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Re: Selecting, scanning, identifying and desicarding old paper photographs #general

Ellen
 

I am very thankful I have a few photos of some of my great-grandparents and other relatives beyond my immediate family and grandparents.  I also have pictures of people I can't identify because no one thought to write their names on the back.  But I know so much was lost.  For decades, I've been trying to learn what happened to my paternal grandfather's parents and sister during the Holocaust.  My sister recently told me that my aunt and uncle had a copy of a letter that was sent to my grandfather - possibly from the International Red Cross - in response to his inquiry about his family.  After my aunt died unexpectedly and my uncle passed away not long afterwards, though, the letter, family photos, and other items were carelessly thrown out so their house could be sold.  One cousin managed to save one or two boxes and has scanned and shared those photos with me.

I have no idea what to do with my photos, family records, and extended family tree files, as I have no children, but it would be shortsighted of me to let them be thrown out or destroyed after my death.  What should I do with the digital files and the photos once they've been scanned?  Some of my first cousins have children, and even grandchildren; however, they aren't really at the point of wanting to dig into their family history.  I'd love to hear your suggestions.

Ellen

   
--
Researching WEISSMAN/VAYSMAN (Ostropol, Ukraine); MOROZ and ESTRIN/ESTERKIN (Shklov & Bykhov, Belarus); LESSER/LESZEROVITZ, MAIMAN, and BARNETT/BEINHART/BERNHART (Lithuania/Latvia); and ROSENSWEIG/ROSENZWEIG, KIRSCHEN, and SCHWARTZ (Botosani, Romania)


Re: Selecting, scanning, identifying and desicarding old paper photographs #general

joannegrosman joannegrosman
 

Hello,
I will look into this. I do feel it is a weight to figure out what to do with all this archival material I have. Photography runs in my father's family professional and amateur and I have a vast quantity of photographs. I have a lot of military WWII photos as he flew in Bomber Command and was responsible for documenting their tours. I will look into your tips.

regards,
Joanne Grosman
researching Czestochowa/Radomsko


Re: Ukraine plans to sell Jewish cemeteries and massacre sites #ukraine

Stephen Katz
 

There's no link to the documents you mentioned.


IAJGS - Stern and Stedman Grants - Nominations now open #jgs-iajgs #announcements

LAURENCE HARRIS
 

IAJGS is now inviting nominations for the Rabbi Malcolm Stern Grant and the John Stedman Memorial Grant (US$ 3,000 each).

These unprecedented times of lock-downs and quarantines, are bringing long periods of difficult to manage social isolation to many individuals and families.Consequently, IAJGS has decided to introduce special arrangements and criteria for the 2020 Stern/Stedman grants.  The grants for this year are aiming to help fast-track projects which not only benefit those undertaking Jewish genealogical research but also help to improve the level of social interaction within and between families, and also between researchers.

The grants are for not for profit organizations including Jewish Genealogical Societies.  Please make appropriate organizations aware of these grants.  Self nominations by organizations are allowed. The closing date for nominations is 30 April 2020. 

For further details see Stern/Stedman Grant Special Arrangements for 2020

Any questions about these grants should be sent to me using email Laurence.Harris@... 

Laurence Harris
Chair, IAJGS 2020 Stern/Stedman Grant Committee
Email:   Laurence.Harris@...


Finding family in Hungary #hungary

zaida67@...
 

How can I find any Taub in Hungary Past or present
Thank you


Re: Re: Seeking SEIDE from Rogoźno [Pol], Rogasen [Ger], Rogozhin [Yid], Rogóźno Wielkopolskie #germany #poland

David Lewin
 


See attached ROGASEN info


At 17:47 01/04/2020, bseide@... wrote:
Searching for information on my family (Seide) immigrated from Rogasen (Prussia) Poland to Birmingham, England around 1850 and then onto the United States around 1860.  Finding it difficult to uncovered much information from Rogasen.


Re: Searching: NADWORNY and KRUGLYAK #poland #ukraine

Steven Turner
 

I am the founder of the Nadworna Shtetl Research Group and I can confirm that we do not have any members associated with the surname Nadworny.

Steve Turner


Re: JewishGen Education DNA II class April 26-May 16 #dna

Lawrence Fagan
 

Thanks for your question.  You don't need to know the content of DNA I in order to take the DNA II course. The goals are different--DNA I helps to explain the different kinds of tests that are available and what information they can provide.  DNA II is designed for someone who already has received the results of one of the tests and want to understand how to use the data for their genealogical research.

We originally planned to teach DNA I in this time period for those who have never ordered one of the tests.  When we started advertising the course, we realized that there are many JewishGen members with existing results and are currently interested in analyzing the information while they are at home, so we swapped the order of the classes.  We plan to teach DNA I in the summer time and then offer DNA II again with enough time between the two classes to get results back from DNA companies.

Thanks,
    Larry Fagan


Re: Locate grave in Germany after Holocaust #germany

Pieter Hoekstra
 

May I ask what is the uncle's name?


Re: Selecting, scanning, identifying and desicarding old paper photographs #general

Eleanor Richmond
 

Have you tried to donate to the Jewish Organization on Bathurst St. where the YMHA used to be?The Cndn. Jewish Federation? CanadianJewish Archives?
Each week there is an old photo in the Cndn. Jewish News and the above organization says they want our stuff.
Eleanor Cooper Richmond


The Liberation of Dachau--75v Years on April 29th FREE Access to Dachau Records on Fold3 #holocaust #events #announcements

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The U.S. Seventh Army’s 45th Infantry Division, the 42nd Infantry Rainbow Division and the 20th Armored Division entered Dachau rescuing 32,000 prisoners.  Dachau was the first Nazi concentration camp established in 1933.  Forty railway cars filled with decomposing bodies were found near the camp, as the Nazis did not have time to send them to the crematorium before they fled due to the American’s nearing the camp.

 

 

 

 

Fold3.com, part of the Ancestry family of companies, produced a blog post about Dachau’s liberation which may be read at:

https://blog.fold3.com/april-29-1945-the-liberation-of-dachau/

 

The blog post says between 1933-945 approximately 188,000 prisoners were incarcerated there and 28,000 prisoners died in the camp.  To see the records from the camp, the Dachau Entry Registers, historical records from the U.S. Seventh Army and a secret diary kept by an inmate at Dachau which was recovered by American soldiers you can search them for free at:

https://www.fold3.com/title/629/dachau-entry-registers

https://www.fold3.com/image/313749543

 

When you find a record you would like to download or save to your computer you can right click with your mouse and save it to your computer or on the upper right there is a “tool” app if you click you can download and print.  There are other opportunities to add an annotation or comment with the app with the “plus sign” on a flag.

 

To read, download or print the record  You will have to register with your name, email and address and password. No credit card information is required.


Fold3 makes their ENTIRE Holocaust collection free access.  Go to: https://www.fold3.com/browse/115/

 

I have no affiliation with Fold3.com nor ancestry and am posting this solely for the information of the reader.

 

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 

 

 


Re: Re: Bobr, Belarus #belarus

yelena.v.volk@...
 

Hi Sherri!
I want to find the living descendants of emigrants from this town. They are the 3rd or 4th generation. Of course, they have another surnames, but I hope that they keep the old history.


Re: Zablotow, Galicia 1892 #galicia

Debbie Lifshitz
 

The fifth cholera pandemic was from1881 to 1896 and hit Eastern Europe in 1892.
All the best from the quarantine in Jerusalem,
Staywell, stay safe!
Debbie


The film Unorthodox on Amazon Prime #israel

Jeff at SG
 

It seems there are several film with that same title. The one I was referring to about the college year in Israel is on Amazon Prime by Anna Wexler, 2015. Not the Netflix one with the same name or several others.
Sorry for the confusion.
Jeff Malka


Sarah Eisen Resnick 1894- ? #israel

Linda Kelley
 

Seeking information about my great uncle's wife, Sarah Eisen Resnick, who moved to Haifa, Israel in 1951, and was in the Pioneer Women organization, Mo'ezet ha-Po'alot or מועצת הפועלות.
Sarah's father was Isadore Eisen, and her mother was Liza Schwartz, per the marriage license. [Eisen might have been Isenberg. When Hyman came to the USA, he claimed to be on his way to a cousin named Benjamin Isenberg in Chicago.] Sarah was b. in Kovno, Lithuania in 1893, and arrived in the USA 1910. Sarah might have lived and worked in Detroit around 1921, possibly with/for Eisen relatives. Sarah married Hyman Resnick in Detroit 20 November, 1921. Hyman [1883-1950], was the son of Itzik/Isadore Reznik/Resnick and Pesche/Paulina Olshwang/Allswang. Hyman and Sarah lived in Chicago. They had two children who died young, Isadore and Pearl/Paulina/Penina. Isadore died in 1924, and Penina died in 1945. Hyman and Sarah were avid Zionists. Hyman volunteered to fight with the British Army in Palestine during WWI. After Hyman's death, Sarah became naturalized, [obtained a passport?], and moved to Haifa. Does anyone have old membership information for Mo'ezet ha-Po'alot or מועצת הפועלות, or know if members were buried in a specific section of a cemetery in Haifa?
Thank you very much,
Linda Wolfe Kelley
Portland, OR, USA


Re: Selecting, scanning, identifying and desicarding old paper photographs #general

viferra@...
 

Do try to scan at the highest resolution possible; you never know what you will see in the picture.  My husband scanned a picture of a building that was included in the family album.  Imagine our surprise when we saw on an upper floor balcony my great grandmother and some of my father's aunts and uncles.  This was not visible in the printed photograph.  We concluded this was the apartment building in which they resided.

Vicky Furstenberg Ferraresi
Belmont, CA

searching: FUERSTENBERG (Gdansk, Berlin, Shanghai), PROCHOWNIK (Bydgoszcz, Berlin, Shanghai), QUIATOWSKY (Berlin), BAUM (Gdansk),
FREYSTADT (Berlin, Sweden), HEYMANN (Israel, Geneva), SCHULVALTER (Berlin, Brazil), SILBERSTEIN/SILVER (Gdansk, Chicago)


How to Digitize Your Documents--NY Times Article #general #announcements

Jan Meisels Allen
 

 

 

As we are sitting home and trying to find things to do, looking at genealogy to do lists, etc. I came across this article from today’s New York Times that we genealogists may find of interest: How to Digitize Your Documents. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/01/technology/personaltech/digitizing-important-documents.html

 

Genealogists are notorious packrats…me included.  How many of us have digitized our documents, photographs, newspaper clippings etc.?  A disaster may strike like fire, earthquake flood, hurricane, tornado etc., and everything could be lost.  Digitizing the documents and then saving them off site (which includes an offsite-back-up program) or encryption service  is the only way to be as close to 100 percent certain that you have protected all your valuable genealogical and other documents (insurance policies for home, car, deeds, etc.)

 

The New York Times article has 5 easy steps:

  1. Get organized
  2. Use a scanner if you have one or
  3. Scan with a mobile app—your smartphone! If you don’t have a scanner
  4. Scan old photos with your phone
  5. Protect and Safely Store Your Files

 

 

Jan Meisels Allen

Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee

 


Re: Seeking SEIDE from Rogoźno [Pol], Rogasen [Ger], Rogozhin [Yid], Rogóźno Wielkopolskie #germany #poland

Sherri Bobish
 
Edited

Searching Rogasen as birthplace on www.familysearch.org gets 330 hits.  Perhaps something there will be of assistance to you in your search.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish,  Princeton, New Jersey


Re: Selecting, scanning, identifying and desicarding old paper photographs #general

Nicole Heymans
 

I might add that old (roughly pre-WWII) monochrome photos were usually very fine-grained, even small almost postage stamp sized snapshots or passport photos. Scanning these at the highest resolution available (2400dpi on my scanner) shows up details that go unnoticed on the originals. And it goes without saying that all original photos should be kept, they will survive longer than IT formats, also resolution will improve in future, as will storage capacity. Scan backs of photos too, even (or particularly) if you can't read the writing.
I would not be so adamant about post-war colour photos from negatives smaller than 35mm. They are generally poor quality, in terms of subject, colour and resolution. This was a period when people became snap-happy, so if you have many views of the same scene, keep the best one or two. As for digital photos, all of us probably need to choose the 10 photos per 1000 we would like to bequeath to our descendants.

BTW, to view all messages in a thread, click on view/reply online then scroll down to "view all x messages in topic".

Nicole Heymans, near Brussels, Belgium


Scanning and sorting..Re: Selecting, scanning, identifying and desicarding old paper photographs #general

Marvin Lauwasser
 

After I retired a few years ago, I scanned several thousand prints and have several tips.

1.  Try to get a dock-type scanner where you feed in the prints and they come out the other side.  I can feed in ~4/minute.  (Flatbed might be 2 minutes per print.)  I realize that several prints can be laid onto the flatbed but then you have the hassle of cropping each one out.  There might be apps that can do that automatically though.

2.  The digital scans will be titled in numerical order starting with scan0001, imag0001, etc.  After each scanning session, scan a colored index card to mark the stopping point.  After you've downloaded the scans to your computer's pictures folder, retain the card image on the scanner so your subsequent scanning session picks up the numbering where you left off.  Resuming scans after completely emptying the scanner will start you back at 0001.  You'll be pleased that each image retains its own distinct number. 

3.  You can also use the index card ploy during a session to keep batches of photos separated.

4.  Most sorting ends up temporal or by family.  Scans end up with "time created" metadata but it's when scanned not when photo'd.  Probably wise to go directly to sorting into family folders and subfolders.

5.  If you do know the photo's creation time, you might enter yrmon to replace the scanner's alpha mark.  For instance, a photo SCAN2689 that you know was from a wedding in June 1934 could be re-titled 34jun2689.  All photos from that event thus renamed would line up together in that family's folder.

6.  I generally just drag the pic thumbnail into the appropriate folder.  A "Preview Pane" comes in handy.

7.  A photo organizing program with facial recognition should be considered.  I'd suggest holding off on running the program though till after your sorting is complete, then run everything at once. All the faces will be grouped by similarity and you'll be asked to key in a correct name to the group individual after removing any wrongly identified thumbnail faces.

8.  If you fix an image, e.g. crop it, and want to retain the original, do a save as to the new one with a lower case letter after the number.  The new wedding image above would become 34jun2689a.

9.  Once scanned i did discard the prints.  But caution..... is there something written on the back that you would retain?