Date   
Ludwig KAHN

David Lewin
 

Does anyone here have a trace of Ludwig KAHN born 20 July 1885 in
Horkheim, Heilbronn, Baden Wuertemberg, Germany

From a Bad Arolswb Archive we hvew just obtained his
1948/1949 address in New York :-
236 E 77 Street
New York 21
NY

Thank you

David Lewin
London

Seeking photos of the Pinsk Judenrat building. #belarus

Leonard Oppenheim <lenoppenheim@...>
 

Does anyone know where I might find a photograph or photographs of the
building in which the Pinsk Judenrat had its office? I am interested
specifically in the Judenrat building and not the Judenrat's members
or activities. I'd like to know the street location as well.

Thank you.

Len Oppenheim
Vermont

Belarus SIG #Belarus Seeking photos of the Pinsk Judenrat building. #belarus

Leonard Oppenheim <lenoppenheim@...>
 

Does anyone know where I might find a photograph or photographs of the
building in which the Pinsk Judenrat had its office? I am interested
specifically in the Judenrat building and not the Judenrat's members
or activities. I'd like to know the street location as well.

Thank you.

Len Oppenheim
Vermont

Re: Technical Questions About Belarus Database #belarus

SarahRose Werner <swerner@...>
 

With regard to Martha (Schecter) Forsyth's point re: variations in
transliteration, the JewishGen Communities Database at
https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/Search.asp may be useful for providing
examples of how different names could be transliterated into different
languages.

For example, the town name my aunt spelled as David-Gorodok is spelled
Davyd-Haradok in Belarussian. This tells me than when searching for records
of my Git(t)elman ancestors, it's worth to check records for Hit(t)elman as
well.

SarahRose Werner
Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada
GITTELMAN (and other spellings thereof), David-Gorodok, Belarus
RABINOWITZ (which has even more possible spellings), Chepovichi (ditto),
Ukraine

Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Technical Questions About Belarus Database #belarus

SarahRose Werner <swerner@...>
 

With regard to Martha (Schecter) Forsyth's point re: variations in
transliteration, the JewishGen Communities Database at
https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/Search.asp may be useful for providing
examples of how different names could be transliterated into different
languages.

For example, the town name my aunt spelled as David-Gorodok is spelled
Davyd-Haradok in Belarussian. This tells me than when searching for records
of my Git(t)elman ancestors, it's worth to check records for Hit(t)elman as
well.

SarahRose Werner
Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada
GITTELMAN (and other spellings thereof), David-Gorodok, Belarus
RABINOWITZ (which has even more possible spellings), Chepovichi (ditto),
Ukraine

Transliteration of Russian/Belarussian Cyrillic to English Roman Alphabet #belarus

Susan Slusky <segslusky@...>
 

In answer to Mr99s . Klionsky's question that might be of general interest
There'sno fixed method of transliteration for Cyrillic to English
It's likely that much of the English spelling variety you are seeing
has to do with variations in transliteration starting >from the same
Cyrillic spelling

The fairly common -sky suffix is generally represented in Czarist era Russian
by their ess letter, their ka letter and then two vowels in the I/Y family.
Transliterators might make this into skii or skiy to evoke the double vowel
in Russian. Or they might use sky or ski to evoke how it is generally shown
and pronounced in English.

The variations in the vowel or vowels that follow KL could also be translite=
ration methodology differences >from identical Cyrillic spellings. It could be
spelling differences >from how Russian officials chose to spell the names of
Yiddish-speaking residents who were indifferent about the Cyrillic spellings
of their names. In particular the difference between I and Y is more likely
to be just a transliteration difference, but the same underlying Cyrillic.
The change >from io/yo to eo/e looks more like there might have been a
difference in the underlying Cyrillic.

Susan Slusky

Belarus SIG #Belarus Transliteration of Russian/Belarussian Cyrillic to English Roman Alphabet #belarus

Susan Slusky <segslusky@...>
 

In answer to Mr99s . Klionsky's question that might be of general interest
There'sno fixed method of transliteration for Cyrillic to English
It's likely that much of the English spelling variety you are seeing
has to do with variations in transliteration starting >from the same
Cyrillic spelling

The fairly common -sky suffix is generally represented in Czarist era Russian
by their ess letter, their ka letter and then two vowels in the I/Y family.
Transliterators might make this into skii or skiy to evoke the double vowel
in Russian. Or they might use sky or ski to evoke how it is generally shown
and pronounced in English.

The variations in the vowel or vowels that follow KL could also be translite=
ration methodology differences >from identical Cyrillic spellings. It could be
spelling differences >from how Russian officials chose to spell the names of
Yiddish-speaking residents who were indifferent about the Cyrillic spellings
of their names. In particular the difference between I and Y is more likely
to be just a transliteration difference, but the same underlying Cyrillic.
The change >from io/yo to eo/e looks more like there might have been a
difference in the underlying Cyrillic.

Susan Slusky

Re: Mount Zion Cemetery seeks old photos and documents

Renee Steinig
 

Richard Werbins <richard@...> wrote:

<<Do you have an email address for Mark Stempa at Mt. Zion? I have a
number of jpg photos for my wife's family that I could send to him.>>

I don't, but you could call the office and ask. The phone number is at
http://www.mountzioncemetery.com/page.asp?id=aboutus , along with a
nice writeup about the cemetery's history.

Jo Ann Goldwater <jogold@...> asked:

<<Do they want photos of people who are buried there or only photos of
the cemetery?>>

Hanging on the walls of the cemetery's outer office are framed photos
of groups of people visiting loved ones' graves and attending
dedications of society plots. I imagine they're hoping to obtain
similar photos, not ones of individuals buried at the cemetery or of
their stones.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...

---

Original message:

Mount Zion Cemetery in Queens, which genealogists visit in search of
their family histories, is looking for records of its own history.

Cemetery president Mark Stempa recently wrote:

"In the past, people have forwarded to us old photographs taken during
family visits to the cemetery. If you have any photos or other
interesting documents pertaining to the cemetery, we would appreciate
your sharing them with us."

Materials can be sent to PO Box 780355, Maspeth NY 11378-0355.
According to Mr. Stempa's letter, the cemetery "will photocopy
anything received and return the originals to you promptly."

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...

Re: Grave at Washington Cemetery in Brooklyn

Hallo Genealogy Services
 

Hello,
Yes! Thank you to Elias, Jacob and Corinne for helping me and sending pictures of the graves from JewishData. I don't have all the death dates, except for John (14 Dec 1928), so I'm hoping this helps solve some mysteries. Now I just have to get the headstones translated....off to upload them now to ViewMate. Thanks again to all.


Tamara Hallo, MLS
Professional Genealogist

Rivka Barbasch

Milton Koch
 

My PGM- Feige- family was Barbasch from Pidvolochysk, Poland (now =
Ukraine).
I have found many siblings of her in both JRI-PL and Gesher Galicia.
However, I have just come upon RIVKA in several documents-her marriage =
to Mendel Wolf Weitman in 1928, as well as two pages of testimony from =
Yad Vashem. She supposedly was born in 1877. She apparently perished in =
1942 in the Shoah-no records of this found either.
One POT is by her nephew, Mordechai Barbasch, written in 1957. The other =
is by her brother, Yisrael, written in 1955.
I have not been able to confirm anything about her at all.
I scoured many genealogy sites to no avail.
I am trying to contact anyone of her relatives to see if there are =
documents to confirm her birth and death, in order to fill in mysterious =
gap in my grandmother=E2=80=99s sibship, as well as whether she had =
children, who would be my cousins!
Is it possible that births may NOT have been entered in official records =
at all??
Thank you.
Milton Koch
Bethesda, MD, USA
BARBASCH-Pidvolochysk

Re: writing to a cemetery in Israel

Susan Rosin
 

Hi Wendy,

12 Petah Tikva street in Netanya is not the cemetery. It is the address of the office of Chevra Kadisha.

Just send to :
Chevrah Kadisha Netanya
Rehov Petah Tikva 12
Netanya, Israel 42460

Re: Help Stop USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Hikes

Mark Jacobson
 

Is this forum allowing politics now? Because I don't have an interest in debating or discussing ICE or any other non-genealogy topic. I don't care where fee the money goes, my problem is the fees, not where the money from the fees go. If this is really about ICE, and not about fees that will hurt genealogists and restrict access to public records, I don't support stopping the fee increase.

Mark Jacobson


On Monday, November 25, 2019, 05:07:10 PM EST, mamabirdlouise@... <mamabirdlouise@...> wrote:


I did comment on this proposal and sent copies to my two senators and representative.  I got a call back from Senator Baldwin's office and was told that she has not made a comment during this comment period; I suspect she and most senators are not very aware of this issue.  So it's time to flood their offices!

Please note that the proposal includes permission to transfer funds from these USCIS fees to ICE, which is an enforcement agency, as we all know only too well.  My senator has gone on record opposing this kind of funds transfer and that may be the hook that gets the attention of congresspeople; it certainly should get OUR attention. 
--
Louise Goldstein

Researching GOLDSTEIN/GOLDSZTERN, BRANDT, WOLOCH, HERSZENFELD (Terespol, Piszczac, Poland; Brest, Belarus); RONEN (Kiyev, Fastov, Ukraine; Lyoev, Belarus); LOPUSHANSKIY; ROZENZUMEN/BEN-DOV (Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland; Israel); BATTALEN, POPKOV (Voronezh, Russia); CHALEWSKY/CHALLOV (Krive Ozero, Ukraine).  https://familyhistorieslouise.com/

BIERENKRANT--Argentina

Sheldon Dan <sheldan1955@...>
 

I am looking for information regarding the BIERENKRANT family in Argentina.  I understand that they may have originated in the same area that my wife's BIRNKRANT family originated.
--
Sheldon Dan
sheldan1955@...

legal changed names - general

Herbert Lazerow
 

<Our ancestors that immigrated to America, 1900-1920, came with their European name.   The spouse had the European spelling of the name as well as the children.   When husband/father naturalized and legally changed his name…  1) did his wife and children automatically became naturalized citizens?>
   Before about 1922, naturalization of the husband also naturalized the wife because husband and wife were regarded as one in loyalties and that choice was viewed as the husband's. (Parenthetically, if a female U.S. citizen married an alien, she became an alien.) The children did not become citizens unless they were specifically listed on the naturalization petition.
  2) did the wife and children’s spelling of the name legally change at that time also?
   One must realize that at that time there were next to no official documents that our ancestors had.  Few had driver's licenses.  Social security does not arrive until 1935, and not until later for the self-employed. So there was little occasion to use a particular spelling of the name. Officially, the name change in the petition probably included wife and children, but it was doubtful that it had any practical significance.
  3) The American born children - would they use the European spellings until dad naturalized?   
     I would assume that everyone in the nuclear family tried to spell the name in the same way to avoid confusion, though in one of the families I am following, some siblings spelled it with a single M and others with a double M.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
Professor of Law, University of San Diego
5998 Alcala Park, San Diego CA 92110 U.S.A.
(619)260-4597 office, (858)453-2388 cell, lazer@...
Author: Mastering Art Law (Carolina Academic Press 2015)

Re: legal changed names - general

Sally Bruckheimer
 

"Our ancestors that immigrated to America, 1900-1920, came with their European name.   The spouse had the European spelling of the name as well as the children.   When husband/father naturalized and legally changed his name…  1) did his wife and children automatically became naturalized citizens?  2) did the wife and children’s spelling of the name legally change at that time also?  3) The American born children - would they use the European spellings until dad naturalized? "

1) Up until Social Security and Drivers Licenses, anyone could call him/her self whatever they wanted. Obviously, if the man change Wojochowicz to Cohen at naturalization and named family members, they would be included in the name change - but they could call themselves whatever they wanted. 

2) Until WW I or so, women were automatically whatever nationality their husband was. If an American born woman married a Russian immigrant (not naturalized), she would become a Russian, and when he naturalized she would be too. A little later, women didn't lose their citizenship, and they had to naturalize separately. If he didn't naturalize until after the law changed, she would have to naturalize to get her citizenship back.

3) American born children (including the father of a friend of mine) were named whatever on their birth record. So a child born Sam Cohen, the son of Shlomo Wojochowicz was automatically changed. But it didn't really matter until after WW I.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ

#Hungary #hungary

Kglattstein
 

Looking for help finding the current names (or historical Hungarian names) for the birth cities Illesfaln and Fleshflow mentioned in 2 naturalization documents.   I have a Declaration of Intention for Naturalization that states a grandfather (Josef Glattstein) was born in Illesfaln sp? and a Petition for Naturalization that states he was born in Fleshflow sp? and his wife was born in Illesfaln.  However, I can't find either town in Hungary or anything that is similar.  His family is in Siroka, Saros, Hungary in 1869 and Josef indicates his last residence was Siroke.  We have another document that states that his wife is from Kishvarda. Josef spoke Hungarian, German, Yiddish, and English. I looked at the neighboring towns and nothing looks similar. https://www.cisarik.com/0_Siroke_Presov_PV_Saros_Saris.html

I've attached the 2 documents that state the birthplaces.  

Thank you.

Edelhofer family from Vienna

rv Kaplan
 


Can anyone help me find out information about the family of Siegfried Ernst Edelhofer?  He came from Vienna to Britain on the Kindertransport, and was born in 1928 to Max and Regina Elizabeth Edelhofer.  He was taken in by a family called Smart in Inverness, Scotland. After the war, he moved to Yeovil, Somerset, to study engineering technology.  He changed his name to Iain Graham Hamilton Stewart.

thanks

Harvey Kaplan
Scottish Jewish Archives Centre
Glasgow 


Re: Legal source for UK Internments

Tony Hausner
 

If any of you are interested in joining our google email group devoted to the Isle of Man interment during World War II, please contact me at thausner@.... I have sent a couple of you an invite to join our group.  

Re: Deportations from France #france #holocaust

jbonline1111@...
 

The Steve Morse pages are in English. 

Re: Mount Zion Cemetery seeks old photos and documents

Jo Ann Goldwater <jogold@...>
 

Do they want photos of people who are buried there or only photos of the cemetery?