Date   
Odessa: Newspaper, Odessa Leaf, Article #ukraine

Marilyn Robinson
 

In a Russian language newspaper article, published in the
"Odessa Leaf"/Odecckie Dmafusailyu ("September 4[August 22], 1912) there
was a short commentary about the death of I. BERMAN, who was almost 100
years old and living in the Odessa Jewish Poorhouse (nursing home). According
to the article he was in the facility for 20+ years. Living in the same home
was a woman, Sura KIKAYET/KIKAES, reported to be 106; B. KONTOROVICH, 108,
and R. SIDLYA, 99. M. SHARGOROSKAYA,101 years old and also a resident, had
recently suffered a severe case of Typhoid Fever, but surprised doctors by
quickly recovering; Mr. Kontorovich was a retired soldier who had fought
in many battles. The article noted that Kontorovich had "excellent eyesight
and memory".

The newspaper was published daily in Odessa November 30, 1880-1917. The
above information was >from starosti.ru.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida

Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Odessa: Newspaper, Odessa Leaf, Article #ukraine

Marilyn Robinson
 

In a Russian language newspaper article, published in the
"Odessa Leaf"/Odecckie Dmafusailyu ("September 4[August 22], 1912) there
was a short commentary about the death of I. BERMAN, who was almost 100
years old and living in the Odessa Jewish Poorhouse (nursing home). According
to the article he was in the facility for 20+ years. Living in the same home
was a woman, Sura KIKAYET/KIKAES, reported to be 106; B. KONTOROVICH, 108,
and R. SIDLYA, 99. M. SHARGOROSKAYA,101 years old and also a resident, had
recently suffered a severe case of Typhoid Fever, but surprised doctors by
quickly recovering; Mr. Kontorovich was a retired soldier who had fought
in many battles. The article noted that Kontorovich had "excellent eyesight
and memory".

The newspaper was published daily in Odessa November 30, 1880-1917. The
above information was >from starosti.ru.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida

Re: Meaning of Zorel #romania

hedyra@...
 

I wonder if Zorel could be Tzirl, a Yiddish name.

Hedy Augenbraun

Hedy Augenbraunhedyra@...

-----Original Message-----

1. Does anybody know if Zorel is a hebrew first name? If yes, is it
also common among non-jewish romanians?

Romania SIG #Romania Re: Meaning of Zorel #romania

hedyra@...
 

I wonder if Zorel could be Tzirl, a Yiddish name.

Hedy Augenbraun

Hedy Augenbraunhedyra@...

-----Original Message-----

1. Does anybody know if Zorel is a hebrew first name? If yes, is it
also common among non-jewish romanians?

Re: Romanian Jewish History #romania

Rafi Manory <rafael.manory@...>
 

1. To my knowledge there is no Zorel. The correct name is most
probably Sorel, and it is a Romanian name. Jews used Romanian names
quite often, and it is common to find Jews named Radu, Liviu, Sorel,
etc. It is most probably a nickname, not an official Hebrew name.
2. Regarding Jews living in Dobrogea: The only pogrom in Iasi that is
famous is the one in January 1941. If you know of other pogroms please
let me know. Pogroms were common in Russia, Ukraine, Bielarus, parts
of Poland, but to my knowledge were quite uncommon in Romania until
the Legionaries party came to power.

Rafael Manory

Subject: Romanian jewish history
From: rmihailv@...
Date: Sun, 20 Jan 2013 14:23:01 -0500

I have a few questions regarding Romanian jewish history:

1. Does anybody know if Zorel is a hebrew first name? If yes, is it
also common among non-jewish Romanians?

2. Does anybody know if any jewish families migrated south to Dobrogea
(southeast Romania) as a result of the Romanian pogroms of the late
19, early 20th century, especially the Iasi pogroms?

Please let me know if you know of any resources regarding the above.

Thank you,

Robert Mihail

Romania SIG #Romania Re: Romanian Jewish History #romania

Rafi Manory <rafael.manory@...>
 

1. To my knowledge there is no Zorel. The correct name is most
probably Sorel, and it is a Romanian name. Jews used Romanian names
quite often, and it is common to find Jews named Radu, Liviu, Sorel,
etc. It is most probably a nickname, not an official Hebrew name.
2. Regarding Jews living in Dobrogea: The only pogrom in Iasi that is
famous is the one in January 1941. If you know of other pogroms please
let me know. Pogroms were common in Russia, Ukraine, Bielarus, parts
of Poland, but to my knowledge were quite uncommon in Romania until
the Legionaries party came to power.

Rafael Manory

Subject: Romanian jewish history
From: rmihailv@...
Date: Sun, 20 Jan 2013 14:23:01 -0500

I have a few questions regarding Romanian jewish history:

1. Does anybody know if Zorel is a hebrew first name? If yes, is it
also common among non-jewish Romanians?

2. Does anybody know if any jewish families migrated south to Dobrogea
(southeast Romania) as a result of the Romanian pogroms of the late
19, early 20th century, especially the Iasi pogroms?

Please let me know if you know of any resources regarding the above.

Thank you,

Robert Mihail

Registration Open for the 33rd IAJGS International Conference #romania

bounce-2549633-772976@...
 

January 21, 2013

Boston -- Registration is now open for the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in historic Boston on
August 4-9.

The early registration discount will end on April 30. For more
information or to register, visit www.iajgs2013.org.

The conference is the leading genealogy event of the year for people
researching their family history. Experts will give 200 lectures,
hands-on workshops and programs during the conference.

Over 1000 researchers ranging >from beginners to professional
genealogists >from all over the United States and around the world
are expected to attend the conference in Boston.

Attendees will have a special rate at the centrally located Boston
Park Plaza Hotel (hotelinfo.iajgs2013.org). The rate will be in
effect >from July 29 to August 14, so consider spending extra time
doing research or enjoying Boston and its wonderful vacation areas
nearby. Within a few hours' drive of Boston are Cape Cod, the
Tanglewood Music Center in western Massachusetts, Maine, New
Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont and Connecticut.

For people who have never attended an IAJGS Conference, see this
video, Passport to Your Past, to learn about the experience:
video.iajgs2013.org.

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies
(IAJGS) and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston
(JGSGB) are co-hosts of the conference. Co-chairs are Marlis
Humphrey representing IAJGS and Jay Sage and Heidi Urich for
JGSGB (chairs@...)

Romania SIG #Romania Registration Open for the 33rd IAJGS International Conference #romania

bounce-2549633-772976@...
 

January 21, 2013

Boston -- Registration is now open for the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in historic Boston on
August 4-9.

The early registration discount will end on April 30. For more
information or to register, visit www.iajgs2013.org.

The conference is the leading genealogy event of the year for people
researching their family history. Experts will give 200 lectures,
hands-on workshops and programs during the conference.

Over 1000 researchers ranging >from beginners to professional
genealogists >from all over the United States and around the world
are expected to attend the conference in Boston.

Attendees will have a special rate at the centrally located Boston
Park Plaza Hotel (hotelinfo.iajgs2013.org). The rate will be in
effect >from July 29 to August 14, so consider spending extra time
doing research or enjoying Boston and its wonderful vacation areas
nearby. Within a few hours' drive of Boston are Cape Cod, the
Tanglewood Music Center in western Massachusetts, Maine, New
Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont and Connecticut.

For people who have never attended an IAJGS Conference, see this
video, Passport to Your Past, to learn about the experience:
video.iajgs2013.org.

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies
(IAJGS) and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston
(JGSGB) are co-hosts of the conference. Co-chairs are Marlis
Humphrey representing IAJGS and Jay Sage and Heidi Urich for
JGSGB (chairs@...)

MOIS Family of Bucharest #romania

Alchemedia
 

I am seeking assistance locating any available information about
Mottal MOIS & family between mid 1800's and early 1900's in Romania.

Most likely born in the early to mid 1850's, MOIS lived in Strada
Piatra (Neamt), Bucharest, Romania vicinity in 1913 and had a daughter
named Sara (b. 1877) who married Leon GOLDFELD (b. 1875) of Odessa,
Russia. Sara and Leon emigrated to Philadelphia in 1913 with their
family of four. Any information or leads would be most greatly
appreciated.

Thank you,

Scott Whitman
San Francisco, CA

Romania SIG #Romania MOIS Family of Bucharest #romania

Alchemedia
 

I am seeking assistance locating any available information about
Mottal MOIS & family between mid 1800's and early 1900's in Romania.

Most likely born in the early to mid 1850's, MOIS lived in Strada
Piatra (Neamt), Bucharest, Romania vicinity in 1913 and had a daughter
named Sara (b. 1877) who married Leon GOLDFELD (b. 1875) of Odessa,
Russia. Sara and Leon emigrated to Philadelphia in 1913 with their
family of four. Any information or leads would be most greatly
appreciated.

Thank you,

Scott Whitman
San Francisco, CA

Re: Assistance locating original surname for SHAW and ROSIN #poland

Susan&David
 

I have another source for the name ROSIN/ROSEN

My father's brother was the first of his family to emigrate, arriving in
the US in 1904. The family name was Nimerozansky. He changed it to
ROSEN by dropping the first and last parts.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Re: Assistance locating original surname for SHAW and ROSIN #poland

Susan&David
 

I have another source for the name ROSIN/ROSEN

My father's brother was the first of his family to emigrate, arriving in
the US in 1904. The family name was Nimerozansky. He changed it to
ROSEN by dropping the first and last parts.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

JewishGen Education February Classes #unitedkingdom

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen Education February Classes Open for Enrollment

1. Creating KehilaLinks Web Pages starts Feb 1. $36. - Mark
Heckman
2. Exploring JewishGen starts Feb 1. $18. This two week Course
is an introduction to navigating JewishGen and the hidden resources
on its website. - Nancy Holden
3. Basic Jewish Genealogy starts Feb 5. $80. There is no charge for
JewishGen contributors to the General Fund - Phyllis Kramer
4. Independent Study starts Feb 15. $150. Enrollment by application
- Nancy Holden

Please read the course descriptions and requirements and enroll at
http://www.jewishgen.org/education

Address your questions to:
JewishGen-Education@...

Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education

JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom JewishGen Education February Classes #unitedkingdom

Nancy Holden
 

JewishGen Education February Classes Open for Enrollment

1. Creating KehilaLinks Web Pages starts Feb 1. $36. - Mark
Heckman
2. Exploring JewishGen starts Feb 1. $18. This two week Course
is an introduction to navigating JewishGen and the hidden resources
on its website. - Nancy Holden
3. Basic Jewish Genealogy starts Feb 5. $80. There is no charge for
JewishGen contributors to the General Fund - Phyllis Kramer
4. Independent Study starts Feb 15. $150. Enrollment by application
- Nancy Holden

Please read the course descriptions and requirements and enroll at
http://www.jewishgen.org/education

Address your questions to:
JewishGen-Education@...

Nancy Holden, Instruction Manager
Phyllis Kramer, VP, Education

Latvian directories searchable #courland #latvia

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

I have added 40 Latvian directories >from the Latvian National Digital
Library (http://gramatas.lndb.lv) to the search engine at
http://genealogyindexer.org. Although the Latvian National Digital
Library itself has full-text search, I added these because of the
usefulness of soundex, automatic Latin to Cyrillic transliteration,
and other special search features of http://genealogyindexer.org; for
the discovery value of having directories with widespread geographic
coverage in one place; and to be able to link more directly to the
matching directory images. The additions consist of the list at
http://genealogyindexer.org/directories#Latvia (excluding the 1940
Latvia Telephone Directory >from Yad Vashem and the 1861 Riga Address +
Business Directory >from Google Books, added earlier), plus the 1924
Baltic States + U.S.S.R. Business Directory categorized under
"Multinational" near the top of that page.

By default, searches at http://genealogyindexer.org include all
sources, but I recommend trying a search with the "Any Place"
drop-down option below the search box changed to "Latvia + Estonia."
When that is selected and your search term consists of a single word
(e.g., a surname), the search engine automatically tries both Latvian
masculine and feminine forms of your search term, and both singular
and plural. Some directories with coverage broader than Latvia (e.g.,
the entire Russian Empire) will be excluded if you choose this option,
so you should also try a "Multinational" search if you do this.

The default search option "Add Latin -> Cyrillic" means that possible
Cyrillic spellings of a Latin script search term will also be found.
Some of the Latvian directories are written in Russian, so this is
useful if you do not know the Russian spelling(s) of your search term.
If the Latvian spelling of your search term includes diacritics,
entering the diacritics may produce fewer false positives in the
transliterations (if no diacritics are entered, all valid diacritics
will be considered). You can also enter Cyrillic search terms
directly.

Search results link directly to images on the Latvian National Digital
Library's website, usually with metadata and the Library's own OCR'd
text (I have separately OCR'd the images, so results might vary).
Occasionally, the image will not be displayed in the middle of the
page, as it should be, but there is a workaround to view it: note the
page number in the top middle, click "Back to current issue" in the
top right, then click on the thumbnail corresponding to that page (you
will likely need to subtract several pages to account for frontmatter
paginated separately). This workaround is a bit tedious, but the
problem is on the Library's website, and I don't know a quicker
solution -- if you do, please post about it.

There are still about 20 Latvian directories >from the Latvian National
Digital Library that I have not yet added, but will hopefully do so in
the near future. Meanwhile, you can try searching at
http://gramatas.lndb.lv, as well. I also recommend the Library's
collection of periodicals, which can be searched at
http://periodika.lndb.lv.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.

Courland SIG #Courland #Latvia Latvian directories searchable #courland #latvia

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

I have added 40 Latvian directories >from the Latvian National Digital
Library (http://gramatas.lndb.lv) to the search engine at
http://genealogyindexer.org. Although the Latvian National Digital
Library itself has full-text search, I added these because of the
usefulness of soundex, automatic Latin to Cyrillic transliteration,
and other special search features of http://genealogyindexer.org; for
the discovery value of having directories with widespread geographic
coverage in one place; and to be able to link more directly to the
matching directory images. The additions consist of the list at
http://genealogyindexer.org/directories#Latvia (excluding the 1940
Latvia Telephone Directory >from Yad Vashem and the 1861 Riga Address +
Business Directory >from Google Books, added earlier), plus the 1924
Baltic States + U.S.S.R. Business Directory categorized under
"Multinational" near the top of that page.

By default, searches at http://genealogyindexer.org include all
sources, but I recommend trying a search with the "Any Place"
drop-down option below the search box changed to "Latvia + Estonia."
When that is selected and your search term consists of a single word
(e.g., a surname), the search engine automatically tries both Latvian
masculine and feminine forms of your search term, and both singular
and plural. Some directories with coverage broader than Latvia (e.g.,
the entire Russian Empire) will be excluded if you choose this option,
so you should also try a "Multinational" search if you do this.

The default search option "Add Latin -> Cyrillic" means that possible
Cyrillic spellings of a Latin script search term will also be found.
Some of the Latvian directories are written in Russian, so this is
useful if you do not know the Russian spelling(s) of your search term.
If the Latvian spelling of your search term includes diacritics,
entering the diacritics may produce fewer false positives in the
transliterations (if no diacritics are entered, all valid diacritics
will be considered). You can also enter Cyrillic search terms
directly.

Search results link directly to images on the Latvian National Digital
Library's website, usually with metadata and the Library's own OCR'd
text (I have separately OCR'd the images, so results might vary).
Occasionally, the image will not be displayed in the middle of the
page, as it should be, but there is a workaround to view it: note the
page number in the top middle, click "Back to current issue" in the
top right, then click on the thumbnail corresponding to that page (you
will likely need to subtract several pages to account for frontmatter
paginated separately). This workaround is a bit tedious, but the
problem is on the Library's website, and I don't know a quicker
solution -- if you do, please post about it.

There are still about 20 Latvian directories >from the Latvian National
Digital Library that I have not yet added, but will hopefully do so in
the near future. Meanwhile, you can try searching at
http://gramatas.lndb.lv, as well. I also recommend the Library's
collection of periodicals, which can be searched at
http://periodika.lndb.lv.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@...
near Washington, D.C.

Registration Open for the 33rd IAJGS International Conference #unitedkingdom

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

January 21, 2013

Boston -- Registration is now open for the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in historic Boston on
August 4-9.

The early registration discount will end on April 30. For more
information or to register, visit www.iajgs2013.org.

The conference is the leading genealogy event of the year for people
researching their family history. Experts will give 200 lectures,
hands-on workshops and programs during the conference.

Over 1000 researchers ranging >from beginners to professional
genealogists >from all over the United States and around the world
are expected to attend the conference in Boston.

Attendees will have a special rate at the centrally located Boston
Park Plaza Hotel (hotelinfo.iajgs2013.org). The rate will be in
effect >from July 29 to August 14, so consider spending extra time
doing research or enjoying Boston and its wonderful vacation areas
nearby. Within a few hours' drive of Boston are Cape Cod, the
Tanglewood Music Center in western Massachusetts, Maine, New
Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont and Connecticut.

For people who have never attended an IAJGS Conference, see this
video, Passport to Your Past, to learn about the experience:
video.iajgs2013.org.

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies
(IAJGS) and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston
(JGSGB) are co-hosts of the conference. Co-chairs are Marlis
Humphrey representing IAJGS and Jay Sage and Heidi Urich for
JGSGB (chairs@...)

JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom Registration Open for the 33rd IAJGS International Conference #unitedkingdom

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

January 21, 2013

Boston -- Registration is now open for the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in historic Boston on
August 4-9.

The early registration discount will end on April 30. For more
information or to register, visit www.iajgs2013.org.

The conference is the leading genealogy event of the year for people
researching their family history. Experts will give 200 lectures,
hands-on workshops and programs during the conference.

Over 1000 researchers ranging >from beginners to professional
genealogists >from all over the United States and around the world
are expected to attend the conference in Boston.

Attendees will have a special rate at the centrally located Boston
Park Plaza Hotel (hotelinfo.iajgs2013.org). The rate will be in
effect >from July 29 to August 14, so consider spending extra time
doing research or enjoying Boston and its wonderful vacation areas
nearby. Within a few hours' drive of Boston are Cape Cod, the
Tanglewood Music Center in western Massachusetts, Maine, New
Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont and Connecticut.

For people who have never attended an IAJGS Conference, see this
video, Passport to Your Past, to learn about the experience:
video.iajgs2013.org.

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies
(IAJGS) and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston
(JGSGB) are co-hosts of the conference. Co-chairs are Marlis
Humphrey representing IAJGS and Jay Sage and Heidi Urich for
JGSGB (chairs@...)

Registration Open for the 33rd IAJGS International Conference #courland #latvia

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

January 21, 2013

Boston -- Registration is now open for the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in historic Boston on
August 4-9.

The early registration discount will end on April 30. For more
information or to register, visit www.iajgs2013.org.

The conference is the leading genealogy event of the year for people
researching their family history. Experts will give 200 lectures,
hands-on workshops and programs during the conference.

Over 1000 researchers ranging >from beginners to professional
genealogists >from all over the United States and around the world
are expected to attend the conference in Boston.

Attendees will have a special rate at the centrally located Boston
Park Plaza Hotel (hotelinfo.iajgs2013.org). The rate will be in
effect >from July 29 to August 14, so consider spending extra time
doing research or enjoying Boston and its wonderful vacation areas
nearby. Within a few hours' drive of Boston are Cape Cod, the
Tanglewood Music Center in western Massachusetts, Maine, New
Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont and Connecticut.

For people who have never attended an IAJGS Conference, see this
video, Passport to Your Past, to learn about the experience:
video.iajgs2013.org.

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies
(IAJGS) and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston
(JGSGB) are co-hosts of the conference. Co-chairs are Marlis
Humphrey representing IAJGS and Jay Sage and Heidi Urich for
JGSGB (chairs@...)

Registration Open for the 33rd IAJGS International Conference #southafrica

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

January 21, 2013

Boston -- Registration is now open for the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in historic Boston on
August 4-9.

The early registration discount will end on April 30. For more
information or to register, visit www.iajgs2013.org.

The conference is the leading genealogy event of the year for people
researching their family history. Experts will give 200 lectures,
hands-on workshops and programs during the conference.

Over 1000 researchers ranging >from beginners to professional
genealogists >from all over the United States and around the world
are expected to attend the conference in Boston.

Attendees will have a special rate at the centrally located Boston
Park Plaza Hotel (hotelinfo.iajgs2013.org). The rate will be in
effect >from July 29 to August 14, so consider spending extra time
doing research or enjoying Boston and its wonderful vacation areas
nearby. Within a few hours' drive of Boston are Cape Cod, the
Tanglewood Music Center in western Massachusetts, Maine, New
Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont and Connecticut.

For people who have never attended an IAJGS Conference, see this
video, Passport to Your Past, to learn about the experience:
video.iajgs2013.org.

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies
(IAJGS) and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston
(JGSGB) are co-hosts of the conference. Co-chairs are Marlis
Humphrey representing IAJGS and Jay Sage and Heidi Urich for
JGSGB (chairs@...)