Date   

Moderator note and Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #usa

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

MODERATOR NOTES:

1. A serious technical problem caused by a malicious cyber attack
has shut down many JewishGen services including Email lists like
this one for the past week (June 15 - 22). Full services will be
restored as soon as possible.

2. We are required by JewishGen to send this message and the two following
messages to all JewishGen hosted Email lists. ==========>

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by the
Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen, Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn, sdh2381@comcast.net


JOWBR Grows to Over 2 Million Records #usa

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2014 pre-Conference update to the JOWBR
(JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The JOWBR database
can be accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/ If you're a
new JOWBR user, we recommend that you take a look at the first two
explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update adds approximately 124,000 new records and 25,000 new photos.
The database is adding and/or updating 190 cemeteries. This update brings
JOWBR's holdings to 2.27 million records >from almost 4,400 cemeteries /
cemetery sections representing 85 countries!

Once again, donors for this update include a mix of individuals, Jewish
genealogical societies, historical societies and museums. We appreciate all
our donors' submissions and the transliteration work done by a faithful
group of JewishGen volunteers.

I want to particularly thank Eric Feinstein who has been helping me to find
and gain permission to add many of the German towns in addition to records
from under-represented countries. In addition, without our volunteer
transliterators, led by Gilberto Jugend, we would not be able to add the
information >from some very difficult to read photos.

Significant additions to the database include collections >from Cleveland,
Ohio and surrounding areas, Leeds, England, various German towns, Bialystok,
Poland, Chernigov, Ukraine, Shanghai, China, and an annual update >from the
US Veterans Administration. Please check our online cemetery inventory at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/tree/CemList.htm for a complete
listing.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to make
additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery section
individually or consider a group project for your local Society, temple or
other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR database and
make it possible for researchers and family members to find answers they
otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations you may be
affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that would
consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
NAltman@JewishGen.org
June, 2014


Memorial Plaque Project Doubles to More Than 60,000 Records. Please help us continue to grow! #usa

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2014 pre-Conference Update for the
Memorial Plaque Project (MPP) database. The MPP database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/ The MPP database includes the
data >from plaques and Yizkor lists >from synagogue and other organizations.
Many of these sources include patronymic information.

This year, we added more than 30,000 records >from the US, Israel and Canada.
These records come >from 35 different synagogues and other institutions. A
big thank you to the work being done by the JGS of Greater Boston, The
Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina, the JGS of Montreal, and a
number of synagogues and individual donors.

We believe that the MPP is a good example of how users of JewishGen's
databases can "give back". If you are a member of a synagogue or other
organization with memorial plaques or Yizkor lists, please consider helping
us to grow this database. You can find more information on submitting data
at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/Submit.htm If you have
additional questions, please contact me directly.

For a complete listing of the institutions currently in the database, please
see http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/tree/MemList.htm

Nolan Altman
NAltman@JewishGen.org
June, 2014


Early American SIG #USA Moderator note and Latest Publications from Yizkor Books in Print #usa

Donald & Sandra Hirschhorn <sdh2381@...>
 

MODERATOR NOTES:

1. A serious technical problem caused by a malicious cyber attack
has shut down many JewishGen services including Email lists like
this one for the past week (June 15 - 22). Full services will be
restored as soon as possible.

2. We are required by JewishGen to send this message and the two following
messages to all JewishGen hosted Email lists. ==========>

Recently, two new titles joined the ranks of hard cover books published by the
Yizkor Books in Print Project part of Yizkor Books Project of JewishGen, Inc.

The first is: "Brest-Litovsk - Volume II Encyclopedia of the Jewish
Diaspora" a translation of Brisk de-Lita: Encyclopedia Shel Galuyot. The
original Yiddish volume was edited by Elieser Steinman and published in
Jerusalem in 1958. The name of the town, Brest-Litovsk, indicates its link
with Lithuania. Although founded by the Slavs in 1017 and invaded by the
Mongols in 1241, it became part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1319, and
in 1569 it became the capital of the unified Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

The town is also known as "Brisk," in Yiddish to the Jews who lived and
thrived there for six centuries. Jewish "Brisk" had an illustrious history;
the famous Brisker Yeshivah attracted scholars >from all over Europe. The
list of Rabbis of Brest includes Solomon Luria and Joel Sirkes, in earlier
periods, the Katzenellenbogens, and three generations of the Soloveitchik
dynasty in more recent times. Brest also produced Jacob Epstein the great
Talmudist at the Hebrew University, Menachem Begin, and many other major
religious, literary and political leaders. In 1923, Jews made up 60% of
Brest's population of 60,000. Brest, Belarus is located 203 mi SW of Minsk.

Written by Brest survivors and former residents >from many countries who
contributed their memories of their hometown as a record for future
generations, and as testament and loving tribute to the innocent Victims of
the Shoah, it is a must read for researchers of the town and descendants of
"Briskers."

The list price is $56.95. Available at Amazon for around $41. Also available
at Barnes & Noble and check the JewishGen website
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Brest.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

The second title is "Grayewo Memorial (Yizkor) Book" It is a translation of
Grayeve yisker-bukh (Grayewo Memorial Book) Editor: Dr. George Gorin, New
York. Originally Published by: United Grayever Relief Committee, 1950.
Grajewo is located 114 mi NNE of Warsaw in Poland. Alternate names for the
town are: Grajewo [Polish], Grayavah [Yiddish], Graevo [Russian], Grayeve,
Grayevo.

Jews have been living in Grajewo, in the province of Bialystok, Poland since
the late 17th century. The 1765 census counted 83 Jewish people and by 1857,
the number had grown to 1,457 comprising 76% of the town's population. By
1921, the percentage of Jews had decreased to 39%.

During the Soviet occupation, between September 1939 and June 1941, Jewish
businesses were nationalized. The Nazi invasion of Grajewo on 22 June 1941
marked the beginning of the devastation and horrors thrust upon the Jewish
population. Within a few months, 1,600 to 2,000 Jews had been sent to the
transit camp at Bogosza and on to the extermination camps at Treblinka and
Auschwitz.

The list price is $49.95, available on Amazon for around $36. Again, see
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip/YBIP_Grajewo.html for further
information and non-U.S. sources.

You can see the full range of books printed through our Yizkor Books in
Print Project at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

Sandra Hirschhorn, sdh2381@comcast.net


Early American SIG #USA JOWBR Grows to Over 2 Million Records #usa

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2014 pre-Conference update to the JOWBR
(JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The JOWBR database
can be accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/ If you're a
new JOWBR user, we recommend that you take a look at the first two
explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update adds approximately 124,000 new records and 25,000 new photos.
The database is adding and/or updating 190 cemeteries. This update brings
JOWBR's holdings to 2.27 million records >from almost 4,400 cemeteries /
cemetery sections representing 85 countries!

Once again, donors for this update include a mix of individuals, Jewish
genealogical societies, historical societies and museums. We appreciate all
our donors' submissions and the transliteration work done by a faithful
group of JewishGen volunteers.

I want to particularly thank Eric Feinstein who has been helping me to find
and gain permission to add many of the German towns in addition to records
from under-represented countries. In addition, without our volunteer
transliterators, led by Gilberto Jugend, we would not be able to add the
information >from some very difficult to read photos.

Significant additions to the database include collections >from Cleveland,
Ohio and surrounding areas, Leeds, England, various German towns, Bialystok,
Poland, Chernigov, Ukraine, Shanghai, China, and an annual update >from the
US Veterans Administration. Please check our online cemetery inventory at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/tree/CemList.htm for a complete
listing.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to make
additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery section
individually or consider a group project for your local Society, temple or
other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR database and
make it possible for researchers and family members to find answers they
otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations you may be
affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that would
consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
NAltman@JewishGen.org
June, 2014


Early American SIG #USA Memorial Plaque Project Doubles to More Than 60,000 Records. Please help us continue to grow! #usa

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2014 pre-Conference Update for the
Memorial Plaque Project (MPP) database. The MPP database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/ The MPP database includes the
data >from plaques and Yizkor lists >from synagogue and other organizations.
Many of these sources include patronymic information.

This year, we added more than 30,000 records >from the US, Israel and Canada.
These records come >from 35 different synagogues and other institutions. A
big thank you to the work being done by the JGS of Greater Boston, The
Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina, the JGS of Montreal, and a
number of synagogues and individual donors.

We believe that the MPP is a good example of how users of JewishGen's
databases can "give back". If you are a member of a synagogue or other
organization with memorial plaques or Yizkor lists, please consider helping
us to grow this database. You can find more information on submitting data
at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/Submit.htm If you have
additional questions, please contact me directly.

For a complete listing of the institutions currently in the database, please
see http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/tree/MemList.htm

Nolan Altman
NAltman@JewishGen.org
June, 2014


Memorial Plaque Project Doubles to More Than 60,000 Records. Please help us continue to grow! #germany

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2014 pre-Conference Update for the
Memorial Plaque Project (MPP) database. The MPP database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/ The MPP database includes the
data >from plaques and Yizkor lists >from synagogue and other organizations.
Many of these sources include patronymic information.

This year, we added more than 30,000 records >from the US, Israel and Canada.
These records come >from 35 different synagogues and other institutions. A
big thank you to the work being done by the JGS of Greater Boston, The
Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina, the JGS of Montreal, and a
number of synagogues and individual donors.

We believe that the MPP is a good example of how users of JewishGen's
databases can "give back". If you are a member of a synagogue or other
organization with memorial plaques or Yizkor lists, please consider helping
us to grow this database. You can find more information on submitting data
at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/Submit.htm If you have
additional questions, please contact me directly.

For a complete listing of the institutions currently in the database, please
see http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/tree/MemList.htm

Nolan Altman, NAltman@JewishGen.org June, 2014


German SIG #Germany Memorial Plaque Project Doubles to More Than 60,000 Records. Please help us continue to grow! #germany

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2014 pre-Conference Update for the
Memorial Plaque Project (MPP) database. The MPP database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/ The MPP database includes the
data >from plaques and Yizkor lists >from synagogue and other organizations.
Many of these sources include patronymic information.

This year, we added more than 30,000 records >from the US, Israel and Canada.
These records come >from 35 different synagogues and other institutions. A
big thank you to the work being done by the JGS of Greater Boston, The
Jewish Historical Society of South Carolina, the JGS of Montreal, and a
number of synagogues and individual donors.

We believe that the MPP is a good example of how users of JewishGen's
databases can "give back". If you are a member of a synagogue or other
organization with memorial plaques or Yizkor lists, please consider helping
us to grow this database. You can find more information on submitting data
at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/Submit.htm If you have
additional questions, please contact me directly.

For a complete listing of the institutions currently in the database, please
see http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/tree/MemList.htm

Nolan Altman, NAltman@JewishGen.org June, 2014


JOWBR Grows to Over 2 Million Records #germany

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2014 pre-Conference update to the JOWBR
(JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The JOWBR database
can be accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/ If you're a
new JOWBR user, we recommend that you take a look at the first two
explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update adds approximately 124,000 new records and 25,000 new photos.
The database is adding and/or updating 190 cemeteries. This update brings
JOWBR's holdings to 2.27 million records >from almost 4,400 cemeteries /
cemetery sections representing 85 countries!

Once again, donors for this update include a mix of individuals, Jewish
genealogical societies, historical societies and museums. We appreciate all
our donors' submissions and the transliteration work done by a faithful
group of JewishGen volunteers.

I want to particularly thank Eric Feinstein who has been helping me to find
and gain permission to add many of the German towns in addition to records
from under-represented countries. In addition, without our volunteer
transliterators, led by Gilberto Jugend, we would not be able to add the
information >from some very difficult to read photos.

Significant additions to the database include collections >from Cleveland,
Ohio and surrounding areas, Leeds, England, various German towns, Bialystok,
Poland, Chernigov, Ukraine, Shanghai, China, and an annual update >from the
US Veterans Administration. Please check our online cemetery inventory at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/tree/CemList.htm for a complete
listing.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to make
additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery section
individually or consider a group project for your local Society, temple or
other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR database and
make it possible for researchers and family members to find answers they
otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations you may be
affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that would
consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman, NAltman@JewishGen.org June, 2014


German SIG #Germany JOWBR Grows to Over 2 Million Records #germany

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2014 pre-Conference update to the JOWBR
(JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The JOWBR database
can be accessed at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/ If you're a
new JOWBR user, we recommend that you take a look at the first two
explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update adds approximately 124,000 new records and 25,000 new photos.
The database is adding and/or updating 190 cemeteries. This update brings
JOWBR's holdings to 2.27 million records >from almost 4,400 cemeteries /
cemetery sections representing 85 countries!

Once again, donors for this update include a mix of individuals, Jewish
genealogical societies, historical societies and museums. We appreciate all
our donors' submissions and the transliteration work done by a faithful
group of JewishGen volunteers.

I want to particularly thank Eric Feinstein who has been helping me to find
and gain permission to add many of the German towns in addition to records
from under-represented countries. In addition, without our volunteer
transliterators, led by Gilberto Jugend, we would not be able to add the
information >from some very difficult to read photos.

Significant additions to the database include collections >from Cleveland,
Ohio and surrounding areas, Leeds, England, various German towns, Bialystok,
Poland, Chernigov, Ukraine, Shanghai, China, and an annual update >from the
US Veterans Administration. Please check our online cemetery inventory at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/tree/CemList.htm for a complete
listing.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to make
additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery / cemetery section
individually or consider a group project for your local Society, temple or
other group, it's your submissions that help grow the JOWBR database and
make it possible for researchers and family members to find answers they
otherwise might not. Please also consider other organizations you may be
affiliated with that may already have done cemetery indexing that would
consider having their records included in the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman, NAltman@JewishGen.org June, 2014


Re: the Joel LOEWE inquiry - CORRECTION #germany

Bruce Brill <bruce.brill@...>
 

The text below contains corrected text. There were two errors
in my earlier message "Joel LOEWE ancestry"

Joel LOEWE (1762- 11/2/1802), a renowned Jewish educator, writer, and
associate of Moses Mendelsohn often used BRIL or BRILL,an acroym as
his last name indicating descent >from one Yehuda LEIB-LOEWE. Although
Joel's father's name was Yehuda LEIB-LOEWE (?- ?,>11/2/1802) some
(most?) sources say that Joel was harking back to a more distant and
renowned Yehuda LEIB ancestor: perhaps the Maharal of Prague
(1525-1609) or the Maharal's great-grandson, Yehuda LEYB-LOEWE
(1611-1704).

Anyone know what the actual story is? ...and IF Joel is referring back
to a more distant Yehuda LEIB-LOEWE, how he traces his ancestral ties
to this more distant Yehuda LEIB-LOEWE? Thanks in advance
for any help on this!

Bruce Brill, {city? state?] bruce.brill@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany Re: the Joel LOEWE inquiry - CORRECTION #germany

Bruce Brill <bruce.brill@...>
 

The text below contains corrected text. There were two errors
in my earlier message "Joel LOEWE ancestry"

Joel LOEWE (1762- 11/2/1802), a renowned Jewish educator, writer, and
associate of Moses Mendelsohn often used BRIL or BRILL,an acroym as
his last name indicating descent >from one Yehuda LEIB-LOEWE. Although
Joel's father's name was Yehuda LEIB-LOEWE (?- ?,>11/2/1802) some
(most?) sources say that Joel was harking back to a more distant and
renowned Yehuda LEIB ancestor: perhaps the Maharal of Prague
(1525-1609) or the Maharal's great-grandson, Yehuda LEYB-LOEWE
(1611-1704).

Anyone know what the actual story is? ...and IF Joel is referring back
to a more distant Yehuda LEIB-LOEWE, how he traces his ancestral ties
to this more distant Yehuda LEIB-LOEWE? Thanks in advance
for any help on this!

Bruce Brill, {city? state?] bruce.brill@gmail.com


Re: Mannheim cemetery - LOEB and FEIBLEMANN #germany

Bert de Jong <bdejong67@...>
 

I searched some database, among them the Theresienstadt website, and found
already some sad news coming up. Sadly Ms. CASPARIUS did not mention any
data of birth. But important as I thought it was, I forwarded this email to
the archive in Mannheim, and emailed Ms. CASPARIUS.
On Monday morning I received this email >from them containing this sad
information: Regards, Bert de Jong The Netherlands

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
"Stadtarchiv Mannheim Mannheim, den 16.06.2014
Dear Mrs. Casparius,
we got your mail with your question about the fate of your parents >from Mr.
de Jong in the Netherlands. In the documents in our archives I found
following sad informations about your family:
Emil and Nelly LOEB lived in Mannheim until spring 1943. As you proabely
know, the most jewish families of Mannheim were deported to Gurs in France
in October 1940. Your parents and your grandfather had the opportunity to
stay longer in Mannheim, it seems because all of them were in the Jewish
Hospital in October 1940. The reason of this stay is not clear, but all the
persons, who were in the Hospital at that time were allowed to stay behind.
Your grandfather, Emil FEIBELMANN, born February 14th 1862, was deported to
the concentration camp Theresienstadt at August 21st 1942 and he died there
October 20th 1942.
Your father, Emil LOEB, was first deported to the concentration camp
Auschwitz at March 1st 1943, then also to Theresienstadt, where he died at
April 1st 1943.
Your mother, Nelly LOEB geb. FEIBELMANN was deported to the concentration
camp Theresienstadt at April 15th 1943 and she died there at July 15th 1943.
If you have any further questions, do not hestitate to contact me.
Best regards Mit freundlichen Grüßen gez. i.A. Susanne Schlösser"


German SIG #Germany Re: Mannheim cemetery - LOEB and FEIBLEMANN #germany

Bert de Jong <bdejong67@...>
 

I searched some database, among them the Theresienstadt website, and found
already some sad news coming up. Sadly Ms. CASPARIUS did not mention any
data of birth. But important as I thought it was, I forwarded this email to
the archive in Mannheim, and emailed Ms. CASPARIUS.
On Monday morning I received this email >from them containing this sad
information: Regards, Bert de Jong The Netherlands

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
"Stadtarchiv Mannheim Mannheim, den 16.06.2014
Dear Mrs. Casparius,
we got your mail with your question about the fate of your parents >from Mr.
de Jong in the Netherlands. In the documents in our archives I found
following sad informations about your family:
Emil and Nelly LOEB lived in Mannheim until spring 1943. As you proabely
know, the most jewish families of Mannheim were deported to Gurs in France
in October 1940. Your parents and your grandfather had the opportunity to
stay longer in Mannheim, it seems because all of them were in the Jewish
Hospital in October 1940. The reason of this stay is not clear, but all the
persons, who were in the Hospital at that time were allowed to stay behind.
Your grandfather, Emil FEIBELMANN, born February 14th 1862, was deported to
the concentration camp Theresienstadt at August 21st 1942 and he died there
October 20th 1942.
Your father, Emil LOEB, was first deported to the concentration camp
Auschwitz at March 1st 1943, then also to Theresienstadt, where he died at
April 1st 1943.
Your mother, Nelly LOEB geb. FEIBELMANN was deported to the concentration
camp Theresienstadt at April 15th 1943 and she died there at July 15th 1943.
If you have any further questions, do not hestitate to contact me.
Best regards Mit freundlichen Grüßen gez. i.A. Susanne Schlösser"


Re: Mannheim Cemetery - LOEB and FEIBELMANN #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

13.06.2014,Edward Casparius casparius@comcast.net wrote:
I read with great interest, GerSig digest of 5/13/14. I am born
in Mannheim and left in 1939 with the Kindertransport.
My grandmother Sophie FEIBELMANN was buried in Mannheim in 1940.
My parents Emil and Nelly LOEB lived in Mannheim. I received Red
Cross messages >from them in Scotland as late as 1943. My postwar
search for their names oncamp lists was in vain. No one knows of
their fate. Could they be buried in the Jewish Cemetery in Mannheim?
Is it possible to get information and do they have an email address? =====>

Dear Ruth,
your parents' fate seems to be documented in the German online
Gedenkbuch link (see below)

http://www.bundesarchiv.de/gedenkbuch/directory.html

The data would be consistent with the messages until 1943.

It still puzzles me that they are not listed in the printed book
"Theresienstaedter Gedenkbuch" (Academia, 2000) that lists the transport
XIII/2 of 17 April 1943 with 20 people on it, nor is there an entry in
the Theresienstadt death list on the Theresienstadt website. Also, I do
not understand why husband and wife would have been separated for
deportation, which the entry for Emil - first to Auschwitz, then to
Theresienstadt, which does not make sense - suggests.

Possibly the 1987 book on the history of the Mannheim Jews by Karl Otto
Watzinger may shed light on this, but I will only able to consult it on
Monday:

Geschichte der Juden in Mannheim
<http://katalogplus.ub.uni-bielefeld.de/cgi-bin/new_titel.cgi?katkey=1560549&;art=f&kat1=freitext&kat2=ti&kat3=aup&op1=AND&op2=AND&var1=&var2=&var3=watzinger%2C%20karl%20otto&vr=1&pagesize=10&bestand=lok&sess=7a28ce3168916cab2176a9a77d823837>
: mit 52 Biographien / von Karl Otto Watzinger. Mit e. Uebers. ueber d.
Quellen im Stadtarchiv Mannheim zur Geschichte d. Juden / von Joerg
Schadt u. Michael Martin. -2., verb. Aufl
Watzinger, Karl Otto

I will inform you about anything I would find in there.

Until then, Fritz Neubauer, North Germany fritz.neubauer@uni-bielefeld.de


LOEB, Emil
born on 29^th March 1892 in Lauterecken / Kusel / Bayern (Pfalz)
resident of Mannheim and Heidelberg

Deportation destination:
from Stuttgart - Trier - Düsseldorf - Dortmund
01^st March 1943, Auschwitz, extermination camp
1943, Theresienstadt, ghetto

Date/Place of Death:
01^st April 1943, Theresienstadt, ghetto


LOEB, Nelli Cornelie Nelly

née FEIBELMANN
born on 19^th September 1892 in Landau i. d. Pfalz / - / Bayern (Pfalz)
resident of Mannheim

Deportation destination:
from Stuttgart
17^th April 1943, Theresienstadt, ghetto

Date/Place of Death:
15^th July 1943, Theresienstadt, ghetto


German SIG #Germany Re: Mannheim Cemetery - LOEB and FEIBELMANN #germany

Fritz Neubauer
 

13.06.2014,Edward Casparius casparius@comcast.net wrote:
I read with great interest, GerSig digest of 5/13/14. I am born
in Mannheim and left in 1939 with the Kindertransport.
My grandmother Sophie FEIBELMANN was buried in Mannheim in 1940.
My parents Emil and Nelly LOEB lived in Mannheim. I received Red
Cross messages >from them in Scotland as late as 1943. My postwar
search for their names oncamp lists was in vain. No one knows of
their fate. Could they be buried in the Jewish Cemetery in Mannheim?
Is it possible to get information and do they have an email address? =====>

Dear Ruth,
your parents' fate seems to be documented in the German online
Gedenkbuch link (see below)

http://www.bundesarchiv.de/gedenkbuch/directory.html

The data would be consistent with the messages until 1943.

It still puzzles me that they are not listed in the printed book
"Theresienstaedter Gedenkbuch" (Academia, 2000) that lists the transport
XIII/2 of 17 April 1943 with 20 people on it, nor is there an entry in
the Theresienstadt death list on the Theresienstadt website. Also, I do
not understand why husband and wife would have been separated for
deportation, which the entry for Emil - first to Auschwitz, then to
Theresienstadt, which does not make sense - suggests.

Possibly the 1987 book on the history of the Mannheim Jews by Karl Otto
Watzinger may shed light on this, but I will only able to consult it on
Monday:

Geschichte der Juden in Mannheim
<http://katalogplus.ub.uni-bielefeld.de/cgi-bin/new_titel.cgi?katkey=1560549&;art=f&kat1=freitext&kat2=ti&kat3=aup&op1=AND&op2=AND&var1=&var2=&var3=watzinger%2C%20karl%20otto&vr=1&pagesize=10&bestand=lok&sess=7a28ce3168916cab2176a9a77d823837>
: mit 52 Biographien / von Karl Otto Watzinger. Mit e. Uebers. ueber d.
Quellen im Stadtarchiv Mannheim zur Geschichte d. Juden / von Joerg
Schadt u. Michael Martin. -2., verb. Aufl
Watzinger, Karl Otto

I will inform you about anything I would find in there.

Until then, Fritz Neubauer, North Germany fritz.neubauer@uni-bielefeld.de


LOEB, Emil
born on 29^th March 1892 in Lauterecken / Kusel / Bayern (Pfalz)
resident of Mannheim and Heidelberg

Deportation destination:
from Stuttgart - Trier - Düsseldorf - Dortmund
01^st March 1943, Auschwitz, extermination camp
1943, Theresienstadt, ghetto

Date/Place of Death:
01^st April 1943, Theresienstadt, ghetto


LOEB, Nelli Cornelie Nelly

née FEIBELMANN
born on 19^th September 1892 in Landau i. d. Pfalz / - / Bayern (Pfalz)
resident of Mannheim

Deportation destination:
from Stuttgart
17^th April 1943, Theresienstadt, ghetto

Date/Place of Death:
15^th July 1943, Theresienstadt, ghetto


Gittel = Cecilia ? #germany

Jeff Lewy <airbair@...>
 

I have a record >from the 1840s in Ostrowo, Prussia/Ostrow
Wielkopolski, Poland listing the children of my gggrandfather Israel
LEWY, including a girl named Gittel LEWY, born in about 1837. Then
there is a long gap in family records, and I find a reference to the
mother of a woman getting married in Breslau/Wroclaw in 1899, and the
mother's maiden name is shown as Cecilia LEWY. >from other evidence, I
believe Cecilia is the same person as Gittel.

I know that the "translation" of Hebrew names to German names is hard
to trace or compare, and I wonder what might be the likelihood of
Gittel becoming known as Cecilia. If Gittel and Cecilia aren't the
same person, then I have to consider that there is another, "missing,"
child not shown in the earlier list. I believe this is unlikely, as
there are 12 children in the family in the earlier record.

Does anyone on this email list have any comments on my hypothesis? Thanks!

Jeff Lewy, San Francisco, Calif. airbair@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany Gittel = Cecilia ? #germany

Jeff Lewy <airbair@...>
 

I have a record >from the 1840s in Ostrowo, Prussia/Ostrow
Wielkopolski, Poland listing the children of my gggrandfather Israel
LEWY, including a girl named Gittel LEWY, born in about 1837. Then
there is a long gap in family records, and I find a reference to the
mother of a woman getting married in Breslau/Wroclaw in 1899, and the
mother's maiden name is shown as Cecilia LEWY. >from other evidence, I
believe Cecilia is the same person as Gittel.

I know that the "translation" of Hebrew names to German names is hard
to trace or compare, and I wonder what might be the likelihood of
Gittel becoming known as Cecilia. If Gittel and Cecilia aren't the
same person, then I have to consider that there is another, "missing,"
child not shown in the earlier list. I believe this is unlikely, as
there are 12 children in the family in the earlier record.

Does anyone on this email list have any comments on my hypothesis? Thanks!

Jeff Lewy, San Francisco, Calif. airbair@gmail.com


GENIESLAW family #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the family of Mordechai Yeshaya GENIESLAW of
Brooklyn, NY., born February 5th, 1929, married Sarah, born in Nowy Sacz,
daughter of Chaim Alter and Esther Gross. Issue, Rivke Chaya, born 1962;
Chaim Alter, born 196?; Machi, born 1968; and Leah, born 1970.

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately to Neil.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen GENIESLAW family #general

Neil@...
 

Trying to make contact with the family of Mordechai Yeshaya GENIESLAW of
Brooklyn, NY., born February 5th, 1929, married Sarah, born in Nowy Sacz,
daughter of Chaim Alter and Esther Gross. Issue, Rivke Chaya, born 1962;
Chaim Alter, born 196?; Machi, born 1968; and Leah, born 1970.

Neil Rosenstein

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately to Neil.

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