Date   

INTRO- Searching: 2 FREUND brothers, both Leitz employees from Wetzlar #germany

Alberto Enriquez <albertoenriquez@...>
 

Hello!

I am a novice researching the background of two brothers,
Walter and Hugo FREUND, who played significant roles in the
Leitz optics company in the early to mid-20th century.

Walter FREUND was born in 1893, precise date unknown, in Wetzlar.
Death date unknown. Hugo FREUND was born July 1, 1900 in Wetzlar
and died August 30, 1972, also in Wetzlar.

The family was at least nominally Lutheran since sometime in the
1700s. However, this conversion did not protect Walter from
being denounced, and he spent time at Buchenwald. Eventually,
he was returned home upon the intervention of an influential scientist.

Both brothers worked for the Leitz optics company through their entire
careers, Walter as Director of Sales; and Hugo, a PhD in chemistry,
as Director or Research. Their father, name unknown, was the station
master at the Wetzlar rail station, before and during WWII.

I would appreciate hearing about any information or resources
related to Walter and Hugo FREUND, especially with regard to
verifying Walter's internment, and the family's presumed
but as yet unconfirmed Jewish heritage. Thank you!

Alberto Enriquez, Medford, Oregon albertoenriquez@hotmail.com


German SIG #Germany INTRO- Searching: 2 FREUND brothers, both Leitz employees from Wetzlar #germany

Alberto Enriquez <albertoenriquez@...>
 

Hello!

I am a novice researching the background of two brothers,
Walter and Hugo FREUND, who played significant roles in the
Leitz optics company in the early to mid-20th century.

Walter FREUND was born in 1893, precise date unknown, in Wetzlar.
Death date unknown. Hugo FREUND was born July 1, 1900 in Wetzlar
and died August 30, 1972, also in Wetzlar.

The family was at least nominally Lutheran since sometime in the
1700s. However, this conversion did not protect Walter from
being denounced, and he spent time at Buchenwald. Eventually,
he was returned home upon the intervention of an influential scientist.

Both brothers worked for the Leitz optics company through their entire
careers, Walter as Director of Sales; and Hugo, a PhD in chemistry,
as Director or Research. Their father, name unknown, was the station
master at the Wetzlar rail station, before and during WWII.

I would appreciate hearing about any information or resources
related to Walter and Hugo FREUND, especially with regard to
verifying Walter's internment, and the family's presumed
but as yet unconfirmed Jewish heritage. Thank you!

Alberto Enriquez, Medford, Oregon albertoenriquez@hotmail.com


Welkoff in Ukraine? #ukraine

Gerner Thomsen <gerner.thomsen@...>
 

My great-grandmother was Jewish and came to Denmark around 1906.The Jewish
synagogue in Denmark has the information that she was born in "Welkoff,
Russia" in the end of 19th century. Does anyone have an idea where Welkoff
is located? Could it be Vylkovo in Ukraine (Odessa area)? If yes, is there
any achieve in Ukraine that can help me to proof my great-grandmother's
birth and origin? Later on (in the beginning of 20th century) she came to
Bobruisk in Belarus. Does anyone know if it was a common at that time that
Ukraine jews fled >from southern Ukraine to Belarus?

Best regards,
Gerner

MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign posts with your full name and location.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Welkoff in Ukraine? #ukraine

Gerner Thomsen <gerner.thomsen@...>
 

My great-grandmother was Jewish and came to Denmark around 1906.The Jewish
synagogue in Denmark has the information that she was born in "Welkoff,
Russia" in the end of 19th century. Does anyone have an idea where Welkoff
is located? Could it be Vylkovo in Ukraine (Odessa area)? If yes, is there
any achieve in Ukraine that can help me to proof my great-grandmother's
birth and origin? Later on (in the beginning of 20th century) she came to
Bobruisk in Belarus. Does anyone know if it was a common at that time that
Ukraine jews fled >from southern Ukraine to Belarus?

Best regards,
Gerner

MODERATOR NOTE: Please sign posts with your full name and location.


Re: Ordering 1930's marriage and birth records from Warsaw USC #general

Judith Elam
 

Thank you, Pamela Weisberger, for your detailed response to Rose Rayman's
message, regarding the location and accessibility of Galician records. In
your response you write "There has recently surfaced a new Fond 154 in the
Przemysl Regional Archives that has many indexes, and some full records,
including ones >from the 20th century for many Galician towns".

Do you know if Fond 154 includes any Toporow (now Toporiv, Ukraine)records?
Have any other Toporow records recently "shown up" in any of the other
archives? I ask this because I have always been told that there are no
surviving Toporow records.

My WIENER's were originally >from Poloniczna, Kamionka Strumilowa ("KS"), and
whilst there are many available records and images online >from KS, I am
stuck because my great-grandparents moved to nearby Toporow. I have
absolutely no information on my great-grandfather, Abraham WIENER, other
than he was married to, and (somehow) related to, my great-grandmother,
Mariem WIENER (who later remarried in Nuremburg to Jakob MANSBACH). Mariem
was born in 1876 in Poloniczna. I know all about her and her two children,
and their tragic fates. My grandmother, Frieda WIENER MENDZIGURSKY, was born
in January 1903 in Toporow, followed by her brother, Abraham WIENER, in
April 1905. Since the son has the same name as the father, and since Mariem
was widowed by the time she and her children emigrated to Nuremburg in June
1912, I assume that Abraham Sr. died in 1904/1905, while Mariem was
pregnant. I would love to know how Abraham Sr. and Mariem were related, and
who Abraham's parents were. A Belgium, Antwerp Police Immigration record I
found on Abraham Jr. states that Abraham Sr. was also born in KS. There is
an Abraham WIENER born in 1866 in KS, but it is not the same person.

I am also stuck with my MARDENFELD ancestors - they were >from Toporow.
Somehow Abraham WIENER Sr. is a "brother" of 3 much younger sisters born
MARDENFELD, who all emigrated to New York in the early 1900's. I obtained
this information >from one of their daughters who is still alive in New York,
turning 101 next week! Two of the sisters' marriage records state their
parents were Samuel MARDENFELD and Frieda TENENBAUM, but the third says
Samuel TENENBAUM and Frieda MARDENFELD. I therefore assume that Samuel
MARDENFELD or TENENBAUM was first married to a WIENER, that Abraham had his
mother's surname, and that he was just a half-brother to the 3 sisters. I
would love to find Toporow records to confirm my assumptions!

I have more than 100 American MARDENFELDs and descendants on my database,
descended >from 3 brothers of Samuel MARDENFELD - Moses Leib, Abraham Leib
and Osias MARDENFELD. Moses and Abraham came to New York, as did Osias'
daughter Gussie/Gertrude. Their parents were Solomon/Moses/Selig MARDENFELD
and Beile SIEGEL, >from Toporow. I have been in contact with many MARDENFELD
descendants, and would be delighted to be in contact with as many as
possible! Same goes for any WIENER descendants >from Toporow and Kamionka
Strumilowa.

Judith Elam
Kihei, HI
elamj@hawaii.rr.com

Researching: WIENER (Poloniczna, Kamionka Strumkilowa and Toporow),
MARDENFELD, TENENBAUM and SIEGEL (Toporow), MANN and HASENLAUF(Przemszyl)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Ordering 1930's marriage and birth records from Warsaw USC #general

Judith Elam
 

Thank you, Pamela Weisberger, for your detailed response to Rose Rayman's
message, regarding the location and accessibility of Galician records. In
your response you write "There has recently surfaced a new Fond 154 in the
Przemysl Regional Archives that has many indexes, and some full records,
including ones >from the 20th century for many Galician towns".

Do you know if Fond 154 includes any Toporow (now Toporiv, Ukraine)records?
Have any other Toporow records recently "shown up" in any of the other
archives? I ask this because I have always been told that there are no
surviving Toporow records.

My WIENER's were originally >from Poloniczna, Kamionka Strumilowa ("KS"), and
whilst there are many available records and images online >from KS, I am
stuck because my great-grandparents moved to nearby Toporow. I have
absolutely no information on my great-grandfather, Abraham WIENER, other
than he was married to, and (somehow) related to, my great-grandmother,
Mariem WIENER (who later remarried in Nuremburg to Jakob MANSBACH). Mariem
was born in 1876 in Poloniczna. I know all about her and her two children,
and their tragic fates. My grandmother, Frieda WIENER MENDZIGURSKY, was born
in January 1903 in Toporow, followed by her brother, Abraham WIENER, in
April 1905. Since the son has the same name as the father, and since Mariem
was widowed by the time she and her children emigrated to Nuremburg in June
1912, I assume that Abraham Sr. died in 1904/1905, while Mariem was
pregnant. I would love to know how Abraham Sr. and Mariem were related, and
who Abraham's parents were. A Belgium, Antwerp Police Immigration record I
found on Abraham Jr. states that Abraham Sr. was also born in KS. There is
an Abraham WIENER born in 1866 in KS, but it is not the same person.

I am also stuck with my MARDENFELD ancestors - they were >from Toporow.
Somehow Abraham WIENER Sr. is a "brother" of 3 much younger sisters born
MARDENFELD, who all emigrated to New York in the early 1900's. I obtained
this information >from one of their daughters who is still alive in New York,
turning 101 next week! Two of the sisters' marriage records state their
parents were Samuel MARDENFELD and Frieda TENENBAUM, but the third says
Samuel TENENBAUM and Frieda MARDENFELD. I therefore assume that Samuel
MARDENFELD or TENENBAUM was first married to a WIENER, that Abraham had his
mother's surname, and that he was just a half-brother to the 3 sisters. I
would love to find Toporow records to confirm my assumptions!

I have more than 100 American MARDENFELDs and descendants on my database,
descended >from 3 brothers of Samuel MARDENFELD - Moses Leib, Abraham Leib
and Osias MARDENFELD. Moses and Abraham came to New York, as did Osias'
daughter Gussie/Gertrude. Their parents were Solomon/Moses/Selig MARDENFELD
and Beile SIEGEL, >from Toporow. I have been in contact with many MARDENFELD
descendants, and would be delighted to be in contact with as many as
possible! Same goes for any WIENER descendants >from Toporow and Kamionka
Strumilowa.

Judith Elam
Kihei, HI
elamj@hawaii.rr.com

Researching: WIENER (Poloniczna, Kamionka Strumkilowa and Toporow),
MARDENFELD, TENENBAUM and SIEGEL (Toporow), MANN and HASENLAUF(Przemszyl)


Lutsk, Ukraine KehillaLink website #ukraine

Hana Abdul-Haq <abdulhaq.hana@...>
 

I am going to work on the Lutsk KehilaLink website in the following
months. Please get in touch with me and send me photos, memoirs,
stories, family trees, post cards or any other relevant material which
is connected to Lutsk and which will enable us to create a fitting
memory for our ancestors who lived there.

Thank you.

Hana - Lutsk town leader
Reasearching - Aks/Oks (Lutsk and Kremenets, Ukraine)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Lutsk, Ukraine KehillaLink website #ukraine

Hana Abdul-Haq <abdulhaq.hana@...>
 

I am going to work on the Lutsk KehilaLink website in the following
months. Please get in touch with me and send me photos, memoirs,
stories, family trees, post cards or any other relevant material which
is connected to Lutsk and which will enable us to create a fitting
memory for our ancestors who lived there.

Thank you.

Hana - Lutsk town leader
Reasearching - Aks/Oks (Lutsk and Kremenets, Ukraine)


The Story of the Jews #general

Ann Linder
 

Some of you may find of interest this book, reviewed [favorably] March
10 in the The New York Times

The Story of the Jews: Finding the Words, 1000 BC-1492 AD
by Simon Schama

Ann Linder

MODERATOR NOTE: The New York Times review may be found at
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/11/books/simon-schamas-the-story-of-the-jews.html?_r=0
shortened URL: http://goo.gl/AohiiH


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Story of the Jews #general

Ann Linder
 

Some of you may find of interest this book, reviewed [favorably] March
10 in the The New York Times

The Story of the Jews: Finding the Words, 1000 BC-1492 AD
by Simon Schama

Ann Linder

MODERATOR NOTE: The New York Times review may be found at
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/11/books/simon-schamas-the-story-of-the-jews.html?_r=0
shortened URL: http://goo.gl/AohiiH


Re: 1890 NYC Police census #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

The 1890 NYC Police Census lists the people in the household and their
ages, nothing more. Still, it's one of the few 1890s census not burned
up in the fire.

But thankfully Ancestry.com has indexed it. Ancestry will give you
name, age and the Family History Library film number; you will then
have to order the microfilm or visit a public or Mormon library which
has the films (eg: the New York Public Library).

A good shortcut to querying the 1890 Police Census on Ancestry is to
begin by clicking on the card catalog (under search), then keying in
1890 New York. Then you can limit your search to just this index
database.

ps: you'd learn more about this and other census in the Beginning
Genealogy class, starting March 16th at
www.JewishGen.org/education

Happy Hunting!!
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
VP, Education, Researching (all Galicia)
...KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna
...SCHEINER, KANDEL >from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
...LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burstyn
...STECHER, TRACHMAN >from Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: 1890 NYC Police census #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

The 1890 NYC Police Census lists the people in the household and their
ages, nothing more. Still, it's one of the few 1890s census not burned
up in the fire.

But thankfully Ancestry.com has indexed it. Ancestry will give you
name, age and the Family History Library film number; you will then
have to order the microfilm or visit a public or Mormon library which
has the films (eg: the New York Public Library).

A good shortcut to querying the 1890 Police Census on Ancestry is to
begin by clicking on the card catalog (under search), then keying in
1890 New York. Then you can limit your search to just this index
database.

ps: you'd learn more about this and other census in the Beginning
Genealogy class, starting March 16th at
www.JewishGen.org/education

Happy Hunting!!
Phyllis Kramer, NYC & Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
VP, Education, Researching (all Galicia)
...KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna
...SCHEINER, KANDEL >from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
...LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burstyn
...STECHER, TRACHMAN >from Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla


Ancestry Offers Free Access to Irish Records Through March 17 at 11:59 p.m. ET #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Do you have Irish roots? Yes there Jews with Irish roots - many Eastern
European Jews stopped in Ireland en route to their destination in North
America. Also records in North America that have Irish connections -
obituaries >from US newspapers, Missing Friends >from Boston
Pilot, NY Emigrant Savings Bank records, All Quebec, Vital and Church
Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967 and more.

In celebration of St. Patricks' Day, Ancestry.com is offering free access
to their Irish collection through March 17 at 11:59 pm ET. There is also a
5-minute audio tape by Julianna Smith who gives hints on what is available
and how to search the records. To access the records you will need to register
- its free- with a name and password - no credit card required. I put in the
search field "Jewish sounding" names and came up with a variety of records.
Ancestry also has a link for a free downloadable guide on where to look for
your Irish ancestors in the United States.

To start your search go to: http://www.ancestry.com/cs/Satellite/us/irish

Remember if you start to search records outside their "free access" Irish
collection you will be directed to subscribe or to the 14-day free offer
where you have to provide your credit card and remember to cancel the
subscription before the 14 days. This is not the current free access offer
-be aware of where you are clicking.

I have no affiliation with Ancestry.com and am posting this solely for the
information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Ancestry Offers Free Access to Irish Records Through March 17 at 11:59 p.m. ET #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

Do you have Irish roots? Yes there Jews with Irish roots - many Eastern
European Jews stopped in Ireland en route to their destination in North
America. Also records in North America that have Irish connections -
obituaries >from US newspapers, Missing Friends >from Boston
Pilot, NY Emigrant Savings Bank records, All Quebec, Vital and Church
Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967 and more.

In celebration of St. Patricks' Day, Ancestry.com is offering free access
to their Irish collection through March 17 at 11:59 pm ET. There is also a
5-minute audio tape by Julianna Smith who gives hints on what is available
and how to search the records. To access the records you will need to register
- its free- with a name and password - no credit card required. I put in the
search field "Jewish sounding" names and came up with a variety of records.
Ancestry also has a link for a free downloadable guide on where to look for
your Irish ancestors in the United States.

To start your search go to: http://www.ancestry.com/cs/Satellite/us/irish

Remember if you start to search records outside their "free access" Irish
collection you will be directed to subscribe or to the 14-day free offer
where you have to provide your credit card and remember to cancel the
subscription before the 14 days. This is not the current free access offer
-be aware of where you are clicking.

I have no affiliation with Ancestry.com and am posting this solely for the
information of the reader.

Jan Meisels Allen
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


The Disappearing Collateral Relative Trick: Eva Dora Ruth QUINT LESSEL #general

Meron Lavie
 

Hi all,

I have done my very best for over 2 years to find post-1938 records for my
grandfather's cousin's wife: Eva (Evelyn?) Dora Ruth QUINT (married Michael
LESSEL), who was born April 26, 1903 in Boston, MA.

I found her birth records in Boston, and her entries in the 1910, 1920 and
1930 census. In 1934, she married Michael LESSEL. He died in January 1938,
and >from after she was widowed I could find no record for her anywhere until
her Social Security death record >from 1984, in which she listed under her
maiden name - that's a 46 year gap. She was most likely in psychiatric
institutions during most of that time.

I have put off writing to this forum for help, since one and a half years
ago I made a similar request for someone I had given up on finding, and
Sherri Bobish and Yehudah Ben Shlomo found the person within minutes - which
was a bit of an embarrassment. I guess I'm ready to be embarrassed again...

Regards,

Meron LAVIE
Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Disappearing Collateral Relative Trick: Eva Dora Ruth QUINT LESSEL #general

Meron Lavie
 

Hi all,

I have done my very best for over 2 years to find post-1938 records for my
grandfather's cousin's wife: Eva (Evelyn?) Dora Ruth QUINT (married Michael
LESSEL), who was born April 26, 1903 in Boston, MA.

I found her birth records in Boston, and her entries in the 1910, 1920 and
1930 census. In 1934, she married Michael LESSEL. He died in January 1938,
and >from after she was widowed I could find no record for her anywhere until
her Social Security death record >from 1984, in which she listed under her
maiden name - that's a 46 year gap. She was most likely in psychiatric
institutions during most of that time.

I have put off writing to this forum for help, since one and a half years
ago I made a similar request for someone I had given up on finding, and
Sherri Bobish and Yehudah Ben Shlomo found the person within minutes - which
was a bit of an embarrassment. I guess I'm ready to be embarrassed again...

Regards,

Meron LAVIE
Israel


Manual search of an address in the US Federal Census -- How to do it #general

A. E. Jordan
 

I made a comment yesterday about doing manual searches by addresses in the
US Federal Census and I got a few emails asking how do you do that. Here's
the primer (maybe people can improve on my steps but this process works for me):

1) find the street address you think your family was living at and be
as close to the date of the census as possible

2) StephenMorse.com has a tab for the US Census and there you find his
Unified Census ED Finder

3) On that page first you select the year at the top of the page >from
a drop down menu;

4) Then you select the state, county and city >from drop down menus;

5) Then you fill in the street number and don't panic because you will
likely get a lot of EDs. There's a button that says see map and it
links to a mapping program that shows the address and you can pick out
the names of some cross streets near your address. You put one or more
in and you get a shorter list of EDs;

6) Then on Ancestry you need to bring up the Census search page for
that specific year. (You can do it via Ancestry's card catalog or other
links >from Census to US Census to year.) When you get to the search
page on Ancestry on the right there is a place to browse the census.
You fill in the state, county, city and then it may ask for Ward or
such. Morse should give you all the data but sometimes there's some
guess work but the Wards for example are in numeric order and within
them the EDs are also in numeric order. (I know Morse has a link to
skip this step but it does not seem to work for my computer.)

7) Once you fill in all that data Ancestry opens the first page of that
section of the Census. The sections I have been working with lately
run 30 or 40 pages.

8) Then you simply have to go page by page reading the street names and
looking for the house number. Eventually you find your street and
then the number. It is slow but it works. Remember that often
especially in the bigger cities the census takers worked one side of
the street so if you see a run of even numbers and your house number is
odd there's likely a separate grouping for that street, maybe in a
different ED. Sometimes Morse gives multiple EDs and you have to
search around and sometimes end up having to go through a few EDs to
find your address. Having a street map of the area around the address
helps because you can usually start to spot patterns in where the
census taker was working and how they progressed, i.e. which block they
stopped at, etc. Also remember usually at the end of each section there
are usually some fill ins of people who got skipped as the bulk of the
census was done.

As I said someone might have some streamlining suggestions but this is
a proven tried and true method for me that gets me to the address most
every time.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Manual search of an address in the US Federal Census -- How to do it #general

A. E. Jordan
 

I made a comment yesterday about doing manual searches by addresses in the
US Federal Census and I got a few emails asking how do you do that. Here's
the primer (maybe people can improve on my steps but this process works for me):

1) find the street address you think your family was living at and be
as close to the date of the census as possible

2) StephenMorse.com has a tab for the US Census and there you find his
Unified Census ED Finder

3) On that page first you select the year at the top of the page >from
a drop down menu;

4) Then you select the state, county and city >from drop down menus;

5) Then you fill in the street number and don't panic because you will
likely get a lot of EDs. There's a button that says see map and it
links to a mapping program that shows the address and you can pick out
the names of some cross streets near your address. You put one or more
in and you get a shorter list of EDs;

6) Then on Ancestry you need to bring up the Census search page for
that specific year. (You can do it via Ancestry's card catalog or other
links >from Census to US Census to year.) When you get to the search
page on Ancestry on the right there is a place to browse the census.
You fill in the state, county, city and then it may ask for Ward or
such. Morse should give you all the data but sometimes there's some
guess work but the Wards for example are in numeric order and within
them the EDs are also in numeric order. (I know Morse has a link to
skip this step but it does not seem to work for my computer.)

7) Once you fill in all that data Ancestry opens the first page of that
section of the Census. The sections I have been working with lately
run 30 or 40 pages.

8) Then you simply have to go page by page reading the street names and
looking for the house number. Eventually you find your street and
then the number. It is slow but it works. Remember that often
especially in the bigger cities the census takers worked one side of
the street so if you see a run of even numbers and your house number is
odd there's likely a separate grouping for that street, maybe in a
different ED. Sometimes Morse gives multiple EDs and you have to
search around and sometimes end up having to go through a few EDs to
find your address. Having a street map of the area around the address
helps because you can usually start to spot patterns in where the
census taker was working and how they progressed, i.e. which block they
stopped at, etc. Also remember usually at the end of each section there
are usually some fill ins of people who got skipped as the bulk of the
census was done.

As I said someone might have some streamlining suggestions but this is
a proven tried and true method for me that gets me to the address most
every time.

Allan Jordan


Re: 1890 NYC Police census #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Original Message-
From: Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@gmail.com>
Actually, this census has been indexed by Ancestry.com. You can search
it here:
http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=3519

"This
updated version of a previously posted database is an index to nine
additional books, for a total of 26 police census books (58-61,
953-966, 969, 971-972, 977, 980, 982-983, 990), and adds the names of
more than 5,000 people." .... >from Ancestry

Pamela:

The indexing on Ancestry is very frustrating to most people as unfortunately
Ancestry has never completed this effort. As you quoted >from Ancestry's
page, they have only indexed 26 books out of a total of 1,008 or of which
894 still exist. That means Ancestry has less than 3% of the total in its
index.

My experience using the 1890 Census is that Ancestry's index also fails
to cover large parts of the Lower East Side of Manhattan, i.e. where
most of the first generation immigrants were living. I know I tracked
down my great great grandmother with her two sons and also my great
grandfather with his wife, baby and sister in law in the 1890 Census
and none of them are in the Ancestry index. They all lived on the
Lower East Side.

I got their addresses through a variety of means. For my great grandfather
I already had his suspected address >from the birth certificate of his child
who was only a matter of months old when the census was re-taken. That
address worked for him.

For years I tried off and on to figure out my great great grandmother
because I knew at some point she became a widow and some later point
remarried. Despite a number of different addresses I had >from other
things none worked for her until I looked up one of her sons in the
1890 Voter's Registration which gave me an address. And low and behold
there she was living with her two single grown sons! It helped me a
lot, but unfortunately Ancestry did not have her in the index then and
I checked today they still do not cover any of these addresses on the
Lower East Side.

Unfortunately this is an instance where you still need to work in the
microfilm. I am not sure if the Family History Centers have the
location finder aids because without then it is a lot harder to find
the address in the Census. The New York Public Library has a location
finder which works on the addresses and a street map to pin down the
book numbers, etc. to find people in this Census.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: 1890 NYC Police census #general

A. E. Jordan
 

Original Message-
From: Pamela Weisberger <pweisberger@gmail.com>
Actually, this census has been indexed by Ancestry.com. You can search
it here:
http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=3519

"This
updated version of a previously posted database is an index to nine
additional books, for a total of 26 police census books (58-61,
953-966, 969, 971-972, 977, 980, 982-983, 990), and adds the names of
more than 5,000 people." .... >from Ancestry

Pamela:

The indexing on Ancestry is very frustrating to most people as unfortunately
Ancestry has never completed this effort. As you quoted >from Ancestry's
page, they have only indexed 26 books out of a total of 1,008 or of which
894 still exist. That means Ancestry has less than 3% of the total in its
index.

My experience using the 1890 Census is that Ancestry's index also fails
to cover large parts of the Lower East Side of Manhattan, i.e. where
most of the first generation immigrants were living. I know I tracked
down my great great grandmother with her two sons and also my great
grandfather with his wife, baby and sister in law in the 1890 Census
and none of them are in the Ancestry index. They all lived on the
Lower East Side.

I got their addresses through a variety of means. For my great grandfather
I already had his suspected address >from the birth certificate of his child
who was only a matter of months old when the census was re-taken. That
address worked for him.

For years I tried off and on to figure out my great great grandmother
because I knew at some point she became a widow and some later point
remarried. Despite a number of different addresses I had >from other
things none worked for her until I looked up one of her sons in the
1890 Voter's Registration which gave me an address. And low and behold
there she was living with her two single grown sons! It helped me a
lot, but unfortunately Ancestry did not have her in the index then and
I checked today they still do not cover any of these addresses on the
Lower East Side.

Unfortunately this is an instance where you still need to work in the
microfilm. I am not sure if the Family History Centers have the
location finder aids because without then it is a lot harder to find
the address in the Census. The New York Public Library has a location
finder which works on the addresses and a street map to pin down the
book numbers, etc. to find people in this Census.

Allan Jordan

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