Date   

Re: how to find a GI's name from WW2 #general

Campbell, Karen (Perkins Coie) <KCampbell@...>
 

Moshe, what is the exact date of VE day in 1945?

The major universities in Seattle are: Seattle University, University of
Washington, Seattle Pacific University. Was is Seattle University that
you contacted?

Have you searched newspaper archives for newspaper
articles on that date?

Karen Campbell, Bellevue, WA (near Seattle)

From: Moshe Schaeffer schaefferfamilytree@gmail.com
I hope you might be able to help me. I am trying to find out about a
relative of mine who was killed on VE day. She was not a GI but her new
husband was.
snip.........


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE: how to find a GI's name from WW2 #general

Campbell, Karen (Perkins Coie) <KCampbell@...>
 

Moshe, what is the exact date of VE day in 1945?

The major universities in Seattle are: Seattle University, University of
Washington, Seattle Pacific University. Was is Seattle University that
you contacted?

Have you searched newspaper archives for newspaper
articles on that date?

Karen Campbell, Bellevue, WA (near Seattle)

From: Moshe Schaeffer schaefferfamilytree@gmail.com
I hope you might be able to help me. I am trying to find out about a
relative of mine who was killed on VE day. She was not a GI but her new
husband was.
snip.........


Accessing and searching the ROM-SIG Moldavia database #general

Bob Wascou
 

The Moldavia Vital Records Database is a component of
the "JewishGen Romania Database", at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/

The Moldavia Vital Records Database's Introductory page,
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/MoldaviaVRs.htm
will tell you what records we have online, and
the records that we have to work on.

The main "JewishGen Romania Database" page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/
will allow you to search for the names you are looking for.

If a search yields any results, they will be under
"Moldavia Marriages and Divorces", "Moldavia Births Database"
or "Moldavia Deaths Records".

Check out the other databases, as you might find results there also.

Bob Wascou
ROM-SIG Research Coordinator


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Accessing and searching the ROM-SIG Moldavia database #general

Bob Wascou
 

The Moldavia Vital Records Database is a component of
the "JewishGen Romania Database", at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/

The Moldavia Vital Records Database's Introductory page,
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/MoldaviaVRs.htm
will tell you what records we have online, and
the records that we have to work on.

The main "JewishGen Romania Database" page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/
will allow you to search for the names you are looking for.

If a search yields any results, they will be under
"Moldavia Marriages and Divorces", "Moldavia Births Database"
or "Moldavia Deaths Records".

Check out the other databases, as you might find results there also.

Bob Wascou
ROM-SIG Research Coordinator


FW: [rom-sig] Accessing and searching the ROM-SIG Moldavia database #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

To all Bessarabian Researchers:

I received a posting >from Romania SIG, and probably many of you received it
too. It talks about Moldavia Vital Records Database. I would like clarify
for you that these records are NOT >from Republic of Moldova/Bessarabia
records our Bessarabia Special Interest Group is covering.

In fact Bob Wascou is presenting Romanian (Moldavia/Moldova Region) records.
The records are >from towns which are part of current Romania!

The words Moldova and Moldavia are in fact the same, but >from different
languages. Moldova is in Romanian language and Moldavia was used to in
Russian and English. Romania SIG is using "Moldavia" Vital Records just for
Romanian (Moldavia region) records, and we can use in our website "Moldova",
in order not to be confused.

Here is a little historical overview. Before 1812 (201 years) Moldova
(Moldavia) was a Principality, an independent country, with rulers, and who
paid tributary to Ottoman Empire. By the agreement between Ottoman Empire
and Moldavia Principality no Turks could live in Moldavia territory, except
in fortified towns. In 1812 Russian Empire after Bucharest Treaty occupied
(or some historians will say liberated) Eastern part of Moldova(Moldavia)
Principality, which became a Province of Bessarabia in Russian Empire. The
remaining part of Moldova(Moldavia) Principality remained as a separate
entity until 1860s-1870s when together with another Principality - Wallachia
a new country was born - Romania. Main city of Moldavia region in Romania
is Yassy.

Please let me know if I confused you even more...

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China

-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Wascou [mailto:bobwascou@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2013 2:05 PM
To: Romania SIG
Subject: [rom-sig] Accessing and searching the ROM-SIG Moldavia database

The Moldavia Vital Records Database is a component of the "JewishGen Romania
Database", at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/

The Moldavia Vital Records Database's Introductory page,
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/MoldaviaVRs.htm
will tell you what records we have online, and the records that we have to
work on.

The main "JewishGen Romania Database" page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/
will allow you to search for the names you are looking for.

If a search yields any results, they will be under "Moldavia Marriages and
Divorces", "Moldavia Births Database"
or "Moldavia Deaths Records".

Check out the other databases, as you might find results there also.

Bob Wascou
ROM-SIG Research Coordinator


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia FW: [rom-sig] Accessing and searching the ROM-SIG Moldavia database #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

To all Bessarabian Researchers:

I received a posting >from Romania SIG, and probably many of you received it
too. It talks about Moldavia Vital Records Database. I would like clarify
for you that these records are NOT >from Republic of Moldova/Bessarabia
records our Bessarabia Special Interest Group is covering.

In fact Bob Wascou is presenting Romanian (Moldavia/Moldova Region) records.
The records are >from towns which are part of current Romania!

The words Moldova and Moldavia are in fact the same, but >from different
languages. Moldova is in Romanian language and Moldavia was used to in
Russian and English. Romania SIG is using "Moldavia" Vital Records just for
Romanian (Moldavia region) records, and we can use in our website "Moldova",
in order not to be confused.

Here is a little historical overview. Before 1812 (201 years) Moldova
(Moldavia) was a Principality, an independent country, with rulers, and who
paid tributary to Ottoman Empire. By the agreement between Ottoman Empire
and Moldavia Principality no Turks could live in Moldavia territory, except
in fortified towns. In 1812 Russian Empire after Bucharest Treaty occupied
(or some historians will say liberated) Eastern part of Moldova(Moldavia)
Principality, which became a Province of Bessarabia in Russian Empire. The
remaining part of Moldova(Moldavia) Principality remained as a separate
entity until 1860s-1870s when together with another Principality - Wallachia
a new country was born - Romania. Main city of Moldavia region in Romania
is Yassy.

Please let me know if I confused you even more...

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China

-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Wascou [mailto:bobwascou@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2013 2:05 PM
To: Romania SIG
Subject: [rom-sig] Accessing and searching the ROM-SIG Moldavia database

The Moldavia Vital Records Database is a component of the "JewishGen Romania
Database", at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/

The Moldavia Vital Records Database's Introductory page,
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/MoldaviaVRs.htm
will tell you what records we have online, and the records that we have to
work on.

The main "JewishGen Romania Database" page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/
will allow you to search for the names you are looking for.

If a search yields any results, they will be under "Moldavia Marriages and
Divorces", "Moldavia Births Database"
or "Moldavia Deaths Records".

Check out the other databases, as you might find results there also.

Bob Wascou
ROM-SIG Research Coordinator


Interesting article about roots travel #general

Daniel Horowitz <daniel@...>
 

The New York Times published on November 15, 2013 an article by Caren
Osten Gerszberg titled "Traveling to Find Your Roots" you can read at

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/17/travel/traveling-to-find-your-roots.html?_r=0

( http://tinyurl.com/ktkyp9s )

The article includes the author's first-hand experience and also
presents some good suggestions on how to prepare for such a trip.

The article talks a bit about those who travel to destinations where
there no longer are living family members. So, though some family
history research travel might provide an opportunity to meet distant
cousins, there is also value to just walking where your ancestor's
once did and seeing places where your family members 'lived' many
years ago.

This information was brought to my attention on a recent post of the
National Genealogical Society (NGS) blog "Upfront" at

http://upfront.ngsgenealogy.org/2013/12/traveling-to-find-your-roots-is-now.html
?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+UpfrontWithNgs+%28UpFront+with
+NGS%29

( http://tinyurl.com/kzarexr )

Daniel Horowitz


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Interesting article about roots travel #general

Daniel Horowitz <daniel@...>
 

The New York Times published on November 15, 2013 an article by Caren
Osten Gerszberg titled "Traveling to Find Your Roots" you can read at

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/17/travel/traveling-to-find-your-roots.html?_r=0

( http://tinyurl.com/ktkyp9s )

The article includes the author's first-hand experience and also
presents some good suggestions on how to prepare for such a trip.

The article talks a bit about those who travel to destinations where
there no longer are living family members. So, though some family
history research travel might provide an opportunity to meet distant
cousins, there is also value to just walking where your ancestor's
once did and seeing places where your family members 'lived' many
years ago.

This information was brought to my attention on a recent post of the
National Genealogical Society (NGS) blog "Upfront" at

http://upfront.ngsgenealogy.org/2013/12/traveling-to-find-your-roots-is-now.html
?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+UpfrontWithNgs+%28UpFront+with
+NGS%29

( http://tinyurl.com/kzarexr )

Daniel Horowitz


On Certainty in Genealogy #general

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

I have written a response to some recent articles in Avotaynu and put it
on my blog if anyone is interested. See http://schoenblog.com/?p=433
My previous article on collaborative genealogy is at
http://schoenblog.com/?p=435

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


Seeking FRUCHTER (SCHINDLER) from Bolechow #general

Orit Lavi
 

Dear friends

Samuel Leib FRUCHTER married Chane Feige SCHINDLER, and three of their
children were born in Bolechow between 1890 - 1900: Taube, Leib,
and Salomon Josel.

Samuel Leib was the son of Mojzesz and Taube, and he died in Bolechow, 1925.
I don't know the fate of Chane Feige.
As to the children - they adopted the name FRUCHTER in 1912, but I
have found nothing about them since that year.

Any information about this family >from 1912 onward would be greatly
appreciated.

Many thanks

Orit Lavi
Tsukey Yam, Israel


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen On Certainty in Genealogy #general

E. Randol Schoenberg
 

I have written a response to some recent articles in Avotaynu and put it
on my blog if anyone is interested. See http://schoenblog.com/?p=433
My previous article on collaborative genealogy is at
http://schoenblog.com/?p=435

Randy Schoenberg
Los Angeles, CA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking FRUCHTER (SCHINDLER) from Bolechow #general

Orit Lavi
 

Dear friends

Samuel Leib FRUCHTER married Chane Feige SCHINDLER, and three of their
children were born in Bolechow between 1890 - 1900: Taube, Leib,
and Salomon Josel.

Samuel Leib was the son of Mojzesz and Taube, and he died in Bolechow, 1925.
I don't know the fate of Chane Feige.
As to the children - they adopted the name FRUCHTER in 1912, but I
have found nothing about them since that year.

Any information about this family >from 1912 onward would be greatly
appreciated.

Many thanks

Orit Lavi
Tsukey Yam, Israel


Accessing and searching the ROM-SIG Moldavia database #romania

Bob Wascou
 

The Moldavia Vital Records Database is a component of
the "JewishGen Romania Database", at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/

The Moldavia Vital Records Database's Introductory page,
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/MoldaviaVRs.htm
will tell you what records we have online, and
the records that we have to work on.

The main "JewishGen Romania Database" page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/
will allow you to search for the names you are looking for.

If a search yields any results, they will be under
"Moldavia Marriages and Divorces", "Moldavia Births Database"
or "Moldavia Deaths Records".

Check out the other databases, as you might find results there also.

Bob Wascou
ROM-SIG Research Coordinator


Romania SIG #Romania Accessing and searching the ROM-SIG Moldavia database #romania

Bob Wascou
 

The Moldavia Vital Records Database is a component of
the "JewishGen Romania Database", at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/

The Moldavia Vital Records Database's Introductory page,
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/MoldaviaVRs.htm
will tell you what records we have online, and
the records that we have to work on.

The main "JewishGen Romania Database" page at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Romania/
will allow you to search for the names you are looking for.

If a search yields any results, they will be under
"Moldavia Marriages and Divorces", "Moldavia Births Database"
or "Moldavia Deaths Records".

Check out the other databases, as you might find results there also.

Bob Wascou
ROM-SIG Research Coordinator


JewishGen offers "Publish Your Family History" Jan 2 - Jan 31 #austria-czech

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is offering a 4 week class "Publish Your Family History"
beginning January 2, 2014. This course requires application.

The class includes lessons to help you organize data for publication,
format and sequence text and media.

The instructor will read written selections and work with you through
the process of Putting it All Together

Are you ready to publish your family history and wondering how to get
it organized and out to family and friends?

This class will consider the various ways of packaging your research,
matching your material to your audience and what to include >from the
research you have accumulated.

We will consider the many kinds of publications >from photo albums to
family history books, the self-publishing venues, and using
professional publishers.

This class will be open 24/7 and students will work on their family
history together with an instructor.

The instructor will read parts of the work as students progress
through the stages of production.

Limited Enrollment
Enrollment is by application. Application may be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40000
Tuition is $150 and is payable after the application process,
through our online secure web site.
For questions and to submit your application, please email the
instructor

Nancy Holden
nholden@interserv.com
Instruction Manager


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech JewishGen offers "Publish Your Family History" Jan 2 - Jan 31 #austria-czech

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen is offering a 4 week class "Publish Your Family History"
beginning January 2, 2014. This course requires application.

The class includes lessons to help you organize data for publication,
format and sequence text and media.

The instructor will read written selections and work with you through
the process of Putting it All Together

Are you ready to publish your family history and wondering how to get
it organized and out to family and friends?

This class will consider the various ways of packaging your research,
matching your material to your audience and what to include >from the
research you have accumulated.

We will consider the many kinds of publications >from photo albums to
family history books, the self-publishing venues, and using
professional publishers.

This class will be open 24/7 and students will work on their family
history together with an instructor.

The instructor will read parts of the work as students progress
through the stages of production.

Limited Enrollment
Enrollment is by application. Application may be found at
http://www.jewishgen.org/education/description.asp?course=40000
Tuition is $150 and is payable after the application process,
through our online secure web site.
For questions and to submit your application, please email the
instructor

Nancy Holden
nholden@interserv.com
Instruction Manager


Re: Cook County naturalizations (Declarations of Intent) index #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Richard,

That is an interesting website and collection.
It may be hard to get all records for Kishinev or other towns, but I still
recommend the site very much.
You can search by country too, but there are different spellings of Romania,
and the same place with same dates could be listed under Romania, Russia, or
Bessarabia.

Thank you very much,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China

-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Levine [mailto:richardslevine@hotmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2013 11:10 AM
To: Bessarabia SIG
Subject: Cook County naturalizations (Declarations of Intent) index

Cook County (Chicago, Illinois) has a searchable online index of over
400,000 "Declarations of Intent" (1906-1929) to become U.S. citizens. I
played with this today, and what I find particularly of interest is that you
can search by town and/or country. First, I found a possible DORFMAN
relation to my ancestors, because he was born 1866 in Kishiner, Russia,
which I assume to be Kishinev, Bessarabia (though I could be wrong) where I
believe my DORFMAN ancestors were from.

Then I tried searching on Town=Kishinev. I got back 29 entries. Because
Kishinev could be spelled many ways in the index, I also tried Kishineff (41
entries) and Chisinau (5 entries). I'm sure there are many other entries
you can find for Kishinev and other Bessarabian towns.

http://www.cookcountyclerkofcourt.org/NR/default.aspx

Regards,
Richard S. Levine
Clearwater, Florida
Researching CONFELD(possibly KUNPFELT/KUMPFELT/KORNFELDT/KORENFELDT),
DORFMAN, WINNER, OXMAN, ZEKMAN...families >from Bessarabia (possibly
Kishinev); KALISH/KALISZ, ZILBERWASER/SYLBERWASSER, GILLER/HILLER,
SENDLER...>from Brzeziny and Lodz; LEVINE, FORMAN...>from Pereyaslav (and/or
possibly Odessa), Ukraine


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia RE: Cook County naturalizations (Declarations of Intent) index #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Richard,

That is an interesting website and collection.
It may be hard to get all records for Kishinev or other towns, but I still
recommend the site very much.
You can search by country too, but there are different spellings of Romania,
and the same place with same dates could be listed under Romania, Russia, or
Bessarabia.

Thank you very much,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania, KOGAN in Dubossary, Moldova, SRULEVICH in Shanghai, China

-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Levine [mailto:richardslevine@hotmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2013 11:10 AM
To: Bessarabia SIG
Subject: Cook County naturalizations (Declarations of Intent) index

Cook County (Chicago, Illinois) has a searchable online index of over
400,000 "Declarations of Intent" (1906-1929) to become U.S. citizens. I
played with this today, and what I find particularly of interest is that you
can search by town and/or country. First, I found a possible DORFMAN
relation to my ancestors, because he was born 1866 in Kishiner, Russia,
which I assume to be Kishinev, Bessarabia (though I could be wrong) where I
believe my DORFMAN ancestors were from.

Then I tried searching on Town=Kishinev. I got back 29 entries. Because
Kishinev could be spelled many ways in the index, I also tried Kishineff (41
entries) and Chisinau (5 entries). I'm sure there are many other entries
you can find for Kishinev and other Bessarabian towns.

http://www.cookcountyclerkofcourt.org/NR/default.aspx

Regards,
Richard S. Levine
Clearwater, Florida
Researching CONFELD(possibly KUNPFELT/KUMPFELT/KORNFELDT/KORENFELDT),
DORFMAN, WINNER, OXMAN, ZEKMAN...families >from Bessarabia (possibly
Kishinev); KALISH/KALISZ, ZILBERWASER/SYLBERWASSER, GILLER/HILLER,
SENDLER...>from Brzeziny and Lodz; LEVINE, FORMAN...>from Pereyaslav (and/or
possibly Odessa), Ukraine


Request for assistance with research project #ukraine

Amy Smith <amy.smith@...>
 

REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE



My name is Amy Smith, and I am the Ben and Zelda Cohen Fellow at the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. I am also a Ph.D. candidate
at Yale University.

I am currently conducting research on the lives of Holocaust
survivors, and would appreciate your assistance.

I am particularly interested in studying the experiences of survivors
who created families after the war, and who immigrated to the United
States or Canada after spending some time in the DP camps. This is an
area of survivors postwar experience that has rarely been studied,
and yet it is an important piece of the history of the Holocaust
aftermath.

If you are a survivor who fits these criteria, or the child of
survivors who fit these criteria, and are willing to help me, I would
love to hear >from you. I can be contacted at amy.smith@yale.edu or at
202-308-4023.

Sincerely,
Amy Smith


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Request for assistance with research project #ukraine

Amy Smith <amy.smith@...>
 

REQUEST FOR ASSISTANCE



My name is Amy Smith, and I am the Ben and Zelda Cohen Fellow at the
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. I am also a Ph.D. candidate
at Yale University.

I am currently conducting research on the lives of Holocaust
survivors, and would appreciate your assistance.

I am particularly interested in studying the experiences of survivors
who created families after the war, and who immigrated to the United
States or Canada after spending some time in the DP camps. This is an
area of survivors postwar experience that has rarely been studied,
and yet it is an important piece of the history of the Holocaust
aftermath.

If you are a survivor who fits these criteria, or the child of
survivors who fit these criteria, and are willing to help me, I would
love to hear >from you. I can be contacted at amy.smith@yale.edu or at
202-308-4023.

Sincerely,
Amy Smith

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