Date   

Help Locating My Aunt in the 1940 Census #general

Stanley and Shelda Sandler
 

Dear Genners,

Can anyone find my aunt, Evelyne APT, in the 1940 Census? She was 18 years
old the previous May. She was not married. There is no question that she
was living at home with her parents, Simon and Anna Apt, and sister, Marie,
at 560 North Paxon Street, Philadelphia, PA. The Census Enumeration
District is 51-1838 (Philadelphia, PA). The date recorded by the Census
Taker on Sheet 4A of the Census is April 4, 1940.

I have read every name in that Enumeration District, including the last page, where
I was told a Census Taker might list people who were not enumerated with their
family at the time the Census was taken. I cannot find my aunt there either.

Can anyone offer any suggestions where or how I might find my aunt in the
1940 Census?

Thank you kindly in advance.

Shelda Bachin Sandler
Springfield, PA

Researching: APTOWITZER/APT (Zborow, Galicia --> Philadelphia) BACHIN
(Mogilev Gubernia, Russia --> Philadelphia)
LUDZKI/LODZKI/LUTZ (Zgierz, Poland --> Philadelphia) NAJFELD/NEWFELD
(Zawichost, Poland --> Philadelphia)


View Mate Translation Request - Polish Marriage Certificate/Pre-Nuptial Agreement/Legitimization of Birth - in Russian Cyrillic #poland

Teven Laxer
 

I am seeking translation of what appears to be a rather unusual document
which I obtained at the Family History Center while I was in Salt Lake City
for the IAJGS Conference a few weeks ago. I received a very rough
translaton of the document, which appears to be a record of the marriage
between Szmul Luria Mariampolski, 24 years old, born in Lazdijai, son of
Abram Uriasz (used to known as Mariampolski) and Rochla Lewin, and of
Dwora Ochron, 21 years old, born in Suwalki, daughter of Eliasz Abramowicz
(son of Abram) and Gela (daughter of Icek).This document also appears to
contain a pre-nuptial agreement, as well the legitimization of two births
that occurred prior to the marriage: Shayna, born 12/25 Apr 1876 and Uria,
born 10/22 Sep 1877.The document is >from 1879 and is in Russian using the
yrillic alphabet.

It is on ViewMate at the following address:
http://wwwjewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35231

I would appreciate a full translation, if at all possible. Please respond
via the form provided in the ViewMate application. Thank you in advance
for any assistance you can provide.

Regards,
Teven LAXER
Sacramento, CA
teven.laxer@sbcglobal.net

LAXER - Iasi, Romania GERSON - Iasi, Romania KIRSCHNER - Biskupice
Radlowski, Poland GLUCKMAN - Ukraine and Romania HERTZ - Coesfeld,
Germany HIDESHEIMER Germany GELLER - Kalush, Ukraine SCHEINDLINGER
Poland KARSEBOOM- Netherlands, Germany, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help Locating My Aunt in the 1940 Census #general

Stanley and Shelda Sandler
 

Dear Genners,

Can anyone find my aunt, Evelyne APT, in the 1940 Census? She was 18 years
old the previous May. She was not married. There is no question that she
was living at home with her parents, Simon and Anna Apt, and sister, Marie,
at 560 North Paxon Street, Philadelphia, PA. The Census Enumeration
District is 51-1838 (Philadelphia, PA). The date recorded by the Census
Taker on Sheet 4A of the Census is April 4, 1940.

I have read every name in that Enumeration District, including the last page, where
I was told a Census Taker might list people who were not enumerated with their
family at the time the Census was taken. I cannot find my aunt there either.

Can anyone offer any suggestions where or how I might find my aunt in the
1940 Census?

Thank you kindly in advance.

Shelda Bachin Sandler
Springfield, PA

Researching: APTOWITZER/APT (Zborow, Galicia --> Philadelphia) BACHIN
(Mogilev Gubernia, Russia --> Philadelphia)
LUDZKI/LODZKI/LUTZ (Zgierz, Poland --> Philadelphia) NAJFELD/NEWFELD
(Zawichost, Poland --> Philadelphia)


JRI Poland #Poland View Mate Translation Request - Polish Marriage Certificate/Pre-Nuptial Agreement/Legitimization of Birth - in Russian Cyrillic #poland

Teven Laxer
 

I am seeking translation of what appears to be a rather unusual document
which I obtained at the Family History Center while I was in Salt Lake City
for the IAJGS Conference a few weeks ago. I received a very rough
translaton of the document, which appears to be a record of the marriage
between Szmul Luria Mariampolski, 24 years old, born in Lazdijai, son of
Abram Uriasz (used to known as Mariampolski) and Rochla Lewin, and of
Dwora Ochron, 21 years old, born in Suwalki, daughter of Eliasz Abramowicz
(son of Abram) and Gela (daughter of Icek).This document also appears to
contain a pre-nuptial agreement, as well the legitimization of two births
that occurred prior to the marriage: Shayna, born 12/25 Apr 1876 and Uria,
born 10/22 Sep 1877.The document is >from 1879 and is in Russian using the
yrillic alphabet.

It is on ViewMate at the following address:
http://wwwjewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35231

I would appreciate a full translation, if at all possible. Please respond
via the form provided in the ViewMate application. Thank you in advance
for any assistance you can provide.

Regards,
Teven LAXER
Sacramento, CA
teven.laxer@sbcglobal.net

LAXER - Iasi, Romania GERSON - Iasi, Romania KIRSCHNER - Biskupice
Radlowski, Poland GLUCKMAN - Ukraine and Romania HERTZ - Coesfeld,
Germany HIDESHEIMER Germany GELLER - Kalush, Ukraine SCHEINDLINGER
Poland KARSEBOOM- Netherlands, Germany, Israel


Re: Error in Tu B'Av - Jewish Valentine's Day #general

Ann Rabinowitz
 

I just realized that I had posted a week late about this holiday in my prior message.
Please forgive my error, but enjoy the article in any case.

Thanks,
Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: Error in Tu B'Av - Jewish Valentine's Day #general

Ann Rabinowitz
 

I just realized that I had posted a week late about this holiday in my prior message.
Please forgive my error, but enjoy the article in any case.

Thanks,
Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


Re: preparing for cemetery visit-need help #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Arlene asked about how to prepare for a cemetery visit and I have
replied specifically to her situation.

A few general pointers I would add that other posters did not mention:

1) translate the date of death into the Hebrew calendar as well as the
Hebrew characters. If the stone is not going to be in English it is
very likely the date will not be Aramaic. Also remember that they
could be using a Hebrew name which is very different >from the every day
name you are expecting. So the date may be critical.

2) yes ask for the map at the office and do things like count the rows,
in the >from the path, etc. to try and get a location. Ask if the
office will photocopy the map or let you take a digital picture. Try
and takes notes of names at the end of rows, etc. so you can translate
the map to the plot when you get there. Some but not all plots have
distinct patterns of burial. Some buried women and men in separate
sections. Some buried in date order and in that case they might work
>from the back of the plot towards the front and >from the right side to
the left. Some permitted family groupings within the society. So
spend some time getting a feel for the patterns.

3) if the cemetery office can not help or provide someone to go out to
the plot with you look around and see if the men who say prayers are at
the cemetery. In New York we can often find these men there to help
the families say prayers. For a small gratitude you might be able to
enlist their help to go out the plot and help by reading the Hebrew
stones. Or in some cases there might be a Jewish center nearby ....
Arlene is specifically looking at Washington Cemetery in Brooklyn where
there is a big community around the cemetery...or you might even be
able to find a lister to meet you at the cemetery and help with the
Hebrew.

4) when all else fails try and photograph the whole society plot ....
hopefully your family will be in there and then you can donate the
information to JOWBR as well. Digital cameras and smart phone camera
make it easy. If you are having problems reading the stones take close
ups of the writing. You may even need to do a montage to capture parts
of it and then piece it together later.

5) call the office and try to work with them in advance. Tell them
your family has already been there and you are having problems finding
the graves. Someone suggested asking about making an appointment.
Also ask them if they can look in advance and see if they have the plot
map for that area. Most times the office will be cooperative with you.
A while back I was visiting a cemetery and doing visits for people on
the list. I mapped out everything in advance and visited the office
but when I got into the cemetery there were two graves I simply could
not find. It is most probably sacrilegious but I called the office and
said this where I am and they guided me on the phone to the grave. The
second one I could not find. I went back to the office and they dug
through the files and gout out a second map to give me more directions
and one of the caretakers actually met me out in the cemetery and we
both walked around and finally found it.

6) Alot enough time. The office may be busy. The cemetery may be
large. It may take several efforts/visits to the office during the
trip to find the grave so don't go just before closing time and you do
not want to be watching you watch because you have another appointment.
Don't be afraid to go back to the office and say you can not find it.
Most of them will be cooperative to help you when you are there.

7) You may want to take some "supplies." By that I mean a soft paint
brush or such to brush away dirt or grime on the stones. Maybe some
garden gloves. Maybe even a small hand trimmer because the stone might
be grown over. Don't go in your best clothes because you might have to
be climbing over or around overgrowth or whatever. (I am not going to
take a stance on things like charcoal, paper, etc. I have had a lot of
luck taking high resolution digital images and then manipulating them
on the computer to increase contrast, etc. to create a digital
"rubbing" of the stone to pull out hard to read text. If you are
planning on photographing a lot plot someone long ago suggested taking
golf tees and using them to mark the stones are you photograph them.
If the plot is not symmetrical it might be a big help to know what you
have done. I guess you need to collect them at the end and also take
some time to review the pictures on your camera before you leave or
even after every few shots. Nothing worse than to get home and find
the camera was not working, you had sun glare, the pictured blurred,
etc. The extra time on site can save a lot of heart ache later.

I am sure other people have more great tips as well.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: preparing for cemetery visit-need help #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Arlene asked about how to prepare for a cemetery visit and I have
replied specifically to her situation.

A few general pointers I would add that other posters did not mention:

1) translate the date of death into the Hebrew calendar as well as the
Hebrew characters. If the stone is not going to be in English it is
very likely the date will not be Aramaic. Also remember that they
could be using a Hebrew name which is very different >from the every day
name you are expecting. So the date may be critical.

2) yes ask for the map at the office and do things like count the rows,
in the >from the path, etc. to try and get a location. Ask if the
office will photocopy the map or let you take a digital picture. Try
and takes notes of names at the end of rows, etc. so you can translate
the map to the plot when you get there. Some but not all plots have
distinct patterns of burial. Some buried women and men in separate
sections. Some buried in date order and in that case they might work
>from the back of the plot towards the front and >from the right side to
the left. Some permitted family groupings within the society. So
spend some time getting a feel for the patterns.

3) if the cemetery office can not help or provide someone to go out to
the plot with you look around and see if the men who say prayers are at
the cemetery. In New York we can often find these men there to help
the families say prayers. For a small gratitude you might be able to
enlist their help to go out the plot and help by reading the Hebrew
stones. Or in some cases there might be a Jewish center nearby ....
Arlene is specifically looking at Washington Cemetery in Brooklyn where
there is a big community around the cemetery...or you might even be
able to find a lister to meet you at the cemetery and help with the
Hebrew.

4) when all else fails try and photograph the whole society plot ....
hopefully your family will be in there and then you can donate the
information to JOWBR as well. Digital cameras and smart phone camera
make it easy. If you are having problems reading the stones take close
ups of the writing. You may even need to do a montage to capture parts
of it and then piece it together later.

5) call the office and try to work with them in advance. Tell them
your family has already been there and you are having problems finding
the graves. Someone suggested asking about making an appointment.
Also ask them if they can look in advance and see if they have the plot
map for that area. Most times the office will be cooperative with you.
A while back I was visiting a cemetery and doing visits for people on
the list. I mapped out everything in advance and visited the office
but when I got into the cemetery there were two graves I simply could
not find. It is most probably sacrilegious but I called the office and
said this where I am and they guided me on the phone to the grave. The
second one I could not find. I went back to the office and they dug
through the files and gout out a second map to give me more directions
and one of the caretakers actually met me out in the cemetery and we
both walked around and finally found it.

6) Alot enough time. The office may be busy. The cemetery may be
large. It may take several efforts/visits to the office during the
trip to find the grave so don't go just before closing time and you do
not want to be watching you watch because you have another appointment.
Don't be afraid to go back to the office and say you can not find it.
Most of them will be cooperative to help you when you are there.

7) You may want to take some "supplies." By that I mean a soft paint
brush or such to brush away dirt or grime on the stones. Maybe some
garden gloves. Maybe even a small hand trimmer because the stone might
be grown over. Don't go in your best clothes because you might have to
be climbing over or around overgrowth or whatever. (I am not going to
take a stance on things like charcoal, paper, etc. I have had a lot of
luck taking high resolution digital images and then manipulating them
on the computer to increase contrast, etc. to create a digital
"rubbing" of the stone to pull out hard to read text. If you are
planning on photographing a lot plot someone long ago suggested taking
golf tees and using them to mark the stones are you photograph them.
If the plot is not symmetrical it might be a big help to know what you
have done. I guess you need to collect them at the end and also take
some time to review the pictures on your camera before you leave or
even after every few shots. Nothing worse than to get home and find
the camera was not working, you had sun glare, the pictured blurred,
etc. The extra time on site can save a lot of heart ache later.

I am sure other people have more great tips as well.

Allan Jordan


Rabbi from Chechelnik #ukraine

Greg Kay <gregorykay@...>
 

My great grandfather x3 was the Rabbi of Chechelnik. I am trying to do
research into him and that side of the family. His name was Joseph
Dayan Gallant He was the Rabbi in the late 1800s
early 1900s.

If anyone has any information about him, please let me know.

Gregory Kay,
Toronto, Canada


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Rabbi from Chechelnik #ukraine

Greg Kay <gregorykay@...>
 

My great grandfather x3 was the Rabbi of Chechelnik. I am trying to do
research into him and that side of the family. His name was Joseph
Dayan Gallant He was the Rabbi in the late 1800s
early 1900s.

If anyone has any information about him, please let me know.

Gregory Kay,
Toronto, Canada


ViewMate Translation Request - posting #ukraine

Dr. Rob Shumaker <rgsphd@...>
 

Subject: ViewMate translation request - Russian

I would greatly appreciate a full translation of the Russian text on (what I
was told is) a Russian passport. It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35228

Please respond using the online ViewMate form.

Thanks very much in advance for any assistance.

Dr. Rob Shumaker
#6617


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine ViewMate Translation Request - posting #ukraine

Dr. Rob Shumaker <rgsphd@...>
 

Subject: ViewMate translation request - Russian

I would greatly appreciate a full translation of the Russian text on (what I
was told is) a Russian passport. It is on ViewMate at the following address:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM35228

Please respond using the online ViewMate form.

Thanks very much in advance for any assistance.

Dr. Rob Shumaker
#6617


Mogilev and Paltava #ukraine

June Genis
 

I recently posted a message here asking for help in identifying the
Mogilev my family reports on the 1910 US census as where they came
from. The spelling on the census record is "Mogilov". I also found a
ship arrival manifest that appears to show my grandmother, identified
there as "Rivke Okum" arriving with their first two children from
"Paltawa" on her way to meet her husband "Salomon", who I knew as
Simon, in St.Albans, VT where I know their third child, Enta (later
called some variant of Ann) was born.

I soon learned that there are multiple possibilities for Poltava as
well as Mogilev.

With the help of several other researchers) I have zeroed in on the
following places as the origins of my grandparents. These appear to be
the closest places to each other (about 50 miles) whose names seem to
fit. Around the turn of the century traveling further by horse or
foot would have been an extremely difficult journey. The towns are:

Poltava, Poltavs'ka oblast, Ukraine
Mohyliv, Dnipropetrovsk Oblast, Ukraine

The fact that Poltava is spelled with a W on the Manifest would also
seem to suggest that at least Rebecca was of Polish or German
heritage. Another record attributed to Simon also says "Poltawa". Or
perhaps it was always spelled that way before WW I.

By the 1910 census all of the original family had Americanized their
names to Rebecca, Simon, Ida and Rose although Enta did not appear as
"Annie" until the 1920 census. The other children born after Enta were
listed in 1910 as Abraham and Gussie (who later became Augusta), Ida
and Rose also changed their names to Rae and Billie. I think all the
later name changes started because when Simon married Minnie Mazelow
after Rebecca's death it brought another child into the family who was
also named Ida. I've never been able to find any entry records for
Minnie or her daughters (Ida and Lottie) both of whom took the name
Okun. The only record I can find on any "Mazelow" is Minnie's
marriage to Simon.

Comments? Suggestions for further research?

June Genis
Livingston, TX (but temporarily in Aguanga, CA)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Mogilev and Paltava #ukraine

June Genis
 

I recently posted a message here asking for help in identifying the
Mogilev my family reports on the 1910 US census as where they came
from. The spelling on the census record is "Mogilov". I also found a
ship arrival manifest that appears to show my grandmother, identified
there as "Rivke Okum" arriving with their first two children from
"Paltawa" on her way to meet her husband "Salomon", who I knew as
Simon, in St.Albans, VT where I know their third child, Enta (later
called some variant of Ann) was born.

I soon learned that there are multiple possibilities for Poltava as
well as Mogilev.

With the help of several other researchers) I have zeroed in on the
following places as the origins of my grandparents. These appear to be
the closest places to each other (about 50 miles) whose names seem to
fit. Around the turn of the century traveling further by horse or
foot would have been an extremely difficult journey. The towns are:

Poltava, Poltavs'ka oblast, Ukraine
Mohyliv, Dnipropetrovsk Oblast, Ukraine

The fact that Poltava is spelled with a W on the Manifest would also
seem to suggest that at least Rebecca was of Polish or German
heritage. Another record attributed to Simon also says "Poltawa". Or
perhaps it was always spelled that way before WW I.

By the 1910 census all of the original family had Americanized their
names to Rebecca, Simon, Ida and Rose although Enta did not appear as
"Annie" until the 1920 census. The other children born after Enta were
listed in 1910 as Abraham and Gussie (who later became Augusta), Ida
and Rose also changed their names to Rae and Billie. I think all the
later name changes started because when Simon married Minnie Mazelow
after Rebecca's death it brought another child into the family who was
also named Ida. I've never been able to find any entry records for
Minnie or her daughters (Ida and Lottie) both of whom took the name
Okun. The only record I can find on any "Mazelow" is Minnie's
marriage to Simon.

Comments? Suggestions for further research?

June Genis
Livingston, TX (but temporarily in Aguanga, CA)


Viewmate translation request - Russian #ukraine

genealogykid20@...
 

I've=20posted=20several=20vital=20records=20in=20Russian=20for=20which=20I=20nee=
d=20=0D=0Atranslations.=20They=20are=20on=20ViewMate=20at=20the=20following=20ad=
dresses:=0D=0A=0D=0Ahttp://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM3=
5247=0D=0Ahttp://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM35248=0D=0A=
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM35249=0D=0Ahttp://www=
.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM35250=0D=0Ahttp://www.jewishgen=
.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM35251=0D=0A=0D=0AMy=20great-grandma=20was=
=20Sara=20Golomb=20and=20these=20are=20her=20relatives=20in=20these=20=0D=0Adocu=
ments.=20I=20am=20trying=20to=20find=20out=20if=20any=20of=20the=20people=20list=
ed=20are=20her=20=0D=0Asiblings.=20Please=20respond=20via=20the=20form=20provide=
d=20in=20the=20ViewMate=20=0D=0Aapplication.=0D=0A=0D=0AThank=20you,=0D=0AAaron=20=
Biterman=0D=0AWashington=20DC=0D=0A=0D=0A


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Viewmate translation request - Russian #ukraine

genealogykid20@...
 

I've=20posted=20several=20vital=20records=20in=20Russian=20for=20which=20I=20nee=
d=20=0D=0Atranslations.=20They=20are=20on=20ViewMate=20at=20the=20following=20ad=
dresses:=0D=0A=0D=0Ahttp://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM3=
5247=0D=0Ahttp://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM35248=0D=0A=
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM35249=0D=0Ahttp://www=
.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM35250=0D=0Ahttp://www.jewishgen=
.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM35251=0D=0A=0D=0AMy=20great-grandma=20was=
=20Sara=20Golomb=20and=20these=20are=20her=20relatives=20in=20these=20=0D=0Adocu=
ments.=20I=20am=20trying=20to=20find=20out=20if=20any=20of=20the=20people=20list=
ed=20are=20her=20=0D=0Asiblings.=20Please=20respond=20via=20the=20form=20provide=
d=20in=20the=20ViewMate=20=0D=0Aapplication.=0D=0A=0D=0AThank=20you,=0D=0AAaron=20=
Biterman=0D=0AWashington=20DC=0D=0A=0D=0A


Minutes of GerSIG meeting at IAJGS conference #germany

Barbara Algaze
 

I am so sorry that I was unable to attend the recent IAJGS conference in
Salt Lake City. Especially the GerSIG meeting as I like to keep abreast of
what is happening. Is there any way that someone could post a copy of the
minutes of our meeting so that the rest of us are informed of what was discussed?

With many thanks,

Barbara Algaze, Los Angeles, California Algaze3@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany Minutes of GerSIG meeting at IAJGS conference #germany

Barbara Algaze
 

I am so sorry that I was unable to attend the recent IAJGS conference in
Salt Lake City. Especially the GerSIG meeting as I like to keep abreast of
what is happening. Is there any way that someone could post a copy of the
minutes of our meeting so that the rest of us are informed of what was discussed?

With many thanks,

Barbara Algaze, Los Angeles, California Algaze3@gmail.com


INTRO - researching PINO family from Neviges, Kreis Mettmann, Nordheim-Westfalen & Finow, Brandenburg, Prussia #germany

avpino@...
 

Hello GerSig,

I just joined the group a few weeks ago and have been reading extensively
on the site. I have been doing genealogy research for two years or so.
I consider myself to be a beginner in doing German Jewish Genealogy research.
My JGFF Researcher ID number is 644153.

I live in Fort Worth, Texas. My native language is English and I also
know about a year’s worth of both Spanish and German. I consider myself
intermediate in using a computer. My experience in using the Internet
is intermediate.

I have identified the name and birth and death dates of my fourth great
grandparents, Sander Samuel PINO, and Roosje DAVID. Sander SAMUEL registered
this surname PINO in 1812 in Tiel, Gelderland, Netherlands.
I know that they emigrated there >from Neviges, Kreis Mettmann, Nordheim-
Westfalen.
My primary research goals now are to find out where he came >from before
this, and to trace his ancestry. It is thought that he came to Neviges
from Finow, Brandenburg, Prussia.
I have entered the surname PINO and the towns of Neviges, Finow, and
even Pinnow in the JGFF with no results, which does not surprise me as
he did not register the name PINO until he was in the Netherlands.
Perhaps his father in Prussia did not register this surname, but some
other (or never registered one)?

It is believed that the family was Sephardic in origin, but became
Ashkenazi (DNA testing has placed us in such a haplogroup). PINO
in Spanish means pine. However, it has also been speculated that
the name came >from Finow, as apparently in Hebrew the ??f ?? and the
??p ?? are interchangeable, and the ??w ?? would be silent??

Also, I believe the ??w ?? would be silent in this case in the German
pronunciation?
Looking it up on the German Wikipedia this morning (following a suggestion
I saw here), what comes up is an article about the Finow river. I see
that there is also a Finowfurt, and a Finow canal. The closest place
that is bigger is Eberswalde. This is also quite close to Berlin.
Has anyone on here researched this area?

Where would be the best place to look for records?

What type of records should I look for? A distant cousin who
is in England is trying to research who the rabbis where at that time
in these various places, but we are finding it very difficult to learn
anything about the records rabbis may have kept. Any help anyone can
give would be much appreciated!

Aaron Pino avpino@swbell.net Fort Worth, Texas

Moderator Note: letters and puctuation marks & accents that aren't in the
Standard USA English language are often garbled in this list system. If you
wish to write Hebrew letters, you must spell them out - aleph gimmel etc.


German SIG #Germany INTRO - researching PINO family from Neviges, Kreis Mettmann, Nordheim-Westfalen & Finow, Brandenburg, Prussia #germany

avpino@...
 

Hello GerSig,

I just joined the group a few weeks ago and have been reading extensively
on the site. I have been doing genealogy research for two years or so.
I consider myself to be a beginner in doing German Jewish Genealogy research.
My JGFF Researcher ID number is 644153.

I live in Fort Worth, Texas. My native language is English and I also
know about a year’s worth of both Spanish and German. I consider myself
intermediate in using a computer. My experience in using the Internet
is intermediate.

I have identified the name and birth and death dates of my fourth great
grandparents, Sander Samuel PINO, and Roosje DAVID. Sander SAMUEL registered
this surname PINO in 1812 in Tiel, Gelderland, Netherlands.
I know that they emigrated there >from Neviges, Kreis Mettmann, Nordheim-
Westfalen.
My primary research goals now are to find out where he came >from before
this, and to trace his ancestry. It is thought that he came to Neviges
from Finow, Brandenburg, Prussia.
I have entered the surname PINO and the towns of Neviges, Finow, and
even Pinnow in the JGFF with no results, which does not surprise me as
he did not register the name PINO until he was in the Netherlands.
Perhaps his father in Prussia did not register this surname, but some
other (or never registered one)?

It is believed that the family was Sephardic in origin, but became
Ashkenazi (DNA testing has placed us in such a haplogroup). PINO
in Spanish means pine. However, it has also been speculated that
the name came >from Finow, as apparently in Hebrew the ??f ?? and the
??p ?? are interchangeable, and the ??w ?? would be silent??

Also, I believe the ??w ?? would be silent in this case in the German
pronunciation?
Looking it up on the German Wikipedia this morning (following a suggestion
I saw here), what comes up is an article about the Finow river. I see
that there is also a Finowfurt, and a Finow canal. The closest place
that is bigger is Eberswalde. This is also quite close to Berlin.
Has anyone on here researched this area?

Where would be the best place to look for records?

What type of records should I look for? A distant cousin who
is in England is trying to research who the rabbis where at that time
in these various places, but we are finding it very difficult to learn
anything about the records rabbis may have kept. Any help anyone can
give would be much appreciated!

Aaron Pino avpino@swbell.net Fort Worth, Texas

Moderator Note: letters and puctuation marks & accents that aren't in the
Standard USA English language are often garbled in this list system. If you
wish to write Hebrew letters, you must spell them out - aleph gimmel etc.

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