Date   

Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

Susie Boyer asked me to post this link for everyone. It concerns a
disease that affects her family and she believes that there may be
others with roots in Bohemia who share the gene. See
http://jewishnews.co.uk/jewish-genetic-diseases-sufferers-remain-defiant/

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII #austria-czech

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

Susie Boyer asked me to post this link for everyone. It concerns a
disease that affects her family and she believes that there may be
others with roots in Bohemia who share the gene. See
http://jewishnews.co.uk/jewish-genetic-diseases-sufferers-remain-defiant/

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Medals in Russia #general

Diane DeMilt <dianedemilt@...>
 

I have a friend who said his grandfather received a medal >from Czar
Nicholas directly. Does anyone know anything about this?
Please respond to Deech10@aol.com
Thank you
Diane De Milt
Tucson, Arizona


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Medals in Russia #general

Diane DeMilt <dianedemilt@...>
 

I have a friend who said his grandfather received a medal >from Czar
Nicholas directly. Does anyone know anything about this?
Please respond to Deech10@aol.com
Thank you
Diane De Milt
Tucson, Arizona


origin of the surname Badrian? #general

Helen Gardner
 

Hi all.
One of the kids in our wider family is doing a school project on the
origin of their surname, Badrian, but we have not ever been able to
find anything, although it has been suggested that is a Sephardic
name coming >from Spain. Does anyone have any information on this?
Helen Gardner


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen origin of the surname Badrian? #general

Helen Gardner
 

Hi all.
One of the kids in our wider family is doing a school project on the
origin of their surname, Badrian, but we have not ever been able to
find anything, although it has been suggested that is a Sephardic
name coming >from Spain. Does anyone have any information on this?
Helen Gardner


Seeking birth registration from wartime Russia #general

Apollo Israel <apollo@...>
 

An older relative of mine does not have a birth certificate, and
I am trying to help her obtain one, if possible. She was born in 1943,
in the middle of World War II, in the city of Chelyabinsk, Russia.
Her parents were Polish Jews who had fled to Russia at the beginning of
the war, and were in Chelyabinsk pretty much for the duration of the war.
Does anyone know if orderly records were kept in Russia, and specifically
in Chelyabinsk, at that time? And if so, how does one go about ordering them?

Thanking you in advance,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking birth registration from wartime Russia #general

Apollo Israel <apollo@...>
 

An older relative of mine does not have a birth certificate, and
I am trying to help her obtain one, if possible. She was born in 1943,
in the middle of World War II, in the city of Chelyabinsk, Russia.
Her parents were Polish Jews who had fled to Russia at the beginning of
the war, and were in Chelyabinsk pretty much for the duration of the war.
Does anyone know if orderly records were kept in Russia, and specifically
in Chelyabinsk, at that time? And if so, how does one go about ordering them?

Thanking you in advance,
Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.


Help with tracing the family of Professor Mordecai ELIAV, Israel #general

Joyaa Antares
 

Dear Fellow Genners,

I am trying to track down the family of Mordecai ELIAV, Professor of Jewish
History and would be grateful for your help. He used to work at the Bar
Ilan University in Jerusalem
(http://jewishhistory.huji.ac.il/Profs/Bar-Ilan/biujh.htm#Eliav),
but the phone number there is no longer valid for him, and following
this up led me to a mobile number that is no longer in use.

I do not know whether Mordecai is still alive, but he had four children, and
it is they whom I am trying to make contact with. I am guessing they will
now be in their 60s. Their names are Ruthie, Tirza, Yossi and Michal. I
would very much like to make contact with any of them.

Mordecai's wife was Rachelle nee URISHEVITCH. Rachelle's mother was
Shoshana/Reisel nee ZAUSMER, which is my family connection.

Yours gratefully,

Joyaa ANTARES

Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
___________________________
Researching ZAUSMER, ZOUSMER, ZESMER, CHOUSMER, CHAUSMER, TSOUZMER etc,
MARCUS, DAVIDOFF in Polangen, Kretinga, Darbenai, Libau, Riga, Memel
SCHORR, SCHERZER, JURIS and DAWID in Buckaczowce, Ottynia, Nadworna, and
Kolomyya
ZUNDER in Buckaczowce and Ivano-Frankivsk
KEMPNER in Berlin, Lodz, Warszawa and London
LEVY, BADER in Berlin, Schwerin, Friedeberg
and GERSON, SIDERSKY, FREED, RIMAN in Gumbinnen, Koenigsberg, Danzig,
Berlin, Vilnius, Sirvintos and South Africa


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Help with tracing the family of Professor Mordecai ELIAV, Israel #general

Joyaa Antares
 

Dear Fellow Genners,

I am trying to track down the family of Mordecai ELIAV, Professor of Jewish
History and would be grateful for your help. He used to work at the Bar
Ilan University in Jerusalem
(http://jewishhistory.huji.ac.il/Profs/Bar-Ilan/biujh.htm#Eliav),
but the phone number there is no longer valid for him, and following
this up led me to a mobile number that is no longer in use.

I do not know whether Mordecai is still alive, but he had four children, and
it is they whom I am trying to make contact with. I am guessing they will
now be in their 60s. Their names are Ruthie, Tirza, Yossi and Michal. I
would very much like to make contact with any of them.

Mordecai's wife was Rachelle nee URISHEVITCH. Rachelle's mother was
Shoshana/Reisel nee ZAUSMER, which is my family connection.

Yours gratefully,

Joyaa ANTARES

Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
___________________________
Researching ZAUSMER, ZOUSMER, ZESMER, CHOUSMER, CHAUSMER, TSOUZMER etc,
MARCUS, DAVIDOFF in Polangen, Kretinga, Darbenai, Libau, Riga, Memel
SCHORR, SCHERZER, JURIS and DAWID in Buckaczowce, Ottynia, Nadworna, and
Kolomyya
ZUNDER in Buckaczowce and Ivano-Frankivsk
KEMPNER in Berlin, Lodz, Warszawa and London
LEVY, BADER in Berlin, Schwerin, Friedeberg
and GERSON, SIDERSKY, FREED, RIMAN in Gumbinnen, Koenigsberg, Danzig,
Berlin, Vilnius, Sirvintos and South Africa


tracing family members from Bohemia between 1938 and 1945 #austria-czech

rfc974@...
 

I'm compiling a family history (for the PROPPER family) >from about
1700 until the present. Among other challenges, this means tracing
the lives (and, alas, in many cases, deaths) of over 100 people who in
1938 were living in Bohemia.

The purpose of this note is to list the sources and issues I've found
so far and see if anyone has thoughts/suggestions about sources and
issues I've missed. I figure others may find this helpful. I don't
know how many others have found themselves sitting down at the US
Holocaust Memorial Museum, or simply in front of a web page, with a
list of 100-some names -- I've found it a daunting challenge.

I've found it somewhat helpful to work chronologically.

In 1938, Jews in the Sudetenland were mostly expelled between Oct 10
and Nov 12 (about 1/6th of the Jews in Bohemia). Some young men were
sent to Dachau. Also, some were taken as political prisoners, and, as
best I can tell, were sent to Sachsenhausen. In general, to learn
about people who were sent to camps at this time, the ITS records (at
various repositories) are best. For those who were refugees, most
ended up in Prague, seeking a way to get out of Czechoslovakia. Some
applied for passports, and one can find the applications in the Czech
Archives. If they already had passports, the records are still in the
town >from which they were driven. In general, if someone had a
passport and does not show up at holocaust.cz or in survivor lists,
they probably successfully emigrated and the challenge is to find
where they went.

In 1939, Czechoslovakia is annexed by Germany. People continue to
have some success getting visas until September 1939, so we continue
to see applications for passports. US immigration was tightly
restricted and British Palestine appears to have largely stopped
issuing visas by late spring 1939, so figuring out where people might
have gone gets really difficult. Some people got visas to Britain and
some to Latin America. Jewish resistance groups successfully smuggled
several hundred people to Palestine, where they were typically
arrested and and then either released to the Jewish Authority or
interned (the arrest records can be found at the US Holocaust Museum
and contain considerable genealogical information). Smaller programs
succeeded in getting children to various countries.

After September 1939, emigration stops, and one traces people through
the Holocaust resources. Most victims can be found at holocaust.cz --
though that only traces people to the first camp after Theresienstadt.
For information about experiences after the first camp, the ITS data
can be very helpful.

Jewish political prisoners (e.g. people active in the SDP between the
wars) often are missing >from holocaust.cz (they were sent to
Theresienstadt small fortress, which had separate records, which I
have been unable to locate).

Survivors can be found through various survivor lists (again the ITS
records are useful) and the Theresienstadt survivors association.

I'd be grateful to learn of any omissions or errors.

Many thanks!

Craig


--
Craig Partridge
(non-work account -- for work issues send to craig@aland.bbn.com)


75 Years after his imprisonment in a Nazi fortress, the account of Rabbi Dr. William Weinberg imprisonments and escapes has now been published! #austria-czech

norofra@...
 

Courage of the Spirit is now available on line!

75 Years after his imprisonment in a Nazi fortress, the account of Rabbi Dr.
William Weinberg imprisonments and escapes has now been published!

This book is of value to a variety of researchers and hence, I am
posting this to multiple SIGs- For Galicia, information on family origins in
Galicia; for Austria-Czech, Jewish resettlement in Vienna after WWI and the
roundup of Jews in Czechoslovakia in 1938; for German Jews, a slice of life
in Germany under the Nazis, and for RavSig, the experiences of the man who
would head the Jewish communities of Hesse, Germany.
I have copied below a description of the book >from my publisher. I hope that
if I see enough support, I will be able to complete rest of my research, on
my mother's account and on the rebuilding of Jewish communities in Austria
and Germany after the Shoah.
Many books have been written of the spiritual heroism of the Jewish
people as they rebuilt their lives after the devastation wrought by Hitler's
attempt to wipe out every last Jew, but some books stand out as unique
because they are written by family members who were told those stories of
heroism firsthand. Courage of the Spirit (paperback ISBN 978-0-9846685-6-4;
ebook ISBN 978-0-9887048-9-3) is such a book. It portrays the spiritual
struggle of one man during the first half of the twentieth century-the
author's father, Rabbi Dr. William Weinberg, who survived under Nazi and
Communist tyranny to become the first State Rabbi of the community of
Holocaust survivors in the German State of Hesse.
It is fitting that the book is now available to the public just 75
years after Rabbi Weinberg was arrested and incarcerated by the Nazis in the
notorious Fortress Spilberk in Brno following the German occupation of
Czechoslovakia in 1939.
Rabbi Weinberg's saga serves as a tour of the ideologies and principles of
the contemporary world, but it also encompasses the movements that shape
Judaism today: Orthodox, Reform, and Conservative, as well as political
Zionism. It is a story that spans thousands of physical miles, by freight
train and on foot, >from the Galician Shtetl to cosmopolitan Vienna and
Berlin, and to Stalingrad and central Asia and back as Rabbi Weinberg kept
one step ahead of the Nazi armies. It is a story that spans the mental and
emotional journey >from the medieval Shtetl, the great empires, and the weak
democracies and totalitarian regimes that followed, and finally, to freedom.

Along the way, we meet significant figures in Rabbi Weinberg's life:
Martin Buber and Mannes Sperber, the founders of Israel's Marxist-Socialist
party, Rabbi Leo Baeck, and Albert Einstein. We are shown a window into life
in a Nazi prison and concentration camp, the day-to-day life of Jews in Nazi
Berlin, and the vagaries of survival under Stalin's totalitarian shelter.
"This book reconstructs these events >from conversations with my
father, >from family notes, and >from historical documentation," says the
author, Rabbi Norbert Weinberg.
Courage of the Spirit is the first part of a trilogy. The second part will
follow the account of Irene Gottdenker, the author's mother, who openly
survived the Holocaust in the guise of a Pole of German descent and
witnessed the destruction of the Jews in Lwow and Warsaw. The third part
will examine the rebirth of Jewish life in the refugee camps in Austria and
then in the city of Frankfurt, Germany, and the environs.
Courage of the Spirit is now available through Create Space, Amazon,
Google Play, Kobo, Nook and Apple. The author's page can be accessed at
www.amazon.com/author/nweinberg

Todah rabbah in advcance,
Rabbi Dr. Norbert Weinberg
email: norofra@sbcglobal.net

The Courage of the Spirit:The story of Europe's Jewry in the 20 th Century
from family accounts and documents
www.courageofspirit.com

Essays on Judaism
www.vintagewein.blogspot.com

Reasearching Family Records of WEINBERG( Dolyna/Ukraine,
Vienna/Austria,Frankfurt AM, Germany),ZARWANITZER ( Dolyna/Ukraine),IGER(
Lviv, Podwolochisk/Ukraine)GOTTDENKER ( Dolyna,Lviv, Bolekhiv/Ukraine).


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech tracing family members from Bohemia between 1938 and 1945 #austria-czech

rfc974@...
 

I'm compiling a family history (for the PROPPER family) >from about
1700 until the present. Among other challenges, this means tracing
the lives (and, alas, in many cases, deaths) of over 100 people who in
1938 were living in Bohemia.

The purpose of this note is to list the sources and issues I've found
so far and see if anyone has thoughts/suggestions about sources and
issues I've missed. I figure others may find this helpful. I don't
know how many others have found themselves sitting down at the US
Holocaust Memorial Museum, or simply in front of a web page, with a
list of 100-some names -- I've found it a daunting challenge.

I've found it somewhat helpful to work chronologically.

In 1938, Jews in the Sudetenland were mostly expelled between Oct 10
and Nov 12 (about 1/6th of the Jews in Bohemia). Some young men were
sent to Dachau. Also, some were taken as political prisoners, and, as
best I can tell, were sent to Sachsenhausen. In general, to learn
about people who were sent to camps at this time, the ITS records (at
various repositories) are best. For those who were refugees, most
ended up in Prague, seeking a way to get out of Czechoslovakia. Some
applied for passports, and one can find the applications in the Czech
Archives. If they already had passports, the records are still in the
town >from which they were driven. In general, if someone had a
passport and does not show up at holocaust.cz or in survivor lists,
they probably successfully emigrated and the challenge is to find
where they went.

In 1939, Czechoslovakia is annexed by Germany. People continue to
have some success getting visas until September 1939, so we continue
to see applications for passports. US immigration was tightly
restricted and British Palestine appears to have largely stopped
issuing visas by late spring 1939, so figuring out where people might
have gone gets really difficult. Some people got visas to Britain and
some to Latin America. Jewish resistance groups successfully smuggled
several hundred people to Palestine, where they were typically
arrested and and then either released to the Jewish Authority or
interned (the arrest records can be found at the US Holocaust Museum
and contain considerable genealogical information). Smaller programs
succeeded in getting children to various countries.

After September 1939, emigration stops, and one traces people through
the Holocaust resources. Most victims can be found at holocaust.cz --
though that only traces people to the first camp after Theresienstadt.
For information about experiences after the first camp, the ITS data
can be very helpful.

Jewish political prisoners (e.g. people active in the SDP between the
wars) often are missing >from holocaust.cz (they were sent to
Theresienstadt small fortress, which had separate records, which I
have been unable to locate).

Survivors can be found through various survivor lists (again the ITS
records are useful) and the Theresienstadt survivors association.

I'd be grateful to learn of any omissions or errors.

Many thanks!

Craig


--
Craig Partridge
(non-work account -- for work issues send to craig@aland.bbn.com)


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech 75 Years after his imprisonment in a Nazi fortress, the account of Rabbi Dr. William Weinberg imprisonments and escapes has now been published! #austria-czech

norofra@...
 

Courage of the Spirit is now available on line!

75 Years after his imprisonment in a Nazi fortress, the account of Rabbi Dr.
William Weinberg imprisonments and escapes has now been published!

This book is of value to a variety of researchers and hence, I am
posting this to multiple SIGs- For Galicia, information on family origins in
Galicia; for Austria-Czech, Jewish resettlement in Vienna after WWI and the
roundup of Jews in Czechoslovakia in 1938; for German Jews, a slice of life
in Germany under the Nazis, and for RavSig, the experiences of the man who
would head the Jewish communities of Hesse, Germany.
I have copied below a description of the book >from my publisher. I hope that
if I see enough support, I will be able to complete rest of my research, on
my mother's account and on the rebuilding of Jewish communities in Austria
and Germany after the Shoah.
Many books have been written of the spiritual heroism of the Jewish
people as they rebuilt their lives after the devastation wrought by Hitler's
attempt to wipe out every last Jew, but some books stand out as unique
because they are written by family members who were told those stories of
heroism firsthand. Courage of the Spirit (paperback ISBN 978-0-9846685-6-4;
ebook ISBN 978-0-9887048-9-3) is such a book. It portrays the spiritual
struggle of one man during the first half of the twentieth century-the
author's father, Rabbi Dr. William Weinberg, who survived under Nazi and
Communist tyranny to become the first State Rabbi of the community of
Holocaust survivors in the German State of Hesse.
It is fitting that the book is now available to the public just 75
years after Rabbi Weinberg was arrested and incarcerated by the Nazis in the
notorious Fortress Spilberk in Brno following the German occupation of
Czechoslovakia in 1939.
Rabbi Weinberg's saga serves as a tour of the ideologies and principles of
the contemporary world, but it also encompasses the movements that shape
Judaism today: Orthodox, Reform, and Conservative, as well as political
Zionism. It is a story that spans thousands of physical miles, by freight
train and on foot, >from the Galician Shtetl to cosmopolitan Vienna and
Berlin, and to Stalingrad and central Asia and back as Rabbi Weinberg kept
one step ahead of the Nazi armies. It is a story that spans the mental and
emotional journey >from the medieval Shtetl, the great empires, and the weak
democracies and totalitarian regimes that followed, and finally, to freedom.

Along the way, we meet significant figures in Rabbi Weinberg's life:
Martin Buber and Mannes Sperber, the founders of Israel's Marxist-Socialist
party, Rabbi Leo Baeck, and Albert Einstein. We are shown a window into life
in a Nazi prison and concentration camp, the day-to-day life of Jews in Nazi
Berlin, and the vagaries of survival under Stalin's totalitarian shelter.
"This book reconstructs these events >from conversations with my
father, >from family notes, and >from historical documentation," says the
author, Rabbi Norbert Weinberg.
Courage of the Spirit is the first part of a trilogy. The second part will
follow the account of Irene Gottdenker, the author's mother, who openly
survived the Holocaust in the guise of a Pole of German descent and
witnessed the destruction of the Jews in Lwow and Warsaw. The third part
will examine the rebirth of Jewish life in the refugee camps in Austria and
then in the city of Frankfurt, Germany, and the environs.
Courage of the Spirit is now available through Create Space, Amazon,
Google Play, Kobo, Nook and Apple. The author's page can be accessed at
www.amazon.com/author/nweinberg

Todah rabbah in advcance,
Rabbi Dr. Norbert Weinberg
email: norofra@sbcglobal.net

The Courage of the Spirit:The story of Europe's Jewry in the 20 th Century
from family accounts and documents
www.courageofspirit.com

Essays on Judaism
www.vintagewein.blogspot.com

Reasearching Family Records of WEINBERG( Dolyna/Ukraine,
Vienna/Austria,Frankfurt AM, Germany),ZARWANITZER ( Dolyna/Ukraine),IGER(
Lviv, Podwolochisk/Ukraine)GOTTDENKER ( Dolyna,Lviv, Bolekhiv/Ukraine).


More on Hotel Bristol, Prague #austria-czech

pinardpr@...
 

Dear SIG,

Peter Lowe and Craig Partridge very kindly informed me that the Hotel Bristol had an even earlier incarnation
prior to the founding of Fischl and Diamant's Hotel Bristol in 1907.

Peter had some 17 of his ancestors and relatives with weddings there, and found some weddings going back
as far as 1892. He also passed on some notes about the hotel >from the Cesko-zidovsky kalendar >from
1901-02, as listed on the Kramerius List. According that source, the Hotel Bristol belonged to a gentleman
named Roubicek at the time and it is described as follows:

Kalendar cesko-zidovsky, volume 1901-1902, page 173: "Roubicek's Hotel Bristol Prague, Dlouha trida.
The only Israelite hotel in town fitted with all comforts, eleg.Central heating and electric lighting. Guestrooms
with excellent beds. Cuisine renowned for its quality. Real Pilsner beer >from the Municipal Brewery."

My thanks to Peter for this additional information, which was not evident >from the Hotel Bristol's file at
Prague's District Trade Court Krajsky soud obchodni located at the Statni oblastni archiv), the source I had
originally consulted.

On the basis of that tip I searched the Prager Tagblatt obituaries and found for 2 November 1907 a note
from Prague announcing the death of Isak Roubicek, "the former
Hotelier in 'Hotel Bristol.'" The on-line Prague Conscriptions for 1850-1914 list Isak Roubicek as a "Hotelier"
and resident, as of 20 December 1890 at Prag I., NC 922 (which today is Dlouha trida 7) and then moving on
11 August 1900 to Prag I., NC 741 "Langegasse," which is the building where Fischl and Diamant picked up
with their incarnation of the Hotel Bristol in 1907.

Assuming that Mr. Roubicek always lived in the same buildings that housed his hotel, which was definitely
the case for NC 741, then the locations of Hotel Bristol in Prague and its present-day street addresses would
be as follows:

1890-1900: NC 922, Dlouha 7
1900-1938: NC 741, Dlouha 13 and 15, and partially NC 742, Dlouha 11.

(Under non-Jewish management starting ca. late 1935/early 1936)

ca. 1938-39: NC 914, Kozi 9
ca. 1939-48: NC 740, Dlouha 17

Shalom >from Prague,

Rick Pinard


Gesher Galicia at the IAJGS 2014 Conference in Salt Lake City #austria-czech

Pamela Weisberger
 

Galician Programming at the IAJGS Conference

Gesher Galicia's SIG day of activities is Monday, July 28th and we are
sponsoring several programs
and activities, with many Galician-themed talks (and films!) taking
place throughout the week. The conference website is:
http://www.iajgs2014.org.

Here are some of the Galician-themed highlights:

Sunday, July 27

1:30P - 5:00P: The Share Fair: Visit the Gesher Galicia table,
staffed by GG board members, to get one-on-one answers your questions
and see examples of our maps and records.

Monday, July 28: The Gesher Galicia SIG Day

Our luncheon will take place >from 12N - 1:30P - this requires a ticket
purchase! You can do this during the registration process, or add on
later.

"Galician Gurus: Ask the Galician Experts" Luncheon

After a short update on the current state of research in Galician
Ukraine and Poland, we'll open the floor to your questions. Providing
the answers will be: Ruth Ellen Gruber (author & head of Jewish
Heritage Europe,) Alexander Denysenko and Tomasz Jankowski (Lviv-based
researchers and travel guides.) Alex Feller (Rohatyn Project Leader,)
and Andrew Zalewski (author & historian) Find the answers to
anything and everything Galician in this interactive luncheon.

Monday Program Schedule:

7:30AM - 8:45AM: "The War That Spelled The End To Galicia" - Alexander Zalewski

There is never a right time to go to war and this was also true in
1914. The summer months brought the failure of diplomacy across
Europe. In August, the inevitable happened and the newspaper headlines
in Galicia screamed, "Austria in War with Russia." Jewish lives in
Lwow, Stanislawow, Bohorodczany and other towns of eastern Galicia are
the backdrop to the stories about the war and the touching acts of
humanity. The talk focuses on the military campaigns, Russian
offensives and Austrian counter-offensives, intertwined with the tales
of the ordinary people. Jewish lives are caught in the monumental
changes around. The war stubbornly does not want to end; the familiar
order of Galicia unravels, with the uncertainty what will happen next.
This talk about the Great War (1914-1918) in Galicia is based on my
research for "Galician Trails." It is illustrated with maps and the
newly discovered archival pictures.

9:00AM - 10:15AM: "JRI-Poland Records >from Galicia and Congress Poland
-- and Searching for Digital Images" - Judy Baston & Michael Tobias

This presentation >from Jewish Records Indexing - Poland will deal with
Jewish records and research for two major areas of Poland, which
covers the majority of the JRI-Poland online database. It will provide
information about Congress Poland narrative records, and Galician
columnar records. This session offers an in-depth examination of vital
records along with a strategic framework to help researchers in
acquiring records to further their research. Close examination of
sample birth, marriage, and death records will reveal the information
contained in the records, identify the records having the most
genealogical value, and discover surprises found in many of these
records. With actual images of thousands of Polish Jewish records now
available online and linked >from JRI-Poland search results, the
presentation will also focus on how a search of the JRI-Poland online
database can connect a researcher with digital images.
Galician & Polish Genealogical Records: A Survey of Unique and Unusual
Archival Holdings

10:30AM - 11:45AM: "Galician & Polish Genealogical Records: A Survey
of Unique and Unusual Archival Holdings" - Pamela Weisberger

Most research in Eastern Europe begins with vital records - but then
what? Expand your genealogical quest to 18th - 20th century landowner,
business, school, draft, voter, magnate and taxpayer records, which
are held in Polish, Ukrainian, Austrian, U.S. and Israeli archives.
Gesher Galicia's Galician Archival Records Project also includes
passport applications (with photos!), 20th century census records,
cadastral maps and first-person accounts of the damage Jews suffered
to their property during WWI. This tutorial will offer examples and
analysis of these extraordinary records and explain how to locate them
for your towns and villages.

12N - 1:30PM: Gesher Galicia Luncheon - get your tickets now!

1:45PM - 3:00PM - The Annual Gesher Galicia SIG Meeting

Updates on the Galician Archival Records Project, the All Galicia
Database, "The Galitzianer," and new website features, plus reports on
restoration efforts overseas in Lviv, Bolechow and Rohatyn. A special
segment will focuse on marriage laws in Galicia and how they changed over time,
affecting the Jewish attitude towards civil -- versus religious --
marriage. The repercussions of these laws resulted in a dearth of
metrical records for Galician marriages, children being assigned their mother's
maiden name and being labeled as "illegitimate," along with a suprising number
of "delayed" marriage records for Galitizianers (in middle age, with a number
of children) showing up in Vienna registries.

4:45PM - 6:00PM - "Legal and Practical Aspects of Archival Research in
Galicia" with Tomasz Jankowski

Researchers of Galician ancestors interested in accessing original
documents are forced to face bureaucracy and very often are confused
by unpredictable behaviour of Polish and Ukrainian officials. The main
aim of the presentation is to shed a light on formal requirements and
procedures in approaching the archives and Civil Registration Offices
in Galicia. I'll discuss in popular manner Polish and Ukrainian law
regulating work in reading rooms, privacy law and law on civil
registration. The second part of my presentation, based on my own
experiences >from Galician archives, will be dedicated to practical
aspects of research: how the law is interpreted, how to approach the
officials effectively, what local differences and peculiarities might
be expected during the on-site genealogical research. My presentation
will leave the participants armed with legal arguments and practical
skills, useful for their further research, regardless they wish carry
it out for themselves or for their friends.

4:45PM - 6:00PM - "Bolechow Jewish Heritage Society BOF Meeting

Tuesday, July 29

7:30AM - 8:45AM: "Early 20 c. Visa Files of Lwow-based Foreign
Consulates; Polish Passport Police Files Genealogy Rsources" -
Alexander Denysenko

Description of collections of Lviv and other Galician towns' police
"passport" files; personal files of the foreign consulates that were
granting transit visas to the migrants leaving Austria and Poland in
the early 20 century. Migratory processes in Galicia and Bukovina
before, during and after WW 1. Re-settlements caused by the WW1
warfare, devastated towns, lost archives. Alternative sources of
genealogical information.

1:45PM - 3:00PM: "Galician Jewish Refugees 1915-1919 and Their
Gravestones in Western Bohemia" - Vaclav Chvatal

This study concerns Jewish refugees >from Galicia and Bukovina, fleeing
from the Russian front during World War One >from their home villages
( Baligrod, Lesko, Ustrzyki Dolne and many others) to other parts of
Austria-Hungary. Starting point of this research are the gravestones
in the Jewish cemeteries in Western Bohemia. Jewish communities in
Eastern Europe (Galicia, Bukovina) were orthodox, so epitaphs of the
refugees are mostly in Hebrew. The style, the shape and the
decorations of their gravestones is unique, different >from other local
gravestones. The second part of presentation shows the state of their
Galician hometowns at the beginning of 21st century.

1:45PM - 3:00PM: "A Voice >from Galicia:Reflections of Determination
and Change" - Lynne Schwartz

Presenting a video producedbased on a1973 cassette tape interview
conducted with Lynne's grandfather Matthew Bush, born in 1892 in
Kolomyya, Austria. He recounts his childood memories of growing up in
Kolommya,his capture and experiences in a prisoner of war camp in
Rochefort France.He recalls the horror of the war and its effect on
him and other prisoners.The video incorporates old photos of pre war
Kolomyya as well as photos of him in the prison camp,.There are rare
ww1 movie clips with sound as well as many photos taken on glass
slides,taken by a French photographer during the war which have been
in our family for 100 years. The video also has original 1914
recordings of war songs incorporated into the video.He also recounts
his memories being released >from the camp and his arrival at Ellis
Island.

3:15PM - 4:30PM: "Stanislawow: Interwar records at the United States
Holocaust Memorial Museum" - Megan Lewis

Jews constituted 25% of the population on Stanislawow, Poland (now
Ivano-Frankisk, Ukraine) between the world wars. The United States
Holocaust Memorial Museum holds thousands of pages about everyday
Jewish life in interwar Stanislawow, the surrounding county and East
Galicia in general. Although some records predate World War I, most of
the records concern the 1920s and 1930s. For Stanislawow, the Museum
holds passport applications (currently being indexed by Gesher
Galicia), records of Zionist organizations such as Karen Hayesod,
school records, birth and death records, emigration case files,
probate files, personnel records of the Jewish community, Jewish
Masonic lodge records and much more. This presentation will explore
these records, highlight the genealogical treasures that can be found
and discuss some of the challenges in using these collections. While
the presentation will focus on Stanislawow proper, other towns
included in these collections include Kolomyya, Zabolotov, Bolekhov,
Tlumach, and Snyatin.

3:15PM - 4:30PM: "Suchostaw Region Research Group Meeting" - Susana
Leistner Bloch

4:45PM - 6:00PM: "Kolbuszowa Region Research Group Meeting" - Susana
Leistner Bloch

Wednesday, July 30

9:00Am - 10:15AM: "Beyond a Doubt: What We Know vs. What We Can Prove"
- Israel Pickholtz

What do you do when the hard proofs just aren't there, but you are as
sure as you can be what they would say if you could find them? If you
fold your hands and wait, you may never get anywhere with your
research, but if you accept your suppositions as fact, they may never
be questioned again. Not by you nor by your research heirs. This
presentation will use examples >from the east Galician single-surname
Pikholz Project to consider when what you know is beyond a reasonable
doubt and if that is indeed good enough.

10:30AM - 11:45AM: "Rohatyn BOF Meeting

Updates on various Rohatyn projects involving records and restoration.

Friday, August 1

7:30AM - 8:45AM: "Austria, Poland & Ukraine: 3 Countries, 5 Archives &
12 Wonderful Days of Discovery" - Pamela Weisberger

In April 2013, Gesher Galicia's president, Pamela Weisberger, and
board member, John Diener, traveled to Austria, Poland, and Ukraine.
Over twelve days they visited archives in Vienna, Warsaw, Przemysl,
Lviv and Ternopil. In Warsaw they attended the opening of the new
Museum of the History of Polish Jews, followed by an incredible dinner
with Count Peter (Piotr) Pininski, great grandson of the magnate
nobleman who once owned the Galician town of Grzymalow where John's
father and Pamela's grandfather were born. Later they visited
Grzymalow, Ukraine and its ruined synagogue, cheder and decimated
Jewish cemetery. Learn about the trip's preparation and highlights,
the challenges of archival research in different locales (>from white
gloves to burnt documents and moldy dust), the difficulties and
rewards of venturing into "shtetland," and the exceptional opportunity
to connect past to present through investigative genealogical research
AND travel.

Film Program:

As part of the conference film screening, we'll be showing the new
documentary: "Alexander Granach: There Goes Mensch," which tells the
remarkable story of an unlikely path >from a poverty-stricken childhood
to success as a leading stage and film actor in Weimar Germany and
eventually, Hollywood. Born in Werbowitz, a small town in Galacia,
near Kolomea (then Austro-Hungary, now Ukraine), Granach was a
multicultural phenomena in and of himself, speaking and acting in
Yiddish, Russian, Polish, Ukrainian, and German. Granach was siezed
with passion for the theatre at the age of 14 in Lemberg/Lviv, he
struggled and wandered for years as a baker's apprentice and had to
overcome great odds to pursue his dream. After working in Berlin with
directors such as Brecht and Murnau, Granach was forced to flee
Germany in 1933. His path led him through Poland, Soviet Ukraine,
Soviet Russia, Switzerland and eventually, the USA, where he began his
Hollywood career in Ernst Lubitsch's classic Ninotchka, starring Greta
Garbo. He died too young in New York, at the age of 54. It was March
1945, just as the war was drawing to a close and he was anticipating a
reunion with the Swiss actress Lotte Lieven, the love of his life. In
the film, renowned actors Juliane Kohler and Samuel Finzi read from
Granach's letters to Lotte and >from his autobiography, ">from the
Shtetl to the Stage: The Odyssey of a Wandering Actor." The film was
shot in Ukraine, Russia, Switzerland, Germany, Israel, Austria and the
USA. Date and time to be announced soon.

We look forward to your joining us at this summer's conference!

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com


Hotel Bristol Prague #austria-czech

danielat1@...
 

Thanks to Rick Pinard and Bernhard Purin too for their information. My
grandfather Victor POLLAK was the son of a shop owner Jakob POLLAK in
Celetna when he married my grandmother Olga LEDERER in 1913. Victor's father
Jakob and Olga's uncle the well known writer and lawyer Dr Eduard LEDERER
were the witnesses to the marriage by Rabbi DEUTSCH and the reception was
at the Hotel Bristol. I have seen the buildings in Dlouha but do not know if
the buildings that stand there now are the original buildings or not. Rick
do you know?
Regards
Daniela Torsh
Sydney Australia


Gesher Galicia Spring Program in NYC: Sunday, May 18: "Austria, Poland, Ukraine!" #austria-czech

Pamela Weisberger
 

You are invited to Gesher Galicia's spring regional meeting coming up
in New York City:

Sunday, May 18, 2014

11:00AM - 1:00PM

Center for Jewish History
Forchheimer Auditorium
15 West 16th St.
New York, NY 10011

"Austria Poland, Ukraine: 3 Countries, 5 Archives, 12 Wonderful Days
of Discovery"

In addition to updating all of our new research projects and website,
there will be a special multi-media presentation:

GG board member, John Diener, >from Ottawa, Canada and Pamela
Weisberger will talk about their trip in April 2013 which was timed
to attend the opening of the building Museum of the History of Polish Jews in
Warsaw, where they also got to dine with Piotr Pininski, great
grandson of Count Leonard Pininski, the magnate nobleman who once
owned the Galician town of Grzymalow where John's father and Pamela's
grandfather were born. They examined rare 18th century Jewish records in
the Austrian State Archives and after a short stop in Krakow, to give a
presentation at the JCC to the local population trying to discover more about
their Jewish roots, they journeyed to Przemysl and toured the Polish
State Archives. Once in Ukraine (after walking across the border!)
escorted by Alex
and Natalie Dunai, they made research stops at the Lviv and Ternopil
archives, and
visited Grzymalow, its ruined synagogue, cheder and Jewish
cemetery. Learn about the trip's highlights and the challenges of archival
research in foreign locales (>from white gloves to burnt documents and moldy
dust) and discover the exceptional opportunity to connect past to
present through
investigative genealogical research and shtetl travel.

Admission is free. No reservations are necessary.

Speakers:

John Diener is an Ottawa, Canada businessman who is also the
vice-president of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Ottawa, and is on
the board of directors of Gesher Galicia. John co-sponsored the
filming of all matzevot in Zhvanets, Ukraine; the data on these 1,200
stones was submitted to JOWBR and he has amassed 2,500 names on his
family tree. John is shtetl leader for Grzymalow, Ukraine and writes a
monthly column, "Connecting the Branches," for the Ottawa Jewish
Bulletin. He is the proud owner of Saslove's Meat Market in the center
of Ottawa's historic marketplace, which has been an institution in the
city since 1954.

Pamela Weisberger is president and research coordinator of Gesher
Galicia and 1st V.P./program chair for the Jewish Genealogical Society
of Los Angeles. She is also a professional genealogist and has
conducted research in Polish, German, Israeli, Ukrainian, and Austrian
archives.

Hope you can join us there! (To be followed by the JGSNY meeting at 2:00PM
on naturalization records: www.JGSNY.org.)

Directions to the Center for Jewish History are here: http://www.cjh.org/p/9

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@gmail.com


KehilaLinks Project Report for April 2014 #austria-czech

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen KehilaLinks
We thank the owners and webmasters of these webpages for creating fitting
memorials to these Kehilot (Jewish Communities) and for providing a valuable
resource for future generations of their descendants.

Dzyhivka (Dzygovka, Zegifke), Ukraine
Created by Michael Maidenberg
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/dzyhivka/index.html
~~~

Kimberley, South Africa
Created by Eli Rabinowitz
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kimberley
~~~

Pereyaslav-Khmel'nyts'kyy (Periyoslov), Ukraine
Created by Bob Levy and Larry Fagan
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Pereyaslav_Khmelnytskyy/index.html
~~~

Solotvyn (Slotvina, Solotwina), Ukraine
Created by Simon Kreindler
http://www.kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Solotvyn/Index.html
~~~

The Rockaways, Queens, New York, USA
Created by Barbara Ellman
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/rockaways/index.html

KEHILALINKS WEBPAGES RECENTLY UPDATED:

Buchach (Buczacz) (G), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Suchostaw/sl_buczacz.htm
~~~

Kimberley, South Africa
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/kimberley
~~~

Krasilov (Krasyliv), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Krasilov/index.html
~~~

Kushnitsa (Kusnyicza, Kusnice) (S-C), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kushnitsa/
~~~

Muizenberg, South Africa
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/muizenberg
~~~

Skala-Podol'skaya (Skala) (G), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/SkalaPodol/
~~~

Zolotonosha, Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Zolotonosha/
~~~

If you wish to create a KehilaLinks webpage or adopt an existing "orphaned"
webpage please contact us at: < bloch@mts.net >.

NEED TECHNICAL HELP CREATING A WEBPAGE?: We have a team of dedicated
volunteer webpage designers who will help you create a webpage.

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, KehilaLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
Barbara Ellman, KehilaLinks Technical Coordinator


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech More on Hotel Bristol, Prague #austria-czech

pinardpr@...
 

Dear SIG,

Peter Lowe and Craig Partridge very kindly informed me that the Hotel Bristol had an even earlier incarnation
prior to the founding of Fischl and Diamant's Hotel Bristol in 1907.

Peter had some 17 of his ancestors and relatives with weddings there, and found some weddings going back
as far as 1892. He also passed on some notes about the hotel >from the Cesko-zidovsky kalendar >from
1901-02, as listed on the Kramerius List. According that source, the Hotel Bristol belonged to a gentleman
named Roubicek at the time and it is described as follows:

Kalendar cesko-zidovsky, volume 1901-1902, page 173: "Roubicek's Hotel Bristol Prague, Dlouha trida.
The only Israelite hotel in town fitted with all comforts, eleg.Central heating and electric lighting. Guestrooms
with excellent beds. Cuisine renowned for its quality. Real Pilsner beer >from the Municipal Brewery."

My thanks to Peter for this additional information, which was not evident >from the Hotel Bristol's file at
Prague's District Trade Court Krajsky soud obchodni located at the Statni oblastni archiv), the source I had
originally consulted.

On the basis of that tip I searched the Prager Tagblatt obituaries and found for 2 November 1907 a note
from Prague announcing the death of Isak Roubicek, "the former
Hotelier in 'Hotel Bristol.'" The on-line Prague Conscriptions for 1850-1914 list Isak Roubicek as a "Hotelier"
and resident, as of 20 December 1890 at Prag I., NC 922 (which today is Dlouha trida 7) and then moving on
11 August 1900 to Prag I., NC 741 "Langegasse," which is the building where Fischl and Diamant picked up
with their incarnation of the Hotel Bristol in 1907.

Assuming that Mr. Roubicek always lived in the same buildings that housed his hotel, which was definitely
the case for NC 741, then the locations of Hotel Bristol in Prague and its present-day street addresses would
be as follows:

1890-1900: NC 922, Dlouha 7
1900-1938: NC 741, Dlouha 13 and 15, and partially NC 742, Dlouha 11.

(Under non-Jewish management starting ca. late 1935/early 1936)

ca. 1938-39: NC 914, Kozi 9
ca. 1939-48: NC 740, Dlouha 17

Shalom >from Prague,

Rick Pinard

110361 - 110380 of 656621