Date   

Re: 23 and me advice #dna

Bob Kosovsky
 

On Thu, 18 Jul 2013, Ben Forman <ben.r.forman@gmail.com> asked:

It seems to be substantially cheaper than Family Tree DNA or the Genographic
Project so I am wondering what the catch is.
Hi Ben,

I use both 23andme and FamilyTreeDNA.

If anything, I surmise the "catch" is that the userbase of 23andme is smaller
than that of FamilyTreeDNA, so of course they're trying to increase it. But
FamilyTreeDNA periodically has sales too (experience shows they often have a
discount during August).

23andme provides all this medical information. I have found a
not-so-distant-but-hitherto-unknown relative through 23andme. But I've also
found good information >from FamilyTreeDNA (as well as potential close-
but-not-documented-relatives).

I lean more towards FamilyTreeDNA because they have a lot more documentation
(not >from the DNA but helps you contextualize it), but I'm happy to use both
vendors.

Bob Kosovsky, New York City, seeking any and all permutations/locations of:
KASOVSKI/Y, KASOWSKI/Y, KOSOFSKY, KOSOVSKY, KOSOWSKY, KOSOW, KOSSOVE, etc.
Slutsk: DAVIDSON, GELFAND (also Sioux City, Iowa)
Klodawa: JARET, JARETSKY, JARECKI, KOLSKY/I; Przedecz: PIFKO, PIWKO


DNA Research #DNA Re: 23 and me advice #dna

Bob Kosovsky
 

On Thu, 18 Jul 2013, Ben Forman <ben.r.forman@gmail.com> asked:

It seems to be substantially cheaper than Family Tree DNA or the Genographic
Project so I am wondering what the catch is.
Hi Ben,

I use both 23andme and FamilyTreeDNA.

If anything, I surmise the "catch" is that the userbase of 23andme is smaller
than that of FamilyTreeDNA, so of course they're trying to increase it. But
FamilyTreeDNA periodically has sales too (experience shows they often have a
discount during August).

23andme provides all this medical information. I have found a
not-so-distant-but-hitherto-unknown relative through 23andme. But I've also
found good information >from FamilyTreeDNA (as well as potential close-
but-not-documented-relatives).

I lean more towards FamilyTreeDNA because they have a lot more documentation
(not >from the DNA but helps you contextualize it), but I'm happy to use both
vendors.

Bob Kosovsky, New York City, seeking any and all permutations/locations of:
KASOVSKI/Y, KASOWSKI/Y, KOSOFSKY, KOSOVSKY, KOSOWSKY, KOSOW, KOSSOVE, etc.
Slutsk: DAVIDSON, GELFAND (also Sioux City, Iowa)
Klodawa: JARET, JARETSKY, JARECKI, KOLSKY/I; Przedecz: PIFKO, PIWKO


Gesher Galicia at the IAJGS Conference #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger
 

This year Gesher Galicia is celebrating our 20th anniversary at the IAJGS
Conference. We are sponsoring the research team of Alexander and
Natalie Dunai who will be accompanied by their daughter, "little Natalie,"
so make sure to give her a friendly welcome if you see her at the programs.

If you are new to Galician research, or not yet sure if you have Galician
roots but want to find out more, and curious about unusual records,
Ukrainian archives, clever ways to research, or the exciting world of
cadastral maps (which exist for the entire Austro-Hungarian Empire,
not just Galicia,) we hope you will attend our programs which are not
"just" for Galitzianers.

Join us at the Share Fair on Sunday >from 1:30PM - 5:00PM. We will
display maps and records, new GG merchandise and books, and have
experts to help with your research questions. Jay Osborn, who
coordinates our Cadastral Map Room, will be available >from 2:30PM -
3:00PM and 4:30PM - 5:00PM to discuss the intricacies of
map-stitching (and putting the resulting large files online) with anyone
interested.

If you want to attend the GG luncheon on Monday - with former US
Ambassador to Poland, Lee A. Feinstein - or the the Galician
Breakfast-with-the Experts on Tuesday with myself and Alex Dunai,
you must purchase a ticket by Wednesday, July 24. That's the cut-off.
Everyone attending the GG luncheon or breakfast will get a 20th
anniversary GG souvenir!

Below are programs sponsored by Gesher Galicia and/or those
presented by our members and/or town leaders. (Although our official
GG SIG day is Monday, every day offers a talk on a Galician topic. Plan
to stay until Friday for two special presentations.)

Sunday, August 4

9:30AM - Tabula Registers: A Untapped Genealogical Resource in the
Lviv Archives - Alexander Dunai

Monday, August 5

8:15AM - Galician Trails: The Forgotten Story of One Family
- Andrew Zalewski
9:45AM - Using the New Gesher Galicia Website to Research Towns
and Families - Brooke Schreier Ganz
11:00AM - Cadastral Maps, Landowner, School & Voter Records: New
Horizons for Genealogists - Pamela Weisberger
12:30PM - Gesher Galicia SIG Luncheon - Ambassador Lee A. Feinstein
2:00PM - Gesher Galicia SIG Meeting and 20th Anniversary Celebration
- a selection of scintillating speakers
3:30PM - Archival Resources for the Interwar Years in Western Ukraine
- Alexander & Natalie Dunai
5:00PM - Polish Magnate Landowner Records: Bringing "The Lords'
Jews" to Life - Pamela Weisberger & Natalie Dunai

Tuesday, August 6

7:00AM - Breakfast with Experts: Researching Your Roots in Galicia
- Pamela Weisberger & Alexander Dunai
9:45AM - Bolechow Jewish Heritage Society BOF Meeting
- Laurence Kirsch
11:15AM - Research in Congress Poland and Galicia: Working with
Vital records and More - Mark Halpern & Judy Baston

Wednesday, August 7

8:15AM - Shtetl Travel Throughout Ukraine - Alexander Dunai
2:00PM - Brody BOF - Ami Elyasaf
5:00PM - Rohatyn BOF - Alex Feller

Thursday, August 8

2:00PM - Kolbuszowa Region Research Group (BOF)
- Susana Leistner Bloch
3:30PM - Suchostaw Region Research Group (BOF)
- Susana Leistner Bloch

Friday, August 9

8:15AM - The Horn Identity: Historic Academic Records Re-Construct
the Lives of Two Galician Sisters >from Rohatyn - Marla Raucher Osborn
9:30AM - Mining Archival Treasures: Unique and Unusual Resources in
Galician Research - Pamela Weisberger

We have arranged to videotape all of our Monday
presentations including the luncheon and SIG meeting. The DVDs will
be available for sale at the conference, or through Conference
Recordings post-conference, and will be offered as a free
members-only viewing option in the fall on our website.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
www.GesherGalicia.org
pweisberger@gmail.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Gesher Galicia at the IAJGS Conference #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger
 

This year Gesher Galicia is celebrating our 20th anniversary at the IAJGS
Conference. We are sponsoring the research team of Alexander and
Natalie Dunai who will be accompanied by their daughter, "little Natalie,"
so make sure to give her a friendly welcome if you see her at the programs.

If you are new to Galician research, or not yet sure if you have Galician
roots but want to find out more, and curious about unusual records,
Ukrainian archives, clever ways to research, or the exciting world of
cadastral maps (which exist for the entire Austro-Hungarian Empire,
not just Galicia,) we hope you will attend our programs which are not
"just" for Galitzianers.

Join us at the Share Fair on Sunday >from 1:30PM - 5:00PM. We will
display maps and records, new GG merchandise and books, and have
experts to help with your research questions. Jay Osborn, who
coordinates our Cadastral Map Room, will be available >from 2:30PM -
3:00PM and 4:30PM - 5:00PM to discuss the intricacies of
map-stitching (and putting the resulting large files online) with anyone
interested.

If you want to attend the GG luncheon on Monday - with former US
Ambassador to Poland, Lee A. Feinstein - or the the Galician
Breakfast-with-the Experts on Tuesday with myself and Alex Dunai,
you must purchase a ticket by Wednesday, July 24. That's the cut-off.
Everyone attending the GG luncheon or breakfast will get a 20th
anniversary GG souvenir!

Below are programs sponsored by Gesher Galicia and/or those
presented by our members and/or town leaders. (Although our official
GG SIG day is Monday, every day offers a talk on a Galician topic. Plan
to stay until Friday for two special presentations.)

Sunday, August 4

9:30AM - Tabula Registers: A Untapped Genealogical Resource in the
Lviv Archives - Alexander Dunai

Monday, August 5

8:15AM - Galician Trails: The Forgotten Story of One Family
- Andrew Zalewski
9:45AM - Using the New Gesher Galicia Website to Research Towns
and Families - Brooke Schreier Ganz
11:00AM - Cadastral Maps, Landowner, School & Voter Records: New
Horizons for Genealogists - Pamela Weisberger
12:30PM - Gesher Galicia SIG Luncheon - Ambassador Lee A. Feinstein
2:00PM - Gesher Galicia SIG Meeting and 20th Anniversary Celebration
- a selection of scintillating speakers
3:30PM - Archival Resources for the Interwar Years in Western Ukraine
- Alexander & Natalie Dunai
5:00PM - Polish Magnate Landowner Records: Bringing "The Lords'
Jews" to Life - Pamela Weisberger & Natalie Dunai

Tuesday, August 6

7:00AM - Breakfast with Experts: Researching Your Roots in Galicia
- Pamela Weisberger & Alexander Dunai
9:45AM - Bolechow Jewish Heritage Society BOF Meeting
- Laurence Kirsch
11:15AM - Research in Congress Poland and Galicia: Working with
Vital records and More - Mark Halpern & Judy Baston

Wednesday, August 7

8:15AM - Shtetl Travel Throughout Ukraine - Alexander Dunai
2:00PM - Brody BOF - Ami Elyasaf
5:00PM - Rohatyn BOF - Alex Feller

Thursday, August 8

2:00PM - Kolbuszowa Region Research Group (BOF)
- Susana Leistner Bloch
3:30PM - Suchostaw Region Research Group (BOF)
- Susana Leistner Bloch

Friday, August 9

8:15AM - The Horn Identity: Historic Academic Records Re-Construct
the Lives of Two Galician Sisters >from Rohatyn - Marla Raucher Osborn
9:30AM - Mining Archival Treasures: Unique and Unusual Resources in
Galician Research - Pamela Weisberger

We have arranged to videotape all of our Monday
presentations including the luncheon and SIG meeting. The DVDs will
be available for sale at the conference, or through Conference
Recordings post-conference, and will be offered as a free
members-only viewing option in the fall on our website.

Pamela Weisberger
President, Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@gmail.com
www.GesherGalicia.org
pweisberger@gmail.com


SMILOWITZ, PAISS, GOLDFELD #romania

Alchemedia
 

I am researching Nathan & Esther SMILOWITZ (Buhusi), Morris PAISS
(Neamtz), and Leon & Sarah GOLDFELD (Bucharest), Romanian citizens
1880's thru approximately 1913 when they immigrated to Philadelphia.
More specifically, I am trying to discover Sarah Goldfeld's maiden
name and the connection between the Smilowitz, Paiss and Goldfeld
families. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Scott Whitman

MODERATOR NOTE: If you have not already done so then you should
enter your family names and towns into the JewishGen Family Finder:
<www.jewishgen.org/jgff> This site is searched daily by hundreds
who may find your data and see a connection.


Romania SIG #Romania SMILOWITZ, PAISS, GOLDFELD #romania

Alchemedia
 

I am researching Nathan & Esther SMILOWITZ (Buhusi), Morris PAISS
(Neamtz), and Leon & Sarah GOLDFELD (Bucharest), Romanian citizens
1880's thru approximately 1913 when they immigrated to Philadelphia.
More specifically, I am trying to discover Sarah Goldfeld's maiden
name and the connection between the Smilowitz, Paiss and Goldfeld
families. Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Scott Whitman

MODERATOR NOTE: If you have not already done so then you should
enter your family names and towns into the JewishGen Family Finder:
<www.jewishgen.org/jgff> This site is searched daily by hundreds
who may find your data and see a connection.


[European Union} Proposed Data Protection Regulation and IAJGS's Records Access Alert #usa

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The genealogical community is facing threats to access of records we know
are critical to our genealogy and all of us should be knowledgeable and
active in preserving our access. One of the issues that is of great concern
and affects most of us with European roots is the pending European Union
[EU] General Data Protection Regulation. If adopted, it will affect records
access >from EU countries including historical records. The majority of us
have roots in one of the 28 EU countries *see list of countries below. If
it is adopted as currently proposed, there are genealogical concerns as the
regulation includes historic as well as future access to personally
identifiable records. The purpose of the proposed regulation is for the
protection of individuals with regard to the processing and use of personal
data. That includes the core of genealogists' documents-vital records and
more. If you rely on records >from any of the 28 countries and many of the
SIGS' record collections could be affected-you should be following this.

This Spring, the civil liberties committee of the European Parliament met to
discuss the latest draft of Europe's Data Protection Regulation. The
proposals for the overhaul of the EU's data protection laws come >from the
European Commission. The original laws date >from 1995, and need to be
updated for the Internet Age. The plan is to create one directly
applicable regulation to replace 28 different national data protection and
privacy laws. A hallmark of the European Commission's proposal is the "right
to be forgotten" provision, which requires companies controlling data to
delete information upon request. Individuals would be allowed access to
their own data and be given a right to "data portability." The expected
vote has been postponed several times and the latest date is September or
October. The reasons given for the delay is the complexity of the document
as well as the overwhelming number of proposed amendments-3,000. The
proposed amendment is scheduled to be heard in the EU's Civil Liberties
Committee.

European Commission Vice-President Viviane Reding, told the Civil Liberties
Committee that access by U.S. authorities to the personal data of EU
citizens under the PRISM (USA's NSA program) program could be illegal under
international law (12 PVLR 1120, 6/24/13). A pivotal issue is a clause that
was in the original draft but removed >from the final draft stating
"disclosures not authorized by Union law" should be inserted back into the
draft data protection regulation". The article would forbid any company
from handing the personal data of EU citizens over to non-EU governments
unless the disclosure was done in accordance with a mutual legal assistance
treaty or equivalent agreement.

The IrishTimes has an article quoting the Irish Genealogical Society and the
probable impact on genealogy if this proposed regulation is adopted in
essence, the EU proposed general data protection regulation requires public
records held by the General Register Office, such as birth certificates, to
be considered as personal information. The Genealogical Society of Finland
has also spoken out and wants genealogy to be included in the regulation as
an exception to the rules of data protection." See:
http://tinyurl.com/kspnjxd Original url:
http://www.irishtimes.com/news/eu-regulation-could-restrict-genealogical-res
earch-1.1440075

The clock is ticking as there are EU Parliament elections scheduled for May
2014 and if this regulation does not pass out of the Civil Liberties
Committee in time for each of the EU institutions to vote on the new
Parliament would have to decide if it wants to proceed with the dossier or
return it to the European Commission. If they decide the former then the
European Council would have to start all over again.

Above was a brief summary of several postings on this issue. The European
Union type of information are the types of information that are purpose of
the IAJGS Records Access Alert. IAJGS may be able to promote advocacy which
would be included in the posting on the alert where advocacy is not
permitted on the listserves hosted by JewishGen. Therefore, you are invited
to subscribe to the IAJGS Records Access Alert-its free. To read more about
the European Union you can access the Alerts archives, but you are required
to be a registered Records Alerts subscriber.

To register go to:
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts and follow
the instructions to enter your email address, full name and
JGS/JHS/SIG/JewishGen affiliation You will receive an email response that
you have to reply to or the subscription will not be finalized. If you want
full details of the postings please go to the Records Access Alert and
access the archives-
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/

*List of European Union Countries:
Austria , Belgium , Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark,
Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia,
Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania ,
Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom.

Four candidate countries: Iceland, Montenegro, Serbia, The former Yugoslav
Republic of Macedonia

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Early American SIG #USA [European Union} Proposed Data Protection Regulation and IAJGS's Records Access Alert #usa

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The genealogical community is facing threats to access of records we know
are critical to our genealogy and all of us should be knowledgeable and
active in preserving our access. One of the issues that is of great concern
and affects most of us with European roots is the pending European Union
[EU] General Data Protection Regulation. If adopted, it will affect records
access >from EU countries including historical records. The majority of us
have roots in one of the 28 EU countries *see list of countries below. If
it is adopted as currently proposed, there are genealogical concerns as the
regulation includes historic as well as future access to personally
identifiable records. The purpose of the proposed regulation is for the
protection of individuals with regard to the processing and use of personal
data. That includes the core of genealogists' documents-vital records and
more. If you rely on records >from any of the 28 countries and many of the
SIGS' record collections could be affected-you should be following this.

This Spring, the civil liberties committee of the European Parliament met to
discuss the latest draft of Europe's Data Protection Regulation. The
proposals for the overhaul of the EU's data protection laws come >from the
European Commission. The original laws date >from 1995, and need to be
updated for the Internet Age. The plan is to create one directly
applicable regulation to replace 28 different national data protection and
privacy laws. A hallmark of the European Commission's proposal is the "right
to be forgotten" provision, which requires companies controlling data to
delete information upon request. Individuals would be allowed access to
their own data and be given a right to "data portability." The expected
vote has been postponed several times and the latest date is September or
October. The reasons given for the delay is the complexity of the document
as well as the overwhelming number of proposed amendments-3,000. The
proposed amendment is scheduled to be heard in the EU's Civil Liberties
Committee.

European Commission Vice-President Viviane Reding, told the Civil Liberties
Committee that access by U.S. authorities to the personal data of EU
citizens under the PRISM (USA's NSA program) program could be illegal under
international law (12 PVLR 1120, 6/24/13). A pivotal issue is a clause that
was in the original draft but removed >from the final draft stating
"disclosures not authorized by Union law" should be inserted back into the
draft data protection regulation". The article would forbid any company
from handing the personal data of EU citizens over to non-EU governments
unless the disclosure was done in accordance with a mutual legal assistance
treaty or equivalent agreement.

The IrishTimes has an article quoting the Irish Genealogical Society and the
probable impact on genealogy if this proposed regulation is adopted in
essence, the EU proposed general data protection regulation requires public
records held by the General Register Office, such as birth certificates, to
be considered as personal information. The Genealogical Society of Finland
has also spoken out and wants genealogy to be included in the regulation as
an exception to the rules of data protection." See:
http://tinyurl.com/kspnjxd Original url:
http://www.irishtimes.com/news/eu-regulation-could-restrict-genealogical-res
earch-1.1440075

The clock is ticking as there are EU Parliament elections scheduled for May
2014 and if this regulation does not pass out of the Civil Liberties
Committee in time for each of the EU institutions to vote on the new
Parliament would have to decide if it wants to proceed with the dossier or
return it to the European Commission. If they decide the former then the
European Council would have to start all over again.

Above was a brief summary of several postings on this issue. The European
Union type of information are the types of information that are purpose of
the IAJGS Records Access Alert. IAJGS may be able to promote advocacy which
would be included in the posting on the alert where advocacy is not
permitted on the listserves hosted by JewishGen. Therefore, you are invited
to subscribe to the IAJGS Records Access Alert-its free. To read more about
the European Union you can access the Alerts archives, but you are required
to be a registered Records Alerts subscriber.

To register go to:
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts and follow
the instructions to enter your email address, full name and
JGS/JHS/SIG/JewishGen affiliation You will receive an email response that
you have to reply to or the subscription will not be finalized. If you want
full details of the postings please go to the Records Access Alert and
access the archives-
http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/

*List of European Union Countries:
Austria , Belgium , Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark,
Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia,
Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania ,
Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom.

Four candidate countries: Iceland, Montenegro, Serbia, The former Yugoslav
Republic of Macedonia

Jan Meisels Allen
IAJGS Vice President
Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


Go to bed early Tuesday night! Less than 3 weeks 'till Boston 2013 #usa

RecordsAccess@...
 

Go to bed early Tuesday night!

Less than 3 weeks until at the IAJGS meeting in Boston...and you're invited

You're invited to the EARLY AMERICAN SIG MEETING on Wednesday August 7, at 8:15 to 9:30 AM.

We'll have 2 great speakers:

The first is David Kleiman, the curator of the Loeb Visitors Center at
Touro Synagogue. He will speak on Hidden Families and Secrets in Malcolm Stern's
"First American Jewish Families"

You will discover the inside scoop on Rabbi Stern's classic work on early
American genealogy. He'll talk about all three ground breaking editions,
tracking back Rabbi Stern's original sources, corrections and updates, and
connections to other classic works such as "Our Crowd".

You will learn how to best use the charts for your own research even if your family arrived
in North America after 1830.

Next, Gladys Friedman Paulin will tell us the exciting adventures of
Eugenia Levy Phillips, one of the most notorious female rebels during the
Civil War. She was arrested in both Washington, DC, and New Orleans. Many of
her family were active in the war. They were well connected socially, politically, and militarily. .

Hear about her exploits and those of the rest of the family during the war
and what happened when the South was defeated. You'll come away with a
new understanding of how Jews could be on both sides of the conflict.

These are "not to missed " speakers, worth getting up early for.

See you there, Marvin

Marvin Weinberg, Coordinator Early American Sig


KehilaLinks Project Report for June 2013 #usa

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen KehilaLinks
We thank the owners and webmasters of these webpages for creating fitting
memorials to these Kehilot (Jewish Communities) and for providing a valuable
resource for future generations of their descendants.

Boyarka, Ukraine
Created by Karen Isabel Sanders
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/boyarka/
~~~

Witbank (Emalahleni), South Africa
Compiled by Barry Mann
Webmaster Eli Rabinowitz
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Witbank/Home.html

~~~

KehilaLinks webpages recently updated:

Bocki (Bodki), Poland
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/bocki/Bocki.html
~~~

Harbin, China
Sitsky And Toper Family Photos >from Harbin, Tientsin And Environs
Vintage Postcards >from The Sitsky/Toper Collection
Synagogue Restoration
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/harbin/index.htm
~~~

Ivano Frankivsk (Stanislawow, Stanisle) (G), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Ivano_Frankivsk/
~~~

Krasilov (Krasyliv), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Krasilov/

~~~

Some of our KehilaLinks webpages were created by people who are no
longer able to maintain them.
The following webpages are "orphaned" and are available for adoption.

Craiova (Belkiralymezo, Canalu), Romania
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/dolj/Craiova.html
~~~

Kamiensk (Kaminska), Poland
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kamiensk/
~~~

Kolomea (Kolomyja) (G)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kolomea/kolomad.htm

~~~

GOOD NEWS! The following webpage was adopted:

Briceni (Brichany, Britshan) (B), Moldova
Adopted by Barbie Moskowitz
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Brichany/brichany.htm
~~~

Fulda, Germany
Adopted by Peter Dreifuss
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/fulda/fulda.html

~~~

If you wish to create a KehilaLinks webpage or adopt an exiting "orphaned"
webpage please contact us at: < bloch@mts.net>.

NEED TECHNICAL HELP CREATING A WEBPAGE?: We have a team of dedicated
volunteers who will help you create a webpage.
~~~

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, KehilaLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
Barbara Ellman, KehilaLinks Technical Coordinator


Early American SIG #USA Go to bed early Tuesday night! Less than 3 weeks 'till Boston 2013 #usa

RecordsAccess@...
 

Go to bed early Tuesday night!

Less than 3 weeks until at the IAJGS meeting in Boston...and you're invited

You're invited to the EARLY AMERICAN SIG MEETING on Wednesday August 7, at 8:15 to 9:30 AM.

We'll have 2 great speakers:

The first is David Kleiman, the curator of the Loeb Visitors Center at
Touro Synagogue. He will speak on Hidden Families and Secrets in Malcolm Stern's
"First American Jewish Families"

You will discover the inside scoop on Rabbi Stern's classic work on early
American genealogy. He'll talk about all three ground breaking editions,
tracking back Rabbi Stern's original sources, corrections and updates, and
connections to other classic works such as "Our Crowd".

You will learn how to best use the charts for your own research even if your family arrived
in North America after 1830.

Next, Gladys Friedman Paulin will tell us the exciting adventures of
Eugenia Levy Phillips, one of the most notorious female rebels during the
Civil War. She was arrested in both Washington, DC, and New Orleans. Many of
her family were active in the war. They were well connected socially, politically, and militarily. .

Hear about her exploits and those of the rest of the family during the war
and what happened when the South was defeated. You'll come away with a
new understanding of how Jews could be on both sides of the conflict.

These are "not to missed " speakers, worth getting up early for.

See you there, Marvin

Marvin Weinberg, Coordinator Early American Sig


Early American SIG #USA KehilaLinks Project Report for June 2013 #usa

Susana Leistner Bloch
 

We are pleased to welcome the following webpages to JewishGen KehilaLinks
We thank the owners and webmasters of these webpages for creating fitting
memorials to these Kehilot (Jewish Communities) and for providing a valuable
resource for future generations of their descendants.

Boyarka, Ukraine
Created by Karen Isabel Sanders
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/boyarka/
~~~

Witbank (Emalahleni), South Africa
Compiled by Barry Mann
Webmaster Eli Rabinowitz
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Witbank/Home.html

~~~

KehilaLinks webpages recently updated:

Bocki (Bodki), Poland
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/bocki/Bocki.html
~~~

Harbin, China
Sitsky And Toper Family Photos >from Harbin, Tientsin And Environs
Vintage Postcards >from The Sitsky/Toper Collection
Synagogue Restoration
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/harbin/index.htm
~~~

Ivano Frankivsk (Stanislawow, Stanisle) (G), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Ivano_Frankivsk/
~~~

Krasilov (Krasyliv), Ukraine
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Krasilov/

~~~

Some of our KehilaLinks webpages were created by people who are no
longer able to maintain them.
The following webpages are "orphaned" and are available for adoption.

Craiova (Belkiralymezo, Canalu), Romania
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/dolj/Craiova.html
~~~

Kamiensk (Kaminska), Poland
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kamiensk/
~~~

Kolomea (Kolomyja) (G)
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kolomea/kolomad.htm

~~~

GOOD NEWS! The following webpage was adopted:

Briceni (Brichany, Britshan) (B), Moldova
Adopted by Barbie Moskowitz
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Brichany/brichany.htm
~~~

Fulda, Germany
Adopted by Peter Dreifuss
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/fulda/fulda.html

~~~

If you wish to create a KehilaLinks webpage or adopt an exiting "orphaned"
webpage please contact us at: < bloch@mts.net>.

NEED TECHNICAL HELP CREATING A WEBPAGE?: We have a team of dedicated
volunteers who will help you create a webpage.
~~~

Susana Leistner Bloch, VP, KehilaLinks, JewishGen, Inc.
Barbara Ellman, KehilaLinks Technical Coordinator


FW: Infomation #bessarabia

Anita Wolkoff <anitawolkoff@...>
 

Hello,

My name is Anita WOLKOFF and I currently live in Montreal, Quebec. I was born in Brazil. My
paternal grandparents were born in Bessarabia ( Kishinev) and immigrated to Recife, Pernambuco,
Brazil between 1917 - 1920. Unfortunately I didn t know them . The information i got >from my
already diseased father was the following:

My paternal grandfather's name - Adolfo Wolkoff, born in 1892 ( his mother's name - Anna
Chaimovich/ his father's name - Samuel Wolkoff)

My paternal grandmother's name - Anita Chapoval , born on March 20, 1898 ( her mothre's
name- Chaika RUBINSKY/ her mother's name - Leib Chapoval)

I know that they were born in Bessarabia, Kishinev.

I know that my grandmother, Anita, immigrated to Brazil and that her brother, Guilherme
CHAPOVOL also immigrated to the same city in Brazil. She also had a  a sister in Bessarabia
( I don t know her name ) who perished in during the holocaust. And she also had another
brother who went to the south of Brazil but I don t know anything about him.

I know that my grandfather, Adolfo, had a sister who came to Montreal, Quebec ( I only have
a photo of her here with me, but no names on it). If I remember some more data I will pass them to you.

Thanks in advance,

Anita WOLKOFF
Montreal
anitawolkoff@hotmail.com

MODERATOR NOTE - Please reply privately to sender


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia FW: Infomation #bessarabia

Anita Wolkoff <anitawolkoff@...>
 

Hello,

My name is Anita WOLKOFF and I currently live in Montreal, Quebec. I was born in Brazil. My
paternal grandparents were born in Bessarabia ( Kishinev) and immigrated to Recife, Pernambuco,
Brazil between 1917 - 1920. Unfortunately I didn t know them . The information i got >from my
already diseased father was the following:

My paternal grandfather's name - Adolfo Wolkoff, born in 1892 ( his mother's name - Anna
Chaimovich/ his father's name - Samuel Wolkoff)

My paternal grandmother's name - Anita Chapoval , born on March 20, 1898 ( her mothre's
name- Chaika RUBINSKY/ her mother's name - Leib Chapoval)

I know that they were born in Bessarabia, Kishinev.

I know that my grandmother, Anita, immigrated to Brazil and that her brother, Guilherme
CHAPOVOL also immigrated to the same city in Brazil. She also had a  a sister in Bessarabia
( I don t know her name ) who perished in during the holocaust. And she also had another
brother who went to the south of Brazil but I don t know anything about him.

I know that my grandfather, Adolfo, had a sister who came to Montreal, Quebec ( I only have
a photo of her here with me, but no names on it). If I remember some more data I will pass them to you.

Thanks in advance,

Anita WOLKOFF
Montreal
anitawolkoff@hotmail.com

MODERATOR NOTE - Please reply privately to sender


Re: 23 and me advice #dna

Itzhak Epstein
 

What are 23&M's services (in plain English) that require a
subscription and how likely are your matches to maintain their subscriptions?
What is the percentage of 23&M customers that is genealogically
involved rather than into it because ofthe medical information? How
likely are they to respond to inquiries?
Did any of you compare the number of matches on equivalent FTDNA and
23&M Y-DNA tests?
Does 23&M provide SNP testing?
What is the number and quality of 23&M projects and their
administrators? How about customer service?
What are the relative sizes of both companies' databases?

Having spent a lot of money on FTDNA testing, it might be cost
effective for me to spend a little on 23&M in order to be matched
against its customer database, especially for autosomal testing. I
should also figure out a way to be better matched in the Sorenson
database. (Good Luck!).

Ben -- what do you know about your DNA and wish that you knew more?

Itzhak Epstein

At 01:37 PM 7/20/2013, Steve wrote:
The "core" test that 23andme offers is an autosomal test. That is,
they match you with potential cousins along *any* branch (not just
maternal or paternal direct lines), most reliably within about 5
generations >from the common ancestor.Ftdna offers a very similar
test, as do some others. You probably won't find out how most folks
really connect to you, but if you workhard at your paper genealogy,
and pursue your dna matches, you'll likely connect with someone
eventually (see below for my successes).

They (23andme) do also give you information (but no detailed data)
on your maternal and paternal haplogroups, if you do not already
know that. However, no attempt is made to *match* you by haplogroup
to anybody (though,amongst your autosomal matches, you can see how
many match you by maternal or paternal haplo, and that *might* have
something to do with how you match). I believe this is at fairly
low resolution (in your terms).

I don't know as though there is any huge advantage for using them
over anybody else, other than getting matched to some folks who
wouldn't test with the other companies (but then the same coudl be
said of ftdna, etc.). Its certainly all very reliable, and I have
been matched to two new documented cousins (and have some good
leads) via 23andme (I have also tested with ftdna).

So, I wouldn't say there is a "catch". Its just a matter of knowing
what you are getting, and comparing it in detail with what other
companies offer. Usually, when a company charges less, its because
maybe they are giving less, but in my experience with 23andme,
that doesn't really seem to be so. For some services though, you
might have to sign up for their "subscription" (a few bucks extra a
month). You'll have to read up on that and see what exactly it is.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia

At 02:04 AM 7/20/2013, you wrote:

Many years ago I had an Oxford Ancestors DNA test, at the time it cost
a lot of money but the information it gave me was excellent and it was
enough to submit to online projects through which over the years I
have continued to learn more. I noticed today that a 23andme test is
only $99.00 and so am I wondering what more I could learn >from this
test that I don't already know; can the information returned be
submitted to other databases/projects and to what resolution re the
mitochondrial and Y tests provided. It seems to be substantially
cheaper than Family Tree DNA or the Genographic Project so I am
wondering what the catch is.
Ben Forman


DNA Research #DNA Re:23 and me advice #dna

Itzhak Epstein
 

What are 23&M's services (in plain English) that require a
subscription and how likely are your matches to maintain their subscriptions?
What is the percentage of 23&M customers that is genealogically
involved rather than into it because ofthe medical information? How
likely are they to respond to inquiries?
Did any of you compare the number of matches on equivalent FTDNA and
23&M Y-DNA tests?
Does 23&M provide SNP testing?
What is the number and quality of 23&M projects and their
administrators? How about customer service?
What are the relative sizes of both companies' databases?

Having spent a lot of money on FTDNA testing, it might be cost
effective for me to spend a little on 23&M in order to be matched
against its customer database, especially for autosomal testing. I
should also figure out a way to be better matched in the Sorenson
database. (Good Luck!).

Ben -- what do you know about your DNA and wish that you knew more?

Itzhak Epstein

At 01:37 PM 7/20/2013, Steve wrote:
The "core" test that 23andme offers is an autosomal test. That is,
they match you with potential cousins along *any* branch (not just
maternal or paternal direct lines), most reliably within about 5
generations >from the common ancestor.Ftdna offers a very similar
test, as do some others. You probably won't find out how most folks
really connect to you, but if you workhard at your paper genealogy,
and pursue your dna matches, you'll likely connect with someone
eventually (see below for my successes).

They (23andme) do also give you information (but no detailed data)
on your maternal and paternal haplogroups, if you do not already
know that. However, no attempt is made to *match* you by haplogroup
to anybody (though,amongst your autosomal matches, you can see how
many match you by maternal or paternal haplo, and that *might* have
something to do with how you match). I believe this is at fairly
low resolution (in your terms).

I don't know as though there is any huge advantage for using them
over anybody else, other than getting matched to some folks who
wouldn't test with the other companies (but then the same coudl be
said of ftdna, etc.). Its certainly all very reliable, and I have
been matched to two new documented cousins (and have some good
leads) via 23andme (I have also tested with ftdna).

So, I wouldn't say there is a "catch". Its just a matter of knowing
what you are getting, and comparing it in detail with what other
companies offer. Usually, when a company charges less, its because
maybe they are giving less, but in my experience with 23andme,
that doesn't really seem to be so. For some services though, you
might have to sign up for their "subscription" (a few bucks extra a
month). You'll have to read up on that and see what exactly it is.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia

At 02:04 AM 7/20/2013, you wrote:

Many years ago I had an Oxford Ancestors DNA test, at the time it cost
a lot of money but the information it gave me was excellent and it was
enough to submit to online projects through which over the years I
have continued to learn more. I noticed today that a 23andme test is
only $99.00 and so am I wondering what more I could learn >from this
test that I don't already know; can the information returned be
submitted to other databases/projects and to what resolution re the
mitochondrial and Y tests provided. It seems to be substantially
cheaper than Family Tree DNA or the Genographic Project so I am
wondering what the catch is.
Ben Forman


16th World Congress of Jewish Studies - Jerusalem July 28 - August 1, 2013 #general

Jean-Pierre Stroweis
 

The 16th World Congress of Jewish Studies will take place at the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem >from July 28 - August 1, 2013. Several sessions are
of particular interest for genealogists:

The session "Genealogical Perspectives on Jewish Family History",
chaired by Prof. Michael Silver, will take place on Sunday July 28 from
11:30 to 13:30.
It includes four lectures:
"Family models of Munk and Goldzieher Family" by Erzsbet Mislovics
"Jewish Families and the Tobacco Monopoly" by Louise Hecht
"The Names Sara and Israel in the Time of the Holocaust" by Prof. Aaron
Demsky
"Village Jews in the Gubernya of Nineteenth-Century Minsk" by Judith Kalik

For more details on this session, see
http://www.jewish-studies.org/?cmd=lectures&act=result&sid=259

The session "Names Through the Ages", chaired by Prof. Aaron Demsky
will take place on Monday July 29 >from 11:30 to 13:30, with four lectures:
"Female Personal Names in the Hebrew Bible and in Rabbinic Literature", by
Helene Friesen
"First Names in Gittin: The Moroccan Rabbis' Approach - The Approach of the
Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Moroccan Rabbis to the Writing of First
Names in Certificates of Divorce" by Moshe Ovadia
"Marketing Software: The Complications of Jewish Names" by Lisa Radding
"Shortened Names and Nicknames: Implications for Writing a Bill of Divorce
and for Giving Personal Names" by Yosef Rivlin

For more details on this session, see
http://www.jewish-studies.org/?cmd=lectures&act=result&sid=1123

The session "Names in Jewish Communities" chaired by Gershon Bacon
will take place on Monday July 29 >from 15:00 to 17:00, including:
"Changes of Names in the Munk Family" by Erzsbet Mislovics
"Each Person Has a Nickname that Characterizes Him" by Margalit Ovadia
"The Last Names of Georgian Jews" by Ruven Enoch
"Kopel not Filaret, Sore not Solomea: Debates about Jewish Naming Practices
in Pre-World War II Poland" by Kalman Weiser

For more details on this session, see
http://www.jewish-studies.org/?cmd=lectures&act=result&sid=1124

For more details on the whole conference, see
http://www.jewish-studies.org/

Jean-Pierre Stroweis
Jerusalem


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen 16th World Congress of Jewish Studies - Jerusalem July 28 - August 1, 2013 #general

Jean-Pierre Stroweis
 

The 16th World Congress of Jewish Studies will take place at the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem >from July 28 - August 1, 2013. Several sessions are
of particular interest for genealogists:

The session "Genealogical Perspectives on Jewish Family History",
chaired by Prof. Michael Silver, will take place on Sunday July 28 from
11:30 to 13:30.
It includes four lectures:
"Family models of Munk and Goldzieher Family" by Erzsbet Mislovics
"Jewish Families and the Tobacco Monopoly" by Louise Hecht
"The Names Sara and Israel in the Time of the Holocaust" by Prof. Aaron
Demsky
"Village Jews in the Gubernya of Nineteenth-Century Minsk" by Judith Kalik

For more details on this session, see
http://www.jewish-studies.org/?cmd=lectures&act=result&sid=259

The session "Names Through the Ages", chaired by Prof. Aaron Demsky
will take place on Monday July 29 >from 11:30 to 13:30, with four lectures:
"Female Personal Names in the Hebrew Bible and in Rabbinic Literature", by
Helene Friesen
"First Names in Gittin: The Moroccan Rabbis' Approach - The Approach of the
Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Moroccan Rabbis to the Writing of First
Names in Certificates of Divorce" by Moshe Ovadia
"Marketing Software: The Complications of Jewish Names" by Lisa Radding
"Shortened Names and Nicknames: Implications for Writing a Bill of Divorce
and for Giving Personal Names" by Yosef Rivlin

For more details on this session, see
http://www.jewish-studies.org/?cmd=lectures&act=result&sid=1123

The session "Names in Jewish Communities" chaired by Gershon Bacon
will take place on Monday July 29 >from 15:00 to 17:00, including:
"Changes of Names in the Munk Family" by Erzsbet Mislovics
"Each Person Has a Nickname that Characterizes Him" by Margalit Ovadia
"The Last Names of Georgian Jews" by Ruven Enoch
"Kopel not Filaret, Sore not Solomea: Debates about Jewish Naming Practices
in Pre-World War II Poland" by Kalman Weiser

For more details on this session, see
http://www.jewish-studies.org/?cmd=lectures&act=result&sid=1124

For more details on the whole conference, see
http://www.jewish-studies.org/

Jean-Pierre Stroweis
Jerusalem


Joseph and Leah ISAACS of London #general

Gloria Spielman <gspiel@...>
 

Hi Adrian,

If you or your friend are on Facebook you could try our Jewish East End of
London Facebook group. This is a general interest group for anyone with an
interest in the area, although most of our members either lived or had
family that lived in the East End. Many members are researching their family
history and you never know ...

https://www.facebook.com/groups/159296087418648/

Best,

Gloria Spielman
Modiin, Israel.
Whitechapel, London.

Researching: Spielman, Szpilman (London\Ostrolenka), Fishman
(London\Warsaw), Weinmann, Gralnick, London

Adrian <adrianp7@talktalk.net>
According to the 1851 census Joseph ISAACS was born in Whitechapel c
1778/79. He married Leah (?) sometime before 1826 to 1833 (the various
census returns differ as to when their daughter Julia was born in Aldgate).
snip...........


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Joseph and Leah ISAACS of London #general

Gloria Spielman <gspiel@...>
 

Hi Adrian,

If you or your friend are on Facebook you could try our Jewish East End of
London Facebook group. This is a general interest group for anyone with an
interest in the area, although most of our members either lived or had
family that lived in the East End. Many members are researching their family
history and you never know ...

https://www.facebook.com/groups/159296087418648/

Best,

Gloria Spielman
Modiin, Israel.
Whitechapel, London.

Researching: Spielman, Szpilman (London\Ostrolenka), Fishman
(London\Warsaw), Weinmann, Gralnick, London

Adrian <adrianp7@talktalk.net>
According to the 1851 census Joseph ISAACS was born in Whitechapel c
1778/79. He married Leah (?) sometime before 1826 to 1833 (the various
census returns differ as to when their daughter Julia was born in Aldgate).
snip...........

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