Date   

Re: DE BEER: Naming traditions #germany #names #sephardic

deborah.shindell@...
 

I have done extensive research for my family tree with Jews in the Netherlands. I have been successful finding great records using this website: https://www.openarch.nl/search-ext.php?lang=en
It is a free website, and you don't need to signup or login in to use. I would suggest you use Jacob de Beer in the name to search on as I didn't find any Jacob Simon de Beer, but 86 pages of just Jacob de Beer, in various permutations. Then sort on date, to get the records in date order, but many early records were undated. You can filter by location, source, role (groom, father, registrant, etc). Especially if you know this man's partner's name, it can help you narrow down the results.

This website also includes Netherlands population registry information that was used to determine who was living where. If you don't find a birth record, you may be able to find the person in the population registry with an accurate birthdate, and the members of his household. This may help you find his correct parents and/or children.

Good luck.
--

Deborah Shindell
Trumbull, CT
deborah.shindell@...
researching: Beserglik, Lederhendler, Goldberg (all in Poland) and Szmukler (Ukraine)


Re: Bayside cemetery Queens, NY #usa

Peter Cohen
 

About 3 years ago, I was able to get some Acacia burial location information from the person or people who are the staff for Bayside, Acacia & Mokom Sholom.  The person I spoke to was very nice and very helpful. The phone number (at that time) was 516-295-4350.
--
Peter Cohen
California


Re: Asking help with one Polish word #translation

Alexander Sharon
 

It appears that word is "iedna" (a single)...daughter

Alexander Sharon


Re: Bayside cemetery Queens, NY #usa

A. E. Jordan
 

-----Original Message-----
From: David Lewin <david@...>
I have transcribed the burial records to a spreadsheet after  Florence Marmor z"l died,  Florence used me as a back-up for years The data is still waiting for a permanent home.  There are 32,300 entries

I would think JewishGen should be / would be happy to host that list if you offered it.

Does it have location information by society name and gate numbers?

Allan Jordan



Re: HECKSCHER in Hamburg #germany

engers_h@...
 

Dear Helga,

I have one Regine Heckscher (b. 5 Aug 1823; d. 17 May 1910 in Altona) in my family tree married to Ephraim Salomon (b. ~ 1821; d. 18 Dec 1891 in Altona) but I cannot find her family.  Perhaps you may be able to help me?

best regards from Founex, Switzerland,

Howard Engers


Re: Bayside cemetery Queens, NY #usa

Diane Jacobs
 

If theyhave not been out on JOWBR they should be.
Diane Jacobs


On May 4, 2021, at 12:14 PM, David Lewin <david@...> wrote:

 I have transcribed the burial records to a spreadsheet after  Florence Marmor z"l died,  Florence used me as a back-up for years The data is still waiting for a permanent home.  There are 32,300 entries

David Lewin
London



At 14:31 04/05/2021, A. E. Jordan via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:



-----Original Message-----
From: Nana Redell <nane7012@...>


I recently found out that my grandfather Max LEFKOWITZ who was living in Newark, NJ was buried in the Bayside Cemetery, in Queens, NY.
Nana(nayna) Redell




I am not sure what the current status of Bayside is. There was an effort (the last of many) maybe two years ago to clean it up. But unless they have done ongoing maintenance it would be useless.

The office was ransacked years ago and most of the onsite records lost ... I was actually there before it happened and even then the records were spotty.

I have not been to the cemetery in years and I am not sure what it hours are for visiting as I think they are limited. Also I am not sure it is the best of areas so I wold not go alone. My great grandfather is among the missing at Bayside which is a great personal frustration.

As for finding a grave there are several partial databases of Bayside burials. Check the JOWBR record here at JewishGen to start. Steve Lasky had some records but I don't know what his status is and he had the overall map of the cemetery http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/cp-maps-ny-nj.htm. You could try emailing him to see if he has the person in his records but make sure you give him the date of burial.

Like most cemeteries it is divided into mostly burial societies. You need to find the name of the society and its gate number.

The Jewish Theological Institute has the burial books and you can try emailing them and ask them to give you the data. My experiences with them were difficult and uncooperative.

Also try newspapers and see if you can find a notice for the person's burial because it might give the name of the society.

Without the society name and the gate number it is a nearly impossible search because of the size of the cemetery especially since you said you are looking for a singe grave.

There are two cemeteries bordering Bayside that are separate but in poor condition as well. A lot of people got confused with which of the three cemeteries a person was being buried in so it is not uncommon to find a record saying Bayside but the person is in one of the two adjoining cemeteries.

Wish there was more encouraging news to offer.

Allan Jordan
New York



--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Re: 1905 New York Census #usa #records

The Becker's Email
 

The family arrived NY on 15 May 1906 on the ship Zeeland out of Antwerp per Louis Pailey's 1909 declaration of intent.  Original available on Ancestry.

The ship's manifest has the family surname as Polez.  They are all there.  Spelling of the first names varies slightly depending on whether you use the stevemorse.org website or Ancestry for the manifest. Louis's first name on the mainfest definitely begins w/ "L".  Ancestry has Leibe and stevemorse has Lerbe.  They were going to cousin Sam Katzenbogen at 149 Belmont Ave Brooklyn.  Spelling of cousin's surname is hard to read as is the exact street name but there was a Saml Katzenbogen at 149 Belmont Ave  on the 1905 NY census for Brooklyn.

i don't believe researching the Hinsdale address in 1905 would yield any necessarily meaningful info.  

Johanna Becker
Newport, RI
 


Re: DE BEER: Naming traditions #germany #names #sephardic

bobmalakoff@...
 

Among early German Jews Jacob Simon naming his son Simon Jacob was common before family names were used.  The family names were usually required by government edict.  I do not know how common continuing this practice with first name and middle name after a family name was adopted. Naming someone after a living father was not done by Eastern European Jews but maybe not for German Jews.  Based on a German Jewish family that I researched (they occupied my house in Pittsburgh around 1890) Jacob Kaufmann named a son Karl Jacob Kaufmann.  Karl Jacob named his son Karl Jacob Kaufmann Jr.  Other family members used Jr. 
Bob Malakoff
Pittsburgh PA 


Re: 1905 New York Census #usa #records

jbonline1111@...
 

LIke Mr. Lerner, I have found my family members with all sorts of names.  In a conversation famous in my family, I told my father that I had found his grandfather's ship passage, but with several names I didn't know.  I told him one.  Oh, he said, that's my aunt Tillie!  Obviously, I was new to genealogy at the time and forgot to ask Hebrew/Yiddish names that might apply.   Another example.  My mother's last name is spelled one way on her birth certificate in 1925 and on other documents.  Her b.c. lists no middle name.  But by 1933, the family name was spelled another way that has persisted to this day. And my mother's Hebrew name became her middle name.  Did I mention that the spelling of her first name was also revised?  The same is true of my grandmother's maiden name and her first name.
In other words, we must be flexible in looking at data we find.  Who else do we find with known relatives?  If they are also known relatives, it's probably our family, regardless of changes in spelling.

 
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


Re: Bayside cemetery Queens, NY #usa

David Lewin
 

I have transcribed the burial records to a spreadsheet after  Florence Marmor z"l died,  Florence used me as a back-up for years The data is still waiting for a permanent home.  There are 32,300 entries

David Lewin
London



At 14:31 04/05/2021, A. E. Jordan via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:



-----Original Message-----
From: Nana Redell <nane7012@...>


I recently found out that my grandfather Max LEFKOWITZ who was living in Newark, NJ was buried in the Bayside Cemetery, in Queens, NY.
Nana(nayna) Redell




I am not sure what the current status of Bayside is. There was an effort (the last of many) maybe two years ago to clean it up. But unless they have done ongoing maintenance it would be useless.

The office was ransacked years ago and most of the onsite records lost ... I was actually there before it happened and even then the records were spotty.

I have not been to the cemetery in years and I am not sure what it hours are for visiting as I think they are limited. Also I am not sure it is the best of areas so I wold not go alone. My great grandfather is among the missing at Bayside which is a great personal frustration.

As for finding a grave there are several partial databases of Bayside burials. Check the JOWBR record here at JewishGen to start. Steve Lasky had some records but I don't know what his status is and he had the overall map of the cemetery http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/cp-maps-ny-nj.htm. You could try emailing him to see if he has the person in his records but make sure you give him the date of burial.

Like most cemeteries it is divided into mostly burial societies. You need to find the name of the society and its gate number.

The Jewish Theological Institute has the burial books and you can try emailing them and ask them to give you the data. My experiences with them were difficult and uncooperative.

Also try newspapers and see if you can find a notice for the person's burial because it might give the name of the society.

Without the society name and the gate number it is a nearly impossible search because of the size of the cemetery especially since you said you are looking for a singe grave.

There are two cemeteries bordering Bayside that are separate but in poor condition as well. A lot of people got confused with which of the three cemeteries a person was being buried in so it is not uncommon to find a record saying Bayside but the person is in one of the two adjoining cemeteries.

Wish there was more encouraging news to offer.

Allan Jordan
New York



Re: Bayside cemetery Queens, NY #usa

Robert Avner
 

Hi Nana
I haven’t been to Bayside Cemetery since before the pandemic but it hasn’t been the mess you read about on the internet for quite a few years. A number of years ago after a lawsuit the synagogue that owned it had to sell it’s building to raise funds to restore the cemetery. It is one of the three old adjacent Ozone Park Jewish cemeteries with very few current burials & as such would be better if you went with someone as it can be desolate. There is no office on the premises although there is a caretaker & a bathroom. The contact person is Jessie & her phone # 212-874-7005. As of 2019 the hours of the cemetery were just Sunday 9am to 3pm & Wed. 8am to 2pm.
Robert Avner


JGS of Greater Boston May 23 Free Virtual Program on Polish Records 1:30-4:00PM EDT #announcements #events #poland #records

Jessie Klein
 

The JGS of Greater Boston and the Polish Genealogical Society of Massachusetts present Julie Roberts Szczepankiewicz-Finding Vital Records from Poland On-line. May 23 1:30-4:00PM EDT. This program is free, but registration is required for individuals who are not members of the JGS of Greater Boston.  Information is at www.jgsgb.org

Jessie Klein
Co-President
JGS of Greater Boston


Re: Bayside cemetery Queens, NY #usa

Sandy Aaronson
 

I found my gm was buried in Acacia Cemetery from her Death Certificate.  There was an office in NYC that I had previously called to inquire about my gm that handled a number of Cemeteries to include Bayside & Acacia.  In 2014, I was in NY to meet some previously unknown cousins.  One took me to Acacia Cemetery right next to Bayside Cemetery.  We roamed around Bayside, as there wasn't a visible division, trying to find the right place in Acacia & called the office.  There was a nice Gentleman in the area who met us & took us to the right place.  Googling Acacia there is a telephone number...Bayside says owner is Congregation Shaare Zedek.  Both were not kept up very well 7 years ago.
--
Sandy Aaronson
El Paso, Texas

COHEN, LEIBOWITZ, WEISS, SHAIKOFSKY/VOIKHANSKY (Suwalki/Lomza area)
RUBENSTEIN, ARONZUN, KOLICHMAN, GONIKBERG, GREENBERG, LERNER (SW Ukraine/Moldova/Romania)


Re: Translation of Polish Occupation #translation

JoannaYael
 

Pachaiarz krów was a man who supplied cow milk to the landlord, in exchange for allowing him to occupy a płot of land.

Dr. Joanna Yael Zimmerman


Re: DE BEER: Naming traditions #germany #names #sephardic

JoannaYael
 

--------- Forwarded message ----------
From: JoannaYael <jyzimmerman@...>
To: main@...
Cc: 
Bcc: 
Date: Tue, 04 May 2021 06:18:38 -0700
Subject: Re: DE BEER: Naming traditions #germany #names #sephardic
Bar Moshe ב״ר משה means in Hebrew Ben Rabbi Moshe, meaning, son of rabbi Moshe (Bar is an abbreviation). Among Ashkenazi Jews, BAR meant usually ‘Ben Reb’ (Reb was a honorific that did not indicate the status of a Rabbi).

Naming a son after his living father was NOT a Jewish custom. 

Dr. Joanna Yael Zimmerman


Re: 1905 New York Census #usa #records

Marshall Lerner
 

I have found that family names (first as well as last), initials, & ages were all very fluid in all manner of census records, immigration records. etc. It seems that interpretation, transliteration, preference & whim mattered more than consistency. Some of those changes are subtle while others are more dramatic. For example my paternal great grandmother immigrated as Scheme Sternberg but appears as Sadie Steinberg in census records & Bat Sheva Alla in other records, etc. My maternal great grandfather immigrated as Moses Eisenberg and appears as Moritz Ajsenberg, Morris Eisenberg, etc. in other family records. My other maternal great grandfather immigrated as Banet Gherbel and appears as Benny Geebel, Benjamin Gabel, Ben Gerbel, etc. in various records.


Marshall Lerner
West Chester, PA


Hessen Gatermann Index Updated #germany #JewishGenUpdates

Alex Calzareth
 

The Hessen Gatermann Index, which contains more than 70,000 records, is one of the largest German databases at Jewishgen.org. Users of this database may have noticed in recent months that the links to view the original records no longer worked after the Hessen archives changed their link formats. We're very happy to report that these links have been updated and you can now easily access the original records again. In addition, the presentation of results has been updated and the entries for marriages now appear in a more compact format.

 

For more information, see JewishGen’s German Research Division webpage and the JewishGen German Collection.

 

Alex Calzareth

Director

German Research Division

acalzareth@...


Re: Translation of Polish Occupation #translation

Alexander Sharon
 

The Polish equivalent of the cotter (at least to the 19th century) was the Pachciarz krów. The term translates as "Cow tenant". One of the functions of the Pachciarz krów was to supply the landowner with milk and other bovine produce.

Alexander Sharon


Re: Bayside cemetery Queens, NY #usa

A. E. Jordan
 




-----Original Message-----
From: Nana Redell <nane7012@...>


I recently found out that my grandfather Max LEFKOWITZ who was living in Newark, NJ was buried in the Bayside Cemetery, in Queens, NY.
Nana(nayna) Redell




I am not sure what the current status of Bayside is. There was an effort (the last of many) maybe two years ago to clean it up. But unless they have done ongoing maintenance it would be useless.

The office was ransacked years ago and most of the onsite records lost ... I was actually there before it happened and even then the records were spotty.

I have not been to the cemetery in years and I am not sure what it hours are for visiting as I think they are limited. Also I am not sure it is the best of areas so I wold not go alone. My great grandfather is among the missing at Bayside which is a great personal frustration.

As for finding a grave there are several partial databases of Bayside burials. Check the JOWBR record here at JewishGen to start. Steve Lasky had some records but I don't know what his status is and he had the overall map of the cemetery http://www.museumoffamilyhistory.com/cp-maps-ny-nj.htm. You could try emailing him to see if he has the person in his records but make sure you give him the date of burial.

Like most cemeteries it is divided into mostly burial societies. You need to find the name of the society and its gate number.

The Jewish Theological Institute has the burial books and you can try emailing them and ask them to give you the data. My experiences with them were difficult and uncooperative.

Also try newspapers and see if you can find a notice for the person's burial because it might give the name of the society.

Without the society name and the gate number it is a nearly impossible search because of the size of the cemetery especially since you said you are looking for a singe grave.

There are two cemeteries bordering Bayside that are separate but in poor condition as well. A lot of people got confused with which of the three cemeteries a person was being buried in so it is not uncommon to find a record saying Bayside but the person is in one of the two adjoining cemeteries.

Wish there was more encouraging news to offer.

Allan Jordan
New York



Re: Bayside cemetery Queens, NY #usa

feinber2@...
 

Many years ago my brother and I went there to look for our maternal ggp’s graves. It was open, but there no help available then, either. The Cemetery is fairly large, but not as big as many of the others in NY. It took us about an hour to find it. 

As an aside, our plan was to look from back to front, each of us having our own territories. Of course, with our luck it was in the front. When we told our mother who was about 75 then, she said “you know, I remember going there as a kid. It was right by the front fence.” 

Good luck. See if some elderly relative can remember anything. If not, prepare to do some work. It feels like striking gold or oil when you find it.

Arthur Feinberg
Kalamazoo MI

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