D20

-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~=
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~=
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
To send messages to ROM-SIG List: <rom-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>.
ROM-SIG is a part of JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy.
Visit the ROM-SIG home page at < http://www.jewishgen.org/romsig >.
Search for previous archived messages at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.isa?jg~jgsys~sigspop
-------------------------------------------------------------------------=
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This list is supported by JewishGen. Become a contributor:
< http://www.jewishgen.org/jewishgen-erosity/contribute.html >.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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your story! Please email us at info@JewishGen.org today."
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Searching for descendants of Mordechai HOROWITZ of Minsk 18-19th cent. #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

While researching my connection to Rabbi David , Rav of Novarudok, in the 18-19th
cent and our connection to the HOROWITZ family I was informed by Arthur Golnick,
(a descendant of R' David) that a certain Mordechai HOROWITZ of Minsk was a
"Mehootan" (in-Law) of Rabbi David, in that Mordechai's daughter was married to
R' David's son Moshe (named after his grandfather Moshe of Klezk).

I would be happy to know if any of Mordechai and/or Moshe's descendants are on
this forum or if anyone knows of them. As of now I can not make an exact
connection between our family and R' David's or the HOROWITZs though many oral
sources in our ABRAMOWITZ family state that we are family.

Since I have posted this in the past on the HOROWITZ family group site
but have never received a reply, may be I didn't post it correctly, I
would appreciate it if someone >from the HOROWITZ family could do it for me.

To add to the above, the"oral sources" which I noted above mention a specific
reference to Rabbi Isaac S. HUREWITZ (d. 1936 Hartford, Ct.) and to his
cousin R'Shimon "Schoichet" HUREWITZ (d. 1960s Petach Tikva, Israel)
but again give no exact connection except for mentioning them as "cousins".

Thank you all for you help, and wishing all a Chag Sameach/Happy Succot holiday.

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for descendants of Mordechai HOROWITZ of Minsk 18-19th cent. #general

Yonatan Ben-Ari
 

While researching my connection to Rabbi David , Rav of Novarudok, in the 18-19th
cent and our connection to the HOROWITZ family I was informed by Arthur Golnick,
(a descendant of R' David) that a certain Mordechai HOROWITZ of Minsk was a
"Mehootan" (in-Law) of Rabbi David, in that Mordechai's daughter was married to
R' David's son Moshe (named after his grandfather Moshe of Klezk).

I would be happy to know if any of Mordechai and/or Moshe's descendants are on
this forum or if anyone knows of them. As of now I can not make an exact
connection between our family and R' David's or the HOROWITZs though many oral
sources in our ABRAMOWITZ family state that we are family.

Since I have posted this in the past on the HOROWITZ family group site
but have never received a reply, may be I didn't post it correctly, I
would appreciate it if someone >from the HOROWITZ family could do it for me.

To add to the above, the"oral sources" which I noted above mention a specific
reference to Rabbi Isaac S. HUREWITZ (d. 1936 Hartford, Ct.) and to his
cousin R'Shimon "Schoichet" HUREWITZ (d. 1960s Petach Tikva, Israel)
but again give no exact connection except for mentioning them as "cousins".

Thank you all for you help, and wishing all a Chag Sameach/Happy Succot holiday.

Yoni Ben-Ari, Jerusalem


KATZ family questions #general

Adam Goodheart
 

The surname KATZ is obviously among the more difficult Ashkenazi ones to research.
My great-grandmother Brana Katz (1880-1958) and her younger brothers, Motel/Max,
Chaim/Hyman, and Zisia/Samuel, immigrated to Philadelphia between 1908 and 1920.
Their father was Abram KATZ (c. 1855-c. 1900) and they came >from Dunaevtsy (in
Yiddish, Dinovitz) in western Podolia Gubernia, not far >from Kamianets-Podolskiy.
The brothers were all carpenters in Dunaevtsy; perhaps their father was as well.
Like most KATZes,they were Cohanim. Unfortunately, I have little other information.

However, in the course of my research, I found many, many other intertwined KATZ
familes >from Dunaevtsy and surrounding towns (Kalyus,Yarmolintsy, Zinkov, Zhvanets,
Minkovtsy) who went to Philadelphia around the same time and mostly settled in the
same neighborhood in North Philadelphia. A disproportionate number were
woodworkers, according to their passenger manifests -- carpenters, joiners,
coopers -- which further suggests a relationship. A rather astonishing
proportion also married other people with the surname KATZ. Quite a few of the men
also married women with rabbinical or Levitical surnames, including SHAPIRO,
HOROWITZ, EPSTEIN, LEVINSON, et al. I've found tangential connections to my own
KATZ relatives but not yet proven the relationship. I have a few questions:

1). Would people with the surname/identity KATZ (or Cohanim generally)have had a
special sense of family connection or "clan identity" with each other across many
branches and towns, more so than families whose surnames denoted no religious
status?
2). Would KATZes (or Cohanim generally) have been more likely than the general
population to practice endogamy by marrying other KATZes, or to marry spouses with
rabbinical surnames? (By the way, I have no evidence that my family or the other
KATZes >from the area were rabbis or especially observant/scholarly.)
3). Would the use of the KATZ identity/surname in Eastern Europe have predated the
more widespread adoption of surnames in the Russian Empire in the early 1800s?
I know that its use goes back at least to the 16th century in Prague, but what
about in Ukrainian shtetls? (If so, this might explain a stronger and broader
family network. The sheer number of Dunaevtsy-area/Philadelphia KATZ families
suggests that their common ancestor could have lived no later than the 18th
century.)

And I am very curious about whether others have noticed similar
patterns in researching other KATZ and/or Cohanim families, whether in
Russian Ukraine or elsewhere.

Adam Goodheart
Washington, D.C.

interrelated families: KATZ (Dunaevtsy, Kalyus, Yarmolintsy, Zinkov,
Zhvanets, Minkovtsy, Kamianets-Podolskiy); HOCHMAN
(Kamianets-Podolskiy); BUCHMAN (Kalyus); KORNBLUTH/KORNBLATT
(Minkovtsy, Kalyus), CIPPES (Dunaevtsy), FRABERMAN/FABERMAN/FARBER
(Minkovtsy, Zinkov, Yarmolintsy), SHISSEL/SCHUSSEL (Yaltushkov),
EIZMAN (Dunaevtsy); SCHUSTERMAN/SHUSTER (Kalyus); all emigrated to Philadelphia.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen KATZ family questions #general

Adam Goodheart
 

The surname KATZ is obviously among the more difficult Ashkenazi ones to research.
My great-grandmother Brana Katz (1880-1958) and her younger brothers, Motel/Max,
Chaim/Hyman, and Zisia/Samuel, immigrated to Philadelphia between 1908 and 1920.
Their father was Abram KATZ (c. 1855-c. 1900) and they came >from Dunaevtsy (in
Yiddish, Dinovitz) in western Podolia Gubernia, not far >from Kamianets-Podolskiy.
The brothers were all carpenters in Dunaevtsy; perhaps their father was as well.
Like most KATZes,they were Cohanim. Unfortunately, I have little other information.

However, in the course of my research, I found many, many other intertwined KATZ
familes >from Dunaevtsy and surrounding towns (Kalyus,Yarmolintsy, Zinkov, Zhvanets,
Minkovtsy) who went to Philadelphia around the same time and mostly settled in the
same neighborhood in North Philadelphia. A disproportionate number were
woodworkers, according to their passenger manifests -- carpenters, joiners,
coopers -- which further suggests a relationship. A rather astonishing
proportion also married other people with the surname KATZ. Quite a few of the men
also married women with rabbinical or Levitical surnames, including SHAPIRO,
HOROWITZ, EPSTEIN, LEVINSON, et al. I've found tangential connections to my own
KATZ relatives but not yet proven the relationship. I have a few questions:

1). Would people with the surname/identity KATZ (or Cohanim generally)have had a
special sense of family connection or "clan identity" with each other across many
branches and towns, more so than families whose surnames denoted no religious
status?
2). Would KATZes (or Cohanim generally) have been more likely than the general
population to practice endogamy by marrying other KATZes, or to marry spouses with
rabbinical surnames? (By the way, I have no evidence that my family or the other
KATZes >from the area were rabbis or especially observant/scholarly.)
3). Would the use of the KATZ identity/surname in Eastern Europe have predated the
more widespread adoption of surnames in the Russian Empire in the early 1800s?
I know that its use goes back at least to the 16th century in Prague, but what
about in Ukrainian shtetls? (If so, this might explain a stronger and broader
family network. The sheer number of Dunaevtsy-area/Philadelphia KATZ families
suggests that their common ancestor could have lived no later than the 18th
century.)

And I am very curious about whether others have noticed similar
patterns in researching other KATZ and/or Cohanim families, whether in
Russian Ukraine or elsewhere.

Adam Goodheart
Washington, D.C.

interrelated families: KATZ (Dunaevtsy, Kalyus, Yarmolintsy, Zinkov,
Zhvanets, Minkovtsy, Kamianets-Podolskiy); HOCHMAN
(Kamianets-Podolskiy); BUCHMAN (Kalyus); KORNBLUTH/KORNBLATT
(Minkovtsy, Kalyus), CIPPES (Dunaevtsy), FRABERMAN/FABERMAN/FARBER
(Minkovtsy, Zinkov, Yarmolintsy), SHISSEL/SCHUSSEL (Yaltushkov),
EIZMAN (Dunaevtsy); SCHUSTERMAN/SHUSTER (Kalyus); all emigrated to Philadelphia.


Re: Rabbis: Public vs Social & Spiritual #general

Alan Shuchat
 

Marilyn Robinson asked about "public" rabbis in the Russian Empire. The position
was called kazyonny ravvin, and there's a good explanation at

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0012_0_10937.html

Marilyn Robinson <marilyn4622R@msn.com> wrote:
While looking at a 1911 list of Russian rabbis, some were labeled
"public" & some were labeled "social & spiritual" rabbis
Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA

SHUCHAT (Talnoye, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka),
Tavrig, Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoye), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
SILVERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Rabbis: Public vs Social & Spiritual #general

Alan Shuchat
 

Marilyn Robinson asked about "public" rabbis in the Russian Empire. The position
was called kazyonny ravvin, and there's a good explanation at

http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0012_0_10937.html

Marilyn Robinson <marilyn4622R@msn.com> wrote:
While looking at a 1911 list of Russian rabbis, some were labeled
"public" & some were labeled "social & spiritual" rabbis
Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA

SHUCHAT (Talnoye, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Odessa, Balta (Abazovka),
Tavrig, Pogrebishche)
VINOKUR (Talnoye), KURIS (Mogilev-Podolskiy, Ataki, Berdichev)
SILVERMAN (Soroki, Kremenets), BIRNBAUM (Kamenets-Podolskiy)
KITAIGORODSKI (Zvenigorodka)


Why are some records in Russian Empire in Polish? #general

pauline rosenberg
 

Hi all,
My great grandmother was born in 1866 in Pinczow, Poland and her birth record was in
Polish. However, she married in 1885 in Wodzislaw and her marriage record was in
Russian. Did some Jewish communities continue to keep their records in Polish even
when they were part of the Russian Empire? Why is it that others, like Wodzislaw,
kept their records in Russian?

Pauline Rosenberg


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Why are some records in Russian Empire in Polish? #general

pauline rosenberg
 

Hi all,
My great grandmother was born in 1866 in Pinczow, Poland and her birth record was in
Polish. However, she married in 1885 in Wodzislaw and her marriage record was in
Russian. Did some Jewish communities continue to keep their records in Polish even
when they were part of the Russian Empire? Why is it that others, like Wodzislaw,
kept their records in Russian?

Pauline Rosenberg


Bohemian censues (censi?) #austria-czech

bjansen201@...
 

With Bohemian Jewish censuses available for exploration, I've been trying
to find out more about my 4(?)great grandfather, Moises Sommer.
I have found a Moises Sommer in the 1793 census:

Moises, wife Catharina, son Jakob, daughter Salka in das freis=E4ssliche=
Viertel Schwenda als juedisch Vorsinger.

A couple of questions: Salka is a Hebrew name; could it possibly have been
Sara for family use? Where is the freisaessliche Viertel Schwenda? Does his
occupation indicate he might have been a music director in a synagogue?

Previous information I have indicated Moises Sommer was >from Sousice.
Sousice is apparently also in the Freisaessliche Viertel Schwenda as a listing
following this one indicates that.

Then in the 1799 census:

Moyses Som[m]er Schwenda Freisassen Viertl Czaslauer Kreises Chisna Dorf
Krziwsaudower Herrschaft 1784
Not sure what all this means...what significance is 1784?

Then in the 1811 census he is listed in Chysna (referenced in 1799 record),
but no further information.

Also, according to a couple of familianten Viewmate records I submitted,
Moises Sommer was given a resident permit in 1784 (when he married?) and it
was transferred to someone else in 1832. Further information on this record
says "Moises Sommer lost his permit according to gov. decree #54847 of No v10, 1827;
court chamber decree #27582 of Oct 26, 1827 "

Why would someone lose their resident permit? Did the fact he transferred
his resident (familiant?) permit to someone else perhaps indicate that his
son Jakob did not survive?

Any information would be very welcomed.

Barbara (Sommer) Jansen


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Bohemian censues (censi?) #austria-czech

bjansen201@...
 

With Bohemian Jewish censuses available for exploration, I've been trying
to find out more about my 4(?)great grandfather, Moises Sommer.
I have found a Moises Sommer in the 1793 census:

Moises, wife Catharina, son Jakob, daughter Salka in das freis=E4ssliche=
Viertel Schwenda als juedisch Vorsinger.

A couple of questions: Salka is a Hebrew name; could it possibly have been
Sara for family use? Where is the freisaessliche Viertel Schwenda? Does his
occupation indicate he might have been a music director in a synagogue?

Previous information I have indicated Moises Sommer was >from Sousice.
Sousice is apparently also in the Freisaessliche Viertel Schwenda as a listing
following this one indicates that.

Then in the 1799 census:

Moyses Som[m]er Schwenda Freisassen Viertl Czaslauer Kreises Chisna Dorf
Krziwsaudower Herrschaft 1784
Not sure what all this means...what significance is 1784?

Then in the 1811 census he is listed in Chysna (referenced in 1799 record),
but no further information.

Also, according to a couple of familianten Viewmate records I submitted,
Moises Sommer was given a resident permit in 1784 (when he married?) and it
was transferred to someone else in 1832. Further information on this record
says "Moises Sommer lost his permit according to gov. decree #54847 of No v10, 1827;
court chamber decree #27582 of Oct 26, 1827 "

Why would someone lose their resident permit? Did the fact he transferred
his resident (familiant?) permit to someone else perhaps indicate that his
son Jakob did not survive?

Any information would be very welcomed.

Barbara (Sommer) Jansen


Announcing the completion of the ambitious project to map the old Jewish Cemetery in Eisenstadt, Austria. #austria-czech

carolevogel51@...
 

Hi All,

Oesterreichisches Juedisches Museum (Austrian Jewish Museum) has
recently finished its second cemetery project in Burgenland. Museum
director Johannes Reiss has photographed, catalogued, and mapped the
existing graves of Eisenstaedt's older Jewish cemetery. The cemetery
is located about 1000 feet (300 meters) >from the museum building so
the mapping project will be especially useful to visitors searching
for specific graves.

Each gravestone has its own page on the museum blog site. A searchable
alphabetical listing of the individual stones provides the name, death
date, and links. To access it go to
www.ojm.at/blog/friedhof-eisenstadt-alt/archiv/

When you access each profile you will see a photo of the existing
gravestone, a transcription of the Hebrew gravestone inscription and
other available information. Plus there is a map inset showing where
to find the stone in the graveyard. The profiles also provide links
to relatives buried in the graveyard so often one can find the
father, mother, wife, children, siblings.

This project take excerpts >from a book published nearly 100 years ago
by Bernard Wachstein, entitled., Die Grabinschriften des Alten
Judenfriedhofes in Eisenstadt, Eisenstaedter Forschungen, hrsg. von
Sandor Wolf, Band I, Wien 1922. Wachstein cataloged the gravestones
when they were in better shape and provided inscriptions and some
photographs.

Finally, the project allows for people to make comments if they can
shed more light on those buried there. For an in-depth description of
the project in German and English see:

http://tinyurl.com/nbkz96z

This was a Herculean effort and is prize worthy! Kudos to Johannes
Reiss and his amazing staff.


Best,
Carole G. Vogel
Branchville, New Jersey, USA


Viewmate help requested--familianten record in Kurrent cursive #austria-czech

bjansen201@...
 

I have uploaded two images >from Viewmate >from the familianten records >from
the Caslov area of Bohemia


The first, 42445, shows a M----? SOMMER. What is the first name--is it
Moises? I believe it shows his parents are unknown, that he was married in
1784. What does the writing in the column "auf das Dominium" say?

There is also another entry further down the page that is puzzling.

The second image, 42446, is the opposite page of the first entry with
considerable writing. It looks like it might tell of his death in 1827.

Any help in translating this record would be gratefully accepted.

Barbara Sommer Jansen


Trying to puzzle out a surname #austria-czech

rfc974@...
 

Hi folks:

I'm hoping for some help with some difficult handwriting in Kurrent.
Can anyone figure out the surname in the last entry of this page?
http://badatelna.eu/fond/1073/reprodukce/?zaznamId=672&;reproId=62332

Just to be clear, the daughter is Julia, and her father is Samuel and
her mother is Maria. The question is what is Samuel's last name
(which is repeated in Maria's entry - she's Maria [name] the daughter
of Markus Popper of Liblin.).

Extra credit for ideas about what the modern name of the town "Gross
Dob[xx]i" she's born in is -- it is near Hostoun and I can't find a
match.

Thanks!

Craig

--
Craig Partridge
(non-work account -- for work issues send to craig@aland.bbn.com)


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Announcing the completion of the ambitious project to map the old Jewish Cemetery in Eisenstadt, Austria. #austria-czech

carolevogel51@...
 

Hi All,

Oesterreichisches Juedisches Museum (Austrian Jewish Museum) has
recently finished its second cemetery project in Burgenland. Museum
director Johannes Reiss has photographed, catalogued, and mapped the
existing graves of Eisenstaedt's older Jewish cemetery. The cemetery
is located about 1000 feet (300 meters) >from the museum building so
the mapping project will be especially useful to visitors searching
for specific graves.

Each gravestone has its own page on the museum blog site. A searchable
alphabetical listing of the individual stones provides the name, death
date, and links. To access it go to
www.ojm.at/blog/friedhof-eisenstadt-alt/archiv/

When you access each profile you will see a photo of the existing
gravestone, a transcription of the Hebrew gravestone inscription and
other available information. Plus there is a map inset showing where
to find the stone in the graveyard. The profiles also provide links
to relatives buried in the graveyard so often one can find the
father, mother, wife, children, siblings.

This project take excerpts >from a book published nearly 100 years ago
by Bernard Wachstein, entitled., Die Grabinschriften des Alten
Judenfriedhofes in Eisenstadt, Eisenstaedter Forschungen, hrsg. von
Sandor Wolf, Band I, Wien 1922. Wachstein cataloged the gravestones
when they were in better shape and provided inscriptions and some
photographs.

Finally, the project allows for people to make comments if they can
shed more light on those buried there. For an in-depth description of
the project in German and English see:

http://tinyurl.com/nbkz96z

This was a Herculean effort and is prize worthy! Kudos to Johannes
Reiss and his amazing staff.


Best,
Carole G. Vogel
Branchville, New Jersey, USA

82901 - 82920 of 657730