Date   

Ancestry.de Free Access Month of October -[SITE CITE & navigation advice] #germany

Jan Meisels Allen
 

To celebrate 25 years of German reunification, Ancestry.de (German
Ancestry.com) is offering throughout the month of October free access to
their databases which includes the worldwide databases-- 16 billion
historic documents and pictures, including 220 million German documents
and images. [The month of free access is to Celebrate 25 Years of Germany's
Reunification.]

When documents are >from another country, for example the United States or
Canada, those records are available in their original language of English
for example : New York, Passegiertlisten, 1820-1957 (auf Englisch). If
the records are >from Germany they are in German as are the instructions on
the website. I found using Google translate
https://translate.google.com
a great help in translating the instructions and the names of some of
the records.

To access the site go to:
http://www.ancestry.de/cs/unityday
it will first ask you if you meant Ancestry.com -and on the bottom
it will say go ahead with Ancestry.de- click on the Ancestry.de or
you will get to the US version which is not offering the free month.

When you put in a name and place of the person you are researching
it will take you to a window with the results.

Once you click on the results a window opens giving you the
instructions to register with your name, and email address and if you
have an Ancestry password >from previous trials use that otherwise you
will be sent a password.

You will also be asked to check the box that you understand
the terms and conditions. Once you are signed in the first page asks
you about setting up your family tree.

On the right hand side about half way down the page is the same
graphic as above about the 25 year reunification celebration.

Click on "jetzt suchen" (Start now) which opens another window
where you fill in the information on the person you are searching and first
name, last name, city/state where they were born and date of birth if you
have it and click on "klostenlos suchen" (search now) and the next window
will display what records they have and the option to provide more
information to enhance the search.

For those who do not speak or read German I recognize this may take
extra translation steps, but it is worth the effort to try this
during the month of October for access to Ancestry's
worldwide database at no charge.

I have no affiliation with Ancestry.com or Ancestry.de and am sharing
this solely for the reader's information.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


German SIG #Germany Ancestry.de Free Access Month of October -[SITE CITE & navigation advice] #germany

Jan Meisels Allen
 

To celebrate 25 years of German reunification, Ancestry.de (German
Ancestry.com) is offering throughout the month of October free access to
their databases which includes the worldwide databases-- 16 billion
historic documents and pictures, including 220 million German documents
and images. [The month of free access is to Celebrate 25 Years of Germany's
Reunification.]

When documents are >from another country, for example the United States or
Canada, those records are available in their original language of English
for example : New York, Passegiertlisten, 1820-1957 (auf Englisch). If
the records are >from Germany they are in German as are the instructions on
the website. I found using Google translate
https://translate.google.com
a great help in translating the instructions and the names of some of
the records.

To access the site go to:
http://www.ancestry.de/cs/unityday
it will first ask you if you meant Ancestry.com -and on the bottom
it will say go ahead with Ancestry.de- click on the Ancestry.de or
you will get to the US version which is not offering the free month.

When you put in a name and place of the person you are researching
it will take you to a window with the results.

Once you click on the results a window opens giving you the
instructions to register with your name, and email address and if you
have an Ancestry password >from previous trials use that otherwise you
will be sent a password.

You will also be asked to check the box that you understand
the terms and conditions. Once you are signed in the first page asks
you about setting up your family tree.

On the right hand side about half way down the page is the same
graphic as above about the 25 year reunification celebration.

Click on "jetzt suchen" (Start now) which opens another window
where you fill in the information on the person you are searching and first
name, last name, city/state where they were born and date of birth if you
have it and click on "klostenlos suchen" (search now) and the next window
will display what records they have and the option to provide more
information to enhance the search.

For those who do not speak or read German I recognize this may take
extra translation steps, but it is worth the effort to try this
during the month of October for access to Ancestry's
worldwide database at no charge.

I have no affiliation with Ancestry.com or Ancestry.de and am sharing
this solely for the reader's information.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


A Personal Tribute to the Indomitable Pamela Weisberger, z"l #ukraine

Fishbein Associates, Inc.
 

A Personal Tribute to the Indomitable Pamela Weisberger, z"l

Rand H. Fishbein, Ph.D., Vice-Chair, JewishGen Board of Governors

The unexpected news of the passing of Pamela Weisberger has hit the world of
Jewish genealogy with the force of a California earthquake. And while
Pamela may have lived in Los Angeles, this particular earthquake has spanned
the globe. For wherever you are, if you swim in the waters of Jewish family
history, then you surely have been touched by the energy, the innovation and
the brilliance of Pamela Weisberger. To so many, she was a force of nature,
a driven personality, whose vision has helped to lift the field of Jewish
genealogy to a new plateau.

You did not have to be a close friend of Pamela Weisberger to know of the
legend. The imprint of her good works were, and are, everywhere to be
found. She always was on the move. Getting her attention at a genealogy
conference often was like asking a humming bird to hold still for a
photograph in the middle of a field of flowers. She was on everyone's
contact list. Life for Pamela was never dull. There always was another
project to start, an ancestral town to visit, a presentation to deliver or a
new search tool to add to Gesher Galicia?s award-winning web site.

Viewed through her eyes, the world was an endless range of research
challenges, and she was determined to conquer each one of them. Whether the
task was turning the Gesher Galicia Special Interest Group into a pacesetter
among the SIGs, building L.A.'s Jewish Genealogy Society into one of the
premier societies in the world, or initiating the extraordinary Cadastral
Map Project, Pamela always was on the cutting edge.

If Pamela were able to read the accolades written about her in the days
since her untimely passing, she would have blushed with pride. For while
she was both an indomitable spirit and never one to rest on her laurels, she
also appreciated that her work had meaning beyond our time. She drew
strength, I believe, >from the fact that so many people benefited >from her
research. Being a leader is rarely easy, but Pamela made the task of
organizing Jews (and Jewish genealogists can be a finicky lot) seem
effortless. She knew how to marshal talent, fund projects, and conceive of
new initiatives that would not only have scholarly value, but would seize
the public's imagination. Pamela did this over and over again. It was, in
every sense, a reflection of not only her love for the craft, but most of
all her love of the Jewish People.

The Jewish genealogical community is made up of many dedicated individuals,
driven and inspired to reclaim a piece of a distant past. The work of
document discovery, recovery and indexing is a righteous endeavor, and those
who undertake this often selfless task do so out of a sense of personal
devotion. This is Pamela's legacy. Much like a painting heavily damaged by
war and neglect, Pamela painstakingly brought history back to life,
returning color, texture and meaning to the lives of the long departed.

In the world of Jewish family history Pamela was a rock star. Blessed with
an unusual talent for sleuthing, she also had a natural ability to
communicate her findings to an amateur audience with uncommon enthusiasm and
warmth. We will miss Pamela. Her inspiration touched us all. Her good
works, like her unquenchable spirit, will continue to burn brightly in the
hearts and minds of those who knew and admired her. May she find eternal
peace among the ancestors she rescued >from obscurity. I have no doubt that
beyond the mountaintops she surveyed, they have welcomed her with open arms
and with the same love she bestowed on their memories.

With deepest sorrow,

Rand H. Fishbein, Ph.D.
Vice-Chair
JewishGen Board of Governors

Potomac, Maryland


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine A Personal Tribute to the Indomitable Pamela Weisberger, z"l #ukraine

Fishbein Associates, Inc.
 

A Personal Tribute to the Indomitable Pamela Weisberger, z"l

Rand H. Fishbein, Ph.D., Vice-Chair, JewishGen Board of Governors

The unexpected news of the passing of Pamela Weisberger has hit the world of
Jewish genealogy with the force of a California earthquake. And while
Pamela may have lived in Los Angeles, this particular earthquake has spanned
the globe. For wherever you are, if you swim in the waters of Jewish family
history, then you surely have been touched by the energy, the innovation and
the brilliance of Pamela Weisberger. To so many, she was a force of nature,
a driven personality, whose vision has helped to lift the field of Jewish
genealogy to a new plateau.

You did not have to be a close friend of Pamela Weisberger to know of the
legend. The imprint of her good works were, and are, everywhere to be
found. She always was on the move. Getting her attention at a genealogy
conference often was like asking a humming bird to hold still for a
photograph in the middle of a field of flowers. She was on everyone's
contact list. Life for Pamela was never dull. There always was another
project to start, an ancestral town to visit, a presentation to deliver or a
new search tool to add to Gesher Galicia?s award-winning web site.

Viewed through her eyes, the world was an endless range of research
challenges, and she was determined to conquer each one of them. Whether the
task was turning the Gesher Galicia Special Interest Group into a pacesetter
among the SIGs, building L.A.'s Jewish Genealogy Society into one of the
premier societies in the world, or initiating the extraordinary Cadastral
Map Project, Pamela always was on the cutting edge.

If Pamela were able to read the accolades written about her in the days
since her untimely passing, she would have blushed with pride. For while
she was both an indomitable spirit and never one to rest on her laurels, she
also appreciated that her work had meaning beyond our time. She drew
strength, I believe, >from the fact that so many people benefited >from her
research. Being a leader is rarely easy, but Pamela made the task of
organizing Jews (and Jewish genealogists can be a finicky lot) seem
effortless. She knew how to marshal talent, fund projects, and conceive of
new initiatives that would not only have scholarly value, but would seize
the public's imagination. Pamela did this over and over again. It was, in
every sense, a reflection of not only her love for the craft, but most of
all her love of the Jewish People.

The Jewish genealogical community is made up of many dedicated individuals,
driven and inspired to reclaim a piece of a distant past. The work of
document discovery, recovery and indexing is a righteous endeavor, and those
who undertake this often selfless task do so out of a sense of personal
devotion. This is Pamela's legacy. Much like a painting heavily damaged by
war and neglect, Pamela painstakingly brought history back to life,
returning color, texture and meaning to the lives of the long departed.

In the world of Jewish family history Pamela was a rock star. Blessed with
an unusual talent for sleuthing, she also had a natural ability to
communicate her findings to an amateur audience with uncommon enthusiasm and
warmth. We will miss Pamela. Her inspiration touched us all. Her good
works, like her unquenchable spirit, will continue to burn brightly in the
hearts and minds of those who knew and admired her. May she find eternal
peace among the ancestors she rescued >from obscurity. I have no doubt that
beyond the mountaintops she surveyed, they have welcomed her with open arms
and with the same love she bestowed on their memories.

With deepest sorrow,

Rand H. Fishbein, Ph.D.
Vice-Chair
JewishGen Board of Governors

Potomac, Maryland


75th anniversary of the deportation of the Jews from Baden #general

Yvonne Stern
 

On Sunday, October 25, 2015 , a commemoration of the 75th anniversary of the
deportation of the Jews >from Baden will take place at the Memorial in
Neckarzimmern.

On October 22, 1940, in context of the Wagner Buerckel Action, 6500 Jews from
Baden and the Palatinate were deported to the internment camp Gurs ,southwestern
France.

The memoral service will be held on the premises of the Tagungsstaette der
Evangelischen Jugend, in Neckarzimmern.

For more information visit the site 'Memorial to the Deported Baden Jews".

Yvonne Stern
Rio de Janeiro - Brasil


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 75th anniversary of the deportation of the Jews from Baden #general

Yvonne Stern
 

On Sunday, October 25, 2015 , a commemoration of the 75th anniversary of the
deportation of the Jews >from Baden will take place at the Memorial in
Neckarzimmern.

On October 22, 1940, in context of the Wagner Buerckel Action, 6500 Jews from
Baden and the Palatinate were deported to the internment camp Gurs ,southwestern
France.

The memoral service will be held on the premises of the Tagungsstaette der
Evangelischen Jugend, in Neckarzimmern.

For more information visit the site 'Memorial to the Deported Baden Jews".

Yvonne Stern
Rio de Janeiro - Brasil


Fanny Horowitz of NYC #general

Shaul Sharoni
 

Dear All,

Looking for information on Fanny Horowitz nee Weisz (Weiss), born 29.12.1968
in Tiszakurt, Hungary; she later on married Fred Horowitz in 1892. Her last
known address in 1955 was 133 W. 81 St. NYC. It's also known she had a son
and daughter whose names are to date unknown.

Any help ascertaining her date of death, as well as the fate of her children
would be most welcome.

Best Regards,
Shaul Sharoni,
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Fanny Horowitz of NYC #general

Shaul Sharoni
 

Dear All,

Looking for information on Fanny Horowitz nee Weisz (Weiss), born 29.12.1968
in Tiszakurt, Hungary; she later on married Fred Horowitz in 1892. Her last
known address in 1955 was 133 W. 81 St. NYC. It's also known she had a son
and daughter whose names are to date unknown.

Any help ascertaining her date of death, as well as the fate of her children
would be most welcome.

Best Regards,
Shaul Sharoni,
Israel


Paul Jacobi collection IIJG #general

Saul Issroff
 

The Paul Jacobi Collection of he International Institute of Jewish Genealogy,
housed at the National Library is featured on page 34 of this online presentation.

The National Library of Israel has uploaded a presentation on genealogical
research to their website that also includes various items in their vast
collection that are relevant to genealogical research. Enjoy.

https://www.slideshare.net/fullscreen/NliIsrael/genealogical-items-in-the-national-library-of-israel/1
(MODERATOR:https://tinyurl.com/o5ecjkb )

Saul Issroff


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Paul Jacobi collection IIJG #general

Saul Issroff
 

The Paul Jacobi Collection of he International Institute of Jewish Genealogy,
housed at the National Library is featured on page 34 of this online presentation.

The National Library of Israel has uploaded a presentation on genealogical
research to their website that also includes various items in their vast
collection that are relevant to genealogical research. Enjoy.

https://www.slideshare.net/fullscreen/NliIsrael/genealogical-items-in-the-national-library-of-israel/1
(MODERATOR:https://tinyurl.com/o5ecjkb )

Saul Issroff


(Russia) President Putin Signs Russia's Right to be Forgotten Law #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Russian President Vladimir Putin signed into law in mid-July the parliament
(Duma) approved "right to be forgotten". The bill was posted on this
announcement list in late June. A later version which is the basis of the
new law were a result of opposition by the press and internet companies. The
Duma changed the bill to delete links to any information about users so that
it does not include data that is truthful and up to date. Another important
correction was the removal of the part of the bill that ordered search
engines to remove the links to information older than three years, even if
this information is correct. The new law allows citizens to demand that
search engines should stop providing hyperlinks to information on them, if
it is disseminated in violation of the Russian legislation, is irrelevant or
"has lost significance for the claimant owing to subsequent events or the
claimant's actions". The new law does not regulate information describing
criminal prosecutions on which the statute of limitations has not yet
expired and convictions that have not been served or removed. Also excluded
from the new law, are information systems that conduct the search for the
state and municipal work and services as well as web services created for
executing other tasks for the society's benefit under the existing federal
laws. Google and Yandex (the largest search engine in Russia) will be the
two most affected websites.

As reported in TASS, (http://tass.ru/en/russia/808525) the Kremlin's news
agency quoted the State Duma Committee for Information Policy Chairman,
stating the final version of the law excluded the notion of "authenticity"
so as not to delete information older than three years. Instead of this, the
law includes the term "irrelevance" to come closer to EU regulation and
allow "deleting hyperlinks to inaccurate, inadequate and incomplete
information". After considering a citizen's claim and arguments, an
Internet search engine may decide either on deleting hyperlinks or rejecting
this demand. A user's claim has 10 working days for consideration by a
search engine organization as well as 10 days for the company to correct
incorrect information. If the search engine declines the request, the
requestor may take the search engine to court. Search engines may not
disclose information on citizens' requests filed to them It is unclear what
criteria will be used to evaluate the correctness and relevance of the
disputed information.

Penalties for non-compliance are not included in the new law, but the Duma
is considering imposing financial penalties in another piece of legislation.

The law becomes effective January 1, 2016.

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


A Note About Changes In Records Access Postings On the JewishGen Discussion Group #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Dear JewishGen Discussion Group Readers:

As you know I post frequently on a number of items of genealogical interest
and records access which affects access to those records we need to
accomplish research. It is my privilege to do so, both personally and on
behalf of IAJGS as their Chairperson, Public Records Access Monitoring
Committee.

Henceforth, postings on enacted legislation and regulations will continue to
be posted -no longer when legislation or regulations are pending. This is
due to a change in JewishGen posting guidelines. This is true whether it be
national, for example, a bill introduced in the US Congress affecting access
to the Death Master File; Australian Parliament on changes to their census;
the European Union (which covers a 28-member country bloc) or a local/state
issue such as a Kansas Supreme Court ruling on marriage records, or a
proposed NYC Department of Health regulation on access to birth or death
records. While I strongly believe it is important to know what is
happening before it occurs so that one can prepare-the fact is, this is a
fait accompli.

How to stay informed: In my postings I have encouraged you to register for
the IAJGS Public Records Access Alert. Now it is more important than ever as
that is the only place to find out what is happening with records access
issues when they are first known and pending , especially if you want your
voice to be heard. As with JewishGen, you will be required to register with
your name, email, password and affiliation-IAJGS member society, subscriber
to a JewishGen SIG or Discussion Group. Directions are on the website
once you register.

Starting in October, and during the first week of each month thereafter, I
will be permitted to post on the JGDG a listing of those IAJGS Records
Access Alert postings so that you have an idea of what has occurred during
the past month.

If you are interested in any of the subject matter then you are encouraged
to register for the IAJGS Records Access Alert at
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts and follow
the instructions to enter your email address, full name and which
JGS/JHS/SIG/JewishGen is your affiliation You will receive an email
response that you have to reply to or the subscription will not be
finalized. The alerts are archived and once you register you may access the
archives at: http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/

I hope you will take the opportunity to register for the IAJGS Records
Access Alert for the records access information which is important to our
being able to access the records for our research.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (Russia) President Putin Signs Russia's Right to be Forgotten Law #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Russian President Vladimir Putin signed into law in mid-July the parliament
(Duma) approved "right to be forgotten". The bill was posted on this
announcement list in late June. A later version which is the basis of the
new law were a result of opposition by the press and internet companies. The
Duma changed the bill to delete links to any information about users so that
it does not include data that is truthful and up to date. Another important
correction was the removal of the part of the bill that ordered search
engines to remove the links to information older than three years, even if
this information is correct. The new law allows citizens to demand that
search engines should stop providing hyperlinks to information on them, if
it is disseminated in violation of the Russian legislation, is irrelevant or
"has lost significance for the claimant owing to subsequent events or the
claimant's actions". The new law does not regulate information describing
criminal prosecutions on which the statute of limitations has not yet
expired and convictions that have not been served or removed. Also excluded
from the new law, are information systems that conduct the search for the
state and municipal work and services as well as web services created for
executing other tasks for the society's benefit under the existing federal
laws. Google and Yandex (the largest search engine in Russia) will be the
two most affected websites.

As reported in TASS, (http://tass.ru/en/russia/808525) the Kremlin's news
agency quoted the State Duma Committee for Information Policy Chairman,
stating the final version of the law excluded the notion of "authenticity"
so as not to delete information older than three years. Instead of this, the
law includes the term "irrelevance" to come closer to EU regulation and
allow "deleting hyperlinks to inaccurate, inadequate and incomplete
information". After considering a citizen's claim and arguments, an
Internet search engine may decide either on deleting hyperlinks or rejecting
this demand. A user's claim has 10 working days for consideration by a
search engine organization as well as 10 days for the company to correct
incorrect information. If the search engine declines the request, the
requestor may take the search engine to court. Search engines may not
disclose information on citizens' requests filed to them It is unclear what
criteria will be used to evaluate the correctness and relevance of the
disputed information.

Penalties for non-compliance are not included in the new law, but the Duma
is considering imposing financial penalties in another piece of legislation.

The law becomes effective January 1, 2016.

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A Note About Changes In Records Access Postings On the JewishGen Discussion Group #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Dear JewishGen Discussion Group Readers:

As you know I post frequently on a number of items of genealogical interest
and records access which affects access to those records we need to
accomplish research. It is my privilege to do so, both personally and on
behalf of IAJGS as their Chairperson, Public Records Access Monitoring
Committee.

Henceforth, postings on enacted legislation and regulations will continue to
be posted -no longer when legislation or regulations are pending. This is
due to a change in JewishGen posting guidelines. This is true whether it be
national, for example, a bill introduced in the US Congress affecting access
to the Death Master File; Australian Parliament on changes to their census;
the European Union (which covers a 28-member country bloc) or a local/state
issue such as a Kansas Supreme Court ruling on marriage records, or a
proposed NYC Department of Health regulation on access to birth or death
records. While I strongly believe it is important to know what is
happening before it occurs so that one can prepare-the fact is, this is a
fait accompli.

How to stay informed: In my postings I have encouraged you to register for
the IAJGS Public Records Access Alert. Now it is more important than ever as
that is the only place to find out what is happening with records access
issues when they are first known and pending , especially if you want your
voice to be heard. As with JewishGen, you will be required to register with
your name, email, password and affiliation-IAJGS member society, subscriber
to a JewishGen SIG or Discussion Group. Directions are on the website
once you register.

Starting in October, and during the first week of each month thereafter, I
will be permitted to post on the JGDG a listing of those IAJGS Records
Access Alert postings so that you have an idea of what has occurred during
the past month.

If you are interested in any of the subject matter then you are encouraged
to register for the IAJGS Records Access Alert at
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts and follow
the instructions to enter your email address, full name and which
JGS/JHS/SIG/JewishGen is your affiliation You will receive an email
response that you have to reply to or the subscription will not be
finalized. The alerts are archived and once you register you may access the
archives at: http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/

I hope you will take the opportunity to register for the IAJGS Records
Access Alert for the records access information which is important to our
being able to access the records for our research.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


First name Hosse #general

Martin Davis (com)
 

Shulamit Spain wrote: What kind of name is Hosse as first name? Is it
derived >from a slave name? >from Hebrew?

Interesting way of putting it Shulamit! A little more detail would be
helpful but at a wild guess I would think Hosse is an attempt to
phonetically describe the Spanish/Portuguese first name Jose - aka Joseph.

Martin Davis
London (UK)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen First name Hosse #general

Martin Davis (com)
 

Shulamit Spain wrote: What kind of name is Hosse as first name? Is it
derived >from a slave name? >from Hebrew?

Interesting way of putting it Shulamit! A little more detail would be
helpful but at a wild guess I would think Hosse is an attempt to
phonetically describe the Spanish/Portuguese first name Jose - aka Joseph.

Martin Davis
London (UK)


Gisella (Gizela) FARKAS - Auschwitz #general

Rebecca Arslanian
 

My grandmother passed away on May 16, 2007. Her and her sister were Auschwitz
survivors. My grandmothers name was Gisella FARKAS and her sisters name was Ella.
When my grandmother arrived at the camp, the guards changed her year of birth on
her records to make her older so they wouldn't kill her right away. She never
could remember her real birth year but said she was 12 or 13 years old when she
arrived there. We think her birthday was Sept 25th between the years of 1929-1932.
I believe she said her mothers name was Ester but not sure of her fathers name (may
be Schmuel). She also said that she had a sister named Rivka. My grandmother
always said Rivka was beautiful with a husband and the most beautiful baby. When
Rivka arrived at the camp, the Germans were grabbing her baby but she wouldnt let
them so they shot her, the baby, and the husband. My grandmother said Rivka was
named Miss Hungary in some sort of a beauty contest.

I'm looking for anyone who may have known my grandmother. Or any information
whatsoever.

I can send you a photo of her right after the war if you send me a direct email.

Rebecca Arslanian
Long Island, New York


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Gisella (Gizela) FARKAS - Auschwitz #general

Rebecca Arslanian
 

My grandmother passed away on May 16, 2007. Her and her sister were Auschwitz
survivors. My grandmothers name was Gisella FARKAS and her sisters name was Ella.
When my grandmother arrived at the camp, the guards changed her year of birth on
her records to make her older so they wouldn't kill her right away. She never
could remember her real birth year but said she was 12 or 13 years old when she
arrived there. We think her birthday was Sept 25th between the years of 1929-1932.
I believe she said her mothers name was Ester but not sure of her fathers name (may
be Schmuel). She also said that she had a sister named Rivka. My grandmother
always said Rivka was beautiful with a husband and the most beautiful baby. When
Rivka arrived at the camp, the Germans were grabbing her baby but she wouldnt let
them so they shot her, the baby, and the husband. My grandmother said Rivka was
named Miss Hungary in some sort of a beauty contest.

I'm looking for anyone who may have known my grandmother. Or any information
whatsoever.

I can send you a photo of her right after the war if you send me a direct email.

Rebecca Arslanian
Long Island, New York


(Scotland) Scotlands People Making 1855 Valuation Rolls Available #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Scotlands People made the 1855 Valuation Rolls available to search for free
through October 13 when their usual charges for searching would be applied.
These include over one million indexed names and addresses >from 1855. They
are fully searchable by name and address. These records are during the time
of industrial expansion and may be of interest to those who had Scottish
ancestors or ancestors who immigrated to Scotland during this time. 1855 is
the same year that statutory registration of births, marriages and deaths
was introduced. This is also during the Crimean War.

For those not familiar with Scotland's Valuation Rolls they are assessments
of every house and piece of ground with the names and designations of the
proprietor, tenant and occupier with the annual ratable value. The ratable
valuable was based on the annual rental value of each property or notional
for owner-occupied property. This started with the Lands Valuation Act
in1854 which established an assessor in each of Scotland's counties and
royal burghs.

You are required to register with your name and email address.

To access the 1855 valuation rolls go to:
http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/content/help/index.aspx?r=3D554&2080

I did input several "Jewish" sounding names and was able to retrieve replies
that records are available and read the records for these people. Jews have
been known to be in Scotland since the 17th century and probably earlier
according to Wikipedia.

To read more about the 1855 valuation rolls see:
http://tinyurl.com/nzhmtaz
Original url:
http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/Content/Help/index.aspx?2349&utm_campaign=news&utm_medium=email&utm_source=sp&utm_content=583002
Scotland's People is a partnership between the National Records of Scotland
and the Court of the Lord Lyon enabled by DC Thomson Family History (which
also owns Findmypast).

I have no affiliation with DC Thompson Family History, Scotlands People or
the partnership that makes it up. This is posted solely for the information
of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen (Scotland) Scotlands People Making 1855 Valuation Rolls Available #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Scotlands People made the 1855 Valuation Rolls available to search for free
through October 13 when their usual charges for searching would be applied.
These include over one million indexed names and addresses >from 1855. They
are fully searchable by name and address. These records are during the time
of industrial expansion and may be of interest to those who had Scottish
ancestors or ancestors who immigrated to Scotland during this time. 1855 is
the same year that statutory registration of births, marriages and deaths
was introduced. This is also during the Crimean War.

For those not familiar with Scotland's Valuation Rolls they are assessments
of every house and piece of ground with the names and designations of the
proprietor, tenant and occupier with the annual ratable value. The ratable
valuable was based on the annual rental value of each property or notional
for owner-occupied property. This started with the Lands Valuation Act
in1854 which established an assessor in each of Scotland's counties and
royal burghs.

You are required to register with your name and email address.

To access the 1855 valuation rolls go to:
http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/content/help/index.aspx?r=3D554&2080

I did input several "Jewish" sounding names and was able to retrieve replies
that records are available and read the records for these people. Jews have
been known to be in Scotland since the 17th century and probably earlier
according to Wikipedia.

To read more about the 1855 valuation rolls see:
http://tinyurl.com/nzhmtaz
Original url:
http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/Content/Help/index.aspx?2349&utm_campaign=news&utm_medium=email&utm_source=sp&utm_content=583002
Scotland's People is a partnership between the National Records of Scotland
and the Court of the Lord Lyon enabled by DC Thomson Family History (which
also owns Findmypast).

I have no affiliation with DC Thompson Family History, Scotlands People or
the partnership that makes it up. This is posted solely for the information
of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

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