Date   

Re: Jaffa Immigration Records-Translation Requested #israel #records #translation

fredelfruhman
 

The 11th record on page 236 is:

Yitzchak (Isaac) Risman, who arrived on August 3rd, 1929, on a ship called the Tarbiel or Charbiel, number 1719 (possibly a ticket number?  I can't make out the column header). 

As to the 2nd and 3rd records on page 229:  To me, the family name looks like "Rachamim".
--
Fredel Fruhman
Brooklyn, New York, USA


(US) President Biden Declares May Jewish American Heritage Month #announcements #usa

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

President Joseph Biden signed a proclamation declaring May Jewish American Heritage Month.  May has been Jewish American Heritage Month since 2006 in recognition of the indelible contributions American Jews have made, and continue to make, to our nation’s history, culture, and society. To read the proclamation go to: https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/2021/04/30/a-proclamation-on-jewish-american-heritage-month-2021/

 

To celebrate Jewish American Heritage Month the Jewish Museum of American Jewish History  (JAHM) has virtual programs every week in May.  See: https://www.nmajh.org/jewish-american-heritage-month/

 

This year’s JAHM’s theme is: This year's theme takes its inspiration from the ancient sage Rabbi Hillel’s most well-known saying–“If I am only for myself, what am I? If not now—when?" JAHM will highlight historical moments in which American Jewish communities demonstrated remarkable resilience and care for communities outside of their own, and also how diverse communities stood up for Jews in the face of antisemitism.

 

This Jewish American Heritage Month, we are inviting the public to nominate and vote on the first ever Jewish American Hometown Hero to be inducted into the Museum's Ed Snider Only in America Gallery/Hall of Fame. Nominations may be made April 30-May 10. Learn more and nominate a deserving individual today! The nomination form is accessible at: https://www.nmajh.org/home-town-hero-contest/

 

To find out what is happening in your community –there are 75 JAHM partners see:

https://www.nmajh.org/jewish-american-heritage-month/#partners

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Pubic Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


Re: Announcing the publication of the Yizkor Book of SOCHACZEW, Poland #yizkorbooks #JewishGenUpdates #announcements

ireneplotzker@...
 

I recently ordered and received this. I had been waiting for years for a full translation and am delighted with it!
This was my grandfather's (Velvet Grundwag, later William Greenwald) birthplace. His mother was Brocha Libert., father Fischel Grundwag. I found Grundwags and Liberts when I first looked at this book on Jewish Gen some years ago and have been in contact with some descendants. However, I can't figure out just how I am related to the Grundwags in Israel, who are descended from those named in the book, nor the Liberts who went to Chicago.  I will review what I have for additional clues. (Anybody out there know either of these families?)

Irene Greenwald Plotzker 
Wilmington, Delaware 


Re: Jewish agricultural communities...Daukniunai, in Lithuania #lithuania

Michael Bloom
 

My mother's father's father came from Butrimonys.  His name in English was Bernard Romsisky which according to the ship manifest was actually Rumsiski.  They lived in the South End neighborhood of Boston and then in Winchester, Mass.  Also a great uncle of mine was Myer Itzkowitz though I don't know where his family came from.  Interesting to me that the original poster mentioned the Daukniunal Jewish Agricultural Community since Bernard's son Samuel (my maternal grandfather) started off as a farmer in Wisconsin and New Jersey.

Michael Bloom
Boston, Massachusetts
Searching:
Romsisky/Rumsisky/Rumsiski/Romsey from Vilna, Butrimonys; Itzkowitz


Yizkor Book Report for April 2021 #yizkorbooks #JewishGenUpdates

lackerfeld@...
 

Shalom,

 

Looking through our Yizkor Projects, I am in awe of the huge amount of work still ahead of us in order to complete the momentous number of projects we have running. On the other hand, I am very encouraged to see that, from time to time and including this past month, we managed to complete some further translation projects, and they are:

Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm) This project which was coordinated over many years by Leah Z. Davidson and after many years of effort, we have managed to see the complete translation online. We do thank Leah for her many years of dedication to this project.

 

Wysokie Mazowieckie, Poland (Wysokie-Mazowieckie; Memorial Book) Begun many years ago by Ada Holtzman z”l and recently, Sandy Levin gratefully took on this project and was able to bring it through to its successful completion. So hats off to Sandy.

Some projects end, and a new project begins. Recently, a dedicated Translations Fund was set up for the Yedinitz (Edineţ), Moldova Yizkor book by a team with high hopes of completely translating this book into English. If you have connections to this community, I’m quite sure your financial support to this combined effort would be much appreciated. Please see the link to support this or any of the other translation funds we have running, please go to the Yizkor Book Translation Funds page.

 

From time to time, we add in translations of necrologies of Holocaust victims to the projects and I would like to point out the recent addition of the necrology from the Vidzy, Belarus Yizkor book which apart immortalizing the names of the victims is also, a genealogical aide providing such information as familiar relationships. I would like to thank Rabbi Shalom Bronstein for preparing this necrology translation and also for the many he has prepared over the years.

 

Before going on to outline details of last month’s achievements, I would like to point out the addition of an article by Joel Alpert, our Yizkor Book in Print Coordinator, who has kindly added his article (from “Avotaynu”. Winter 2020, Vol. XXXVI number 4) on Yizkor books to our Yizkor Book Insights collection. It is definitely worth reading through his article and also the other articles appearing there - perhaps you will be inspired to become involved in the Yizkor Book Project, and of course, you would be warmly welcomed.


And now for details of what was carried out in April:

 

Yizkor Book updates

This month, 37 existing projects were updated and they were:

·  Berehove, Ukraine (The Jews of Berehovo - Beregszasz in pictures)

·  Braslaw, Belarus (Darkness and desolation)

·  Brzesko, Poland (Memorial book of Briegel-Brzesko and vicinity)

·  Bilgoraj, Poland (Destruction of Bilgoraj)

·  Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)

·  Dubno, Ukraine (Dubno; a memorial to the Jewish community of Dubno, Wolyn)

·  Dzyatlava, Belarus (A memorial to the Jewish community of Zhetel)

·  Hrubieszow, Poland (Memorial Book of Hrubieshov)

·  Jaroslaw, Poland (Jaroslaw Book: a Memorial to Our Town)

·  Kalisz, Poland (The Kalish Book)

·  Kamyanyets, Belarus (Memorial Book of Kamenets Litovsk, Zastavye, and Colonies)

·  Kutno, Poland (Kutno and Surroundings Book)

·  Lviv, Ukraine (A memorial library of countries and communities, Poland Series: Lwow Volume) 

·  Makow Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of the community of Maków-Mazowiecki)

·  Mińsk Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial Book in Memory of the destroyed Jewish Community of Minsk-Mazowiecki)

·  Mizoch, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Mizocz)

·  Mlyniv, Ukraine (Mlynov-Muravica Memorial Book)

·  Myślenice, Poland (Memorial Book of the Communities Wadowice, Andrychow, Kalwarja, Myslenice, Sucha)

·  Ostrowiec Świętokrzyski, Poland (Ostrowiec; a monument on the ruins of an annihilated Jewish community)

·  Przedecz, Poland (Memorial book to the Holocaust victims of the city of Pshaytsh)

·  Radom, Poland (The book of Radom)

·  Radomsko, Poland (Memorial book of the community of Radomsk and vicinity)

·  Rafalovka, Ukraine (Memorial book for the towns of Old Rafalowka, New Rafalowka, Olizarka, Zoludzk and vicinity)

·  Sarny, Ukraine (Memorial Book of the Community of Sarny)

·  Skala Podolskaya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Skala)

·  Siedlce, Poland (On the ruins of my home; the destruction of Siedlce)

·  Sokolivka, Ukraine (Sokolievka/Justingrad)

·  Sokołów Podlaski, Poland (Memorial Book Sokolow-Podlask)

·  Shums'k, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)

·  Tarnow, Poland (Tarnow; The Life and Destruction of a Jewish City)

·  Ustilug, Ukraine (The growth and destruction of the community of Uscilug)

·  Valozhyn, Belarus (Wolozin; the book of the city and of the Etz Hayyim Yeshiva)

·  Vidzy, Belarus (Widze Memorial Book)

·  Wołomin, Poland (Volomin; a memorial to the Jewish community of Volomin)

·  Wysokie Mazowieckie, Poland (Wysokie-Mazowieckie; Memorial Book)

·  Zolochiv, Ukraine   (The City of Zloczow)

·  Żychlin, Poland (The memorial book of Zychlin)

 

New book


The following is a new complete book placed online:


New entries


The following are new entries placed online:

  • Brześć Kujawski, Poland (from “Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland, Volume IV”)
  • Ludza, Latvia (from “Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities, Latvia and Estonia”)
  • Nirza, Latvia (from “Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities, Latvia and Estonia”)

 

New Yizkor Books in Print

I am pleased to report that the Yizkor Book in Print Project had an extremely productive month with three new books becoming available:

If you are interested in this book or any of the others that have been made available, please go to the YBIP main page using the link shown below. 

Important links

Before ending this report, here are some important links to note:

All the best,

Lance Ackerfeld

Director of Special Projects - Yizkor Books

JewishGen.org

lackerfeld@...

 


Re: Jewish agricultural communities...Daukniunai, in Lithuania #lithuania

grayps@...
 

I also have relatives from Butrimonys (Pailet) and Merkine & Varena (Godofsky) who are listed as being  "farmer from Leipalingis colony", another Jewish agricultural community, and would appreciate any information about these colonies/communities.
--

Susan Gray, Chicago
Searching:

 -FELDSTEIN / FELDSZTAJN / FELTON / FELTYN etc.; GOLDBERG; WEINSTEIN / WEINSZTEIN etc. from Warsaw, Lutsk, Kamenets Podolskiy, Kholm.
-APPLE / APPEL / APEL etc; TAUB; LINEAL / LINIAL; KLEIN from Burshtyn, Rogatin, Sarniki, Putyatinsy, Dem'yanov, Solova.
-PAILET / PEYLET / PAILED / PEJLET etc; ITZCOVITZ / ITSKOVITCH etc. from Butrimonys, Panosiskes, Nemajunai, Vilnius, Drosgusitz.
-RATSAN / RACAN; SIROTA from Butrimonys, Jieznas, Brishton.


Re: Naming customs in the Ukraine in early 1830s #ukraine #general

Janet Furba
 

Ask the State Archive of the Lvov Region Ukraine
http://www.arhives.in.ua/oblastnye-arxivy/obl-arxivy-zapada-ukrainy/ga-lvov-o/
Janet Furba, Germany









germany


Re: translation from Yiddish needed #translation #yiddish

seth@...
 

This is both an easy and difficult text, as the general contents is clear, but not necessarily the names mentioned. Hopefully, you have them in your family tree and my interpretation will help you to intelliguess what the writer had in mind.

My interpretation is:
This is Elle [or Melle?] Moses
(Endisher/Entsisher-smith/Schmidt)
as transformed in
the time of the Civil War
in Spain in the year 1936
 
The second one is not
a Minsker and also a Spanish
fighter

Further comments:
  • The given name of Mr. Moses is unclear.
  • The second line (in parenthesis) could be a nickname or maybe profession
  • A higher quality scan (better focus) would have made interpretation safer/better
Good luck,

Seth Jacobson
Jerusalem


May is Canadian Jewish Heritage Month #canada #announcements

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

In 2018,  the Canadian Parliament unanimously passed a bill proclaiming that the month of May will be marked as “Canadian Jewish Heritage Month” throughout Canada, celebrating the inspirational role that Jewish Canadians have played and continue to play in communities across the country.  From law, to politics, to culture, to sports, this important initiative celebrates the contributions Jewish Canadians have been making to Canada for 250 years. To read the  Canadian Jewish Heritage Month Act go to: https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/C-18.4/page-1.html

 

Canada is home to the fourth largest Jewish community in the world.

 

Jewish Canadian leaders are active in all parts of society and have helped shape the diversity found within it. Canadian Jewish Heritage Month provides an opportunity to celebrate Jewish communities from coast to coast to coast for their valuable contributions in building a more open, diverse, and consciously more inclusive Canada for all.

 

If you would like to share your family’s contribution, if you are a descendent of a Holocaust survivor who came to Canada, a family member who served in the Canadian Force, and/or a family member who enriched their community as an artist or performer they would like you to tell them your story using the #JewishHeritageMonth hashtag on Twitter or by email  info@.... Please put “My Jewish Heritage” in the subject line.  They will amplify your story and collectively celebrate Canada’s proud history.

 

Statement by Minister of Diversity Chagger on Canadian Jewish Heritage Month may be read at:

https://stockhouse.com/news/press-releases/2021/05/01/statement-by-minister-chagger-on-canadian-jewish-heritage-month

 

To see the Jewish Heritage Guide go to: http://jewishheritage.ca/guide/

 

The National Film Board of Canada also has a selection of films in honor of Jewish Heritage Month which may be accessed at: https://www.nfb.ca/channels/canadian-jewish-heritage-month/

The films are free and do not require registration.

 

The Friends of the Simon Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust Studies has a Jewish Heritage Month Resource Guidebook which may be downloaded at:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/x398vjbkzu6zzad/Jewish%20Heritage%20Month%20Guide%202020.pdf?

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Pubic Records Access Monitoring Committee


Re: Announcing the publication of the Yizkor Book of SOCHACZEW, Poland #yizkorbooks #JewishGenUpdates #announcements

Susan Rosin
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project is pleased to announce its 121st title:
Memorial Book of Sochaczew (Poland); Translation of Pinkas Sochaczew

Original Yizkor Book was published Jerusalem in 1962

Translation Project Coordinator: Jan Meisels Allen
Editors: A. Sh. Sztejn, G. Wejszman
Cover Design: Rachel Kolokoff-Hopper
Layout and Name Indexing: Jonathan Wind
Photo Processing: Sondra Ettlinger

Hard Cover, 8.5" by 11", 670 pages with all original illustrations and
photographs.
The book is available from JewishGen for $38

Sochaczew, located in central Poland is a town about 44 miles due west of
Warsaw, whose Jewish presence dates back to the 15th century. The first
reported Jew in town was in 1463 - a doctor. Life was not easy for the Jews
due to an alleged "blood libel" in the mid- 16th century, and the rabbi was
sentenced to death, along with several other inhabitants. In the 19th
century the Jewish community grew. Sochaczew became a great Hasidic center,
first led by Tzaddik Abraham Bornsztajn.
The synagogue was destroyed when the Nazis occupied the town in September
1939, and the town was destroyed during World War ll. Many of the Jews ended
up in the Warsaw ghetto and some ended up in the Skarzyko Work Camp. 4,000
Jews lived in the town at the start of the war. Few survived. Today, there
are no Jews in the town.

This Yizkor book contains many first-hand accounts and personal remembrances
of the survivors and immigrants from the town and serves as a fitting
memorial to this destroyed Jewish community and in addition bears witness to
its destruction.

For the researchers, this book contains a wealth of both genealogical and
cultural information that can provide a picture of the environment of our
ancestors.

Consider this book as a gift for a family member or a friend.

For all our publications see: https://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

For ordering information see:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Sochaczew.html


Susan Rosin
Yizkor Books In Print


Re: Searching for American immigration for Jennie Baer #general #lithuania #usa

The Becker's Email
 

Assuming the info above is correct that Jennie's parents were Faiwusch and Sarah Berman arriving NY Aug. 1921, they were going to son (Edward) Baer in Dover, NH.  Attached is the link to Edward's nat. petition.  I could not find his immigration/manifest record.  Suggest you research as many of Jennie's siblings' records as you can find as that may help you sort out the Berman vs. Baer and find Jennie on a ship's manifest.

New Hampshire, County Naturalization Records, 1771-2001; https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99SG-H72?cc=2040051&wc=M7MP-B38%3A347264701%2C347318401

Johanna Becker
Newport, RI


Re: Searching for American immigration for Jennie Baer #general #lithuania #usa

Renee Steinig
 

Arthur Pronin <aspronin@...> wrote:

"I am searching for my great grandmother's immigration entry to
America. Ive searched many times and ways. Jennie Baer- born 1887 in
Salat Russia, sometimes lists Riga. Census says she came to USA-1909.
On her marriage record it says Berman not Baer. Ive done searches on
that name also. Her name on tombstone is Shayna...."

Adding to others' advice (check various ports, censuses,
naturalizations, etc.), I'd emphasize two things:

- Learn more about immediate family members, whose records may shed light.
So, for example, I looked for the arrival records of Philip and Sara
Baer, who -- according to a tree on Geni where Art has contributed --
were Jennie's parents. They arrived in New York in August 1921 as
Faiwusch and Sara Berman. And one of Jennie's sisters arrived in New
York in August 1912, as Riwe Berman. Last residence for all: Salat.
Baer may have been a name the family changed to in the US.

- Search names and dates very flexibly.
Even if censuses all show arrival in 1909, check a somewhat wider
period. Same for year of birth. And consider various ways names may
have been spelled -- or misspelled! -- on a manifest.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...


Announcing the publication of the Yizkor Book of SPCHACZEW, Poland #yizkorbooks #announcements #JewishGenUpdates

Susan Rosin
 

The Yizkor-Books-In-Print Project is pleased to announce its 121st title:
Memorial Book of Sochaczew (Poland); Translation of Pinkas Sochaczew
Original Yizkor Book was published Jerusalem in 1962

Translation Project Coordinator: Jan Meisels Allen
Editors: A. Sh. Sztejn, G. Wejszman
Cover Design: Rachel Kolokoff-Hopper
Layout and Name Indexing: Jonathan Wind
Photo Processing: Sondra Ettlinger

Hard Cover, 11" by 8.5", 670 pages with all original illustrations and
photographs.
The book is available from JewishGen for $38

Sochaczew, located in central Poland is a town about 44 miles due west of
Warsaw, whose Jewish presence dates back to the 15th century. The first
reported Jew in town was in 1463 - a doctor. Life was not easy for the Jews
due to an alleged "blood libel" in the mid- 16th century, and the rabbi was
sentenced to death, along with several other inhabitants. In the 19th
century the Jewish community grew. Sochaczew became a great Hasidic center,
first led by Tzaddik Abraham Bornsztajn.
The synagogue was destroyed when the Nazis occupied the town in September
1939, and the town was destroyed during World War ll. Many of the Jews ended
up in the Warsaw ghetto and some ended up in the Skarzyko Work Camp. 4,000
Jews lived in the town at the start of the war. Few survived. Today, there
are no Jews in the town.

This Yizkor book contains many first-hand accounts and personal remembrances
of the survivors and immigrants from the town and serves as a fitting
memorial to this destroyed Jewish community and in addition bears witness to
its destruction.

For the researchers, this book contains a wealth of both genealogical and
cultural information that can provide a picture of the environment of our
ancestors.

Consider this book as a gift for a family member or a friend.

For all our publications see: https://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

For ordering information see:
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Sochaczew.html


Susan Rosin
Yizkor Books In Print


New Database Documents One Million WWll Russian Citizen Heroes Who Defended Moscow #announcements #records #russia

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

The Russian Archives have been posting WWll records—the latest database is honoring citizens who helped with the defense of Moscow during the war. The database includes children and women and people from north of Moscow, the Yaroslav Region also received the medal. Over one million people received the For the Defense of Moscow medal.  The list of names may be found at: https://vov.mos.ru/title?redirect_url=%2Fcollections%2Fmoscow-defense%2Fawarded  If you use Chrome as your browser there is an English option.  Personal details on these people can include their birth year, political party affiliation, nationality, employer and work title.

  

 Award recipients can be searched by last, first or patronymic name (such as Nikolaevich for a man whose father was Nikolai). A list of recipients appears when a Russian letter is clicked on but that is not the complete list of recipients for each letter.

The database if free to use and does not require registration.

 

To learn how to use the database there is a video guide for those unfamiliar with Russian which can be found at:

  https://tinyurl.com/ypzsepv8

original url:

https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipOAMICDEsWtYYO846bOf-Gfx717tPCKGEU2e8JIq1aca6ihlR0LeclY96n_g7pj6A/photo/AF1QipNI3WWJCxBspg2o85L3Djc10UT1AjWcv9LjUfEr?key=NjY4X2g3ck5Ec21qXzg3UTlyT0RMSUVuMDNCYU93

 

For tips using the database without knowing Russian see Vera Miller’s posting at:

https://lostrussianfamily.wordpress.com/2021/05/01/new-database-documents-1-million-wwii-citizen-heroes-who-defended-moscow/

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Re: Jewish agricultural communities...Daukniunai, in Lithuania #lithuania

spivaks@...
 

I suggest you talk to Chaim Bargman who is a historian and researcher living in Kaunas, Lithuania. If anyone is able to find out things like that, it would be him.
https://www.visitlithuania.net/guides-service/jewish/1681-chaim-bargman

Galina Spivak
Los Angeles,  California


Re: Searching for American immigration for Jennie Baer #general #lithuania #usa

Molly Staub
 

Hi Arthur,

Did you try other American entry ports, such as Philadelphia, Baltimore, Boston, and Galveston? I solved one such mystery by checking immigration through Canada. Good luck

  Molly Arost Staub, Boca Raton, FL

Searching
UKRAINE:
BERENSON,
GROFFMAN,
MENDELSOHN,
KISBERG

BESSARABIA:
AROST/HARAST/ KHAREST
SHTOFMAN


Jaffa Immigration Records-Translation Requested #israel #records #translation

fred.kuntzman@...
 

I have attached the immigration records from Jaffa from 1919-1921 obtained from the Israeli government archives.  I believe my grandfather, Isaac Russman, may have emigrated to Palestine from Wlodova, Poland, likely through Odessa in that period.  My Hebrew is fairly rudimentary, but it appears to me that there may be 2 Russman's as the second and third records on page 229, or another one as the 11th record on page 236.  I would appreciate it if someone could translate these records and let me know.  Also, if there are other Russman entries, or some derivation thereof, in the listing, it would be great to know.

Thank you.

Fred Kuntzman


Re: Jewish agricultural communities...Daukniunai, in Lithuania #lithuania

Sherri Bobish
 

David,

The JewishGen Gazetteer
https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/LocTown.asp
lists three locations in Lithuania with the name Daukniunai.

Good luck in your search,

Sherri Bobish


Re: Looking for Edvando, Lithuania #lithuania

pathetiq1@...
 

Hi Tracy, 

Perhaps you are looking for this place Jedvabno
https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/Community.php?usbgn=-505687
--
Giannis Daropoulos 

Greece


Reminder: Manipulating the SteveMorse website and more - JGSIG May meeting #announcements #education #events #jgs-iajgs

Arthur Sissman
 

Hi JewishGenners!

 

The Jewish Genealogy SIG May meeting is on Tues May 11, 2021 at 10-11:30 am EDT on Zoom - RSVP to genresearch13@... to join the fun. 
You will get a response to your RSVP.   The Zoom link will come 2-3 days before the event!

The topics will include: Manipulating the SteveMorse.org website, Handling Google alerts, Following "your people" on Family Search, and using Member Connect feature at Ancestry.com.  Sorta like - letting other people do the work!

If you request a Zoom link for the above meeting and are NOT in the JGSIG database, please answer the questions below:

  • How did you find out about the meeting?
  • Where are you located?
  • Do you have a family tree?
  • Have you DNA Tested?
  • Research interest or what question are you trying to answer - not too much detail please?
--
Arthur Sissman
Jewish Genealogy SIG of Collier/Lee Co FL

genresearch13@...

954-328-3559

Join our FB page at Jewish Genealogy SIG: https://www.facebook.com/groups/hellojewishgen

Genealogy Wise page: http://www.genealogywise.com/profile/ArthurSissman

TimeZoneConverter. https://www.thetimezoneconverter.com/ 

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