Date   

Re: Sourcing Photos #general #photographs

Phil Karlin
 

I forgot to mention that I think for exchanging with other people purposes, a code for source is a great idea. I would append it to the end of my filename.


FINKEL / FINKLE family in Philadelphia #usa

boris
 

 

Has anybody come across this family?

 

They came to New York City, lived to Philly (1910), then back in New York (1920). Still lived in New York in 1940.

 

Joseph FINKEL , b. ca. 1867, in "Russia", tailor;

Wife Sarah Fikel;

immigrated ca. 1892-1894-1896 (different in each subsequent census).

had several daughters: Lizzi, Minnie, Mary, Clara, Dorothy, and one (?) son Morris.

 

Mary married one Abe Goodman, a tailor and lived all her life in Philly.  Don't know yet what happened to others.

 

Any leads are appreciated.

 

Please  help others by responding to the group and listing all related last names.

 

Boris Feldblyum


Re: Har Nebo Cemetery in Phila #photographs #usa

Harry Green
 

I am sorry to hear about that as my maternal ancestors (Brantz) have some beautiful monuments!!! Fortunately we have photos of them all (taken  about 2006). They were erected in the 1920's. The last time I visited them was about 1988. At that time they had an active open office and a new section.
Harry Green


Re: Other names for Yitzchak? #names

Vered Dayan
 

Sometimes Eisig or Ajzik in Yiddish.
Vered Dayan
Israel


Re: Other names for Yitzchak? #names

Elise Cundiff
 

Itsik, Itzik,   and any spelling that is phonetically similar to that or Yitzchak or Isaac.   


Re: From Which Viewpoint Are Cousins Named? #general #names

Russ Maurer
 

Each additional generation makes the relationship more distant or further "removed" to use the lingo. Thus if two people (A & B) are, say 2nd cousins, then A's child and B are 2nd cousins, once removed.

Russ Maurer


Professional researcher in France #france #general

Yariv Timna
 

Hello
I need a Professional researcher in France. My search is in Paris. I have only a family name and an address during WW2.
If anyone can help, please contact me privately: ytimna@...
Thanks!


Re: Other names for Yitzchak? #names

rebasolomon
 

Ayzik, Icek, Itzchak


Re: Other names for Yitzchak? #names

abergman@...
 

Some used the name Icek (especially from Poland) or Anglicized to Isidor. 
--
Abby Barry Bergman
New York


Re: IAJGS Salutes! Shalom Bronstein #announcements

Sharon Rottman
 

I would like to congratulate the IAJGS on awarding this recognition to such a worthy individual.
Shalom and his lovely wife, Fran welcomed us to Israel in 1991 smoothing our Aliyah process.
Shalom's genealogy work is legendary and of such value to our community and I have a personal story on that note:
One day he called and asked if i had a copy of my ggrandfather's signature.
When I answered in the negative, he informed me that he had obtained a copy of his grandparents marriage certificate from Philadelphia and no other then my ggrandfather, Rabbi Joseph Grossman, was the officiated Rabbi.
When he later held one of my grandsons at the little boy's bris, I was overwhelmed by this connection between the generations and our families discovered by Shalom.

I was privileged to this very personal assistance in my search for family roots but I can only imagine how many people have been assisted by Shalom's work over the years, 

Keep up the wonderful work!
Sharon Grossman Rottman


On Sat, Jun 13, 2020 at 12:10 AM, Nolan Altman wrote:
IAJGS


Re: From Which Viewpoint Are Cousins Named? #general #names

Phil Schwarz
 

You and a relative are Nth cousins K times removed, where your common ancestor is N+1 generations before the older of the two of you, and the two of you are K generations apart.  So for example, first cousins share grandparents (2 generations before both of you, so N = 1, and you're the same generation, so K = 0: first cousins 0 times removed).  Second cousins share great-grandparents (3 generations back, so N = 2).
The great-granddaughter of your great-great-grandfather is 3 generations after your great-great-grandfather, and you're 4 generations after him.  So N+1 = 3, and K = 4 - 3 = 1, so you are 2nd cousins (N = 2), once removed.
These relationships are symmetric, because N is always calculated from the older-generation relative.
 
Phil Schwarz
Schwarz/Schwartz/Szwarc, Katz (Grzymalów, Galicia)
Schwebel, Kallenberg, Klein, Schramm, Wolfmann (Czortków, Galicia; Neulengbach and Vienna, Austria)
Adler, Feith (Koblenz, Germany)
Rosenthal, Elkan, Block (Wetzlar, Germany)
Heymann (Cologne, Germany; Amsterdam, Netherlands)
A product of a mixed marriage: my father was a Galizianer, my mother a Yekke :-).
 
 


Re: Surname TAJWIJ #names

David Lewin
 

At 19:07 13/06/2020, Karol Swanson via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
I just discovered my great grandfather's surname was TAJWIL and the
name appears on the JRI list of Rozdal surnames 1869-1901. Can
anyone please tell me how to pronounce this name? Is it Yiddish,
Polish, Russian or whatever? Would there be an English or Yiddish
equivalent of this name?
Also, I have two different first name versions for, what I believe,
is the same person. One is spelled Uszer and the other is Vicher.
Could this be the same name?

Many thanks,
Karol Schlosser Swanson
Scotland


Dates and countries - or language - would be of great help for this guesswork


I had two possibilities come to mind

1, Tevele - diminutive for Tuvia Tuvia being "Tuv" or "Tov" -
Good and "ia" being God

2, Teufel

David Lewin
London


Re: Other names for Yitzchak? #names

David Lewin
 

At 18:41 13/06/2020, judith.cannon4@... wrote:

On my grandfather Louis Witkin's death certificate, his father's
name is Yitzchak, but I can't find Yitzchak anywhere in the
archives. Any suggestions for how that name may have been listed?
Thanks/
--
Judy Cannon
judith.cannon4@...
_._,_._,_
Yitzchak is the Hebrew (Ivrit) for Isaac. Does that help??

David Lewin
London


Re: We Are Here! Join us on June 14@2PM ET for a very special program #JewishGenUpdates #events

Susan H. Sachs
 

Kol HaKavod - sounds wonderful!   
Have you also considered Esther Foer Safran. author of recent book, "I Want You to Know We're Still Here"? She wrote it following a family heritage roots trip.
 
Susan H. Sachs
 
 

On Sun, Jun 14, 2020 at 8:04 AM Avraham Groll <agroll@...> wrote:
**WE ARE HERE!**
JOIN US TOMORROW - JUNE 14@2PM ET - FOR THIS IMPORTANT EVENT
 
JewishGen.org is proud to partner with 60 other museums and cultural institutions around the world for:
 
We Are Here:
A Celebration of Resilience, Resistance, and Hope
Sunday, June 14 @ 2:00 PM ET.
 
Featuring award-winning media personalities Whoopi Goldberg, Dr. Ruth Westheimer, Adrien Brody, Mayim Bialik, Jackie Hoffman, and Tiffany Haddish, world-renowned singers and musicians Renee Fleming, Lea Salonga, Steven Skybell, Joyce DiDonato, and Lang Lang, and other public figures from all walks of life, the free 90-minute program will commemorate the recent anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising and project a message of hope amidst the crises we face.
 
Find more info and tune in to view the program at www.WeAreHere.live.


 

 


Re: Moses Hyam or Hyam Moses - name reversal in early 19th century #unitedkingdom

David Lewin
 

At 12:47 13/06/2020, Steven I Usdansky via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
In my family, one grandson of Chaim-Moshe was named that, two were
named Moshe-Chaim. The reason for the reversal of the names remains a mystery.
_._,_._,_
Had one of the Moshe-Chaim's died before the other was born?

David Lewin
London


Re: Moses Hyam or Hyam Moses - name reversal in early 19th century #unitedkingdom

David Lewin
 

At 09:33 13/06/2020, jlevy2008@... wrote:
Hello everyone from the sweltering heat of Dubai,

Thank you all for your replies and interest.

I just wanted to clarify that I am asking about the likelihood of a
man swapping his given name and his family name.

The 1812 marriage recorded in the register of London's Great
Synagogue indicates that the groom's given name was Hyam in English
and Chayim in Hebrew. His English family name was apparently MOSES.

Is it likely that that he later chose to call himself Moses (given
name) HYAM (family name) for civil purposes, i.e. change his family name?

Were the family names used by the Jews of early 19th England fixed
or was there a degree of fluidity?

Justin Levy
_._,_._,_
Are you certain that the reversed names apply to the same individual
and not to different generations in that family?


A string of two names was used before they invented family
names. XY was simply X, the son of Y

Jews also often named a newborn after a deceased grandparent. So XY
could be read as X son of Y. Mostly that was the name of a
grandfather - but not always, of course. That would be too
simple. Giving the child the same personal name as the father became
a "modern" copying of the gentiles.

In Germany Jews did not take on family names until 1812 -
1834. There are a couple of such databases at Jewishgen of name
adoptions which I created some years back for the 1812 and 183427
West Prussia and Posen provinces. At that time the Jews were granted
citizenship in those territories and one condition was that they
adopt family names as had been practiced by their non-Jewish host
territories for generations.

David Lewin
London


Other names for Yitzchak? #names

Herbert Lazerow
 

The question is not clear. 
   If you are looking for names Yitzkhak might use in a country where English is not the language spoken, I have seen Icek, Izaak, Aizik and Itsko.
   If you are looking at English language possibilities, Isaac is the direct translation, but I have seen Isadore, Irving, Irwin, all of which begin with the same sound. Though I have never seen it, Zach is another sound-alike.

Herbert Lazerow


Re: "High Rabbi" in Poland, Ger Rabbi #poland #warsaw #rabbinic

btkerman@...
 

An idea I had to possibly suggest which chassidus your family followed would be to look for names given in honor of deceased Rebbes. Although it's not a very reliable method, if you find relatives' names that are in common with Rebbes from either Ger or Radomsk that could suggest your family named after the chassidus they were members of. This would be if you don't know of another reason they would have picked the name (ie. there is no obvious relative they were named after).
You can find the names of the Rebbes from both Ger and Radomsk chassidus on Wikipedia and then check if the dates make sense that any relatives with names in common could have been named after the death of the Rabbi in question.
I like Steve Bloom's suggestion about maybe being a Radomsker chassid. It seems after WWI the chassidus moved to Sosnowiec which is even closer to Krakow than Radomsko is.
Good luck!


We Are Here! Join us on June 14@2PM ET for a very special program #JewishGenUpdates #events

Avraham Groll
 

**WE ARE HERE!**
JOIN US TOMORROW - JUNE 14@2PM ET - FOR THIS IMPORTANT EVENT
 
JewishGen.org is proud to partner with 60 other museums and cultural institutions around the world for:
 
We Are Here:
A Celebration of Resilience, Resistance, and Hope
Sunday, June 14 @ 2:00 PM ET.
 
Featuring award-winning media personalities Whoopi Goldberg, Dr. Ruth Westheimer, Adrien Brody, Mayim Bialik, Jackie Hoffman, and Tiffany Haddish, world-renowned singers and musicians Renee Fleming, Lea Salonga, Steven Skybell, Joyce DiDonato, and Lang Lang, and other public figures from all walks of life, the free 90-minute program will commemorate the recent anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising and project a message of hope amidst the crises we face.
 
Find more info and tune in to view the program at www.WeAreHere.live.



Re: Translate Yiddish Grave #photographs #translation #yiddish

fredelfruhman
 

Shavua Tov,

I am wondering whether you are aware that you can post images of gravestones using the wonderful ViewMate feature of jewishgen.  Doing so make it easy to reply, and easier for helpers to see other replies -- and to respond to them -- in a more organized and efficient manner.

Here is my reading of the entire stone, which will repeat much of what was already written, but will also be a bit different.

I will bold the actual text of the stone, to help it stand out from my remarks.
===============================================

[The top of the stone has the word "HaLevi", meaning that the deceased was a Levite.  Levites trace their ancestry back, son to father, to Levi, one of the 12 sons of Jacob.  Levites had specific functions in the Temple services, still have special status today, and assist the Priests (Cohanim) when they prepare to bless the congregation.]

Here lies

a dear and honored man

the learned one

[who died at a] young age, our teacher the rabbi [I beg to differ with the person who responded that the abbreviation that appears, which represents the Hebrew words "Moreinu HaRav", usually does not indicate that the person was a rabbi.  On the contrary:  this abbreviation means exactly that:  he was a rabbi.  Unfortunately, this abbreviation occasionally appears when it should not.  The excellence of the rest of the text on this stone makes me feel strongly that he was indeed a rabbi.  It does not necessarily mean that he had a pulpit and led a congregation, but it definitely means that he had received rabbinical ordination].

SHMARYAHU [I see that others have read it as Shmaryah.  Both of these are valid names.  However, there is an apostrophe on the stone after the last letter, which usually indicates an abbreviation, meaning that at least one letter has been omitted.]

son of Menachem Aryeh [here, too, the middle name is not spelled out; there is an apostrophe to indicate the missing last letter], may his light shine [in other words, the father was still alive].

Rivnik/Ribnik, died on the second day of the holiday of Pesach [Passover]

[rather than give the date of death using the standard month+day, it is here given in terms of the holiday upon which he died.  The calendar date of the 2nd day of Passover is always the 16th day of the month of Nisan]

of the year [5]688 [I am reading the year differently from others; zooming in on the date indicates clearly that the last digit is an 8, rather than a 5]

according to the small count [in other words, the thousands digit -- the  '5' -- does not appear in the year, but is understood]

[The 2nd day of Passover of the year 5688 began at sunset on April 5th, 1928, and ended at sunset on the 6th.]

May his soul be bound up in the bond of life.
--
Fredel Fruhman
Brooklyn, New York, USA