Date   

LUCHANSKY, Koshevata, Ukraine and LUBCHANSKY, Grodno, Belarus

Joseph Walder
 

The LUCHANSKY family appears to have lived in and around Koshevata (which is about 100 km south of Kiev) since records with surnames first appeared in the early 19th century. Immigrants to the USA from my branch of the LUCHANSKY tree settled primarily in the Midwest, with a few in New York and Los Angeles. About two years ago, I became aware than immigrants from other branches of the Koshevata LUCHANSKY family had settled in New London, Connecticut, USA. I also discovered a large number of immigrants named LUBCHANSKY--note the spelling difference--who had also gone to New London, but who had originated in Grodno, Belarus, about 800 km from Koshevata.

I have looked at old records for Koshevata (census, birth, death, marriage) and the name in Russian is indeed correctly transliterated as LUCHANSKY. I have not seen records for Grodno.

The similarity of LUCHANSKY to LUBCHANSKY obviously makes me wonder whether there is a connection between the two families.

To the extent that the JewishGen Family Finder may give a hint about the geographic distribution of surnames, LUCHANSKY was restricted to the area near Koshevata in Ukraine. For LUBCHANSKY, there is one JGFF listing for this name in Odessa, Ukraine; otherwise, the name seems to have been only in and near Grodno and Minsk.

I have a weak DNA match on Ancestry with several people whose family trees include LUBCHANSKY ancestors. Our shared DNA matches include a few of my 2nd or 3rd cousins with LUCHANSKY ancestry.
 
Can anyone suggest where I might find data on the geographic distribution of surnames? Or ways to assess whether LUCHANSKY and LUBCHANSKY are related?

Joseph Walder, Portland, Oregon, USA




Request for translation of 1934 death record written in Yiddish & Lithuanian

marlene finkelstein
 

I have posted to Viewmate (VM 78249) the 1934 death record of my ggf
Hersch (Tzvi) Bloch. I can determine that he was born in 1855, died on
the 15th of Adar, & was buried in the Kurseniai ( Yiddish: Kurshan)
cemetery. Can anyone glean any further information, ideally the names of
Hersch's parents, from either the Yiddish or Lithuanian column of the
record?

https://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/full.asp?ID=78249&loc=A&name=78249HerschBlochdeathrecord1934%7E1%2Ejpg

Much thanks in advance.

Marlene Finkelstein

Researching BLOCH & SCHUPAK in Kurseniai & Papile, Lithuania;
KAMENSCHEIN, FELDMAN, & ROSENBERG in Kunev & Ostrog, Ukraine


Re: Computer program

Alan Ehrlich
 

Just want to react to Dani's remark that Brother's Keeper, in addition to genders:  "Male" and "Female"... does indeed also have the third choice: "Unknown".

Kind regards,
Alan Ehrlich
Geneva Switzerland


JewishGen Databases Working Again

Nancy Siegel
 

We’re pleased to report that the JewishGen databases are back on line. We apologize for any inconvenience this disruption may have caused you. Your patience is greatly appreciated.

Nancy Siegel
Director of Communications
JewishGen.org





Massachusetts: legislation to close access to birth, marriage, death, and other vital records

Stephen Katz
 

The Governor of Massachusetts has proposed legislation that will prevent access to birth, marriage, death, and other previously-public records by anyone but the person requesting the record, or his/her parent or attorney. In Massachusetts, these records have been available to everyone (after a lapse of time in some cases) since 1641, in colonial and state repositories (archives and registries) as well as town and city halls. They have been a principal and critical source of genealogical information. Steve Eastman has recently posted an alert about the proposed legislation in his blog (https://blog.eogn.com/2020/01/31/massachusetts-governor-seeks-to-cut-access-to-public-domain-records/). The Massachusetts Genealogical Council has issued a "Call to Action" to oppose the legislation; further information, including ways to register opposition to the legislation, is available at https://www.massgencouncil.org/call-to-action.

Stephen KATZ
(KATZ (Novograd-Volynskiy, Ukraine), KAPLAN (Stakliskes, Lithuania), VITKIN (Kaunas, Lithuania), TEPPER (Rovno and Novograd-Volinskiy, Ukraine)


Re: Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance, Mechelen, Belgium's Web site

albert.pampel@...
 

For your information, you will find the site at https://www.kazernedossin.eu

Best regards,
Albert Pampel


Lack of responses from DNA match

Shelley Mitchell
 

Several times I’ve seen mention of a DNA match’s failure to respond to an inquiry. I know this might sound simplistic but what’s amazing is the amount of non-spam that I find in my Spam file. I used to automatically delete my spam. Then, when I checked, I’d find email that should have been in my inbox.

Also, I’ve been more successful with responses when I first share my information. Such as “there are Terners in my family tree. It’s available on Ancestry...” “I see you match more closely with my mother whose mother’s name was Terner”
Then I ask about the DNA’s information. I personally think it’s less off putting. Just an idea.
--
Shelley Mitchell 
NYC
searching KONIGSBERG/KINIGSBERG, TERNER, MOLDAUER, SCHONFELD - Kolomyya PLATZ - DELATYN. All Galicia. 


Re: Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance, Mechelen, Belgium's Web site

Lewis, Megan
 

Hi Avraham,

The website is now https://www.kazernedossin.eu/EN. The website of their archives/ documentation center is https://www.kazernedossin.eu/EN/Museumsite/Documentatiecentrum/Archief-leeszaal.

The museum is digitizing their collections however they can only put certain collections online.  They are working with other institutions to provide access at those institutions.  So far they have partnered with Mémorial de la Shoah, Paris, France and the
Herinneringscentrum Kamp Westerbork, the Netherlands.

Megan Lewis
reference librarian, USHMM


Re: Asking Family For Information

Maurine McLellan
 

I have had best luck by sending what information I have, even if it is not documented. People are much more willing to correct you and then add info than they are to reply to a, “please tell me what you know” request.

Maurine McLellan
Researching:
BOTHMAN (BOIDMAN), Zhitomir, Kiev
BEJACH, Zempelburg (Sepolno Krajenskie), Berlin
FLEISCHER, Latvia
SACHS, Huluipol, Lithuania


Re: Brothers Spell Their Name Differently

Alan Greenberg
 

This is extremely common. Sometimes there may be a minor spelling difference and sometimes it could be a complete name change.

You ask "what is the best solution?" I'm afraid I don't know what the "problem" is. They used different names so you record them as such, but that does not alter their parents of the fact that they are siblings.

Alan Greenberg
Montreal, Canada

At 10/02/2020 10:33 PM, Shmuel Meyer via Groups.Jewishgen.Org wrote:
Shalom,

I have 2 brothers that spell their names slightly differently so they are not seen as brothers. Tabachnik and Tabatchnik

I'm sure this isn't unique to me. What is the best solution?

Thanks.

Shmuel
https://meyer-services.net/webtrees


Re: Kozienice census - Russian / Polish translation needed - Names Dzik Szames, Frydman, Sztajnbok, Ejchenholtz, Rojzenman

Daniella Alyagon
 

Arie,

Please note that these are not census records, they are however books of residents detailing local residents as well as movement of residents

Daniella Alyagon

נשלח ממכשיר Huawei שלי


Re: Brothers Spell Their Name Differently

sharon yampell
 

I have one last name that has been permutated 10 other ways from the original.  I put the original down for the oldest family member and then put each permutation for those who use it.  I will use my own last name as an example.

 

For example, my original last name was YAMPOLSKY but not all of us use YAMPOLSKY..I use YAMPELL; one set of cousins uses JAMPOL; and another set uses YAMPOL… but make sure you use all permutations when researching.

 

Sharon F. Yampell

Voorhees, NJ USA

 

From: Shmuel Meyer
Sent: Tuesday, February 11, 2020 8:27 AM
To: main@...
Subject: [JewishGen.org] Brothers Spell Their Name Differently

 

Shalom,

I have 2 brothers that spell their names slightly differently so they are not seen as brothers. Tabachnik and Tabatchnik

I'm sure this isn't unique to me. What is the best solution?

Thanks.

Shmuel
https://meyer-services.net/webtrees

 


Re: Looking for people from Hertsa

sacredsisters1977@...
 

My great grandfather was from there. His name was Adolph Abraham Greenberg. He was born about 1883 and immigrated to America in 1907 with his fiancee family named Markowitz who was from neighboring town of darabani. According to research I had done their last name was different in home country. Instead of Greenberg it was Apreive or similar spelling. Not sure if the information I obtained is accurate. On yadvashem there is a whole bunch listed on POT's that were from Hertza, but can't make any connections or find any descendant to ask questions. So pretty much my Greenberg line remains a mystery.


Kozienice census - Russian / Polish translation needed - Names Dzik Szames, Frydman, Sztajnbok, Ejchenholtz, Rojzenman

arie dzick
 

I've posted a vital record in Polish and Russian for which I need a translation..

These are extracts from the Kozienice town census dating back the spanning from early 1900's to 1948.
These are the census page of my direct family . These are my g and gg grand parents.


Depending on records, names are  : Szames, Frydman, Rojzenman, Dzik, Ejchenholtz, Sztajnbok.

In case you accept, could you please translate main info by line number. What is of utmost importance are the town of birth (when it's not kozienice), profession, cause of death or any information about their life. I you could pay attention to the information in last column on the right hand side.
Thank you very much for your help.
Arie


Thank you very much.

Arie Dzick


Re: Searching for Fusgeyer Descendants #romania

Dave and Melanie Bloom
 

Hi,
I'm a Fusgeyer descendant, although not from Boston.  Short on time right now, but would enjoy chatting about that.  
Dave Bloom

Daveandmelanie@...


Re: Changing Market for Home DNA Testing

Jake Jacobs
 

Something to check, if you are not getting responses to emails about DNA matches: I just discovered that my email/message box on Ancestry was nonfunctional: Nothing coming in, nothing going out. Figured this out when I sent a message to a cousin, who did not receive it.  I checked my outbox, and it did not reflect a single message sent since 2012!  I have sent many messages since that time, but no responses.  I contacted Ancestry. It took them 2 months to get the problem resolved. It finally does appear to be working.

If you haven't had any responses at all on Ancestry, might be worth checking your mailbox, sending a test message to someone who can confirm they received it.

Diane Jacobs
Austin, Texas


Re: Belarus? Geography Question: Slonim Zaludok Grodno Wilna

cohen.izzy@...
 

Hello Joel --

During the years you mentioned, first born sons were exempt from service in the Czar's army. Later born sons were sometimes "adopted" by neighbors who had no sons and were past child-bearing age. So on official records, they had the "adoptive" family's last name.

According to Wikipedia:
Slonim is now a city in the Grodno Region of Belarus.(BelarusianСло́німRussianСло́нимLithuanianSlanimasPolishSłonimYiddishסלאָנים‎, Slonim)
It is located at the junction of the Shchara and Isa rivers, 143 km (89 mi) southeast of Grodno

Slonim was in the area annexed by Russia in 1795. Administratively it was part of the Slonim Governorate until 1797, Vilna Governorate until 1801 and Grodno Governorate until World War I. In 1897 it was the fourth largest city of the governorate after the leading cities of BiałystokGrodno and Brześć.

Slonim was one of the many towns in Poland that had a significant Jewish population. The imposing Great Synagogue, built in 1642, survived the destruction and brutal Nazi liquidation of the Słonim Ghetto with 10,000 Jews massacred in 1942 alone. The 10 small synagogues around the Great Synagogue called Stiblach did not survive.

The Slonimer Hasidic dynasty came from there. Michael and Ephraim Marks (of Marks & Spencer) were born in Slonim. The wealthiest family in Slonim before World War II were the Rabinowicz brothers, Vigdor and Yossel. Their parents were Dovber and Rivka Rochel (née Kancepolski). After World War I, they entered the forestry business together with Yaakov Milikowski, and were known as the Rabmils. They escaped the Nazi atrocities by flying to Israel (Palestine at the time). ... Slonim is on the railway line between Baranavichy and Vaukavysk. [My father was born in Baranovichi, Belarus in Dec 1904. He died in Nov 2007 one month before his 103rd birthday.]

= = = = = = = = = 

Zaludok -- See photos at
https://www.google.co.il/search?q=Zaludok&sxsrf=ACYBGNSvsE1xpw_70aJTVHxrsy4O3Vuvng:1581424472790&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=2X4zj8EJxlbsrM%253A%252CcgHmjUQfZg-3nM%252C_&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kQD283XqSLao-nne5f83alU9Rfw1A&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj88MGfwcnnAhXHNcAKHVc8AcQQ9QEwB3oECAoQEg#imgrc=2X4zj8EJxlbsrM:

See the KehilaLinks website at
https://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Lida-District/zaludok.htm

And the JewishGen webpage at
https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/zaludok/zhe007.html

Jewish Cemetery Project webpage for Zaludok
http://iajgscemetery.org/eastern-europe/belarus/zheludok

Zaludok memorial in Holon cemetery in Israel
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wasiliszki,_Zaludok_and_Szczuczyn_memorial.JPG

Zaludok genealogy Message Board
https://www.ancestry.com/boards/localities.eeurope.belarus.general/419/mb.ashx
Researching families Poretsky, Pelovsky and Antokolski from the shtetl Zaludok in Belarus. The Pelovsky family originated in Vilna.

Best regards,
Izzy







Looking for WAGMAN, WAKSMAN, KAUFER, DAJCH from Gowarczow, Poland

Shaul Ceder <shaul.ceder@...>
 

These are names of direct ancestors of mine. Please note that DAJCH is pronounced with a guttural "ch".


New Database on IGRA’s Website

Elena Bazes
 

The Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA) has just released a new database on its website. There are over 1,500,000 records available in our databases. With each release we provide a variety of records to our collection.

 A preview of the database is available at

 

https://bit.ly/2uC5CKf

 

New Database

 

Participants in the Maccabiah Games 1931-1997       20,052 Listings

 

This database includes all participants in 33 different sports from 74 countries.

 

Please note, the IGRA databases are now searchable to all registrants. The search results page is also available to all registrants. Additional details regarding most databases are available only to paid IGRA members. Certain exceptions exist due to requests of the specific archives.

 

Before viewing the databases, please register for free on the IGRA website:

 

http://genealogy.org.il/

 

To view the databases, go to the database tab on the website.

Elena Biegel Bazes

IGRA Publicity Chair

 

 


Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance, Mechelen, Belgium's Web site

Avraham Y. Kahana <avreimale@...>
 

Some 10 years ago I exchanged several emails with the Jewish Museum of Deportation and Resistance, Mechelen, Belgium. They were very helpful and provided me with lots of documents (few on the deportations but lots of files on my family - I am not sure now if the files were of their possession or the belgium immigration offices - in any case, were very helpful and for those of you who have family that stayed in Belgium for some time - I would strongly recommend checking)

I am writing this message to ask if anyone knows about the current web site of the Museum of Deportation. The site mentioned here does not seem valid anymore. The mails I have in my archives show the cicb.be domain, this must have been the site indeed.

Anyone knows what is the working web address of the institution ?
Thanks in advance,
Avraham Yehoshua Kahana
Israel