Date   

"No Place on Earth" - The History Channel - Saturday, April 26th - A Holocaust survival story #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

The documentary film, "No Place on Earth," which tells the true story
of 38 Jews >from the area of Borschiv (formerly Galicia and Poland,
today Ukraine) who hid in caves for 511 days to escape the Nazis
during WWII, will air on the History Channel (in the U.S.) on Saturday,
April 26th at 6:00PM ET/PT.

More info here:

http://tinyurl.com/noplaceonearth
[MODERATOR NOTE: Original URL http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwtv/article/History-to-Debut-Gripping-Documentary-NO-PLACE-ON-EARTH-426-20140402#.U1vwPFV86iO ]

The remarkable true story of "No Place on Earth" starts out as a
mystery. While exploring some of the longest caves in the world in
southwestern Ukraine in the 1990s, American caver Chris Nicola
stumbled onto unusual objects...an antique ladies shoe and comb, old
buttons, an old world key. Was the vague rumor true, that some Jews
had hid in this cave during WWII and if so, had any survived to tell
their tale? Chris used the resources of JewishGen to assist him in
discovering the identities of the cave dwellers. Sixty seven years
later, Chris leads four of the survivors back to Ukraine to say thank
you to "the cave."

Chris has spoken at JGS programs and the IAJGS conference about this
remarkable story (also in book form "The Secret of Priests Grotto")
and the film is well worth seeing. Although it has screened around
the country and at film festivals, I think this is the first
television airing.

The film's website is here:

http://www.noplaceonearthfilm.com

Note that Jeff Field, the son of JewishGen's former research VP, Joyce
Field, is one of the film's executive producers.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...


JewishGen Success! Stories #rabbinic

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read the inspiring stories in the
latest issue of JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine.

You can access these stories >from the "About Us" button
on the JewishGen website, or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Judy Simon connects with previously unknown cousins
through the JewishGen Family Finder, and learns that she
is related to the prominent sculptor, Simon Moselsio.

Marla Raucher Osborn was curious about her grandmother's
aunt, Jete Horn. Her research takes surprising twists
and turns -- and eventually leads her to Israel.

Barbara Lichtman Tayar recently learned her Latvian
great-grandmother's surname was Hummel -- a name she
hadn't heard before.
Through the JewishGen Family Finder, Barbara connects
with cousins >from the around the world.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers --
Nancy Siegel, Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster.
We think you will be moved by these stories, and we
encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at: < success@... >.

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen "No Place on Earth" - The History Channel - Saturday, April 26th - A Holocaust survival story #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

The documentary film, "No Place on Earth," which tells the true story
of 38 Jews >from the area of Borschiv (formerly Galicia and Poland,
today Ukraine) who hid in caves for 511 days to escape the Nazis
during WWII, will air on the History Channel (in the U.S.) on Saturday,
April 26th at 6:00PM ET/PT.

More info here:

http://tinyurl.com/noplaceonearth
[MODERATOR NOTE: Original URL http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwtv/article/History-to-Debut-Gripping-Documentary-NO-PLACE-ON-EARTH-426-20140402#.U1vwPFV86iO ]

The remarkable true story of "No Place on Earth" starts out as a
mystery. While exploring some of the longest caves in the world in
southwestern Ukraine in the 1990s, American caver Chris Nicola
stumbled onto unusual objects...an antique ladies shoe and comb, old
buttons, an old world key. Was the vague rumor true, that some Jews
had hid in this cave during WWII and if so, had any survived to tell
their tale? Chris used the resources of JewishGen to assist him in
discovering the identities of the cave dwellers. Sixty seven years
later, Chris leads four of the survivors back to Ukraine to say thank
you to "the cave."

Chris has spoken at JGS programs and the IAJGS conference about this
remarkable story (also in book form "The Secret of Priests Grotto")
and the film is well worth seeing. Although it has screened around
the country and at film festivals, I think this is the first
television airing.

The film's website is here:

http://www.noplaceonearthfilm.com

Note that Jeff Field, the son of JewishGen's former research VP, Joyce
Field, is one of the film's executive producers.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@...


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic JewishGen Success! Stories #rabbinic

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read the inspiring stories in the
latest issue of JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine.

You can access these stories >from the "About Us" button
on the JewishGen website, or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Judy Simon connects with previously unknown cousins
through the JewishGen Family Finder, and learns that she
is related to the prominent sculptor, Simon Moselsio.

Marla Raucher Osborn was curious about her grandmother's
aunt, Jete Horn. Her research takes surprising twists
and turns -- and eventually leads her to Israel.

Barbara Lichtman Tayar recently learned her Latvian
great-grandmother's surname was Hummel -- a name she
hadn't heard before.
Through the JewishGen Family Finder, Barbara connects
with cousins >from the around the world.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers --
Nancy Siegel, Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster.
We think you will be moved by these stories, and we
encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at: < success@... >.

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


Re: Elisabeth as a Hebrew name #germany

Tobias A. Kemper <kemper@...>
 

Barbara Algaze asks:

I always thought that Elizabeth was a Christian name. Is it really a Hebrew
name? Does anyone know if it appears anywhere in the Bible, or is it a
"common" Hebrew name?
It is Elischeva in Hebrew. Of course Elisabeth was a popular Christian
name (Elisabeth, mother of St. John Baptist; St. Elisabeth von
Thueringen). But Elisabeth, mother of St. John Baptist,
was Jewish of course.

Tobias Kemper, Alfter, Germany kemper@...


BOCHNER Family from Galicia #galicia

Linda Shefler
 

I just discovered that there is a good chance my ggg grandmother was
Sara BOCHNER, but I'm not 100% sure. Here is where the confusion
arises: My ggg grandfather Leib REICHER was born about 1838, possibly
in either Pilzno or Tarnow. I just learned that he was married to Sarah
BOCHNER. My gg grandmother, Rosa REICHER (daughter of Leib and a
woman named Sara) was 20 years older than her next sibling (Samuel
REICHER) that I've been able to find, and 29 years older than the
youngest sibling (Fani REICHER). While they can be full siblings, I'm not
sure if they are, mainly because of the huge age difference and because
the daughter of the youngest sibling never knew that her mother had a
sister, just a brother. All of them lived in Cleveland, Ohio.

Samuel immigrated in 1904. He came over with my gg grandparents (on
one of their frequent trips back and forth to Europe) and was listed as
the brother-in-law of my gg grandfather. Fani immigrated 2 years later.
She lived with family friends by the name of BLACHMAN, in Cleveland,
until she married. On his marriage license, Samuel indicated his mother's
name was Sara BACHMAN. Fani indicated that her mother's name was
Sara BOCHNER. I can't find a record for my gg grandmother which
indicates her mother's maiden name, just that her name was Sara.

In 1938 David BOCHNER and his family immigrated to the US; David was
born in Jodlowa (near both Pilzno and Tarnow). His wife Dora was >from
Tarnow and their children were born in Berlin. Samuel and Fani
sponsored them and the manifest indicated they were cousins. They
spent a few years in Cleveland and then moved to Saratoga Springs
where they managed the New Windsor Hotel.

I've contacted everyone in JGFF who might be connected to the BOCHNER
family, but so far I've only had one response with no known connection.
I've been through the JRI Poland records but can't seem to find the
appropriate family. Is anyone familiar with the family of David BOCHNER
(born about 1890), or Sara (nee BOCHNER) REICHER (born about 1840)?
I would love to learn more about this family and piece it all together. I
would also like to confirm one way or the other if my gg grandmother
Rosa was a full or half sibling to Samuel and Fani.

As always, many thanks for your time!
Linda Silverman Shefler
San Francisco East Bay
linda.shefler@...


German SIG #Germany Re: Elisabeth as a Hebrew name #germany

Tobias A. Kemper <kemper@...>
 

Barbara Algaze asks:

I always thought that Elizabeth was a Christian name. Is it really a Hebrew
name? Does anyone know if it appears anywhere in the Bible, or is it a
"common" Hebrew name?
It is Elischeva in Hebrew. Of course Elisabeth was a popular Christian
name (Elisabeth, mother of St. John Baptist; St. Elisabeth von
Thueringen). But Elisabeth, mother of St. John Baptist,
was Jewish of course.

Tobias Kemper, Alfter, Germany kemper@...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia BOCHNER Family from Galicia #galicia

Linda Shefler
 

I just discovered that there is a good chance my ggg grandmother was
Sara BOCHNER, but I'm not 100% sure. Here is where the confusion
arises: My ggg grandfather Leib REICHER was born about 1838, possibly
in either Pilzno or Tarnow. I just learned that he was married to Sarah
BOCHNER. My gg grandmother, Rosa REICHER (daughter of Leib and a
woman named Sara) was 20 years older than her next sibling (Samuel
REICHER) that I've been able to find, and 29 years older than the
youngest sibling (Fani REICHER). While they can be full siblings, I'm not
sure if they are, mainly because of the huge age difference and because
the daughter of the youngest sibling never knew that her mother had a
sister, just a brother. All of them lived in Cleveland, Ohio.

Samuel immigrated in 1904. He came over with my gg grandparents (on
one of their frequent trips back and forth to Europe) and was listed as
the brother-in-law of my gg grandfather. Fani immigrated 2 years later.
She lived with family friends by the name of BLACHMAN, in Cleveland,
until she married. On his marriage license, Samuel indicated his mother's
name was Sara BACHMAN. Fani indicated that her mother's name was
Sara BOCHNER. I can't find a record for my gg grandmother which
indicates her mother's maiden name, just that her name was Sara.

In 1938 David BOCHNER and his family immigrated to the US; David was
born in Jodlowa (near both Pilzno and Tarnow). His wife Dora was >from
Tarnow and their children were born in Berlin. Samuel and Fani
sponsored them and the manifest indicated they were cousins. They
spent a few years in Cleveland and then moved to Saratoga Springs
where they managed the New Windsor Hotel.

I've contacted everyone in JGFF who might be connected to the BOCHNER
family, but so far I've only had one response with no known connection.
I've been through the JRI Poland records but can't seem to find the
appropriate family. Is anyone familiar with the family of David BOCHNER
(born about 1890), or Sara (nee BOCHNER) REICHER (born about 1840)?
I would love to learn more about this family and piece it all together. I
would also like to confirm one way or the other if my gg grandmother
Rosa was a full or half sibling to Samuel and Fani.

As always, many thanks for your time!
Linda Silverman Shefler
San Francisco East Bay
linda.shefler@...


Re: Elisabeth as a Hebrew name #germany

Roger Lustig
 

"Elizabeth" is a Greek form of Elisheva, who was the wife of Aaron and
the mother of Eleazar. She is mentioned only once: Exodus 6:23.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 4/26/2014 Barbara Algaze Algaze3@... wrote:
I found Gerhard Buck's posting interesting in that he wrote:
" ..the French Lisette, which is derived >from Hebrew Elisabeth...
I always thought that Elizabeth was a Christian name. Is it really a
Hebrew name? Does anyone know if it appears anywhere in the Bible...?"


German SIG #Germany Re: Elisabeth as a Hebrew name #germany

Roger Lustig
 

"Elizabeth" is a Greek form of Elisheva, who was the wife of Aaron and
the mother of Eleazar. She is mentioned only once: Exodus 6:23.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

On 4/26/2014 Barbara Algaze Algaze3@... wrote:
I found Gerhard Buck's posting interesting in that he wrote:
" ..the French Lisette, which is derived >from Hebrew Elisabeth...
I always thought that Elizabeth was a Christian name. Is it really a
Hebrew name? Does anyone know if it appears anywhere in the Bible...?"


JewishGen Success! Stories #dna

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read the inspiring stories in the
latest issue of JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine.

You can access these stories >from the "About Us" button
on the JewishGen website, or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Judy Simon connects with previously unknown cousins
through the JewishGen Family Finder, and learns that she
is related to the prominent sculptor, Simon Moselsio.

Marla Raucher Osborn was curious about her grandmother's
aunt, Jete Horn. Her research takes surprising twists
and turns -- and eventually leads her to Israel.

Barbara Lichtman Tayar recently learned her Latvian
great-grandmother's surname was Hummel -- a name she
hadn't heard before.
Through the JewishGen Family Finder, Barbara connects
with cousins >from the around the world.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers --
Nancy Siegel, Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster.
We think you will be moved by these stories, and we
encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at: < success@... >.

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


DNA Research #DNA JewishGen Success! Stories #dna

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read the inspiring stories in the
latest issue of JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine.

You can access these stories >from the "About Us" button
on the JewishGen website, or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Judy Simon connects with previously unknown cousins
through the JewishGen Family Finder, and learns that she
is related to the prominent sculptor, Simon Moselsio.

Marla Raucher Osborn was curious about her grandmother's
aunt, Jete Horn. Her research takes surprising twists
and turns -- and eventually leads her to Israel.

Barbara Lichtman Tayar recently learned her Latvian
great-grandmother's surname was Hummel -- a name she
hadn't heard before.
Through the JewishGen Family Finder, Barbara connects
with cousins >from the around the world.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers --
Nancy Siegel, Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster.
We think you will be moved by these stories, and we
encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at: < success@... >.

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


Lodz Ghetto Postcard on Sale at Auction Site #lodz #poland

Fritz Neubauer
 

Dear all,

On ebay Germany a postcard written on 04-Dec-1941 by Dr. Arthur Weise
from Prague >from the Lodz Ghetto to an address in Prague with a full
message in German (inquiry about family, asking for money) on the back
is on sale for another 9 days. At this point in time the auction stands
at 5 Euros (after starting at 1).
The sender died in the ghetto on 14-Oct-1942.

This kind of document should be in a museum collection rather than on a
commercial site ...

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany


JewishGen Success! Stories #sephardic

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read the inspiring stories in the
latest issue of JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine.

You can access these stories >from the "About Us" button
on the JewishGen website, or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Judy Simon connects with previously unknown cousins
through the JewishGen Family Finder, and learns that she
is related to the prominent sculptor, Simon Moselsio.

Marla Raucher Osborn was curious about her grandmother's
aunt, Jete Horn. Her research takes surprising twists
and turns -- and eventually leads her to Israel.

Barbara Lichtman Tayar recently learned her Latvian
great-grandmother's surname was Hummel -- a name she
hadn't heard before.
Through the JewishGen Family Finder, Barbara connects
with cousins >from the around the world.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers --
Nancy Siegel, Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster.
We think you will be moved by these stories, and we
encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at: < success@... >.

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland Lodz Ghetto Postcard on Sale at Auction Site #lodz #poland

Fritz Neubauer
 

Dear all,

On ebay Germany a postcard written on 04-Dec-1941 by Dr. Arthur Weise
from Prague >from the Lodz Ghetto to an address in Prague with a full
message in German (inquiry about family, asking for money) on the back
is on sale for another 9 days. At this point in time the auction stands
at 5 Euros (after starting at 1).
The sender died in the ghetto on 14-Oct-1942.

This kind of document should be in a museum collection rather than on a
commercial site ...

Fritz Neubauer, North Germany


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim JewishGen Success! Stories #sephardic

Phyllis Kramer
 

We invite you to read the inspiring stories in the
latest issue of JewishGen's SUCCESS! STORIES webzine.

You can access these stories >from the "About Us" button
on the JewishGen website, or by following this link:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/Testimonials/

Judy Simon connects with previously unknown cousins
through the JewishGen Family Finder, and learns that she
is related to the prominent sculptor, Simon Moselsio.

Marla Raucher Osborn was curious about her grandmother's
aunt, Jete Horn. Her research takes surprising twists
and turns -- and eventually leads her to Israel.

Barbara Lichtman Tayar recently learned her Latvian
great-grandmother's surname was Hummel -- a name she
hadn't heard before.
Through the JewishGen Family Finder, Barbara connects
with cousins >from the around the world.

This issue was prepared by JewishGen volunteers --
Nancy Siegel, Editor and Anna Blanchard, Webmaster.
We think you will be moved by these stories, and we
encourage you to submit your own success stories
to us at: < success@... >.

Phyllis Kramer, NYC & PBG, Florida
VP, Education & Special Projects, JewishGen, Inc.


Internal Passport Records Added to the Database #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

3,534 additional Internal Passport records have been added to the
LitvakSIG All Lithuania Database (ALD) and the Jewishgen Lithuania
Database. These records, and many more, are also available on
the appropriate Litvak SIG District Research Group web site.

These internal passports were applied for in the following towns in
Lithuania - Panevezys, Klaipeda, Palanga, Velvirzeniai, Kartena,
Darbeniai, Andriejavas, Kuliai, Nosedis, and Plateliai.

Even if you are not interested in any of these towns, you should search
the database anyway because the records include the place of birth
which could be entirely different >from the town where the applicant
obtained their internal passport. In addition to doing a surname search,
I suggest you also do a town search if the town of your interest is a
small one. Doing a town search for Vilnius or Kaunas, as an example,
will not bring any results as it would provide a large response that
cannot be transmitted.

The internal passport records cover the period, 1919-1940. However,
do not be misled by those dates if your family left there prior to
1919. Your immediate family may have left but everyone did not leave.
Siblings, uncles, aunts, cousins, etc. remained.

Howard Margol
Founder - Coordinator - Internal Passport Project


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Internal Passport Records Added to the Database #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

3,534 additional Internal Passport records have been added to the
LitvakSIG All Lithuania Database (ALD) and the Jewishgen Lithuania
Database. These records, and many more, are also available on
the appropriate Litvak SIG District Research Group web site.

These internal passports were applied for in the following towns in
Lithuania - Panevezys, Klaipeda, Palanga, Velvirzeniai, Kartena,
Darbeniai, Andriejavas, Kuliai, Nosedis, and Plateliai.

Even if you are not interested in any of these towns, you should search
the database anyway because the records include the place of birth
which could be entirely different >from the town where the applicant
obtained their internal passport. In addition to doing a surname search,
I suggest you also do a town search if the town of your interest is a
small one. Doing a town search for Vilnius or Kaunas, as an example,
will not bring any results as it would provide a large response that
cannot be transmitted.

The internal passport records cover the period, 1919-1940. However,
do not be misled by those dates if your family left there prior to
1919. Your immediate family may have left but everyone did not leave.
Siblings, uncles, aunts, cousins, etc. remained.

Howard Margol
Founder - Coordinator - Internal Passport Project


Elisabeth as a Hebrew name #germany

Barbara Algaze
 

I found Gerhard Buck's posting interesting in that he wrote:

..the French Lisette, which is derived >from Hebrew Elisabeth...
I always thought that Elizabeth was a Christian name. Is it really a Hebrew
name? Does anyone know if it appears anywhere in the Bible, or is it a
"common" Hebrew name?

Barbara Algaze, Los Angeles, California Algaze3@...

Gerhard Buck <buckidstein@...> Wrote:
"... S in German and Z in English) is the abbreviation of the French
Lisette, which is derived >from Hebrew Elisabeth (the same sort of s/z)."


German SIG #Germany Elisabeth as a Hebrew name #germany

Barbara Algaze
 

I found Gerhard Buck's posting interesting in that he wrote:

..the French Lisette, which is derived >from Hebrew Elisabeth...
I always thought that Elizabeth was a Christian name. Is it really a Hebrew
name? Does anyone know if it appears anywhere in the Bible, or is it a
"common" Hebrew name?

Barbara Algaze, Los Angeles, California Algaze3@...

Gerhard Buck <buckidstein@...> Wrote:
"... S in German and Z in English) is the abbreviation of the French
Lisette, which is derived >from Hebrew Elisabeth (the same sort of s/z)."