Date   

Re: Breclav synagogue #austria-czech

gluckpast@...
 

I have just discovered that around 1935/6, after training in Berlin as a
cantor and shochet, my father Jakub Berkovic went to work in Breclav,
presumably in the synagogue that now forms part of the town museum and arts
centre. I would be very interested to discover if any records >from that
period may survive or if anyone may be able to suggest where they might be
found.

I have spent most of my life (now aged 68) searching for my father's family
and am trying to gather as much information as possible for a family
history.

John Berkeley (previously Berkovic)

Warwick, UK


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Breclav synagogue #austria-czech

gluckpast@...
 

I have just discovered that around 1935/6, after training in Berlin as a
cantor and shochet, my father Jakub Berkovic went to work in Breclav,
presumably in the synagogue that now forms part of the town museum and arts
centre. I would be very interested to discover if any records >from that
period may survive or if anyone may be able to suggest where they might be
found.

I have spent most of my life (now aged 68) searching for my father's family
and am trying to gather as much information as possible for a family
history.

John Berkeley (previously Berkovic)

Warwick, UK


Subj: ViewMate translation request of graves from Beresnegovate- Hebrew #ukraine

Laura M. Steiman <cantata150@...>
 

Hello

I've posted a vital record in Hebrew for which I need a loose
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=29777
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=29778

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
--
Laura M. Steiman
(2000) Rosario- Santa Fe
Argentina



--
Laura M. Steiman
(2000) Rosario- Santa Fe
Argentina


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Fwd: Subj: ViewMate translation request of graves from Beresnegovate- Hebrew #ukraine

Laura M. Steiman <cantata150@...>
 

Hello

I've posted a vital record in Hebrew for which I need a loose
translation. It is on ViewMate at the following address ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=29777
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=29778

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.
--
Laura M. Steiman
(2000) Rosario- Santa Fe
Argentina



--
Laura M. Steiman
(2000) Rosario- Santa Fe
Argentina


Re: Yiddish-German-English pronunciation? #general

bernerfolk
 

Robert Lustig wrote:
When might this person have emigrated?
~ 1914 Hamburg to England leg of the trip.

And what other names were on the manifest? That might give us a clue as to
the nationality of the author/scribe, who could have been German, English,
American or something else entirely.

So I can't assume that the scribe in Hamburg was German? Did they use
translators and employ people of various ethnic and national groups to
facilitate processing emigres at departure? The other passengers on the
page are all >from various parts of the Russian Empire and the script is
really quite beautiful.

And what kind of records are you referring to? Riga's especially tricky
because the records could have been kept in any of three alphabets,

Point taken. I had in mind the various indexes on JG.

Interesting that for this young man, his last name was spelled consistently
throughout his voyage, though a local spin was applied to his first name:
Yosef, Josel Z., Jossill, Jossel. In the US he was known as Joseph Kennen
so I was wondering whether the American "Ke", as in "kept" or "Kenneth", was
an original pronunciation or completely American. Likewise for the soft "e"
as opposed to the original sound of "i" as in "iris".

Thank you to all who've provided guidance,

Sherri Venditti


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Yiddish-German-English pronunciation? #general

bernerfolk
 

Robert Lustig wrote:
When might this person have emigrated?
~ 1914 Hamburg to England leg of the trip.

And what other names were on the manifest? That might give us a clue as to
the nationality of the author/scribe, who could have been German, English,
American or something else entirely.

So I can't assume that the scribe in Hamburg was German? Did they use
translators and employ people of various ethnic and national groups to
facilitate processing emigres at departure? The other passengers on the
page are all >from various parts of the Russian Empire and the script is
really quite beautiful.

And what kind of records are you referring to? Riga's especially tricky
because the records could have been kept in any of three alphabets,

Point taken. I had in mind the various indexes on JG.

Interesting that for this young man, his last name was spelled consistently
throughout his voyage, though a local spin was applied to his first name:
Yosef, Josel Z., Jossill, Jossel. In the US he was known as Joseph Kennen
so I was wondering whether the American "Ke", as in "kept" or "Kenneth", was
an original pronunciation or completely American. Likewise for the soft "e"
as opposed to the original sound of "i" as in "iris".

Thank you to all who've provided guidance,

Sherri Venditti


Re: Ernestin (was Cernestin) #hungary

edelman@...
 

Hi all,

Thanks for clarification about this name. The most convincing arguments
were that it was simply a transcription error, and the best one of those
was similar to what I was thinking: That the extra "flourish" in the
first "E" in the name looked to someone like a "C".

End of thread (?)

- Todd

Moderator: Yes, this thread is ended.
--
Todd Edelman
California

Voice/Text: 415 867 9843
Skype: toddedelman

edelman@greenidea.eu


Hungary SIG #Hungary re: Ernestin (was Cernestin) #hungary

edelman@...
 

Hi all,

Thanks for clarification about this name. The most convincing arguments
were that it was simply a transcription error, and the best one of those
was similar to what I was thinking: That the extra "flourish" in the
first "E" in the name looked to someone like a "C".

End of thread (?)

- Todd

Moderator: Yes, this thread is ended.
--
Todd Edelman
California

Voice/Text: 415 867 9843
Skype: toddedelman

edelman@greenidea.eu


KUNSZTLER-SUSHOLZ Family of Ungvar_and/or_Perecseny also_KLEIN_of_Püspökladány #hungary

edelman@...
 

Hi,

This is a follow-up/date to my earlier query about the Kunsztlers in
Hajdu megye. Questions are at the bottom.

I was able to talk to a cousin in Canada that I found on 411 online (her
grandfather is apparently my great-grandmother's brother) who gave me a
tip that solved my Rubik's Cube, at least til around 1850... okay, just
in part.

So the current theory is that my great-great-grandfather was David
Kunsztler and his wife was Regina Susholz, and that were born around
1840-1850 and got married in around 1870-1874 in Ungvár and/or
Perecseny, or of course nearby.

The Kunsztler children - the three I know of - moved to Püspökladány
(Fani and Hermina) and Budapest (Móric/Moritz) by around 1900 to 1905. I
have no definite information about the Susholzes - my grandmother, her
mother and sister may have for safety reasons gone to Ungvár and/or
Perecseny during WWI to visit while my great-grandfather was in the
army, and my grandmother definitely ran into one in Los Angeles in the
1950's who later attended my parents' wedding.)

Fani (b. 1875, per YV records) married Vilmos Yaakov Zev Klein, who is
likely a brother or cousin of Hermina's (b. 1886 or 1887) husband Ernö
Klein (b.1881).
Fani and Vilmos at at least one child, Béla (b. 1902) who died as a
forced laborer in Kiev in 1943. Vilmos himself had already died in 1825.
Hermina and Ernö had several children whom I have mentioned before
including one whose birth information I could not find. My new theory is
that she - Manci Klein - was born in Ungvár and/or Perecseny during the
WWI refuge/visit - so 1915 to 1917 - and her birth certificate remains
there. The histories >from just after WWI are more or less clear, though
there is a definite deportation record (WWII) only for Fani. My
understanding is that the youngest Klein child visited the home and
neighbourhood after WWII and was told that all were taken.

Móric (born around 1888 to 1895) was a doctor in Budapest who invented a
kidney treatment procedure or tool, married a socialite named Erszébet,
and had a son named Tom in 1920. Not sure about other children. Tom was
in Mauthausen, but survived. Their histories >from that point or more or
less clear - e.g. Erszébet and Tom moved to Canada and the cousin I
talked to is Tom's daughter - though we will want to find out where
Móric was buried in Israel (I have found the database online and only
need the date >from my cousin).

Questions/Things I need help with:
* Finding SUSHOLZ people
* Locating the archive(s) on LDS etc. for Ungvár and/or Perecseny >from
mid-19th (including 1848 census) both Jewish Community and government
records (Hungarian Empire, Czechoslovakia, the Ukraine. I did visit
Familysearch.org but could not sort it out.)
* Finding any Hungarian medical history documents which may mention
Móric Kunsztler for the reasons I mention above.
* Finding out if Vilmos Klein is the brother or cousin of Ernö Klein.

Please respond privately.

Thank you!

--
Todd Edelman
SLOW Factory

<snip>
Skype: toddedelman

edelman@greenidea.eu
www.greenidea.eu

https://www.facebook.com/Iamtoddedelman
http://twitter.com/toddedelman
http://de.linkedin.com/in/toddedelman

Moderator: Personal phone numbers have been deleted per JewishGen policy. Please make your moderator's
job easier by not including this info and not sending messages that included fonts with diacritics/accents.


Hungary SIG #Hungary KUNSZTLER-SUSHOLZ Family of Ungvar_and/or_Perecseny also_KLEIN_of_Püspökladány #hungary

edelman@...
 

Hi,

This is a follow-up/date to my earlier query about the Kunsztlers in
Hajdu megye. Questions are at the bottom.

I was able to talk to a cousin in Canada that I found on 411 online (her
grandfather is apparently my great-grandmother's brother) who gave me a
tip that solved my Rubik's Cube, at least til around 1850... okay, just
in part.

So the current theory is that my great-great-grandfather was David
Kunsztler and his wife was Regina Susholz, and that were born around
1840-1850 and got married in around 1870-1874 in Ungvár and/or
Perecseny, or of course nearby.

The Kunsztler children - the three I know of - moved to Püspökladány
(Fani and Hermina) and Budapest (Móric/Moritz) by around 1900 to 1905. I
have no definite information about the Susholzes - my grandmother, her
mother and sister may have for safety reasons gone to Ungvár and/or
Perecseny during WWI to visit while my great-grandfather was in the
army, and my grandmother definitely ran into one in Los Angeles in the
1950's who later attended my parents' wedding.)

Fani (b. 1875, per YV records) married Vilmos Yaakov Zev Klein, who is
likely a brother or cousin of Hermina's (b. 1886 or 1887) husband Ernö
Klein (b.1881).
Fani and Vilmos at at least one child, Béla (b. 1902) who died as a
forced laborer in Kiev in 1943. Vilmos himself had already died in 1825.
Hermina and Ernö had several children whom I have mentioned before
including one whose birth information I could not find. My new theory is
that she - Manci Klein - was born in Ungvár and/or Perecseny during the
WWI refuge/visit - so 1915 to 1917 - and her birth certificate remains
there. The histories >from just after WWI are more or less clear, though
there is a definite deportation record (WWII) only for Fani. My
understanding is that the youngest Klein child visited the home and
neighbourhood after WWII and was told that all were taken.

Móric (born around 1888 to 1895) was a doctor in Budapest who invented a
kidney treatment procedure or tool, married a socialite named Erszébet,
and had a son named Tom in 1920. Not sure about other children. Tom was
in Mauthausen, but survived. Their histories >from that point or more or
less clear - e.g. Erszébet and Tom moved to Canada and the cousin I
talked to is Tom's daughter - though we will want to find out where
Móric was buried in Israel (I have found the database online and only
need the date >from my cousin).

Questions/Things I need help with:
* Finding SUSHOLZ people
* Locating the archive(s) on LDS etc. for Ungvár and/or Perecseny >from
mid-19th (including 1848 census) both Jewish Community and government
records (Hungarian Empire, Czechoslovakia, the Ukraine. I did visit
Familysearch.org but could not sort it out.)
* Finding any Hungarian medical history documents which may mention
Móric Kunsztler for the reasons I mention above.
* Finding out if Vilmos Klein is the brother or cousin of Ernö Klein.

Please respond privately.

Thank you!

--
Todd Edelman
SLOW Factory

<snip>
Skype: toddedelman

edelman@greenidea.eu
www.greenidea.eu

https://www.facebook.com/Iamtoddedelman
http://twitter.com/toddedelman
http://de.linkedin.com/in/toddedelman

Moderator: Personal phone numbers have been deleted per JewishGen policy. Please make your moderator's
job easier by not including this info and not sending messages that included fonts with diacritics/accents.


Memorial Plaque Project Update #hungary

bounce-2691899-772961@...
 

The next update to JewishGen's Memorial Plaque Project
(http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/) will be at year-end and will
include all submissions made through November 30.

The Memorial Plaque Project database currently contains close to 30,000
records >from 46 synagogues/organizations in 3 countries. The database grows
through the efforts of our donors; Jewish Genealogical Societies,
individuals, Jewish day schools, and synagogues. If you are aware of Yizkor
lists or memorial plaques that are not currently in our database, we would
appreciate if you could help us obtain them and help grow the database.

If you're interested in making a submission, please see "Submitting Data to
the JewishGen Memorial Plaque Database" at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/Submit.htm

If you have any questions, please contact me at NAltman@JewishGen.org

Thank you in advance for your help!

Nolan Altman
Memorial Plaque Project Coordinator


Help Grow JOWBR - Next Update #hungary

bounce-2691900-772961@...
 

The next update to JewishGen's JOWBR Database (JewishGen's Online Worldwide
Burial Registry) (http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/) will be at
year-end and will include all submissions made through November 30. Per
JOWBR's requirements, submissions should include complete cemeteries or
cemetery sections, not individual family burial information.

JOWBR currently contains over 2 million Jewish burial records >from 81
countries. The database grows through the efforts of our donors; Jewish
Genealogical Societies, individuals, historical societies, cemetery
administrators, synagogues and Chevra Kadishas. If you are aware of cemetery
records that are not currently in our database, we would appreciate if you
could help us obtain them and help grow the database.

If you're interested in making a submission, please see "Submitting Data to
JOWBR" at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm If you
prefer, you can also watch our online screencasts that show you how JOWBR
works and will also walk you through the completion of the standard
templates, at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

If you have any questions, please contact me at NAltman@JewishGen.org

Thank you in advance for your help!

Nolan Altman
JOWBR Coordinator


Re: RES: Re: The first/given name Cernestin #hungary

oblath@...
 

As I know Ester comes >from the Tora, >from the world Lehastir, means to =
hide.

Best
Andras Oblath
Budapest

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Venetianer (iG) [mailto:tom.venetia@ig.com.br]=20
Sent: Friday, November 01, 2013 12:45 PM
To: H-SIG
Cc: klein.laszlo@ppk.elte.hu
Subject: [h-sig] RES: Re: The first/given name Cernestin

Actually, Esther or Ester is a Persian name meaning "star." The Hebrew
equivalent is Hadasa or Hadassa, which means "myrtle tree."

Thomas (Tom) Venetianer
S=E3o Paulo - Brasil
email: tom.venetia@ig.com.br

Subject: Re: The first/given name Cernestin
From: klein.laszlo@ppk.elte.hu
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2013 09:25:28 +0100
X-Message-Number: 1

Dear Todd Edelman,

But Esther comes >from Hebrew and means myrtle as I know.


Hungary SIG #Hungary Memorial Plaque Project Update #hungary

bounce-2691899-772961@...
 

The next update to JewishGen's Memorial Plaque Project
(http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/) will be at year-end and will
include all submissions made through November 30.

The Memorial Plaque Project database currently contains close to 30,000
records >from 46 synagogues/organizations in 3 countries. The database grows
through the efforts of our donors; Jewish Genealogical Societies,
individuals, Jewish day schools, and synagogues. If you are aware of Yizkor
lists or memorial plaques that are not currently in our database, we would
appreciate if you could help us obtain them and help grow the database.

If you're interested in making a submission, please see "Submitting Data to
the JewishGen Memorial Plaque Database" at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/Submit.htm

If you have any questions, please contact me at NAltman@JewishGen.org

Thank you in advance for your help!

Nolan Altman
Memorial Plaque Project Coordinator


Hungary SIG #Hungary Help Grow JOWBR - Next Update #hungary

bounce-2691900-772961@...
 

The next update to JewishGen's JOWBR Database (JewishGen's Online Worldwide
Burial Registry) (http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/) will be at
year-end and will include all submissions made through November 30. Per
JOWBR's requirements, submissions should include complete cemeteries or
cemetery sections, not individual family burial information.

JOWBR currently contains over 2 million Jewish burial records >from 81
countries. The database grows through the efforts of our donors; Jewish
Genealogical Societies, individuals, historical societies, cemetery
administrators, synagogues and Chevra Kadishas. If you are aware of cemetery
records that are not currently in our database, we would appreciate if you
could help us obtain them and help grow the database.

If you're interested in making a submission, please see "Submitting Data to
JOWBR" at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm If you
prefer, you can also watch our online screencasts that show you how JOWBR
works and will also walk you through the completion of the standard
templates, at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

If you have any questions, please contact me at NAltman@JewishGen.org

Thank you in advance for your help!

Nolan Altman
JOWBR Coordinator


Hungary SIG #Hungary RE: RES: Re: The first/given name Cernestin #hungary

oblath@...
 

As I know Ester comes >from the Tora, >from the world Lehastir, means to =
hide.

Best
Andras Oblath
Budapest

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Venetianer (iG) [mailto:tom.venetia@ig.com.br]=20
Sent: Friday, November 01, 2013 12:45 PM
To: H-SIG
Cc: klein.laszlo@ppk.elte.hu
Subject: [h-sig] RES: Re: The first/given name Cernestin

Actually, Esther or Ester is a Persian name meaning "star." The Hebrew
equivalent is Hadasa or Hadassa, which means "myrtle tree."

Thomas (Tom) Venetianer
S=E3o Paulo - Brasil
email: tom.venetia@ig.com.br

Subject: Re: The first/given name Cernestin
From: klein.laszlo@ppk.elte.hu
Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2013 09:25:28 +0100
X-Message-Number: 1

Dear Todd Edelman,

But Esther comes >from Hebrew and means myrtle as I know.


JGSCT Program, Sunday, November 17, 2013 at 1:30 pm, Godfrey Library, Middletown, CT #general

gkr
 

***Book Discussion with Dr. Leon Chameides***

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut presents Dr. Leon Chameides,
founding Chair of Pediatric Cardiology at Hartford Hospital and Connecticut
Children's Hospital, on Sunday, November 17, 2013 at 1:30 pm at Godfrey
Memorial Library, 134 Newfield Street, Middletown, CT.

Dr. Chameides, now retired, will discuss his recently published books.
Strangers in Many Lands traces his family in eastern Europe back to 1790.
Using genealogical tables, photographs, maps, and copies of documents, he
discusses the experiences of each generation, including his own experiences
during World War II when he was hidden in a monastery in Poland.

On the Edge of the Abyss is a collection of essays written by his father,
who was Rabbi of the Katowice Jewish community between 1932 and 1936. He
found these essays in a community newspaper, 118 issues of which have been
preserved in a library in Poland. Dr. Chameides translated the essays from
the original Polish and German, annotated them and grouped them by topic.
They consist of discussions of biblical texts, Jewish historical events and
current events.

The event is free and open to the public.

www.jgsct.org for additional information.

Gail K. Reynolds


Help Grow JOWBR - Next Update #latinamerica

Nolan Altman
 

The next update to JewishGen's JOWBR Database (JewishGen's Online Worldwide
Burial Registry) (http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/) will be at
year-end and will include all submissions made through November 30. Per
JOWBR's requirements, submissions should include complete cemeteries or
cemetery sections, not individual family burial information.

JOWBR currently contains over 2 million Jewish burial records >from 81
countries. The database grows through the efforts of our donors; Jewish
Genealogical Societies, individuals, historical societies, cemetery
administrators, synagogues and Chevra Kadishas. If you are aware of cemetery
records that are not currently in our database, we would appreciate if you
could help us obtain them and help grow the database.

If you're interested in making a submission, please see "Submitting Data to
JOWBR" at http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Submit.htm If you
prefer, you can also watch our online screencasts that show you how JOWBR
works and will also walk you through the completion of the standard
templates, at:
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Cemetery/Screencasts/

If you have any questions, please contact me at NAltman@JewishGen.org

Thank you in advance for your help!

Nolan Altman
JOWBR Coordinator


Memorial Plaque Project Update #latinamerica

Nolan Altman
 

The next update to JewishGen's Memorial Plaque Project
(http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/) will be at year-end and will
include all submissions made through November 30.

The Memorial Plaque Project database currently contains close to 30,000
records >from 46 synagogues/organizations in 3 countries. The database grows
through the efforts of our donors; Jewish Genealogical Societies,
individuals, Jewish day schools, and synagogues. If you are aware of Yizkor
lists or memorial plaques that are not currently in our database, we would
appreciate if you could help us obtain them and help grow the database.

If you're interested in making a submission, please see "Submitting Data to
the JewishGen Memorial Plaque Database" at
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Memorial/Submit.htm

If you have any questions, please contact me at NAltman@JewishGen.org

Thank you in advance for your help!

Nolan Altman
Memorial Plaque Project Coordinator


Yizkor Book Project, October 2013 #latinamerica

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

Busy, busy, busy is how I would describe the level of activity in the Yizkor
Book Project over the month of October. I am pleased to let you know that
over the last month no less than three projects were completed and I would
like to sincerely thank all of the people involved with them who saw these
projects through to their successful completion online. The projects are:

Halmeu, Romania (In memory of the communities of Halmin-Turcz and vicinity)
Slovakia (The Tragedy of Slovak Jewry in Slovakia)
Through Forests and Pathways

This means we now have around 90 projects that are online in their entirety
and quite a few have been published as part of our Yizkor Books in Print
Project and many others are in the process of being prepared for print. More
details of the books that are now available in print and others that are in
the works may be found at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html

All the projects I note in my reports owe their existence to a considerable
number of volunteers (500+) and we endeavor to credit all of those who are
involved and have been involved in the YB Project over the years (>from 1994)
in the following list appearing at: http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ If you
have yet to become involved in our project and would like to take part in
the very gratifying experience of seeing these translations go online, I'd
be happy to hear >from you.

Now to facts and figures for October, during this last month we have added 6
new projects:

- Kuty, Ukraine (Kitever memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kuty/kuty.html

- Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland (Ostrowiec; a monument on the ruins of an
annihilated Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrowiec/ostrowiec.html

- Otaci, Moldova (Memorial for Ataky: A Memorial Book for a Jewish Community
in Bessarabia) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Otaci/Otaci.html

- Radom, Poland (The book of Radom; the story of a Jewish community in
Poland destroyed by the Nazis)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/radom/radom.html

- Suceava, Romania (The Book of the Jews >from Suceava (Shotz) and the
Surrounding Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suceava/Suceava.html

- Yavoriv, Ukraine (Monument to the community of Jaworow and the surrounding
region) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Yavoriv/Yavoriv.html

Added in 7 new entries:

- Briceva, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00339.html

- Glod, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar190.html

- Khotyn, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume II)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00353.html

- Lipcani, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00362a.html

- Markuszow, Poland (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland, volume
VII) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol7_00315.html

- Rozavlea, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar166.html

- Tabor, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh621.html

We have continued to update 26 of our existing projects:

- Belchatow, Poland (Belchatow memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Belchatow/Belchatow.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy (Akkerman), Ukraine (Akkerman and the Towns of its
District; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Akkerman/Akkerman.html

- Briceva, Moldova (Memorial Book of Brichevo)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bricheva/Bricheva.html

- Gargzdai, Lithuania (Gorzd book; A memorial to the Jewish community of
Gorzd) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Gargzdai/Gargzdai.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Gorlice, Poland (Gorlice book; the Building and Destruction of the
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/gorlice/gorlice.html

- Halmeu, Romania (In memory of the communities of Halmin-Turcz and
vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Halmeu/Halmeu.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Klobuck, Poland (The Book of Klobucko; in memory of a martyred community
which was destroyed) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/klobuck/klobuck.html

- Molchad, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Nowy Dwor Mazowiecki, Poland (Memorial book of Nowy-Dwor)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Nowy_Dwor/Nowy_Dwor.html

- Ostrow-Lubelski, Poland (Memorial-Book Ostrow-Lublesk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrow_lubelski/ostrow_lubelski.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozerna.html

- Ozerna, Ukraine (Memorial book of Jezierna)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Ozerna/Ozernah.html [Hebrew]

- Sanok, Poland (Memorial Book of Sanok and Vicinity)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sanok/sanok.html

- Shumskoye, Ukraine (Szumsk, memorial book of the martyrs of Szumsk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/szumsk/szumsk.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Slovakia (The Tragedy of Slovak Jewry in Slovakia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Slovakia/Slovakia.html

- Stryy, Ukraine (Book of Stryj)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/stryj2/stryj2.html

- Strzegowo, Poland (Memorial Book of Strzegowo)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Strzegowo/Strzegowo.html

- Szczebrzeszyn, Poland (The Book of Memory to the Jewish Community of
Shebreshin) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczebrzeszyn/Szczebrzeszyn.html

- Szrensk, Poland (The Jewish community of Szrensk and the vicinity; a
memorial volume) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Szrensk/Szrensk.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Through Forests and Pathways
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/forests/forests.html

- Tykocin, Poland (Memorial book of Tiktin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tykocin/tykocin.html

Some important links to note:

- This month's additions and updates are flagged at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy to find
them.
- All you would like to know about the Yizkor Books in Print Project
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ybip.html
- Yizkor Book Translation Funds
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
where your financial support will assist in seeing more translations go
online.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager

124861 - 124880 of 658639