Date   

Re: Eisenberg in Raseiniai, Lithuania #lithuania

Lin Mor
 

My Press/Pres and Schneider/Shneyder families came from the same area and had been living there for at least 3-4 generations by the time of WW II. Have not come across Eisenberg in my research as yet, there seems to be few known records from that area. Please share other surnames linked to the Eisenbergs and do list yourself in Family Finder if you have not done so, already. 


Re: Unable to find names on passenger lists #names

jennifer@...
 

OP said he believed the passenger arrived in the early 1900s. This is why I said to start by searching for a naturalization. Searching for a manifest without first searching for a naturalization in that era is not an efficient use of time. I was actually trying to answer the question at hand and be helpful to the person asking it. Had he asked for a lecture on the paucity of information in 19th century naturalizations, perhaps one would have been relevant. But I still recommend searching for them before searching manifests. Because limiting factors like addresses can give you more certainty you have the correct person. 

And certificates of arrival were required by federal law after 1906. So for someone believed to have arrived “in the early 1900s” there’s a chance some reliable information can be found.


Re: Re: Searching for Leah Noah Da Costa #unitedkingdom

martyn@...
 

I have searched Bevis Marks records but can find no marriage between Solomon/Saloman da Costa and Leah (?), so it is possible that they were married in another synagogue, not Sephardi.  It is also possible that in  spite of her Jewish name of Leah, she was not Jewish and they were married in a church.
I will try in the next day or so to search through the BM records for the forename Leah and see if I can trace her that way.
Regards
Martyn Woolf


I don't understand how this site is functionning #general

marietheschaffter@...
 

Hello,

I wanted to post a reply to a message. I can't log in. How does it work?
Don't ask me to search in the FAQ questions, it's too complicated. I
don't want to receive everyday a big list of topics.

I just want to know if there are replies to the 2 topics I sent.

Can someone help make it easier?

Thanks!


--
L'absence de virus dans ce courrier électronique a été vérifiée par le logiciel antivirus Avast.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Shklyar, Pinkhasik and Reznik from Slutsk and Kletsk #belarus

Gary Dickman
 

Researching Pinkhasik from Zhitomir, Volhynia Guberniya,Ukraine

 

Without known connection saw once on JewishGen

1907 Slutsk Uyezd Duma List

SURNAME

Given name

Patronymic

Value

Category

Nationality

Residence

List number

Remarks

PINKHASIK

Leiba

Zusev

 

apartment tax

Jewish

Slutsk

1393

2nd congress


Gary Dickman

Mevaseret Zion


Re: Shklyar, Pinkhasik and Reznik from Slutsk and Kletsk #belarus

Gary Dickman
 

Researching Pinkhasik from Zhitomir, Volhynia Guberniya,Ukraine

 

Without known connection I saw once on JewisgGen:

 1907 Slutsk Uyezd Duma List

SURNAME

Given name

Patronymic

Value

Category

Nationality

Residence

List number

Remarks

PINKHASIK

Leiba

Zusev

 

apartment tax

Jewish

Slutsk

1393

2nd congress


Gary Dickman
Mevaseret Zion


bergerfrajnd #russia

ירוחם צבי קינסטליך
 


--
I am looking for an original documents  of my mother 's parents, even one document.they were lived in bilgoraj, in1941 they escaped to uzbekistan, there they died both of them.the hospital did give them to the children so also,we don't know their grave.


Landau family 18-19th centuries #poland

isak@bm.technion.ac.il
 

I am looking for early ancestors of Stanislaus Landau (or Landa), born in Poland about 1820, married to Anna (nicknamed Andzulku or Anschulka) who died in Berlin in 1919. They married in Poland in 1846 and had a son born in 1848 named Leopold. They relocated to Germany (Breslau, Berlin) around 1850. I am trying to establish their genealogical roots to the Landau's of Opatów, i.e. to R' Yaakov Landau (1705-1777), AB"D of Tarlow and then of Tarnopol (Ternopil in the Ukraine). R' Yaakov Landau had a son, Gerszon (Gershon) who was AB"D of a small town Rozprza near Piotrków Trybunalski. Direct descendants of this family spread to the region of CRARG (Czestochowa, Radomsko, Przedborz etc). For example, the son of  R' Gerszon of Rozprza, R' Izrael Aron, b. 1773, and his descendants were AB"Ds in Kamiensk. 

 















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Never Again Education Act Passes Congress En Route to President #usa #holocaust

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

The US Congress passed HR 943, the Never Again Education Act—unanimously by the Senate this week and House  393 – 5 on January 27th.  The bill was authored by Rep. Carolyn Mahoney, (D-NY)-Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens). There were 22 original co-sponsors but now 302 co-sponsors.  The act will fund the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) $10 million over the next five years. The funds will allow the museum to increase teacher access to their educational programming and resources, maintain a museum website containing curriculum materials on Holocaust education, and support professional development programming.

 

The bill may be rad at: https://www.congress.gov/116/bills/hr943/BILLS-116hr943rfs.pdf

 

To read more about the bill see:

https://www.kingscountypolitics.com/maloney-holocaust-education-bill-passes-congress/

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


The Genetic Genealogist Detective Series Change of Premiere Date to June 2 #dna #usa #events

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

As previously posted the ABC network, presents a new prime time series the Genetic Detective staring Cece Moore. The premiere date has been changed to June 2  10:00-11:00 PM EDT.

 

ABC News presents a new prime-time series, “The Genetic Detective,” that follows investigative genetic genealogist CeCe Moore and her work with DNA technology company Parabon NanoLabs. In the series, Moore and her team are revolutionizing crime solving by working with police departments and accessible crime scene DNA to help trace the path of a criminal suspect’s family tree, uncover their identity and bring them to justice.

 

For the past decade, Moore, a self-trained genetic genealogist, has pioneered genetic genealogy techniques utilizing a growing body of genetic data in conjunction with traditional genealogical records to help adoptees find their birth parents and to solve family mysteries. Since 2018, Moore has used her unique research skills to transform the face of crime solving, helping to identify more than 100 violent criminal suspects.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


How Rachel Sir (Zoltak) does is my father cousin? #names #israel #poland

JOSEPH GODELNIK
 

My name is Joseph Godlenik (Godlenik). I live in Israel. My father, Haim and his family lived in Siemiatycze, Poland. He immigrated to Israel in 1936. We lived in Petach Tikva and there was a woman named Rachel [Rashke] Zoltak [married to Heizyk Sir]. I assume that Rachel was my father cousin but I never knew how. In a letter sent by my father's parents from December 1938, they also ask about her. I post this request to Dr. Sidney Joshua (Shie) Zoltak, who his (as I know) Rachel nephew, but never got respond.


--
Jgodelnik


23andMe Publishes New BRCA Study-Ashkenazi Jewish Results #dna

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The DNA testing company 23AndMe has published a new BRCA study.  The BRCA gene is not specific only to breast cancer but ovarian, prostate and more.  Many people who carry a BRCA genetic variant associated with an increased risk for breast, ovarian, prostate, pancreatic and certain other cancers do not have a strong family history of cancer, according to a new study from 23andMe.

The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-63466-x )could help inform the on-going discussion around broader access to BRCA genetic testing.  The title of the study is: Identifying Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1/2 founder variants in individuals who do not self-report Jewish ancestry.

Of the 1,967 carriers who provided self-reported ancestry information, 21% did not self-report Jewish ancestry; of these individuals, more than half (62%) do have detectable Ashkenazi Jewish genetic ancestry. In addition, of the 343 carriers who provided both ancestry and family history information, 44% did not have a first-degree family history of a BRCA-related cancer and, in the absence of a personal history of cancer, would therefore be unlikely to qualify for clinical genetic testing. These findings may help inform the discussion around broader access to BRCA genetic testing.

 

The prevalence of pathogenic BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants is estimated to be between 1 in 300 and 1 in 800 in the general population1,2. Among individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish descent, three BRCA1/2 founder variants — 185delAG (c.68_69delAG), 5382insC (c.5266dupC), and 6174delT (c.5946delT) — are present at a frequency of ~1 in 401.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


Re: Konigsberg -East Prussia #russia #germany

Rodney Eisfelder
 

Aida,
There is an enormous amount of data from Königsberg on line at familysearch.org in the form of scanned microfilms. Unlike many other places, most of these microfilms are viewable from home. The bad news is that the scans are not indexed, so you have to view them to find the events you are interested in. The other bad news is that the microfilms were of rather poor quality - some pages are grey on grey rather than black on white, the registers were filmed in a strange order, left hand pages first, then right hand pages in reverse order, and there are some missing pages, usually the ones you need.
There are some records going back to the late 1700s, and birth death and marriage record up to the 1870s. Just in the last few days I found a burial record for my great-great-great-grandfather, who died in Königsberg in 1870.

Start with:
https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/results?count=20&placeId=42332&query=%2Bplace%3A%22Germany%2C%20Preu%C3%9Fen%2C%20Ostpreu%C3%9Fen%2C%20K%C3%B6nigsberg%22
and click on "Jewish Records".
 I've been exploring "Matrikel, 1769-1880"  but there are other collections that may be of interest, that I haven't looked at yet.
Under the matrikel, there are multiple versions of births, deaths and marriages. Some are ordered by date, others by surname, so a missing page in one collection is not always fatal.

Also, ancestry has civil records from Königsberg starting about 1874 in a collection called "Eastern Prussian Provinces, Germany [Poland], Selected Civil Vitals, 1874-1945"

Good luck with your search!

Rodney Eisfelder
Melbourne, Australia


Re: Research Maurice Leizerson, family of Claude Pasquier and Kronental, Sternis or Berliner #france #poland

itencorinne@...
 

Hi Danielle 

I think I found Paul Parczewski twice on passenger lists in 1938 (ship Champlain) and 1939 (ship Champlain). He went to his brother A. PARSKY in New York, and his wife Marjem remained in Paris, 83bis rue Lafayette. In 1942 I found another passenger list of the ship "Serpa Pinto" from Casablanca to New York. Marjem Parczewski nee Glajchmann and Claude Jacques Benjamin Parczewski are on it. Bajla Glajchmann was Marjems mother who lived in Ogrodowa, Warsaw, Poland and they went to Marjems husband Paul Parsky in New York.

You can look at this three passenger lists on familysearch, each list contains two pages.

Regards

Corinne Iten


Re: Unable to find names on passenger lists #names

kosfiszer8@...
 

The strategies are many. I use Steve Morse one step gold page to search immigration records. It provides better filters, including name of the town, boat name, etc. I would start with the first 3 letter using the gold page and add on and test if any name shows up. It can also give you the microfiche records of NARA. Hope you have more info that the name only. Good luck


Ukrainian Police Official Instructed Communal Leaders to Supply List of Names, Addresses and Phone Numbers of All Jews In Kolomyia #ukraine

Jan Meisels Allen
 

A police official in Koloymia, Ukraine has instructed communal leaders to supply a list of all Jews in the town with their names, addresses and phone numbers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


In a letter to the head of the Orthodox Jewish community in Kolomyia,--about 500 miles west of Kiev, the police wanted details about Orthodox Jews in the city.  Signed by Mykhailo Bank, a senior police official in the Ivano-Frankivsk region of Ukraine, the letter demanded a copy of the community’s charter, together with “a list of community members with addresses and mobile phones” and “a list of Jewish students in universities of Kolomyia and Ivano-Frankivsk.”

 

Bank explained that he required the information because his department was “engaged in the fight against transnational and ethnic organized groups and criminal organizations.” The community responded that the charter was available n the state registry also informing him that the “religious communities are separate from the state” and pointing out that “personal data of community members can be provided only in the case of registered criminal cases.”  This was reminiscent of the roundup of Ukrainian Jews by the Nazis and local collaborators following the German military invasion in June 1941 according to the head of the Jewish community.

 

The regional  head of  Ukraine’s Intereior Ministry apoogized on behalf of the leadership and stafff to the entire Jewish community for the situation. The head of Ukraine’s national police has ordered an official investigation.

 

A group of 40 parliamentary deputies signed an April 30 letter to Ukraine’s prime minister and interior minister urging Bank’s dismissal.

 

Settled by Jews from the early part of the sixteenth century, the present size of the community in Kolomyia is less than 1,000. During World War II, most of the city’s Jews were deported to the Belzec concentration camp.  According to some estimates, as many as 1.5 million Jews were killed on Ukrainian soil by Nazi forces during World War II.


To read more see:

https://www.algemeiner.com/2020/05/11/outrage-in-ukraine-as-letter-emerges-from-top-police-official-demanding-list-of-jews-in-western-city-of-kolomyia/

 

https://www.algemeiner.com/2020/05/12/ukraine-police-chief-orders-official-investigation-into-demand-for-list-of-jews/

 

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


The Genealogist Offering Two Record Sets for Beginners for Free for Three Months #unitedkingdom

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

The Genealogist  is offering two of their record sets for beginners for FREE for three months with no credit card details, no subscriptions no catches! 

 

The two record sets are the Census for England and Wales 1891, 1901, 1911; and

Birth, Marriage and Death records index for England and Wales 1837-2005.

 

You need to sign-up. Once they have your email address they will send you a link to access this service.

Go to: https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/account/signup  You will need to provide your name., email and password.


To read more see: https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/first-steps

 

During this offer you may also view and download several issues of their journal, Discover Your Ancestors.

 

After the free access time period, if you try to search their site you will be invited to subscribe.

 

I have no affiliation with The Genealogist and am posting this solely for the information of the reader.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland Free Access Until May 21 #unitedkingdom

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

The Arts and Humanities Research Council and Oxford University Press are providing free access to the Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland, starting on the 15 and continuing for a week, until 21 May.  Go to: https://tinyurl.com/ya3usns6

Original url:

https://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780199677764.001.0001/acref-9780199677764

 

The reference work on family names of the UK, covering English, Scottish, Welsh, Irish, Cornish, and immigrant surnames. It includes every surname that currently has more than 100 bearers, and those that had more than 20 bearers in the 1881 census.

 

Each entry contains lists of variant spellings of the name, an explanation of its origins (including the etymology), lists of early bearers showing evidence for formation and continuity from the date of formation down to the 19th century, geographical distribution, and, where relevant, genealogical and bibliographical notes, making this a fully comprehensive work on family names.

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


Re: Minsk vs minsk #belarus

David Oseas
 

Post-1907 naturalization documents and WWI draft registrations are the best sources for the town name of your ancestor.  If your grandfather wasn't of draft age, then look for a son or nephew born in the old country and of the correct age range.

Occasionally, Landsmanshaftn (burial societies) cover a specific enough geographic region to distinguish between two towns of similar names.

Regards,
David Oseas

Researching:
HYMAN/HEYMAN/HEIMOWITS/CHAJMOVITS: Zemplen-Dobra, Hungary > New York
KLEIN: Satoraljaujhely (Ujhely), Hungary > New York > Los Angeles
KRONOWITH:
Hungary > New York
OSEAS/OSIAS/OSIASI/OZIAS: Iasi, Romania > Chicago > Milwaukee > Los Angeles
SCHECHTER/SHEKTER: Kishinev, Bessarabia > New York  
SHERMAN: Iasi, Romania > New York > Los Angeles
STRUL:  Iasi, Romania > Haifa, Israel
WICHMAN: Syczkowo (Bobruisk), Belarus > Milwaukee > Los Angeles


MINSK - Gubernia or City #belarus

Shel
 

Mary Ellen,

Try the “JewishGen Belarus Gubernia Databse" <https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Belarus/>, specifically the Minsk Gubernia lists of Births/Marriages/Deaths/Residences/Yizkor Books, etc. Data files.

If the name you’re seeking comes up at all, you’ll soon see whether it’s in the “city” of Minsk or some other town in Minsk Gubernia.

Shel Bercovich