Date   

Re: Vienna Marriage record help: Trauungindex lists an odd "Lauf. Nr." #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

Micah,

Welcome to the SIG.

The easiest way to locate the Vienna records is to use the indices at
genteam.at. There you=92ll find that the marriage of Chaskel CHOMET and
Ite SANZ is recorded in the Leopoldsgasse volume for 1901, at number 44.
That book is not on familysearch, I think.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Vienna Marriage record help: Trauungindex lists an odd "Lauf. Nr." #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

Micah,

Welcome to the SIG.

The easiest way to locate the Vienna records is to use the indices at
genteam.at. There you=92ll find that the marriage of Chaskel CHOMET and
Ite SANZ is recorded in the Leopoldsgasse volume for 1901, at number 44.
That book is not on familysearch, I think.

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Prague University Records online #hungary

stephen@...
 

The Charles University in Prague has started digitising its student
database for 1882-1945. Since many Jewish students left Hungary to study
due the Numerus Clausus restrictions, this database will be a useful
resource when it is fully completed.

http://is.cuni.cz/webapps/archiv/public/?lang=en

Stephen Schmideg
Melbourne, Australia


Hungary SIG #Hungary Prague University Records online #hungary

stephen@...
 

The Charles University in Prague has started digitising its student
database for 1882-1945. Since many Jewish students left Hungary to study
due the Numerus Clausus restrictions, this database will be a useful
resource when it is fully completed.

http://is.cuni.cz/webapps/archiv/public/?lang=en

Stephen Schmideg
Melbourne, Australia


Kohns and Brauns near Marosvasarhely #hungary

anitacsoke@...
 

Dear All -

I'm having difficulties to find my ancestors originating >from the county of Maros.

Jozsef Kohn was born in MezÅ?bÃ¥nd (Mezoband), Maros around 1845, his wife Lujza Braun was born in Bord, Maros around 1853. They had 5 children - we know details about 2 of them: Roza was born in Bord in 1881, Geza was born in SzÊlkút (Salcud), Maros in 1888. These towns belonged to Kis-KßkßllÅ? (Tarnava Mica) near Marosvasarhely. Interestingly, the birth certificate of Roza was issued in DeÊg (DÊg) 17 years later with the presence of her mum, Lujza who was living in OlÃ¥h-AndrÃ¥sfalva (Olah-Andrasfalva), Hargita at that time (it's called today SzÊkelyandrÃ¥sfalva). We don't know if it's DÊg in VeszprÊm or MarosdÊg in Maros (the latter one would make more sense to me).

Since Kohn and Braun are extremely common names, I've been trying to find
them according to these places, but I've found almost nothing about
these villages on Jewishgen and Familysearch. There is a chance that I'm
doing something wrong, or is it possible that this area is completely
out of the databases? I appreciate any info and searching tips.

Many thanks,
Anita Csoke, Hungary


Hungary SIG #Hungary Kohns and Brauns near Marosvasarhely #hungary

anitacsoke@...
 

Dear All -

I'm having difficulties to find my ancestors originating >from the county of Maros.

Jozsef Kohn was born in MezÅ?bÃ¥nd (Mezoband), Maros around 1845, his wife Lujza Braun was born in Bord, Maros around 1853. They had 5 children - we know details about 2 of them: Roza was born in Bord in 1881, Geza was born in SzÊlkút (Salcud), Maros in 1888. These towns belonged to Kis-KßkßllÅ? (Tarnava Mica) near Marosvasarhely. Interestingly, the birth certificate of Roza was issued in DeÊg (DÊg) 17 years later with the presence of her mum, Lujza who was living in OlÃ¥h-AndrÃ¥sfalva (Olah-Andrasfalva), Hargita at that time (it's called today SzÊkelyandrÃ¥sfalva). We don't know if it's DÊg in VeszprÊm or MarosdÊg in Maros (the latter one would make more sense to me).

Since Kohn and Braun are extremely common names, I've been trying to find
them according to these places, but I've found almost nothing about
these villages on Jewishgen and Familysearch. There is a chance that I'm
doing something wrong, or is it possible that this area is completely
out of the databases? I appreciate any info and searching tips.

Many thanks,
Anita Csoke, Hungary


Re: Sub-Carpathia Trip Report 2014 #hungary

jausland@...
 

Kudos to Marshall Katz for his outstanding work documenting Jewish
Transcarpathia!

As many of you know, outside the major cities this region is where the
bulk of Hungarian Speaking Jewry lived. In many towns in the region,
Jews were the dominant minority composing 25-50 percent of the general
population.

A comment on Marshall's notation. Where he indicates "no cemetery,"
this may or may not be the case.

For example: Hlyboke (Melyut) - Uzhhorodskyi - No cemetery

The Jewish burial ground is actually a cleared plot between the well
maintained Catholic and Greek Orthodox cemeteries. No Jewish stones
remain but the bodies are there.

Many of the small towns had their own local burial plots, even if they
did not have their own congregations. Down the road >from
Hluboke/Hlyboke, in the neighboring hamlet of Also Szlatina (now Nizsny
Szolotvino) there is a separate Jewish burial ground with a few
remaining stones. Both these settlements had a 1876 Jewish population of
about 75 each, and worshipped in the nearby larger town of Seredne.

I'm sure in some cases, where Marshall has indicated "no cemetery" there
may be the scars of one, while in others, noting where the local
congregation worshipped, may lead to the likely burial ground.
Jordan Auslander


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Sub-Carpathia Trip Report 2014 #hungary

jausland@...
 

Kudos to Marshall Katz for his outstanding work documenting Jewish
Transcarpathia!

As many of you know, outside the major cities this region is where the
bulk of Hungarian Speaking Jewry lived. In many towns in the region,
Jews were the dominant minority composing 25-50 percent of the general
population.

A comment on Marshall's notation. Where he indicates "no cemetery,"
this may or may not be the case.

For example: Hlyboke (Melyut) - Uzhhorodskyi - No cemetery

The Jewish burial ground is actually a cleared plot between the well
maintained Catholic and Greek Orthodox cemeteries. No Jewish stones
remain but the bodies are there.

Many of the small towns had their own local burial plots, even if they
did not have their own congregations. Down the road >from
Hluboke/Hlyboke, in the neighboring hamlet of Also Szlatina (now Nizsny
Szolotvino) there is a separate Jewish burial ground with a few
remaining stones. Both these settlements had a 1876 Jewish population of
about 75 each, and worshipped in the nearby larger town of Seredne.

I'm sure in some cases, where Marshall has indicated "no cemetery" there
may be the scars of one, while in others, noting where the local
congregation worshipped, may lead to the likely burial ground.
Jordan Auslander


maps - another wonderful source #galicia

Phyllis Kramer
 

As Pam Weisberger recently explained, area maps are terrific for
understanding your ancestral area.

I would like to point out another set of maps which are very detailed
and easy to use, >from the Lemko site... to quote: "These are high
resolution [ 100,000 : 1 ] maps of the south-eastern corner of Poland,
with a small encroachment into Ukraine and the Slovak Republic.
These maps were recently released for public use by the Headquarters
of the Polish Army, Carthographic Division, Warsaw 1994...."

The main map is at http://www.lemko.org/maps100/index.html

and if you click on any of the squares you will link to wonderful,
detailed maps of each area.

It's very easy to see the towns around, the relative sizes of the towns
(houses are marked), the roads connecting the towns and the
landscape (rivers, parks). The symbols on the map (eg: religious
buildings, gas stations, castles, museums) are explained at
http://www.lemko.org/maps100/legend.jpg

It's akin to going to the JewishGen gazetteer,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/LocTown.asp
entering the name of your town, then clicking on the link to the list
of all the towns within a 10 mile radius.

happy hunting....

Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education, www.JewishGen.org/education


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia maps - another wonderful source #galicia

Phyllis Kramer
 

As Pam Weisberger recently explained, area maps are terrific for
understanding your ancestral area.

I would like to point out another set of maps which are very detailed
and easy to use, >from the Lemko site... to quote: "These are high
resolution [ 100,000 : 1 ] maps of the south-eastern corner of Poland,
with a small encroachment into Ukraine and the Slovak Republic.
These maps were recently released for public use by the Headquarters
of the Polish Army, Carthographic Division, Warsaw 1994...."

The main map is at http://www.lemko.org/maps100/index.html

and if you click on any of the squares you will link to wonderful,
detailed maps of each area.

It's very easy to see the towns around, the relative sizes of the towns
(houses are marked), the roads connecting the towns and the
landscape (rivers, parks). The symbols on the map (eg: religious
buildings, gas stations, castles, museums) are explained at
http://www.lemko.org/maps100/legend.jpg

It's akin to going to the JewishGen gazetteer,
http://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/LocTown.asp
entering the name of your town, then clicking on the link to the list
of all the towns within a 10 mile radius.

happy hunting....

Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education, www.JewishGen.org/education


Fold3 Offers Free Access To Their Revolutionary War Collection Through July 31 #usa

Jan Meisels Allen
 

In celebration of America's Independence Fold3 (an Ancestry company)is
offering free access to their Revolutionary War Collection through
July 31.
Not only does Fold3 have Revolutionary War pension files,
service records, war rolls, or payment vouchers, or in the Revolutionary
War Manuscript File they also have captured vessels prize cases,
Revolutionary War milestone documents, Pennsylvania Archives,
Constitutional Convention records, and the papers and letters of the
Continental Congress.

You will need to register with an email address and password
to access the records.

To access the site go to: http://tinyurl.com/pyjtm37
Original url:
http://go.fold3.com/revolutionary-war/?xid=1756&utm_source=content&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=odp-revwar-july2014
I have no affiliation with Ancestry.com or Fold3 and am noticing this
solely for the information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen, Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Key dates for IAJGS Conference #usa

Hal Bookbinder
 

Shalom,

The IAJGS Conference is just over two weeks away. With over 250
sessions, nearby research at the world's foremost genealogical library
and special events including an opening reception, the play, "Time
Capsule in a Milkcan" and a fun-filled awards banquet it is indeed the
Jewish Genealogical event of the year. To view the full Conference
program please go to http://program.iajgs2014.org.

Please be aware of these upcoming key dates:
- July 15 - last day to update online conference Family Finder information.
- July 22 - last day to purchase breakfast with the experts, SIG
luncheons or Shabbat dinner tickets.
- July 25 - last day to register on line for $325. Thereafter you can
register on site for $365.
- July 25 - last day to register for IAJGS LIVE! if you want your
access code in time to view all LIVE! conference programming as it is
presented.
(whether you register for LIVE! by this date or later you will be able
to enjoy 60 of the best conference programs whenever you like and as
many times as you like until October 31, 2014)
- July 27 - August 1 - 34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy, Salt Lake City!
- July 28 - last day to purchase banquet tickets.

Go to http://registration.iajgs2014.org to register to attend the
conference or for IAJGS LIVE!. Go to http://update.iajgs2014.org to
modify an existing registration, including updating your Family Finder
information or adding meals or computer labs.

See you in SLC!
Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein and Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
hal.bookbinder@ucla.edu


KehilaLinks Project Report for June 2014 #usa

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen KehilaLinks
We thank the owners and webmasters of these webpages for creating fitting
memorials to these Kehilot (Jewish Communities) and for providing a valuable
resource for future generations of their descendants.

Moshny (Moshne, Dudnitskoye), Ukraine
Created by Karen Steinfeld
Webpage design by Richard Baum
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/moshny/
~~~

Pietersburg, South Africa
Created by Eli Rabinowitz
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/pietersburg

KehilaLinks Web Pages Recently Updated:

***Correction***: On the May KehilalInks update we listed:
Raducaneni, Moldova. The correct listing should be:
Raducaneni, Romania.
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/raducaneni/
~~~

Orphaned Web Pages

Some of our Kehila webpages were created by people who are no longer
able to maintain them.
We thank them for their past efforts and wish them luck on their
future endeavors.
The following webpages are "orphaned" and are available for adoption.

Barysaw (Borisov), Belarus
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/borisov/borisov.html
~~~

Briceni (Brichany, Britshan) (B)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Brichany/brichany.htm
~~~

Borzna, Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/borzna/borzna.htm
~~~

Rozdol, Ukraine (G)
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/rozdol/rozdol.htm
~~~

If you wish to create a KehilaLinks webpage or adopt an existing "orphaned"
webpage please contact us at: < bloch@mts.net >.

Need Technical Help Creating a Web Page?: We have a team of dedicated
volunteer webpage designers who will help you create a webpage.

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, KehilaLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
Barbara Ellman, KehilaLinks Technical Coordinator


Early American SIG #USA Fold3 Offers Free Access To Their Revolutionary War Collection Through July 31 #usa

Jan Meisels Allen
 

In celebration of America's Independence Fold3 (an Ancestry company)is
offering free access to their Revolutionary War Collection through
July 31.
Not only does Fold3 have Revolutionary War pension files,
service records, war rolls, or payment vouchers, or in the Revolutionary
War Manuscript File they also have captured vessels prize cases,
Revolutionary War milestone documents, Pennsylvania Archives,
Constitutional Convention records, and the papers and letters of the
Continental Congress.

You will need to register with an email address and password
to access the records.

To access the site go to: http://tinyurl.com/pyjtm37
Original url:
http://go.fold3.com/revolutionary-war/?xid=1756&utm_source=content&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=odp-revwar-july2014
I have no affiliation with Ancestry.com or Fold3 and am noticing this
solely for the information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen, Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Early American SIG #USA Key dates for IAJGS Conference #usa

Hal Bookbinder
 

Shalom,

The IAJGS Conference is just over two weeks away. With over 250
sessions, nearby research at the world's foremost genealogical library
and special events including an opening reception, the play, "Time
Capsule in a Milkcan" and a fun-filled awards banquet it is indeed the
Jewish Genealogical event of the year. To view the full Conference
program please go to http://program.iajgs2014.org.

Please be aware of these upcoming key dates:
- July 15 - last day to update online conference Family Finder information.
- July 22 - last day to purchase breakfast with the experts, SIG
luncheons or Shabbat dinner tickets.
- July 25 - last day to register on line for $325. Thereafter you can
register on site for $365.
- July 25 - last day to register for IAJGS LIVE! if you want your
access code in time to view all LIVE! conference programming as it is
presented.
(whether you register for LIVE! by this date or later you will be able
to enjoy 60 of the best conference programs whenever you like and as
many times as you like until October 31, 2014)
- July 27 - August 1 - 34th IAJGS International Conference on Jewish
Genealogy, Salt Lake City!
- July 28 - last day to purchase banquet tickets.

Go to http://registration.iajgs2014.org to register to attend the
conference or for IAJGS LIVE!. Go to http://update.iajgs2014.org to
modify an existing registration, including updating your Family Finder
information or adding meals or computer labs.

See you in SLC!
Hal Bookbinder, Banai Feldstein and Ken Bravo, conference co-chairs
hal.bookbinder@ucla.edu


Early American SIG #USA KehilaLinks Project Report for June 2014 #usa

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen KehilaLinks
We thank the owners and webmasters of these webpages for creating fitting
memorials to these Kehilot (Jewish Communities) and for providing a valuable
resource for future generations of their descendants.

Moshny (Moshne, Dudnitskoye), Ukraine
Created by Karen Steinfeld
Webpage design by Richard Baum
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/moshny/
~~~

Pietersburg, South Africa
Created by Eli Rabinowitz
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/pietersburg

KehilaLinks Web Pages Recently Updated:

***Correction***: On the May KehilalInks update we listed:
Raducaneni, Moldova. The correct listing should be:
Raducaneni, Romania.
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/raducaneni/
~~~

Orphaned Web Pages

Some of our Kehila webpages were created by people who are no longer
able to maintain them.
We thank them for their past efforts and wish them luck on their
future endeavors.
The following webpages are "orphaned" and are available for adoption.

Barysaw (Borisov), Belarus
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/borisov/borisov.html
~~~

Briceni (Brichany, Britshan) (B)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Brichany/brichany.htm
~~~

Borzna, Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/borzna/borzna.htm
~~~

Rozdol, Ukraine (G)
http://www.shtetlinks.jewishgen.org/rozdol/rozdol.htm
~~~

If you wish to create a KehilaLinks webpage or adopt an existing "orphaned"
webpage please contact us at: < bloch@mts.net >.

Need Technical Help Creating a Web Page?: We have a team of dedicated
volunteer webpage designers who will help you create a webpage.

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, KehilaLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
Barbara Ellman, KehilaLinks Technical Coordinator


Re: Amkha? #general

tom
 

Literally, "amkha" means "your people", as in ordinary people.

It sounds like a local teacher wrote letters for local, less-educated people.
It's possible that they were illiterate, but I suspect that it might be
because they were educated in Yiddish, and didn't speak Polish very well.

tom klein, Toronto

Martin Jacobs <duomundi@gmail.com> wrote:
What is Amkha,(ayin, mem, final khaf) in pre-Holocaust usage? I know
that today it refers to a right-wing Zionist organization or to an
organization in Israel that assists Holocaust survivors, but what did
this term refer to before WW II, and why would anyone write personal
letters for it? (In the Goworowo yizkor book a local teacher is
represented as writing "private briv" for it.)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Amkha? #general

tom
 

Literally, "amkha" means "your people", as in ordinary people.

It sounds like a local teacher wrote letters for local, less-educated people.
It's possible that they were illiterate, but I suspect that it might be
because they were educated in Yiddish, and didn't speak Polish very well.

tom klein, Toronto

Martin Jacobs <duomundi@gmail.com> wrote:
What is Amkha,(ayin, mem, final khaf) in pre-Holocaust usage? I know
that today it refers to a right-wing Zionist organization or to an
organization in Israel that assists Holocaust survivors, but what did
this term refer to before WW II, and why would anyone write personal
letters for it? (In the Goworowo yizkor book a local teacher is
represented as writing "private briv" for it.)


Re: Amcha? #general

Jeff Marx
 

Amcha is a compound word: Am is "people" and cha is "your". Thus: your people.
It is probably taken >from the Book of Exodus, following Israel's sin of
worshipping the golden calf. God says to Moses: "Look what your people have done!?
Moses tries to calm God down, saying: "Remember, that this is Your People!?
(Exodus 32: 7-11).

Amcha, in later Jewish use, was not understood literally ("your people") but was
used, informally to be "our People". But "amcha" also came to have a quality
associated with it, based on another usage involving the word, "Am". "Am
ha'aretz", literally, "people of the land", that is, farmers, in later usage
meant an individual who was ignorant. Amcha comes to mean "the common folk".

When one writes a letter for amcha, then, he's not just writing for "our
people", one of us, but writing for the simple folk among us, who aren't
literate.

Jeff Marx


Help in San Luis Obispo, California #lithuania

Yael & Barry <ydriver@...>
 

Dear Fellow Litvaks residing in California,

I have been looking for over a month for a lady by the name of Daniela
Clark nee Arnon. I believe she lives in San Luis Obispo. I contacted
two synagogues in that area where I thought I could get some help but
so far nothing has come up.

If any of you lives in SLO and can help, I would be very very grateful.

Thank you in Advance

Yael Driver, London England

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.

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