Date   

Rabbi Meir of Fulda, the MaHaRaM Schiff #rabbinic

Jim Bennett
 

I'm searching for a fairly complete, accurate and documented genealogy of
the MaHaRaM Schiff. In particular information about his daughters and who
they married.

Jim Bennett, Haifa


Rabbinic Genealogy SIG #Rabbinic Rabbi Meir of Fulda, the MaHaRaM Schiff #rabbinic

Jim Bennett
 

I'm searching for a fairly complete, accurate and documented genealogy of
the MaHaRaM Schiff. In particular information about his daughters and who
they married.

Jim Bennett, Haifa


Re: LDS online Hungarian Civil Registration images #hungary

edelman@...
 

In order to make browsing more efficient, rather than look for a name or
anything else that might be somewhat indecipherable, I first just look
first to see if the individuals and so on are Jewish. If they are, I
know that they might be who I am looking for.

Todd Edelman

On 12/16/2013 11:01 AM, tom wrote:
The page "Hungary, Civil Registration, 1895-1980" is accessible at
<https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1452460>. near the bottom
of the screen, there's a link labelled: "Browse through 5,914,035
images".

the notation on the page says: "This collection is being published as
images become available. Please visit the wiki or browse the
collection to determine current coverage."

and i can add that "browsing" is very tedious and time-consuming. (i
have a 4 megabit dsl connection, but each image is fairly large.) the
local family history centre is a 20-minute drive away, but i still
think i can get more research done, for the same amount of effort,
with the films than online.

there was a programme available that would "pre-load" pages >from the
lds site (which greatly reduces the waiting time for the next page to
load), but the church requested that it be discontinued, supposedly
because they do not approve of anything that stores the images on the
user's local hard drive. this seems strangely at odds with everything
else they are doing, but the author of the software has complied. (as
of a week or two ago, when i tried to download the software.)


....... tom klein, toronto


awmjr@magocsi.org wrote:

Am I correct that the actual film images are only available
at one of the Family History Centers, i.e. they are not viewable online?

If they are viewable online, can someone point me to a
starting point, please?
I have used the database of transcriptions but would love to see the
actual images.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This SIG (h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org
For more information on the Hungarian SIG see our
website at http://www.jewishgen.org/hungary/ and check out
the fabulous Hungary Database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/
For back issues, search the H-SIG message archives at
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigs
Has JewishGen helped you connect with your family? We want to hear
your story! Please email us at info@JewishGen.org today
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up now for value-added services!
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/ValueAdded.asp

To post a message, please address it to <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
----
You are currently subscribed to h-sig as: [edelman@greenidea.eu]
To change the format of our mailings, to stop/resume delivery (vacation),
or to unsubscribe, please go to http://www.jewishgen.org/listserv
--
Todd Edelman
SLOW Factory

Voice/Text: 415 867 9843
Skype: toddedelman

edelman@greenidea.eu
www.greenidea.eu

https://www.facebook.com/Iamtoddedelman
http://twitter.com/toddedelman
http://de.linkedin.com/in/toddedelman


Thankyous for Responses on Hungary to Bohemia immigrant #hungary

Paul King
 

Re my posting (16.12.2013) of questions related to Benjamin Konig. He was
apparently born in Nagycenk (near Sopron) and was a merchant in Mako. It is
only speculative how he arrived in Karlovy Vary (Carlsbad), but it may have
been for an extended health cure. Special thanks to Karesz Vandor,
genealogist and guide, for giving whereabouts of Nagycenk vital data and
about Mako as onion capital. Thankyou Hungarian SIGgers.

Paul King
Jerusalem


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: LDS online Hungarian Civil Registration images #hungary

edelman@...
 

In order to make browsing more efficient, rather than look for a name or
anything else that might be somewhat indecipherable, I first just look
first to see if the individuals and so on are Jewish. If they are, I
know that they might be who I am looking for.

Todd Edelman

On 12/16/2013 11:01 AM, tom wrote:
The page "Hungary, Civil Registration, 1895-1980" is accessible at
<https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1452460>. near the bottom
of the screen, there's a link labelled: "Browse through 5,914,035
images".

the notation on the page says: "This collection is being published as
images become available. Please visit the wiki or browse the
collection to determine current coverage."

and i can add that "browsing" is very tedious and time-consuming. (i
have a 4 megabit dsl connection, but each image is fairly large.) the
local family history centre is a 20-minute drive away, but i still
think i can get more research done, for the same amount of effort,
with the films than online.

there was a programme available that would "pre-load" pages >from the
lds site (which greatly reduces the waiting time for the next page to
load), but the church requested that it be discontinued, supposedly
because they do not approve of anything that stores the images on the
user's local hard drive. this seems strangely at odds with everything
else they are doing, but the author of the software has complied. (as
of a week or two ago, when i tried to download the software.)


....... tom klein, toronto


awmjr@magocsi.org wrote:

Am I correct that the actual film images are only available
at one of the Family History Centers, i.e. they are not viewable online?

If they are viewable online, can someone point me to a
starting point, please?
I have used the database of transcriptions but would love to see the
actual images.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This SIG (h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org) is hosted by
JewishGen: The Home of Jewish Genealogy
Visit our home page at http://www.jewishgen.org
For more information on the Hungarian SIG see our
website at http://www.jewishgen.org/hungary/ and check out
the fabulous Hungary Database at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Hungary/
For back issues, search the H-SIG message archives at
http://data.jewishgen.org/wconnect/wc.dll?jg~jgsys~sigs
Has JewishGen helped you connect with your family? We want to hear
your story! Please email us at info@JewishGen.org today
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Sign up now for value-added services!
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/ValueAdded.asp

To post a message, please address it to <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
----
You are currently subscribed to h-sig as: [edelman@greenidea.eu]
To change the format of our mailings, to stop/resume delivery (vacation),
or to unsubscribe, please go to http://www.jewishgen.org/listserv
--
Todd Edelman
SLOW Factory

Voice/Text: 415 867 9843
Skype: toddedelman

edelman@greenidea.eu
www.greenidea.eu

https://www.facebook.com/Iamtoddedelman
http://twitter.com/toddedelman
http://de.linkedin.com/in/toddedelman


Hungary SIG #Hungary Thankyous for Responses on Hungary to Bohemia immigrant #hungary

Paul King
 

Re my posting (16.12.2013) of questions related to Benjamin Konig. He was
apparently born in Nagycenk (near Sopron) and was a merchant in Mako. It is
only speculative how he arrived in Karlovy Vary (Carlsbad), but it may have
been for an extended health cure. Special thanks to Karesz Vandor,
genealogist and guide, for giving whereabouts of Nagycenk vital data and
about Mako as onion capital. Thankyou Hungarian SIGgers.

Paul King
Jerusalem


Re: LDS online Hungarian Civil Registration images #hungary

g_hirsch@...
 

"Hungary, Civil Registration, 1895-1980," index and images,

Hallo Tom,

I tried the given link just to see how it works. I entered the name of my mother and her father's name, the repply was:

Hungary, Civil Registration, 1895-1980
Keine Einträge gefunden fßr >Name: JånosnÊ Hirsch, Name des Vaters: Zsigmond Kohut
Â
I browsed earlier and I found my mother's name, because in 1947 when my father remarried, my mother was declared death. So once I searched through the death register for BÊkÊscsaba between 1945 - 1951, to find data of some in Holocaust perished relatives,friends, schoolmates, so I copied to pages my mother was on.

"Hungary, Civil Registration, 1895-1980," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-20644-18829-58?cc=1452460&wc=M944-HHN:1603112742 : accessed 17 Dec 2013), BÊkÊs > BÊkÊscsaba > Deaths (Halottak) 1945 > image 288 of 933.

One nice - and for me new - idea is that I can printout the source of the data "Quellenangabe kopieren"
I have no idea, what did I wrong, that with the browser and correct data I couldn't find the proper pages. May be you have an idea.

All the best
Gabor

Gesendet:Â Montag, 16. Dezember 2013 um 20:01 Uhr
Von:Â tom <tomk@ecologicaltech.com>
An:Â H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Betreff:Â Re:[h-sig] LDS online Hungarian Civil Registration images
The page "Hungary, Civil Registration, 1895-1980" is accessible at
<https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1452460>. near the
bottom of the screen, there's a link labelled: "Browse through
5,914,035 images".

the notation on the page says: "This collection is being published as
images become available. Please visit the wiki or browse the
collection to determine current coverage."

and i can add that "browsing" is very tedious and time-consuming. (i
have a 4 megabit dsl connection, but each image is fairly large.)
the local family history centre is a 20-minute drive away, but i
still think i can get more research done, for the same amount of
effort, with the films than online.

there was a programme available that would "pre-load" pages >from the
lds site (which greatly reduces the waiting time for the next page to
load), but the church requested that it be discontinued, supposedly
because they do not approve of anything that stores the images on the
user's local hard drive. this seems strangely at odds with
everything else they are doing, but the author of the software has
complied. (as of a week or two ago, when i tried to download the
software.)


....... tom klein, toronto

awmjr@magocsi.org wrote:

Am I correct that the actual film images are only available
at one of the Family History Centers, i.e. they are not viewable online?

If they are viewable online, can someone point me to a
starting point, please?
I have used the database of transcriptions but would love to see the
actual images.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Aw: Re:LDS online Hungarian Civil Registration images #hungary

g_hirsch@...
 

"Hungary, Civil Registration, 1895-1980," index and images,

Hallo Tom,

I tried the given link just to see how it works. I entered the name of my mother and her father's name, the repply was:

Hungary, Civil Registration, 1895-1980
Keine Einträge gefunden fßr >Name: JånosnÊ Hirsch, Name des Vaters: Zsigmond Kohut
Â
I browsed earlier and I found my mother's name, because in 1947 when my father remarried, my mother was declared death. So once I searched through the death register for BÊkÊscsaba between 1945 - 1951, to find data of some in Holocaust perished relatives,friends, schoolmates, so I copied to pages my mother was on.

"Hungary, Civil Registration, 1895-1980," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-20644-18829-58?cc=1452460&wc=M944-HHN:1603112742 : accessed 17 Dec 2013), BÊkÊs > BÊkÊscsaba > Deaths (Halottak) 1945 > image 288 of 933.

One nice - and for me new - idea is that I can printout the source of the data "Quellenangabe kopieren"
I have no idea, what did I wrong, that with the browser and correct data I couldn't find the proper pages. May be you have an idea.

All the best
Gabor

Gesendet:Â Montag, 16. Dezember 2013 um 20:01 Uhr
Von:Â tom <tomk@ecologicaltech.com>
An:Â H-SIG <h-sig@lyris.jewishgen.org>
Betreff:Â Re:[h-sig] LDS online Hungarian Civil Registration images
The page "Hungary, Civil Registration, 1895-1980" is accessible at
<https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1452460>. near the
bottom of the screen, there's a link labelled: "Browse through
5,914,035 images".

the notation on the page says: "This collection is being published as
images become available. Please visit the wiki or browse the
collection to determine current coverage."

and i can add that "browsing" is very tedious and time-consuming. (i
have a 4 megabit dsl connection, but each image is fairly large.)
the local family history centre is a 20-minute drive away, but i
still think i can get more research done, for the same amount of
effort, with the films than online.

there was a programme available that would "pre-load" pages >from the
lds site (which greatly reduces the waiting time for the next page to
load), but the church requested that it be discontinued, supposedly
because they do not approve of anything that stores the images on the
user's local hard drive. this seems strangely at odds with
everything else they are doing, but the author of the software has
complied. (as of a week or two ago, when i tried to download the
software.)


....... tom klein, toronto

awmjr@magocsi.org wrote:

Am I correct that the actual film images are only available
at one of the Family History Centers, i.e. they are not viewable online?

If they are viewable online, can someone point me to a
starting point, please?
I have used the database of transcriptions but would love to see the
actual images.


Re: Tracing a Hungary to Bohemia migration via Hungarian birth data #hungary

tom
 

my first suggestion is that you post the image of whatever record you
have to viewmate, because it's very difficult to guess handwriting
without seeing what's actually on the page. there were at least 3
places that started with "nagyszent" according to the 1913 gazetteer
at bogardi.com.

as for speculations about name changes, you should check the book of
19th century name changes (officially titled "szazadunk
nevvaltoztatasai", available online at
<http://archive.org/details/szzadunknvv00magyuoft>), just on the off
chance that he changed his name formally before moving to karlsbad. i
would guess not, but you never know. also, flipping through the
book, you'll notice that most people (largely jews and ethnic
germans) at that time were changing their names away from, not to,
german-sounding names.

it's possible that his original name was KIRALY, but i think KOHN is
much more likely, just because of the political climate of the time.
(and there were a lot more jews named KOHN than KIRALY.)

good luck,


....... tom klein, toronto

pauledking@gmail.com wrote:

I have the documented death of a Benjamin Konig in Karlsbad, Bohemia on 26
May 1909, age 60. He was born in Nagyzsend (the last 5 letters are not fully
legible to me). Can anyone suggest the possible village/town? The only
location I could find which bears a resemblance is Nagycenk.

Secondly, once identifying the location, what are my data bank options for
tracing this Konig's birth around 1849.

Thirdly, while Konig may be a common surname in Hungary, is Kiraly an
accepted surname (translation of Konig)


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Tracing a Hungary to Bohemia migration via Hungarian birth data #hungary

tom
 

my first suggestion is that you post the image of whatever record you
have to viewmate, because it's very difficult to guess handwriting
without seeing what's actually on the page. there were at least 3
places that started with "nagyszent" according to the 1913 gazetteer
at bogardi.com.

as for speculations about name changes, you should check the book of
19th century name changes (officially titled "szazadunk
nevvaltoztatasai", available online at
<http://archive.org/details/szzadunknvv00magyuoft>), just on the off
chance that he changed his name formally before moving to karlsbad. i
would guess not, but you never know. also, flipping through the
book, you'll notice that most people (largely jews and ethnic
germans) at that time were changing their names away from, not to,
german-sounding names.

it's possible that his original name was KIRALY, but i think KOHN is
much more likely, just because of the political climate of the time.
(and there were a lot more jews named KOHN than KIRALY.)

good luck,


....... tom klein, toronto

pauledking@gmail.com wrote:

I have the documented death of a Benjamin Konig in Karlsbad, Bohemia on 26
May 1909, age 60. He was born in Nagyzsend (the last 5 letters are not fully
legible to me). Can anyone suggest the possible village/town? The only
location I could find which bears a resemblance is Nagycenk.

Secondly, once identifying the location, what are my data bank options for
tracing this Konig's birth around 1849.

Thirdly, while Konig may be a common surname in Hungary, is Kiraly an
accepted surname (translation of Konig)


Classes and Fields #bessarabia

David and Gloria Green <davidgreen777@...>
 

Professor Yefim!
Thank you so much for the education on languages and names for the Moldova/Bessarabian region.
The following comment you made in your Dec 14 post (below) hit home: "The Moldovans children
usually studied until 3-4th grade and after that worked at home and in the field with the parents."

My father (Jacob Moses SCHWARTZMAN) left Bendery for America in 1906 at age 18 or 21, the age
depending on how important the record was that he filled out in the US. I was young when he died
(at 78 or 81) and never took the opportunity to ask about his life in Bendery. All I remember his
telling us is that he had a third grade education and that he was working "the field" when his sister
came running - he sensed it was to tell him their father had died. I showed a picture of my father's
mother and 3 of his sisters to staff members of the Bendery Culture and History Museum (except
no Jewish culture/history) during a visit this summer. The picture was taken in Bendery in 1907
(a year after he left for America). The ladies at the museum exclaimed at how well dressed they
were and said they were clearly "petit bourgeois." The Researcher Alla Chastain found a record of
my father's parents in the Criuleny metric books for 1879. It indicates they were "petit bourgeois".
According to Wikipedia, the term refers to lower middle class, trade professions.

Yefim, kindly expound on the different classes that were used in these record books and where
Jews typically fit - and, if you can, the balance in comparison to the rest of the population.

Also, >from what I saw, the old homes in Bendery typically have carefully designed, fenced garden
plots in their yards. Between the residential area and the Dneister River, I saw a large area of many
acres of land divided into individual garden plots. So, my second question is: typically, what is
"the field" that you referred to? Who owned the land? Did Jews typically have a "business" and a
"field"?

On the road between Kishinev and Bendery, there were only huge plots of land planted first with
wheat, then corn, sunflowers, grapes. No farm houses, barns, farm equipment - just acres of one
huge crop after another. Can I assume these are government controlled? Has it always been so?

If you wish, I can put together a document which shows these various gardens/plots as they are
currently, but perhaps if I had your explanation first, I could incorporate that in the document.

Thank you so much for all your efforts.

Gloria Green
Searching SCHWARTZMAN/SPIVAK - Bendery, Criuleni and LERNER - Bendery, Odessa
Winter Garden, FL
------------

Subject: RE: Languages in Moldova and Moldovia
From: "Yefim Kogan" <yefimk@verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2013 17:44:35 -0500

Hi everybody, it is a great discussion. I want to thank everyone who
participated. I would be glad to let you know my take on Languages.
200 years ago: 1812 - Russia annexed the Eastern part of Moldova
Principality, and that whole region between rivers Prut and Dniester and
Danube in the south became part of Russia, the oblast and later Gubernia
(Province) of Russian Empire……….


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Classes and Fields #bessarabia

David and Gloria Green <davidgreen777@...>
 

Professor Yefim!
Thank you so much for the education on languages and names for the Moldova/Bessarabian region.
The following comment you made in your Dec 14 post (below) hit home: "The Moldovans children
usually studied until 3-4th grade and after that worked at home and in the field with the parents."

My father (Jacob Moses SCHWARTZMAN) left Bendery for America in 1906 at age 18 or 21, the age
depending on how important the record was that he filled out in the US. I was young when he died
(at 78 or 81) and never took the opportunity to ask about his life in Bendery. All I remember his
telling us is that he had a third grade education and that he was working "the field" when his sister
came running - he sensed it was to tell him their father had died. I showed a picture of my father's
mother and 3 of his sisters to staff members of the Bendery Culture and History Museum (except
no Jewish culture/history) during a visit this summer. The picture was taken in Bendery in 1907
(a year after he left for America). The ladies at the museum exclaimed at how well dressed they
were and said they were clearly "petit bourgeois." The Researcher Alla Chastain found a record of
my father's parents in the Criuleny metric books for 1879. It indicates they were "petit bourgeois".
According to Wikipedia, the term refers to lower middle class, trade professions.

Yefim, kindly expound on the different classes that were used in these record books and where
Jews typically fit - and, if you can, the balance in comparison to the rest of the population.

Also, >from what I saw, the old homes in Bendery typically have carefully designed, fenced garden
plots in their yards. Between the residential area and the Dneister River, I saw a large area of many
acres of land divided into individual garden plots. So, my second question is: typically, what is
"the field" that you referred to? Who owned the land? Did Jews typically have a "business" and a
"field"?

On the road between Kishinev and Bendery, there were only huge plots of land planted first with
wheat, then corn, sunflowers, grapes. No farm houses, barns, farm equipment - just acres of one
huge crop after another. Can I assume these are government controlled? Has it always been so?

If you wish, I can put together a document which shows these various gardens/plots as they are
currently, but perhaps if I had your explanation first, I could incorporate that in the document.

Thank you so much for all your efforts.

Gloria Green
Searching SCHWARTZMAN/SPIVAK - Bendery, Criuleni and LERNER - Bendery, Odessa
Winter Garden, FL
------------

Subject: RE: Languages in Moldova and Moldovia
From: "Yefim Kogan" <yefimk@verizon.net>
Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2013 17:44:35 -0500

Hi everybody, it is a great discussion. I want to thank everyone who
participated. I would be glad to let you know my take on Languages.
200 years ago: 1812 - Russia annexed the Eastern part of Moldova
Principality, and that whole region between rivers Prut and Dniester and
Danube in the south became part of Russia, the oblast and later Gubernia
(Province) of Russian Empire……….


Cartography Update for the Gesher Galicia Map Room: Eastern Galicia Ethnographic Map 1939 and more.... #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

Dear Genealogical Mapping Enthusiasts:

Newly added to the Gesher Galicia map room at:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org

Eastern Galicia Ethnographic Map 1939

This is a demographic map of the ethnic populations of southwestern
Ukraine (historic eastern Galicia) created in 1953 by the Association
of Ukrainian Former Combatants in Great Britain, estimated from
various data sources for the beginning of 1939. Circle sizes scale to
village and town populations, squares to cities, and colors indicate
the proportions of Ukrainians, Poles, Jews, and other populations in
each. The original paper document is in the extensive map collection
of Harrie Teunissen and John Steegh, who provided Gesher Galicia with
a digital scan and a copy of the introductory notes (pdf: 13MB); an
excellent summary of this text is included in their online exhibition
Jewish history on the map.

The direct link to the map is here:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/special/east-galicia-ethnographic-1939/

Link to the original introductory notes (PDF file):
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/special/east-galicia-ethnographic-1939/text.pdf

The web site of Harrie Teunissen and John Steegh is also well worth a visit.

http://siger.org/

Here, among other things, you'll find an absolutely fascinating
presentation,"The Holocaust in Contemporary Maps," delivered at the
international workshop "Geography and Holocaust Research," held in Bad
Arolsen, Germany last year, is available here:

http://www.siger.org/holocaustincontemporarymaps/

And "Jewish HIstory on the Map" (a 2009 exhibit >from the Netherlands
showing Jewish history on maps >from the 19th - 21st centuries) is
available here:

http://siger.org/jewish-history-on-the-map

This exhibit contains maps ranging >from the Venice ghetto, mellah of
Marrakech, synagogues in Salonika and Strasbourg, to the Jewish
Diaspora, Jews in New York, and the Warsaw Ghetto 1940.

Back to our own site, the "specialty maps" section of Gesher Galicia's
map room (scroll down) offers a Jewish population density map of
Galician Districts >from 1910, and a climatic map >from 1899.

Thanks to Jay Osborn, Gesher Galicia's map room coordinator, for
pursuing maps valuable to genealogists wherever in the world they are
and getting them in shape to go online.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
www.geshergalicia.org
http://maps.geshergalicia.org


JRI Poland #Poland Cartography Update for the Gesher Galicia Map Room: Eastern Galicia Ethnographic Map 1939 and more.... #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

Dear Genealogical Mapping Enthusiasts:

Newly added to the Gesher Galicia map room at:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org

Eastern Galicia Ethnographic Map 1939

This is a demographic map of the ethnic populations of southwestern
Ukraine (historic eastern Galicia) created in 1953 by the Association
of Ukrainian Former Combatants in Great Britain, estimated from
various data sources for the beginning of 1939. Circle sizes scale to
village and town populations, squares to cities, and colors indicate
the proportions of Ukrainians, Poles, Jews, and other populations in
each. The original paper document is in the extensive map collection
of Harrie Teunissen and John Steegh, who provided Gesher Galicia with
a digital scan and a copy of the introductory notes (pdf: 13MB); an
excellent summary of this text is included in their online exhibition
Jewish history on the map.

The direct link to the map is here:
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/special/east-galicia-ethnographic-1939/

Link to the original introductory notes (PDF file):
http://maps.geshergalicia.org/special/east-galicia-ethnographic-1939/text.pdf

The web site of Harrie Teunissen and John Steegh is also well worth a visit.

http://siger.org/

Here, among other things, you'll find an absolutely fascinating
presentation,"The Holocaust in Contemporary Maps," delivered at the
international workshop "Geography and Holocaust Research," held in Bad
Arolsen, Germany last year, is available here:

http://www.siger.org/holocaustincontemporarymaps/

And "Jewish HIstory on the Map" (a 2009 exhibit >from the Netherlands
showing Jewish history on maps >from the 19th - 21st centuries) is
available here:

http://siger.org/jewish-history-on-the-map

This exhibit contains maps ranging >from the Venice ghetto, mellah of
Marrakech, synagogues in Salonika and Strasbourg, to the Jewish
Diaspora, Jews in New York, and the Warsaw Ghetto 1940.

Back to our own site, the "specialty maps" section of Gesher Galicia's
map room (scroll down) offers a Jewish population density map of
Galician Districts >from 1910, and a climatic map >from 1899.

Thanks to Jay Osborn, Gesher Galicia's map room coordinator, for
pursuing maps valuable to genealogists wherever in the world they are
and getting them in shape to go online.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
www.geshergalicia.org
http://maps.geshergalicia.org


JGS (NY) Meeting, Sunday, December 22 #lithuania

Harriet Mayer
 

JGS (NY) Meeting Sunday, December 22 at 2 PM at the Center for Jewish
History, 15 West 16th St. New York
Speaker: Professor Magda Teter.
Lecture: "The Myth and Reality of Jewish Life in Eastern Europe"

With the images of Tevye the Milkman ingrained in popular memory of
Jewish society in eastern Europe, the real experience of Jews is
often lost. In her talk, Magda Teter will discuss how this popular
imagery of Jewish life came about, and what it leaves hidden about
Jewish history.

Magda Teter grew up in Cold-War Poland. She received an M.A. >from
the School of Oriental Studies at the University of Warsaw, and
an M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D degrees >from Columbia University. She
currently teaches at Wesleyan University. She specializes in early
modern religious and cultural history, with an emphasis on
Jewish-Christian relations in Eastern Europe, the politics of
religion, and the transmission of culture among Jews and Christians
across Europe in the early modern period. She is the author of
"Jews and Heretics in Catholic Poland" (2006),"Sinners on Trial"
(2011), and a co-editor of and a contributor to "Social and Cultural
Boundaries in Pre-Modern Poland" (2010).

The Annual Meeting and Presentation of the Slate of Officers will
also take place. In Addition: >from 12:30 to 1:30: Bring your lunch
and meet with JGS members and experts in an informal setting to
share research stories and ask questions. Free for members;
guests, $5 at the door.

Harriet Mayer
JGS NY VP Communications
New York, NY


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania JGS (NY) Meeting, Sunday, December 22 #lithuania

Harriet Mayer
 

JGS (NY) Meeting Sunday, December 22 at 2 PM at the Center for Jewish
History, 15 West 16th St. New York
Speaker: Professor Magda Teter.
Lecture: "The Myth and Reality of Jewish Life in Eastern Europe"

With the images of Tevye the Milkman ingrained in popular memory of
Jewish society in eastern Europe, the real experience of Jews is
often lost. In her talk, Magda Teter will discuss how this popular
imagery of Jewish life came about, and what it leaves hidden about
Jewish history.

Magda Teter grew up in Cold-War Poland. She received an M.A. >from
the School of Oriental Studies at the University of Warsaw, and
an M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D degrees >from Columbia University. She
currently teaches at Wesleyan University. She specializes in early
modern religious and cultural history, with an emphasis on
Jewish-Christian relations in Eastern Europe, the politics of
religion, and the transmission of culture among Jews and Christians
across Europe in the early modern period. She is the author of
"Jews and Heretics in Catholic Poland" (2006),"Sinners on Trial"
(2011), and a co-editor of and a contributor to "Social and Cultural
Boundaries in Pre-Modern Poland" (2010).

The Annual Meeting and Presentation of the Slate of Officers will
also take place. In Addition: >from 12:30 to 1:30: Bring your lunch
and meet with JGS members and experts in an informal setting to
share research stories and ask questions. Free for members;
guests, $5 at the door.

Harriet Mayer
JGS NY VP Communications
New York, NY


JewishGen's Memorial Plaque Project Adds 5,400 Records. We Need Your Help to Grow! #galicia

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2013 year-end update for the
Memorial Plaque Project database. The MPP database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/
The MPP database includes the data >from plaques and Yizkor lists >from
synagogue and other organizations. Many of these sources include
patronymic information.

The database now includes more than 35,100 records >from the USA,
Israel, British Columbia, and now Morocco. These records come >from
57 different synagogues and other institutions.

We believe that the MPP is a good example of how users of JewishGen's
databases can "give back". If you are a member of a synagogue or other
organization with memorial plaques or Yizkor lists, please consider
helping us to grow this database. You can find more information on
submitting data at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/Submit.htm
If you have additional questions, please contact me directly.

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:

• Boston Area, Massachusetts. Thanks to David Rosen, who is
coordinating submissions >from the JGS of Greater Boston. He and his
team have added 3,500 records >from 6 institutions.

• Congregation Agudas Israel, Newburgh. Many thanks for the
submission of 1,250 records >from this Newburgh synagogue.

Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all your
submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information
for this update.

Nolan Altman
NAltman@JewishGen.org
JewishGen Acting VP for Data Acquisition
December, 2013


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia JewishGen's Memorial Plaque Project Adds 5,400 Records. We Need Your Help to Grow! #galicia

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2013 year-end update for the
Memorial Plaque Project database. The MPP database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/
The MPP database includes the data >from plaques and Yizkor lists >from
synagogue and other organizations. Many of these sources include
patronymic information.

The database now includes more than 35,100 records >from the USA,
Israel, British Columbia, and now Morocco. These records come >from
57 different synagogues and other institutions.

We believe that the MPP is a good example of how users of JewishGen's
databases can "give back". If you are a member of a synagogue or other
organization with memorial plaques or Yizkor lists, please consider
helping us to grow this database. You can find more information on
submitting data at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/Submit.htm
If you have additional questions, please contact me directly.

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:

• Boston Area, Massachusetts. Thanks to David Rosen, who is
coordinating submissions >from the JGS of Greater Boston. He and his
team have added 3,500 records >from 6 institutions.

• Congregation Agudas Israel, Newburgh. Many thanks for the
submission of 1,250 records >from this Newburgh synagogue.

Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all your
submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information
for this update.

Nolan Altman
NAltman@JewishGen.org
JewishGen Acting VP for Data Acquisition
December, 2013


JOWBR Adds 114,000 Records. Database Includes Over 2.1 Million Records! #galicia

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2013 year-end update to the JOWBR
(JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The JOWBR
database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/

If you're a new JOWBR user, we recommend that you take a look at the
first two explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update adds approximately 114,000 new records and 19,000 new
photos.The database is adding 172 new cemeteries along with updates or
additions to an additional 219 cemeteries. This update brings JOWBR's
holdings to 2.14 million records >from more than 4,200 cemeteries /
cemetery sections representing 83 countries! (We've even added two new
countries: the Dominican Republic and Sri Lanka)

Once again, donors for this update include a mix of individuals, Jewish
genealogical societies, historical societies and museums. We appreciate
all our donors' submissions and the transliteration work done by a
faithful group of JewishGen volunteers.

I want to particularly thank Eric Feinstein who has been helping me to
find and gain permission to add many of the records >from
under-represented countries. In addition, without our volunteer
transliterators, led by Gilberto Jugend, we would not be able to add the
information >from some very difficult to read photos.

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:

-- Sharon, Massachusetts. Thanks to the administrators of the Sharon
Memorial Park with assistance >from Jerry Wyner and the New England
Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) for their submission of 37,100
records.

-- Praha, Czech Republic. Thanks to Randy Schoenberg and the Jewish
Community of Praha for 25,200 records >from the New Jewish Cemetery.

-- Pennsylvania. Thanks to Susan Melnick, archivist for the Rauh Jewish
Archives of the Senator John Heinz History Center for the following
sets:
- 9,100 records >from the Beth Shalom Cemetery connected with
Congregation Beth Shalom in Pittsburgh, Pa.
- Johnstown area cemeteries -- 1,050 records >from 6 cemeteries in
Westmont and Geistown.

-- Germany. We are adding close to 62 new German cemeteries (7,300
records). Significant contributions came from:
- Dieter Peters submitted approximately 40 cemeteries with 5,000
records >from his collection. Additional cemetery records will be added in
future updates.
- Partnering with JewishGen's German Special Interest Group (GerSIG),
we have added 20 cemeteries with approximately 2,150 records.

-- Zhytomyr, Ukraine. Thanks to a team of volunteers >from JewishGen's
Ukrainian Special Interest Group for 4,100 additional records and 5,300
photos to link to the entire collection.

-- Sadgora, Ukraine. Thanks to a project funded by the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Ottawa, Canada, the submission includes 3,500
records and their linked photos.

-- Hegenheim, France. Thanks to Professor Frowald Gil Huettenmeister
for the submission of 3,200 records >from his book on the cemetery:
Huettenmeister, Gil und Rogg, Lea: "Der juedische Friedhof in
Hegenheim. Le Cimetiere Israelite de Hegenheim (Haut-Rhin)".

-- Ontario, Canada. Thanks to Allen Halberstadt, coordinator of the
Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada, Toronto's Cemetery Project, for
updating 190 cemetery sections resulting in 2,800 additional records
from various cemeteries.
-- Porto Alegre, Brazil. Thanks to David Jovegelevicius, President of
the Centro Israelita, Porto Alegre, Brazil for submitting his data set
of 2,600 records.

-- Waterbury, Connecticut. Thanks to Ruben Poupko for submitting
1,800 records and photos for 3 additional Waterbury cemeteries. Included
in this update are records and photos >from Hebrew Benefit Cemetery,
Melchizedek Cemetery, and the Farband Cemetery.

-- Kursk, Russia. Thanks to Mikhail Moiseevich Kaner, Chairman of the
Jewish community of the city of Kursk for submitting 1,300 records along
with 1,100 photos.

-- West Springfield, Massachusetts. Thanks to Jeff Kontoff for
photographing the Kodimoh Cemetery and submitting 1,250 photos and
an additional 250 records.

-- Forest Park, Illinois. Thanks to Debra Wolraich for submitting 1,200
records >from the Anshe Motele Society section in the Waldheim Cemetery.

-- Eisenstadt, Austria. >from the book "Die Grabschriften des Alten
Judenfriedhofes in Eisenstadt" by Bernhard Wachstein, a listing of the
1,200 burials in the old cemetery that took place between 1679 until
1874.

-- Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all
your submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information
for this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to
make additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery /
cemetery section individually or consider a group project for your local
Society, temple or other group, it's your submissions that help grow the
JOWBR database and make it possible for researchers and family members
to find answers they otherwise might not. Please also consider other
organizations you may be affiliated with that may already have done
cemetery indexing that would consider having their records included in
the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
NAltman@JewishGen.org
JewishGen Acting VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR - Coordinator
December 2013


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia JOWBR Adds 114,000 Records. Database Includes Over 2.1 Million Records! #galicia

Nolan Altman
 

JewishGen is proud to announce its 2013 year-end update to the JOWBR
(JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry) database. The JOWBR
database can be accessed at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/

If you're a new JOWBR user, we recommend that you take a look at the
first two explanatory screencasts at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

This update adds approximately 114,000 new records and 19,000 new
photos.The database is adding 172 new cemeteries along with updates or
additions to an additional 219 cemeteries. This update brings JOWBR's
holdings to 2.14 million records >from more than 4,200 cemeteries /
cemetery sections representing 83 countries! (We've even added two new
countries: the Dominican Republic and Sri Lanka)

Once again, donors for this update include a mix of individuals, Jewish
genealogical societies, historical societies and museums. We appreciate
all our donors' submissions and the transliteration work done by a
faithful group of JewishGen volunteers.

I want to particularly thank Eric Feinstein who has been helping me to
find and gain permission to add many of the records >from
under-represented countries. In addition, without our volunteer
transliterators, led by Gilberto Jugend, we would not be able to add the
information >from some very difficult to read photos.

Of particular note in this update are the following additions:

-- Sharon, Massachusetts. Thanks to the administrators of the Sharon
Memorial Park with assistance >from Jerry Wyner and the New England
Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) for their submission of 37,100
records.

-- Praha, Czech Republic. Thanks to Randy Schoenberg and the Jewish
Community of Praha for 25,200 records >from the New Jewish Cemetery.

-- Pennsylvania. Thanks to Susan Melnick, archivist for the Rauh Jewish
Archives of the Senator John Heinz History Center for the following
sets:
- 9,100 records >from the Beth Shalom Cemetery connected with
Congregation Beth Shalom in Pittsburgh, Pa.
- Johnstown area cemeteries -- 1,050 records >from 6 cemeteries in
Westmont and Geistown.

-- Germany. We are adding close to 62 new German cemeteries (7,300
records). Significant contributions came from:
- Dieter Peters submitted approximately 40 cemeteries with 5,000
records >from his collection. Additional cemetery records will be added in
future updates.
- Partnering with JewishGen's German Special Interest Group (GerSIG),
we have added 20 cemeteries with approximately 2,150 records.

-- Zhytomyr, Ukraine. Thanks to a team of volunteers >from JewishGen's
Ukrainian Special Interest Group for 4,100 additional records and 5,300
photos to link to the entire collection.

-- Sadgora, Ukraine. Thanks to a project funded by the Jewish
Genealogical Society of Ottawa, Canada, the submission includes 3,500
records and their linked photos.

-- Hegenheim, France. Thanks to Professor Frowald Gil Huettenmeister
for the submission of 3,200 records >from his book on the cemetery:
Huettenmeister, Gil und Rogg, Lea: "Der juedische Friedhof in
Hegenheim. Le Cimetiere Israelite de Hegenheim (Haut-Rhin)".

-- Ontario, Canada. Thanks to Allen Halberstadt, coordinator of the
Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada, Toronto's Cemetery Project, for
updating 190 cemetery sections resulting in 2,800 additional records
from various cemeteries.
-- Porto Alegre, Brazil. Thanks to David Jovegelevicius, President of
the Centro Israelita, Porto Alegre, Brazil for submitting his data set
of 2,600 records.

-- Waterbury, Connecticut. Thanks to Ruben Poupko for submitting
1,800 records and photos for 3 additional Waterbury cemeteries. Included
in this update are records and photos >from Hebrew Benefit Cemetery,
Melchizedek Cemetery, and the Farband Cemetery.

-- Kursk, Russia. Thanks to Mikhail Moiseevich Kaner, Chairman of the
Jewish community of the city of Kursk for submitting 1,300 records along
with 1,100 photos.

-- West Springfield, Massachusetts. Thanks to Jeff Kontoff for
photographing the Kodimoh Cemetery and submitting 1,250 photos and
an additional 250 records.

-- Forest Park, Illinois. Thanks to Debra Wolraich for submitting 1,200
records >from the Anshe Motele Society section in the Waldheim Cemetery.

-- Eisenstadt, Austria. >from the book "Die Grabschriften des Alten
Judenfriedhofes in Eisenstadt" by Bernhard Wachstein, a listing of the
1,200 burials in the old cemetery that took place between 1679 until
1874.

-- Whether your name or records are listed above, we appreciate all
your submissions! Thank you to all the donors that submitted information
for this update.

We appreciate all the work our donors have done and encourage you to
make additional submissions. Whether you work on a cemetery /
cemetery section individually or consider a group project for your local
Society, temple or other group, it's your submissions that help grow the
JOWBR database and make it possible for researchers and family members
to find answers they otherwise might not. Please also consider other
organizations you may be affiliated with that may already have done
cemetery indexing that would consider having their records included in
the JOWBR database.

Nolan Altman
NAltman@JewishGen.org
JewishGen Acting VP for Data Acquisition
JOWBR - Coordinator
December 2013

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