Date   

Re: Questions about Surnames - Galicia/Poland

Sally Bruckheimer
 

Our ancestors in Eastern Europe were often unable to marry civilly, because Jewish marriages were banned or highly taxed. So the government considered the children illegitimate. Since the parents were married religiously, it didn't matter much to the Jews.

In records, the government wanted the 'illegitimate' children to use the mother's maiden name, not their fathers. So you get records with 'vel', 'falshe', and 'recte': Smith vel (or) Jones, Smith falshe (falsely) Jones, Smith recte (correctly) Jones. 

The kids can end up using either the father's family name or the mother's - or both. Vel is or, falshe is false, recte is true or correctly. When you see 6 kids with a different family name than their father, it may be that their biological father died and mother remarried, or they may all be using their mother's maiden name.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Re: women's right to vote

Eva Lawrence
 

You don't say which country you are asking about. In Englland an electoral register is maintained, and was compiled every year. Currently a registration form is delivered to every household, and and the householder enters the names of eligible people in the household. I suspect but can't say for sure that this was the case as soon as there was universal male suffrage, At first only property-owning married women were allowed to vote,and presumably they would have access to  such a registration form.
.As the husband fills in the form, in the past, you might have needed his permission,  I did find the name of one of my husband's female ancestors on a 1930s electoral register,  and was quite impressed. 
Some male relatives of mine who were householders, were on the electoral register in 1876,  almost as soon as Jews were allowed to vote in England, even though they were not British citizens, so it looks as if not too many awkward questions were asked if you actually wanted to vote
     
--
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


Arthur Miller ancestry

neilan1
 

Does anyone have information about the Family Tree of the writer Arthur Miller (family name in Europe - Mahler)?  Before he passed away, he and I had established an email relationship. We believed that we were related through an aunt who had married a "Moe Stern" from Radomysl Wielki, Poland. Mr. Miller couldn't remember any other names. Since there appear to have been very few Sterns in the town, my family believed that "Moe Stern" may have been one of my grandmother's 15 children, of whom several remain unknown.


Re: Domestic Service Visas: 1938 . . .

Judith Diamond
 

 National Archives in Kew have a file on law. I don’t have a copy. 
http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/results/r?_q=Domestic%20servant&_d=HO&_tsj=C10091&_p=1925&_hb=tna&_rv=simple


Research

catherine.cahoua@...
 

Hi, I would like to find people from my mother’s family : The name is Liesouk and they lived in Vilnot in Lithuania before 1900. Some of them are supposed to be In Israēl now. If you have any information, please let me know.
Thank you very much !
--
Catherine


Re: MANDEL's #belarus

shirley@...
 

Dear Anna [from Russia] and Susan & Neville [Vatican], and extended JewishGen family,

Here is a bit about my Mandel side:  Israel Mandel, born 1875, son of Aaron Mandel and Ruth Smokler [Rochel Shmukler], all of Mir, Minsk Gubernia.

My great aunt Hannah [Chashke] married Israel Mandel in 1898 in MIR, which is near NOVOGRUDOK.  Her maiden name was DeMatoff [Dalmatovsky ?].  They came to Chicago in 1904 ? with two children.  Subsequently she had several more children with Israel, who was a bakery truck driver.

Israel's obituary [1942, Chicago] mentioned 5 siblings, presumably also born in or near Mir [also called Demir, I think].  These were Esther, Fannie, Celia, Benjamin, Elsie.  Some of them lived in Chicago, others in New York.

While we are at it, Hannah's mother was Sarah [Tchirke] Epstein, possibly also from Mir.

Any connections? 
Can anyone clarify why Mir is also called Demir?  Is one an earlier name for the town?  Or a Yiddish inflected version of the Russian name?

Shirley
California


JGASG Philadelphia- March 15 ,2020 Meeting

Lois Sernoff
 

JGASG Philadelphia- March 15th Meeting

Date: Sunday, March 15, 2020

Time: 1:30 pm

Place: Main Line Reform Temple
          Corner: Montgomery Ave & Penn Rd.
          Wynnewood, PA

Speaker: Joel Spector Director of Metrical Record Projects, JewishGen Ukraine Research Group

 

Topic: The Krakovsky Documents: Utilization of the Data by the Ukraine Research Group and Its Preservation on JewishGen

Joel is a Past President of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Philadelphia, where he has also been chairperson of its Russian Special Interest Group.
Joel has given presentations and workshops on the Russian language, both contemporary and pre-Revolutionary, and has provided translations of documents to
individuals and groups. Currently Joel is a member of the Ukraine Research Group and serves as its Director of Metric Record Projects. Joel has been actively
engaged in genealogy for over 30 years and has been conducting research in several historic Russian language encyclopedias He has produced a unique English
language Index to the Russian language Evreiskaya Entsiklopedia.

For several years, Alex Krakovsky, a Ukrainian Jew, has been scanning metrical and census records found in long-closed Ukrainian archives. He has placed the
indexes, in Cyrillic, on a webpage where they can easily be accessed by anyone interested. This presentation will first discuss the origin and method of Alex's data
acquisition, and then give an overview of the contents of his site.

The Ukraine Research Group, formerly the Ukraine SIG, has begun a project to make English language indexes to these documents available. Joel will describe the Group's
current Metrical Records Project, whose purpose is to transliterate components of the documents and make the data available for researchers on JewishGen.

Mentors will also be available from 1:00 pm until the start of the meeting to help with your research efforts.

JGSGP website http://www.jgsgp.org is now available with latest news,upcoming meeting notices, and links to Philadelphia resources.

We can also be found on Facebook.
Member are welcome without charge
Guest fee of $5 can be applied toward membership

Lois Sernoff [JGASGP]


Re: Domestic Service Visas: 1938 . . .

Terry Ashton
 

Hi Leah (and others who have also been interested in this topic),
This was such a coincidence to see this email on this topic, as I am also trying to find information on my cousin's mother (Esther Aronowicz) who arrived in the UK in March 1939 on a Domestic Sevice Permit. I have been to the website for World Jewish Relief and left details for them as they may be able to help.
Sincerely,
Ms Terry Ashton
Melbourne Australia

Searching: 

ARONOWICZ: Germany/Poland
PRASHKER: Kalisz,  Poland

SZUMOWSKI: Gorki, Zdunska Wola, Lomza,  Poland

WAJNGOT: Hungary/Poland

GOLDMAN: Blaszki, Poland

SEGAL/SEGALOVITCH: Vilnius, Lithuania

HOLTZ: Dvinsk, Russia (now Latvia)

 


Ohel Kervitz, Russia 1886

Carl Kaplan
 

On a naturalization document from 1908, a woman I am researching said she was born in 1886 in Ohel Kervitz, Russia. What town would that be today?


women's right to vote

Gayle Schlissel Riley
 

Was there a special registration to vote when women got the right to vote? I have not seen any records about the registration.
I know my Schlissel Grandmother would have been excited to case her opinion. She was a business women. Gayle


ViewMate Translation Request - Polish - Birth - Izydor Turkel

Deborah Schultz
 

Hello. I've posted 2 columns of an 1896 birth record on ViewMate, and hope that a kind volunteer could translate them for me. I believe the record is in Polish. I would be very grateful for any assistance provided.

The birth record is for Izydor Turkel of Drohobycz, Galicia, Austria-Hungary. He traveled to the U.S. in 1912, as Isaak Tierkel, and was called Irving Turkel in the U.S. (New York City). 

The left column is his father's information, and the right column is his mother's.

In an earlier email I sent, I neglected to include a link to the record. My apologies. 

Thank you very much.

--
Deborah Schultz, Michigan, USA


--
Deborah Schultz


ViewMate Translation Request - Polish - Birth - Izydor Turkel

Deborah Schultz
 

Hello. I've posted 2 columns of an 1896 birth record on ViewMate, and hope that a kind volunteer could translate them for me. I believe the record is in Polish. I would be very grateful for any assistance provided.

The birth record is for Izydor Turkel of Drohobycz, Galicia, Austria-Hungary. He traveled to the U.S. in 1912, as Isaak Tierkel, and was called Irving Turkel in the U.S. (New York City). 

The left column is his father's information, and the right column is his mother's.

Thank you very much.

--
Deborah Schultz, Michigan, USA


Viewmatew #78804--Polish or German translation requested

Joseph Walder
 

The quality of the record I need translated is poor enough that I frankly cannot tell if it is in Polish or German. This birth record for Mincze WALDER is indexed by JRI-Poland but there may well be important hints that are not included in the indexed information. Thus I would be grateful for as complete a translation as is feasible. Please note that only the top record on the page is pertinent.

I appreciate whatever help can be given.

Joseph Walder, Portland, Oregon, USA


Viewmate 78803--Polish translation requested

Joseph Walder
 

In connection with trying to understand an apparent DNA match, I have come across a Galician marriage record that may be pertinent.This marriage record comes from Drohobych records and is for Mechel JOSEFSBERG and Ester Mindel FEDERSCHNEIDER. Although it is indexed on JRI-Poland, some of the indexed information is inconsistent with other information provided to me by a JOSEFSBERG descendant. To try to resolve the inconsistency, I would appreciate as complete a translation as possible, with particular attention to any information about the parents of the married couple.

Many thanks for any help.

Joseph Walder, Portland, Oregon, USA


ViewMate translation request - Polish (and Yiddish?)

Dan Williams
 

I'm looking for a translation from Polish of two birth records from Krakow. My third great grandfather Joseph Herzog was born in Krakow in 1840 and I'm trying to determine if these records are of him and perhaps a sister. It looks like there's a small amount of Yiddish at the bottom but I'm not sure.


Thanks so much in advance for your help.

Dan Williams
Oakland, CA


Re: Domestic Service Visas: 1938 . . .

Eva Lawrence
 

My maiden aunt, my mother's sister came to England on a Domestic Service Visa. Potential immigrants were only admitted, even with a passport, if they could prove that they would not be a liability on the State. They had to have a job, unless a British resident who would guarantee them to an amount of £50. My grandmother, this aunt's mother, aged 60, was able to call on an English nephew for a gurantee, but there wasno such gurantee for my aunt.  Almost the only work unqualified women with apoor command of the language were able to take at the time was domestic service, and many English families offered jobs as maids, cooks or such like to refugees from Germany and Austria. You'd need a letter from your future employer,  and probably it was marked on your passport by the British consulate in Germany. 

They usually would still have to pay for their own journey to England   Many were live-in jobs.  My aunt, a trained secretary was quite unhappy working as a dentist's maid, where she had to answer the door wearing the black dress and white frilly apron that maids wore at the time, but she knew that it had saved her life. She found other work in a munitions factory as soon as she could - harder but less demeaning,. More varied work was  available for men, and married women were exempt, as it was accepted that their husband would support them.  Some of these women on domestic service visas have written autobiographies. 
--
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


ViewMate Translation Requests #ukraine

paulmoverman@...
 

I've posted two vital records in Russian for which I would greatly appreciate a translation. Please note that I am not requesting a translation of the Hebrew.  I have posted the right side pages to give a better view due to the curvature of the image caused by the book binding.  They are on ViewMate at the following addresses:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM78734 (right side of page is VM78735)
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM78732 (right side of page is VM78733) Please respond via the form provided on the ViewMate image page. Thank you very much. Paul Moverman ---


Latvia birth certificate

Laura O
 

I am doing some research with documents my husband inherited from his mother, she was born in Riga 1929. As indicated from the image taken from her birth certificate below, Line 6 is Nationality, (žīds-Jew); Line 7 is Faith. Faith is listed as “mozus”. I am curious why faith was listed as such; is this a reference to Mosus? I am interested in understanding the use of different terms are in different instances (ie. Ebrejs, žīds, mozus). A great-grandparent’s Latvian passport uses žīds and ebrejs.

(Not sure which hashtags to use, this is my first post, I thank you for your patience)


Re: Death Certificate for Detroit for Julius Kozloff

Jay Paul
 

Original Message on 6 Mar 2020 from: barbara Schoenburg
Mar 6   

Can anyone help? I need a copy of the death certificate for Julius Kozloff (my Grandfather) who died 12/4/1949. Cannot get it as there is a 75 year wait. Thank you
-----------------------
Barbara,
There certainly is the discrepancy in the date of death in the death record found by Linda Kelley. If this is the Julius KOZLOFF you are seeking, married to Bella (née BELACHEFSKY), with sons Benjamin and Harold, and daughter Elaine (married to David RIESMAN), the Julius who owned a fish market (information from the 1940 US Federal Census and his brief death notice in the Detroit Free Press on Sunday, 7 Sep 1947), then the information was as she provided. From his listing in the Detroit Border Crossings and Passenger and Crew Lists, 1905-1963, his birth date was about 1887 (as he was 38 on his arrival in Detroit on 8 Aug 1925). Hence he would have been about 60 when he died, not 7. (From directories, it appears that Bella eventually moved to Miami Beach, FL.)

This information doesn’t give you the actual death certificate, but it at least allows you to verify the online information if pertinent and use that as some documentation.

Sincerely,
Jay Paul
San Francisco, CA 94117

Researching: SUMBERG (Pilvishok/Pilviskiai, Lithuania), LANGERT (Pilviskiai & elsewhere in Suwalki gubernia); KAHN (Ranstadt, Germany), GOTTLIEB (Grebenau, Germany), PAVLOVSKIY / PAVLOVSKY (Mala Antonivka, Bila Tserkiv, Vasyl’kiv, Kyiv gubernia, Ukraine), LEVITSKIY / LEVITZSKY (Yasnohorodka, Vasyl’kiv, Kyiv gubernia), KOTLER (Vistytis, Suwalki gubernia), WOLF (Austro-Hungary).




--
Jay Paul, PhD
San Francisco CA 94117
Researching: SUMBERG (Pilvishok/Pilviskiai, Lithuania), LANGERT (Pilviskiai & elsewhere in Suwalki gubernia); KAHN (Ranstadt, Germany), GOTTLIEB (Grebenau, Germany), PAVLOVSKIY / PAVLOVSKY (Mala Antonivka, Bila Tserkiv, Vasyl’kiv, Kyiv gubernia, Ukraine), LEVITSKIY / LEVITZSKY (Yasnohorodka, Vasyl’kiv, Kyiv gubernia), KOTLER (Vistytis, Suwalki gubernia), WOLF (Austro-Hungary).


Questions about Surnames - Galicia/Poland

Mitch Mermel
 

As an example: I've come across listings in the Jewish Records Indexing where the parents are Abraham Hersch LEIMSIDER and Chaje Jütte SIGAL, but the surname for the child may be listed as [ SIGAL V. LEIMSIDER ] or [SIGAL \ LEIMSIDER] or [LEIMSIEDER R SIGAL] or [LEIMSIEDER f SIGAL]. Sometimes the surname will simply be that of the father.

The primary question is, when both surnames are listed, do we assume the child takes on the surname of the father or does some other naming convention come into play?  How do we know which surname the child went by?
Secondary question: What are the meanings of the "V", "F", "R" or "\"

Thank you
Mitch MERMEL
Orlando, Florida, USA