Date   

ViewMate translation request - Polish #lodz #poland

Israel Michaeli <ismichaeli@...>
 

Dear all,

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation. It is
on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37937
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37939
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37940
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37941

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Israel Michaeli
Herzliya, Israel


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland ViewMate translation request - Polish #lodz #poland

Israel Michaeli <ismichaeli@...>
 

Dear all,

I've posted a vital record in Polish for which I need a translation. It is
on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37937
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37939
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37940
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM37941

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Israel Michaeli
Herzliya, Israel


Meyer GERSTEIN and ancestors #general

Joseph Forsyth <joeforsyth@...>
 

We are searching for family history of Meyer and Pearl GURSTEIN who lived
in the town of Boloszewka in the administrative district of Volhynia in
Russian Ukraine, in mid to late 19th century. Meyer was born in 1869 and we
can only presume it was in Boloszewka. His father, Moshe GURSTEIN operated
a flour mill in that town. Meyer's wife was the former Pearl PASHTAR, her
birth date unknown. They were first cousins.

If you have any information about the GURSTEIN family >from that era or before
please contact us at joeforsyth@shaw.ca. I am initiating this post on behalf
of a man who is blind and has difficulty negotiating the jewishgen website.
I have not been able to confirm the name of the town with that spellling.

Thank you

Joseph Forsyth
British Columbia, Canada


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Meyer GERSTEIN and ancestors #general

Joseph Forsyth <joeforsyth@...>
 

We are searching for family history of Meyer and Pearl GURSTEIN who lived
in the town of Boloszewka in the administrative district of Volhynia in
Russian Ukraine, in mid to late 19th century. Meyer was born in 1869 and we
can only presume it was in Boloszewka. His father, Moshe GURSTEIN operated
a flour mill in that town. Meyer's wife was the former Pearl PASHTAR, her
birth date unknown. They were first cousins.

If you have any information about the GURSTEIN family >from that era or before
please contact us at joeforsyth@shaw.ca. I am initiating this post on behalf
of a man who is blind and has difficulty negotiating the jewishgen website.
I have not been able to confirm the name of the town with that spellling.

Thank you

Joseph Forsyth
British Columbia, Canada


ViewMate Translation Request - Russian #poland

Jeff Jacobs
 

I have posted three records on ViewMate for which I would appreciate a
translation >from Russian. The images are:

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=37842

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=37843

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=37844

You can use the ViewMate form to respond. Thank you.

Jeff Jacobs
Columbia, SC USA


JRI Poland #Poland ViewMate Translation Request - Russian #poland

Jeff Jacobs
 

I have posted three records on ViewMate for which I would appreciate a
translation >from Russian. The images are:

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=37842

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=37843

http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=37844

You can use the ViewMate form to respond. Thank you.

Jeff Jacobs
Columbia, SC USA


New Adopt-A-Jewish_Cemetery-in-Poland Initiative by FODZ #poland

Marla Raucher Osborn <osborn@...>
 

The Foundation for the Preservation of Jewish Heritage in Poland
(FODZ) announces a new "ADOPT-A-JEWISH-CEMETERY IN POLAND" initiative
to help save Jewish cemeteries in Poland.

We invite individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations
who are interested in starting a commemoration project to partner with
us. Projects can be as small as designing and mounting a memorial
plaque to remind visitors and locals that a particular site is a Jewish
cemetery (even if no headstones exist there today) or as large as
erecting a fence, gate, or elaborate lapidarium-style memorial.

Our goal is to engage new partners who have been wanting to do
something here in Poland to physically commemorate a place, a family,
or a community but who have not known where to turn for advice and
help on the logistics, paperwork, and details.

Our Foundation was established in 2002 by the Union of Jewish
Communities in Poland and the World Jewish Restitution Organization
(WJRO). Our primary mission is to protect and commemorate the
surviving sites and monuments of Jewish cultural heritage in Poland.
The Foundation is active where no Jewish community exists today or
where distance >from major urban centers or lack of sufficient
financial resources makes it difficult for present-day small Jewish
communities to provide adequate longterm care and maintenance of
historic Jewish properties.

Our extensive experience in working in Jewish cemeteries in Poland
for more than a decade, together with our contacts and relationships
with local governments and administrative bodies, puts us in a unique
position to partner with those interested and motivated to see that
these sites - these precious and sacred places - are not lost and
forgotten. All of our cemetery works is conducted under the relevant
rabbinical supervision.

There are more than 1200 Jewish cemeteries in Poland. Most are in
advanced states of neglect, without any markers, signs, fences, or
even gravestones. Most are not protected, maintained, or easily
accessible by visitors. Even the simple installation in town of
a sign pointing the way to the nearby Jewish cemetery can make a
small but important difference.

In the last decade, FODZ has been active in 200 Jewish cemeteries
in Poland, with work ranging >from clean-up and repair initiatives,
to elaborate fencing and gating projects, several of which culminated
in re-dedication ceremonies covered by the media and attended by
officials >from the Polish government and Jewish descendants mostly
from Israel and America. In 2013 and 2014, FODZ had projects in
more than two dozen Jewish cemeteries.

If you want to make sure that the final resting place of a parent,
grandparent, or great-grandparent is not forgotten, or if you wish
to commemorate on the site of a Jewish cemetery in Poland a
particular family or community that perished in the Shoah, we may
be able to help you realize your project. We can handle legal,
organizational, and practical matters here in Poland; you would
be responsible for the project's concept and financial support.

We are also available to assist when your project is completed,
organizing the re-dedication ceremony, arranging speakers,
participants, and representatives of the Polish and Jewish
communities, as well as post-ceremony roots travel to other
towns and cities in Poland relevant to your family heritage.

So join us! FODZ loves partners!

Please contact us if you want to make a difference in Poland -
and in your family town or cemetery.

www.fodz.pl
Email: fodz@fodz.pl

And find us now on Facebook too:
www.facebook.com/fodz.jewish.poland

Warm regards,
Marla Raucher Osborn
Warsaw
osborn@nuthatch.org

Researching surnames:
HORN, FRUCHTER, LIEBLING >from Rohatyn (Galicia, today Ukraine);
KURZROCK >from Kozova (Galicia, today Ukraine);
TEICHMAN >from Chodorow (Galicia, today Ukraine);
SILBER, BAUMANN, and SCHARF fromUlanow and Sokolow Malopolska (Galicia,
Poland);
RAUCHER/RAUSCHER and KESTENBAUM >from Przemysl (Galicia, Poland);
BLECHER >from Soroka, Bessarabia (Moldova);
and BRUNSHTEIN, MOGALNIK, SARFAS, and
FABER >from Mohyliv Podilskyy and Kamyanets Podilskyy (Ukraine)


JRI Poland #Poland New Adopt-A-Jewish_Cemetery-in-Poland Initiative by FODZ #poland

Marla Raucher Osborn <osborn@...>
 

The Foundation for the Preservation of Jewish Heritage in Poland
(FODZ) announces a new "ADOPT-A-JEWISH-CEMETERY IN POLAND" initiative
to help save Jewish cemeteries in Poland.

We invite individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations
who are interested in starting a commemoration project to partner with
us. Projects can be as small as designing and mounting a memorial
plaque to remind visitors and locals that a particular site is a Jewish
cemetery (even if no headstones exist there today) or as large as
erecting a fence, gate, or elaborate lapidarium-style memorial.

Our goal is to engage new partners who have been wanting to do
something here in Poland to physically commemorate a place, a family,
or a community but who have not known where to turn for advice and
help on the logistics, paperwork, and details.

Our Foundation was established in 2002 by the Union of Jewish
Communities in Poland and the World Jewish Restitution Organization
(WJRO). Our primary mission is to protect and commemorate the
surviving sites and monuments of Jewish cultural heritage in Poland.
The Foundation is active where no Jewish community exists today or
where distance >from major urban centers or lack of sufficient
financial resources makes it difficult for present-day small Jewish
communities to provide adequate longterm care and maintenance of
historic Jewish properties.

Our extensive experience in working in Jewish cemeteries in Poland
for more than a decade, together with our contacts and relationships
with local governments and administrative bodies, puts us in a unique
position to partner with those interested and motivated to see that
these sites - these precious and sacred places - are not lost and
forgotten. All of our cemetery works is conducted under the relevant
rabbinical supervision.

There are more than 1200 Jewish cemeteries in Poland. Most are in
advanced states of neglect, without any markers, signs, fences, or
even gravestones. Most are not protected, maintained, or easily
accessible by visitors. Even the simple installation in town of
a sign pointing the way to the nearby Jewish cemetery can make a
small but important difference.

In the last decade, FODZ has been active in 200 Jewish cemeteries
in Poland, with work ranging >from clean-up and repair initiatives,
to elaborate fencing and gating projects, several of which culminated
in re-dedication ceremonies covered by the media and attended by
officials >from the Polish government and Jewish descendants mostly
from Israel and America. In 2013 and 2014, FODZ had projects in
more than two dozen Jewish cemeteries.

If you want to make sure that the final resting place of a parent,
grandparent, or great-grandparent is not forgotten, or if you wish
to commemorate on the site of a Jewish cemetery in Poland a
particular family or community that perished in the Shoah, we may
be able to help you realize your project. We can handle legal,
organizational, and practical matters here in Poland; you would
be responsible for the project's concept and financial support.

We are also available to assist when your project is completed,
organizing the re-dedication ceremony, arranging speakers,
participants, and representatives of the Polish and Jewish
communities, as well as post-ceremony roots travel to other
towns and cities in Poland relevant to your family heritage.

So join us! FODZ loves partners!

Please contact us if you want to make a difference in Poland -
and in your family town or cemetery.

www.fodz.pl
Email: fodz@fodz.pl

And find us now on Facebook too:
www.facebook.com/fodz.jewish.poland

Warm regards,
Marla Raucher Osborn
Warsaw
osborn@nuthatch.org

Researching surnames:
HORN, FRUCHTER, LIEBLING >from Rohatyn (Galicia, today Ukraine);
KURZROCK >from Kozova (Galicia, today Ukraine);
TEICHMAN >from Chodorow (Galicia, today Ukraine);
SILBER, BAUMANN, and SCHARF fromUlanow and Sokolow Malopolska (Galicia,
Poland);
RAUCHER/RAUSCHER and KESTENBAUM >from Przemysl (Galicia, Poland);
BLECHER >from Soroka, Bessarabia (Moldova);
and BRUNSHTEIN, MOGALNIK, SARFAS, and
FABER >from Mohyliv Podilskyy and Kamyanets Podilskyy (Ukraine)


MEYER GURSTEIN and ancestors #ukraine

Joseph Forsyth <joeforsyth@...>
 

We are searching for family history of Meyer and Pearl GURSTEIN who lived
in the town of BOLOSZEWKA in the administrative district of Volhynia in
Russian Ukraine, in mid to late 19th century. Meyer was born in 1869 and we
can only presume it was in Boloszewka. His father, MOSHE GURSTEIN operated
a flour mill in that town. Meyer's wife was the former PEARL PASHTAR, her
birth date unknown. They were first cousins. If you have any information
about the Gurstein family >from that era or before please contact us at,
joeforsyth@shaw.ca.

I am doing this post on behalf of a blind man who cannot navigate the jewishgen
website himself. I have been unable to confirm a town of this name. Any
help is appreciated.

Joseph Forsyth
Parksville, British Columbia, Canada

Moderator's Note: According to the JewishGen Communities Database, Boloszewka is now known as Bilshivtsi.
Any chance that the family was >from Galicia rather than Volhynia?


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine MEYER GURSTEIN and ancestors #ukraine

Joseph Forsyth <joeforsyth@...>
 

We are searching for family history of Meyer and Pearl GURSTEIN who lived
in the town of BOLOSZEWKA in the administrative district of Volhynia in
Russian Ukraine, in mid to late 19th century. Meyer was born in 1869 and we
can only presume it was in Boloszewka. His father, MOSHE GURSTEIN operated
a flour mill in that town. Meyer's wife was the former PEARL PASHTAR, her
birth date unknown. They were first cousins. If you have any information
about the Gurstein family >from that era or before please contact us at,
joeforsyth@shaw.ca.

I am doing this post on behalf of a blind man who cannot navigate the jewishgen
website himself. I have been unable to confirm a town of this name. Any
help is appreciated.

Joseph Forsyth
Parksville, British Columbia, Canada

Moderator's Note: According to the JewishGen Communities Database, Boloszewka is now known as Bilshivtsi.
Any chance that the family was >from Galicia rather than Volhynia?


Re: 2nd entry to the US? The mystery of Gdal/Gdalye KAMINKER/KAMINSKY #general

Edwin Reffell <edwin.reffell@...>
 

Gdal KAMENKER born 1884 in Schereschan, Russia

https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XLD9-2ZV

Gedaliy KAMINSKY (married) born 1884 nearest relative in old country
is a friend and is going to his brother-in-law (handwritten it says
as above where it says grandson Joseph COVEN 34 Jefferson Str,
Worchester Massachusetts) in 1923 to his brother-in-law (no name
given) and seems to be with Riva (f 36 married, his wife), Sheindal (f
15). Isaiy (m 14) and Leiba (m 3). All were born in Elsiavetgrad,
Russia.Joseph COVEN is the grandson of Sora KOVALEVSKY (79 widow)
travelling with Jankel (63 married) and Rochel (57 married). Jankel
and Rochel are Joseph's parents.The nearest contact they have in the
old country is a friend, David LIPOWETZKY in Elisavetgrad.

https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:23XL-VHP

Elisavetgrad is now Kirovohrad in Ukraine. I could not find anything
for Schereschan. It could be mistranscription.

Edwin

On Thu, Feb 5, 2015 at 3:48 PM, Allan Jordan aejordan@aol.com wrote:
From: Yohanan Loeffler
I'll start with my bottom-line question: If a person re-entered USA from
Europe in 1923 after first entry in 1913 - would he still be in an Alien list;
would he have to declare it in his entry;
Will there be a hint for the first entry in the second Manifest list? Or,
would he be able to enter USA as if he had never been there before?
The simple answer is it is possible it is the same person even though they are
on the Alien list and even though he says he has not been in the USA before on
the 1923 arrival. No one was checking details like that and it was dependent
on the purser on the ship recording the information correctly.

Unless he was carrying proof of US Citizenship with him on the 1923 trip they
would have treated him as an Alien. If he had stayed in the USA in 1913 and
maybe got caught by World War I and could only go back for his family in the
1920s he would most certainly have carried proof of citizenship with him in
1923 assuming he had in fact become a US Citizen. If he left the USA in the
1920s without citizenship he would have been subjected to the same immigrant
quotas as everyone else and risked not being able to get back into the USA.
I do not believe things like "resident alien" status (today a Green Card)
existed in the 1920s and if they did he would have answered yes to that
question.

The obvious question is the person in 1913 and 1923 going to the same "brother
in law" or is it different people who just happen to be listed with the same
relationship status? The brother in law should show at least in the 1920 USA
census and maybe the 1910 which could possibly provide clues.

Also the 1920s passenger list should show his next of kin in the old country
or where he was coming >from in some detail. You said the wives had different
names but I would not put too much stock in that either in a 10 year span.
The first wife could have died and he remarried and hence the much younger
child or maybe the wife just decided to use a different name 10 years later or
maybe one of the two clerks got the name wrong.

If the person came across the border in 1913 to a brother in law have you tried
tracking down that brother in law's household? Was there a 1915 State Census
for where ever the brother in law was living and have you looked to see who was
in the household? Also city directories for around that time?

I am sort of betting that it is not the same person because of the issue of the
1923 quota problems for an alien to leave the USA. It seems very risky that he
would get back into the USA without some type of arrangement. But that is only
a supposition that would need to be tested. Ultimately the only way to be sure
would be to track down vital records for the man who arrives in 1923 to see what
his parentage is listed as. Or maybe the wife if she arrives later with the
children gives some more clues.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: 2nd entry to the US? The mystery of Gdal/Gdalye KAMINKER/KAMINSKY #general

Edwin Reffell <edwin.reffell@...>
 

Gdal KAMENKER born 1884 in Schereschan, Russia

https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XLD9-2ZV

Gedaliy KAMINSKY (married) born 1884 nearest relative in old country
is a friend and is going to his brother-in-law (handwritten it says
as above where it says grandson Joseph COVEN 34 Jefferson Str,
Worchester Massachusetts) in 1923 to his brother-in-law (no name
given) and seems to be with Riva (f 36 married, his wife), Sheindal (f
15). Isaiy (m 14) and Leiba (m 3). All were born in Elsiavetgrad,
Russia.Joseph COVEN is the grandson of Sora KOVALEVSKY (79 widow)
travelling with Jankel (63 married) and Rochel (57 married). Jankel
and Rochel are Joseph's parents.The nearest contact they have in the
old country is a friend, David LIPOWETZKY in Elisavetgrad.

https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:23XL-VHP

Elisavetgrad is now Kirovohrad in Ukraine. I could not find anything
for Schereschan. It could be mistranscription.

Edwin

On Thu, Feb 5, 2015 at 3:48 PM, Allan Jordan aejordan@aol.com wrote:
From: Yohanan Loeffler
I'll start with my bottom-line question: If a person re-entered USA from
Europe in 1923 after first entry in 1913 - would he still be in an Alien list;
would he have to declare it in his entry;
Will there be a hint for the first entry in the second Manifest list? Or,
would he be able to enter USA as if he had never been there before?
The simple answer is it is possible it is the same person even though they are
on the Alien list and even though he says he has not been in the USA before on
the 1923 arrival. No one was checking details like that and it was dependent
on the purser on the ship recording the information correctly.

Unless he was carrying proof of US Citizenship with him on the 1923 trip they
would have treated him as an Alien. If he had stayed in the USA in 1913 and
maybe got caught by World War I and could only go back for his family in the
1920s he would most certainly have carried proof of citizenship with him in
1923 assuming he had in fact become a US Citizen. If he left the USA in the
1920s without citizenship he would have been subjected to the same immigrant
quotas as everyone else and risked not being able to get back into the USA.
I do not believe things like "resident alien" status (today a Green Card)
existed in the 1920s and if they did he would have answered yes to that
question.

The obvious question is the person in 1913 and 1923 going to the same "brother
in law" or is it different people who just happen to be listed with the same
relationship status? The brother in law should show at least in the 1920 USA
census and maybe the 1910 which could possibly provide clues.

Also the 1920s passenger list should show his next of kin in the old country
or where he was coming >from in some detail. You said the wives had different
names but I would not put too much stock in that either in a 10 year span.
The first wife could have died and he remarried and hence the much younger
child or maybe the wife just decided to use a different name 10 years later or
maybe one of the two clerks got the name wrong.

If the person came across the border in 1913 to a brother in law have you tried
tracking down that brother in law's household? Was there a 1915 State Census
for where ever the brother in law was living and have you looked to see who was
in the household? Also city directories for around that time?

I am sort of betting that it is not the same person because of the issue of the
1923 quota problems for an alien to leave the USA. It seems very risky that he
would get back into the USA without some type of arrangement. But that is only
a supposition that would need to be tested. Ultimately the only way to be sure
would be to track down vital records for the man who arrives in 1923 to see what
his parentage is listed as. Or maybe the wife if she arrives later with the
children gives some more clues.


Ancestry Announces New Website --Option to Try Beta Mode #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Ancestry.com invited me along with other selected genealogists to two-
online sessions for an advance look at their new Ancestry website-which is
still in beta mode. The website will be available at RootsTech February
10-14, 2015 and those attending the conference are invited to stop at the
Ancestry booth will be able to opt-in and participate in the beta
experience. The new website will be going "mainstream" in May and broadly
available by mid-year.

The reason Ancestry said they are changing their website is to solve four
problems:

1. Years of organic growth
2. Need for a story for subscribers using their information
3. Improvement of core facts
4. Media was >from the 90's and today there are major differences in
media types.

As it's still in Beta, not all functions were available to try, but there is
currently a wealth of information so it is worth your time to look. If you
are not going to RootsTech, Ancestry is extending an invitation to be placed
on a waiting list. Visit this link: http://home.ancestry.com/beta

Due to recent growth, the website appeared "cluttered" as features were
added which is challenging to mobile devices as many of the features were
developed before the advent of tablets.

The new Ancestry website has a "cleaner" look and is less "busy". The
changes in "look and feel" are site wide. There is a new header which is not
as prominent -more in the background. The media photographs and documents
when clicked on a tree on Ancestry are robust and clear. The new navigator
is mobile friendly, has a new visual design and a simplified layout.

The improved Ancestry website includes (>from Ancestry.com):
. A new LifeStory view to transform your ancestors' facts and events
into engaging, unique stories
. A new, intuitive, modern look to streamline your work flows and make
your family story the focus
. Historical Insights to discover significant historical events that
your ancestors may have experienced
. A new Facts View to make it easier to validate facts with sources,
and edit and review facts contextually
. A new Media Gallery where you can consolidate all your media in one
place

The new features on the tree aspect are only for Ancestry trees not Family
Tree Maker (FTM) whether you keep your FTM on the Ancestry website or only
on your computer. There will be no problems using FTM on the website during
the website's beta period. When I inquired if this meant the long-term life
of FTM was in question, the person conducting the overview said he was not
involved with FTM only with the beta and could not respond.

Story view will be retired eventually. No date has been given. If a person
changes facts during the beta testing the changes will be reflected in story
view.

Non-subscribers will have some availability and can see trees but they will
be limited to seeing Ancestry records.

There is a new facts view with an increase on genealogical concepts and more
transparency, there is an increased focus on content.

Genealogy has been going through an evolution >from records to family trees
to hints and now stories. In the demo that we were shown, it takes
information >from within your tree and documents and writes a story-Life
story. It includes maps >from around the world highlighting towns that are
mentioned >from your resources and tree. As not everyone can "write" this
will help those who are writing-challenged in writing "their" story. You do
not need to keep the story that is created by the software.

As this is still in beta one of the items they are working on is checking
on sources to see the record; putting the life story in chronological order
and the print option, seeing source material in another person's tree,
integration with Ancestry Academy plus more., Every week more attributes are
being added and by RootsTech some of these will be included.

I am not affiliated with Ancestry and am sharing information on a totally
new overhaul of their website solely for the information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ancestry Announces New Website --Option to Try Beta Mode #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Ancestry.com invited me along with other selected genealogists to two-
online sessions for an advance look at their new Ancestry website-which is
still in beta mode. The website will be available at RootsTech February
10-14, 2015 and those attending the conference are invited to stop at the
Ancestry booth will be able to opt-in and participate in the beta
experience. The new website will be going "mainstream" in May and broadly
available by mid-year.

The reason Ancestry said they are changing their website is to solve four
problems:

1. Years of organic growth
2. Need for a story for subscribers using their information
3. Improvement of core facts
4. Media was >from the 90's and today there are major differences in
media types.

As it's still in Beta, not all functions were available to try, but there is
currently a wealth of information so it is worth your time to look. If you
are not going to RootsTech, Ancestry is extending an invitation to be placed
on a waiting list. Visit this link: http://home.ancestry.com/beta

Due to recent growth, the website appeared "cluttered" as features were
added which is challenging to mobile devices as many of the features were
developed before the advent of tablets.

The new Ancestry website has a "cleaner" look and is less "busy". The
changes in "look and feel" are site wide. There is a new header which is not
as prominent -more in the background. The media photographs and documents
when clicked on a tree on Ancestry are robust and clear. The new navigator
is mobile friendly, has a new visual design and a simplified layout.

The improved Ancestry website includes (>from Ancestry.com):
. A new LifeStory view to transform your ancestors' facts and events
into engaging, unique stories
. A new, intuitive, modern look to streamline your work flows and make
your family story the focus
. Historical Insights to discover significant historical events that
your ancestors may have experienced
. A new Facts View to make it easier to validate facts with sources,
and edit and review facts contextually
. A new Media Gallery where you can consolidate all your media in one
place

The new features on the tree aspect are only for Ancestry trees not Family
Tree Maker (FTM) whether you keep your FTM on the Ancestry website or only
on your computer. There will be no problems using FTM on the website during
the website's beta period. When I inquired if this meant the long-term life
of FTM was in question, the person conducting the overview said he was not
involved with FTM only with the beta and could not respond.

Story view will be retired eventually. No date has been given. If a person
changes facts during the beta testing the changes will be reflected in story
view.

Non-subscribers will have some availability and can see trees but they will
be limited to seeing Ancestry records.

There is a new facts view with an increase on genealogical concepts and more
transparency, there is an increased focus on content.

Genealogy has been going through an evolution >from records to family trees
to hints and now stories. In the demo that we were shown, it takes
information >from within your tree and documents and writes a story-Life
story. It includes maps >from around the world highlighting towns that are
mentioned >from your resources and tree. As not everyone can "write" this
will help those who are writing-challenged in writing "their" story. You do
not need to keep the story that is created by the software.

As this is still in beta one of the items they are working on is checking
on sources to see the record; putting the life story in chronological order
and the print option, seeing source material in another person's tree,
integration with Ancestry Academy plus more., Every week more attributes are
being added and by RootsTech some of these will be included.

I am not affiliated with Ancestry and am sharing information on a totally
new overhaul of their website solely for the information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Ferenc (Francois) KRAUT #hungary

Linda Shefler
 

Ferenc (Francois) KRAUT was born in Pinkafeld, Hungary in 1907. He was
the son of Izidor KRAUT and Malvin STERN. Ferenc was a famous French
geologist, mineralogist, meteorite researcher and professor in the
University of Paris. The krautite mineral was named for him.
We know that my husband's great grandmother Tereza STERN had a sister
Malvin STERN, who married an Izidor KRAUT, and we're trying to determine
if this is the same family. Is anyone familiar with the geologist Ferenc
KRAUT or with the family of Malvin STERN and Izidor KRAUT? If so, I would
love to hear >from you.

Many thanks,
Linda Silverman Shefler
San Francisco East Bay
Linda.shefler@gmail.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Ferenc (Francois) KRAUT #hungary

Linda Shefler
 

Ferenc (Francois) KRAUT was born in Pinkafeld, Hungary in 1907. He was
the son of Izidor KRAUT and Malvin STERN. Ferenc was a famous French
geologist, mineralogist, meteorite researcher and professor in the
University of Paris. The krautite mineral was named for him.
We know that my husband's great grandmother Tereza STERN had a sister
Malvin STERN, who married an Izidor KRAUT, and we're trying to determine
if this is the same family. Is anyone familiar with the geologist Ferenc
KRAUT or with the family of Malvin STERN and Izidor KRAUT? If so, I would
love to hear >from you.

Many thanks,
Linda Silverman Shefler
San Francisco East Bay
Linda.shefler@gmail.com


Re: The "Conscriptio Judaeorum" - where to find it, and what years are available #hungary

HungarianRoots
 

Let's bring a little light into this:
- originals of censuses are at the respective county archives (some also
have microfilmed versions of these). Since 2014 these county archives have
been centralized and are county branches of the National Archives. Some
early Jewish censuses are at the central National Archives in Budapest.
- copies of census sheets kept at the county archives are available
(microfilm copies, mainly) at the National Archives main research facilities
(Budapest)
- The Jewish archives have some census records, but nearly not all. Some
are, as Pam said, paper copies of the microfilmed censuses.
- Some Jewish vital register microfilmes contain census sheets as well.

The Hungarian Jewish archives belongs to the Federation of Hungarian Jewish
Communities (which is, in fact, only a Federation of neolog communities).
The orthodox community also has its documents and will also likely set up
their archives.

Regards,

Karesz Vandor
genealogist/Historian/Private tour guide

Hungarian Roots
web: www.hungarianroots.com


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: The "Conscriptio Judaeorum" - where to find it, and what years are available #hungary

HungarianRoots
 

Let's bring a little light into this:
- originals of censuses are at the respective county archives (some also
have microfilmed versions of these). Since 2014 these county archives have
been centralized and are county branches of the National Archives. Some
early Jewish censuses are at the central National Archives in Budapest.
- copies of census sheets kept at the county archives are available
(microfilm copies, mainly) at the National Archives main research facilities
(Budapest)
- The Jewish archives have some census records, but nearly not all. Some
are, as Pam said, paper copies of the microfilmed censuses.
- Some Jewish vital register microfilmes contain census sheets as well.

The Hungarian Jewish archives belongs to the Federation of Hungarian Jewish
Communities (which is, in fact, only a Federation of neolog communities).
The orthodox community also has its documents and will also likely set up
their archives.

Regards,

Karesz Vandor
genealogist/Historian/Private tour guide

Hungarian Roots
web: www.hungarianroots.com


Weiss from Miskolc #hungary

Shaul Sharoni
 

Dear Siggers,

Looking for members of the Weiss family of Miskolc, including Zoltan
Czeisler, born 1902 in or around Miskolc, died 7.6.1982 in Israel. His
mother was probably a Weiss, sister to Bertha Grunwald nee Weiss, born 1865
in Hejokeresztur to Salamon Weiss (Weisz) and Rozalia Brunner. I'm also
looking for any of Bertha's siblings and their own descendants, which to
date are unknown to me.


Best Regards
Shaul Sharoni,
Israel


Hungary SIG #Hungary Weiss from Miskolc #hungary

Shaul Sharoni
 

Dear Siggers,

Looking for members of the Weiss family of Miskolc, including Zoltan
Czeisler, born 1902 in or around Miskolc, died 7.6.1982 in Israel. His
mother was probably a Weiss, sister to Bertha Grunwald nee Weiss, born 1865
in Hejokeresztur to Salamon Weiss (Weisz) and Rozalia Brunner. I'm also
looking for any of Bertha's siblings and their own descendants, which to
date are unknown to me.


Best Regards
Shaul Sharoni,
Israel

95861 - 95880 of 658076