Date   

Re: Portugal Recognizes Consul who Saved thousands From Holocaust #holocaust

Jean-Pierre Stroweis
 

Jan Allen Maisel reported here recently that Aristides de Sousa Mendes - Portugal’s consul in Bordeaux in 1940 - finally received his country’s recognition for his salvation action. Let me just add that the Sousa Mendes Foundation provides a list of the known visa recipients, sometimes with a short bio and a picture at :  

http://sousamendesfoundation.org/visa-recipients

 

Unfortunately, not all of them were able to make use of the visas.

 

Jean-Pierre Stroweis

https://stevemorse.org/france

 


Re: BLUMENTHAL - family relations #germany #usa #general

Peter Lowe
 

Whose Birth certificate are you looking for ?  Are you trying to find the relationship between Daniel & Erich Blumenthal ?

Erich's birth and marriage certificate are digitized on  Ancestry.com 


Re: What is an "instrument"? #general

Cynthia Hollinsworth
 

David, my guess is that this is referring to the date of the original legal document.  An instrument in contracts/legal terminology is usually a formal legally binding  signed document
--
Cynthia Hollinsworth


Re: more information needed Re: Hessen Jews prior 1700 #germany

Ernst-Peter Winter
 

As Corinna said, it is very difficult to find sources before
1700, even for German fmilies.

In addition, the Hessian region before 1800 is a patchwork
of many individual independent territories. For the time
before 1700 it must be determined who had which rights in
the individual places. Only then there is a chance to find
an archive where documents may be found. Then the search
starts, where this archive has remained and whether it
survived the Second World War unscathed.

In Hesse there is an institution called "Kommission für die
Geschichte der Juden in Hessen", which researches the
history and has issued some publications:
<https://kgj-hessen.de/home-en.html>

Ernst-Peter Winter, Münster (Hessen)


Borders changing in Russian Poland in the 19thC, etc.: they didn't. #poland #russia #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Contrary to the stories we hear so often, the borders of northeastern Europe did not change between 1815 and 1914, with only very minor exceptions. Prussia became part of the German Empire, but its holdings east of the Oder were always the same. Posen Province was the Grand Duchy of Posen until around 1848 (with the King of Prussia as grand duke), and then became the Prussian/German Province of Posen. 

The Balkans were another matter, of course.

https://tinyurl.com/TtT-Borders1 for more detail.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA
research coordinator, GerSIG


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

Jules Levin
 

Of course!  Note the assumptions underlying the claim:  the immigration
officials were ignorant hicks who just didn't get them foreigners [half
were themselves naturalized, and understood 40 languages, no doubt
including Yiddish]; they were so stupid they risked their jobs to
frivolously violate regs to change names; burocratic rules were so
casual (compared to the enlightened present) that they could do whatever
they wanted to; etc., etc. Our parents pass on mishegas they heard from
their parents.

Jules Levin



On 6/25/2020 4:09 PM, Feldman, Daniel wrote:
It is a fallacy that names were changed at Ellis Island. Immigration
personnel used the names on the passenger manifest. They were
forbidden to change any name as that might be contributing to
fraudulent purposes. Immigrants changed their names after the fact .
In New York State for instance, one could change their name merely by
adopting the new one. It was legal as long as there was no attempt to
commit fraud.

Daniel Feldman


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

Jules Levin
 

This "meme" as you call it, is discussed at length in an official
statement from the Immigration Service, and is available at some .gov
web page.  I suggest you reconsider your skepticism until you have read
it.  As a government official document, it does not qualify as a meme,
at least as I understood the term when I was publishing articles in the
field of semiotics.

Jules Levin


On 6/25/2020 3:52 PM, YaleZuss via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
I'd like to ask people to reserve judgment until I have received the
document I requested from NARA.  If it is what I expect it to be, it
should resolve any serious questions about the
"no-involuntary-name-change" meme.  People need to understand that the
process was nowhere near as pristine as advocates for the meme assume,
and once one realizes how messy it was, all kinds of possibilities arise.
Incidentally, in reply to David Rosen, in my conversations with the
USCIS Historians' Office, they reported that what happened in the case
of Mary Johnson/Frank Woodhull was a change in /listing/ rather than a
change in /name/.  The evidence I have establishes that she continued
to live as Frank Woodhull.
Yale Zussman


Re: Why no check-marks on passenger manifests? #usa #general

Roger Lustig
 

Check marks were most of what the officials did write on the manifests, and they're generally quite large. What manifests are you referring to?

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA
research coordinator, GerSIG


Why no check-marks on passenger manifests? #usa #general

Josephine Rosenblum
 

     As each new immigrant was processed at Castle Garden, Ellis Island, or other reception center, how did officials keep track of who had passed through?  Why didn't the clerk put some sort of check-mark or other mark on his copy of the manifest?  I have never seen a mark on any manifest that I have viewed.  Even a tiny dot would show that a person had been checked for physical or mental problems and had gone through a brief interview.
     Thanks in advance if you know the answer.
Josephine Rosenblum
Cincinnati, OH


Re: Reclaim The Records publishes Yonkers, New York birth and death records from late 19th and early 20th centuries #announcements #usa

Esther Brill
 

 

Mazal Tov = that’s wonderful. Thanks for all of your perseverance

 

Esther Levine Brill

Looking for Jablonsky – Jankel,(Elchanan David),  Mortchaj , Chaja ; from Szcuczyn and Golberg -Estera, Szelma , Itzko Branna from Grajewo

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: Sapanta #romania

Peninah Zilberman
 

An idea
You can ask to be a member of fb
SIGHET GENERATIONS, and find other people with Spenta roots
Peninah Zilberman

Fundatia Tarbut Sighet
+40 74 414 5351
www.ftsighet.com


Re: Sapanta #romania

Peninah Zilberman
 

Hi,
What are you looking for?
There is the Jewish cemetery in Spenta
Location 20 km. from the major city Sighet.
I stay in Sighet spring to fall
Except of this year due to COVID-19
Regards
Peninah Zilberman


Fundatia Tarbut Sighet
+40 74 414 5351
www.ftsighet.com


Hebrew names in Hungarian birth records #names #hungary

erikagottfried53@...
 

Some of the microfilmed Hungarian birth records I'm looking at have what appears to be an additional name (?) column(s)  in Hebrew.   Are these indeed names.  And if they are, are they religious names (if so, whose? the children's or the parents?) It would be wonderful if they are, so helpful for research. Or are they a Hebrew equivalent of the Hungarian name given by the parents?  Or wait, are these in Yiddish, not Hebrew--so they're Yiddish names?  See attachment for a sample of what I'm talking about.






Erika Gottfried
Teaneck, New Jersey


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

Art Hoffman
 

According to family lore, when my father age 13 and/or uncle Morris age 15 first attended public school, their teacher could not pronounce their last name (Goichmann).  The G sounded like "huh" and the ch was guttural sounding.  The teacher said she would henceforth call them Hoffman.  When they came home that day and told my grandfather.  He said OK we are now Hoffman. 


Reclaim The Records publishes Yonkers, New York birth and death records from late 19th and early 20th centuries #announcements #usa

Asparagirl
 

HELLO, YONKERS! Reclaim The Records has won our Freedom of Information fight for the birth and death records from Yonkers, New York! They're now online, and free!

After literally years of negotiating and haggling (although luckily stopping short of yet another lawsuit), we are pleased to announce this first-ever publication of tens of thousands of late nineteenth and early twentieth century births and deaths for Yonkers. We've photographed the alphabetical indices, and for most years we were able to photograph the full birth and death registers, too!

And none of these record books had ever been available to the public to use or browse before, not even on microfilm at a library. And the people listed in these records were generally not in the statewide birth and death indices that we previously acquired and published for New York.

These photos are all new, and they're gorgeous. Here's a sample:
 
Reclaim_The_Records_-_Yonkers_NY_Births_-_1895-1897_-_newsletter.jpg

Click here to read our latest newsletter with all the details, and with direct links to all the now-online record books, which span from roughly 1875 to 1916, with a few gaps.

Thanks go to our attorney Dave Rankin for handling all the legal paperwork that finally got the Yonkers City Clerk's Office to stop messing around and give the public our rightful access to these important historical records. And a special shout-out to our intrepid RTR board member Jonathan Webb Deiss for going on a road trip last October to laboriously photograph these books for us.

And if you're happy to see these kinds of free (and copyright-free) historical records go online, we hope you'll consider making a donation to support our work -- so that we can do more of it, and reclaim more records for more towns and cities and states. We're a 501c3 non-profit organization, so donations may be tax-deductible in the United States.

Enjoy the new records! And we have a lot more coming soon.
 
 
- Brooke Schreier Ganz
Mill Valley, California
President and Founder, Reclaim The Records
 


Chaim Menachem Pollak family, Belsky and Schonburg families of Brooklyn #usa

Neil Rosenstein
 

Trying to make contact with the family of Eliot (Eli) Pollak who died
in 2010 and was a member of Congregation Etz Chaim in Midwood, NY. His
children - Gloria married Simon (Sy) Belsy who died in 2020, Hedy
Schonburg and Michael Pollak.
They descend from the Furtcher-Horowitz rabbinical ancestry.


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

Feldman, Daniel
 

It is a fallacy that names were changed at Ellis Island. Immigration personnel used the names on the passenger manifest. They were forbidden to change any name as that might be contributing to fraudulent purposes. Immigrants changed their names after the fact . In New York State for instance, one could change their name merely by adopting the new one. It was legal as long as there was no attempt to commit fraud.

Daniel Feldman


"His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

YaleZuss@...
 

I'd like to ask people to reserve judgment until I have received the document I requested from NARA.  If it is what I expect it to be, it should resolve any serious questions about the "no-involuntary-name-change" meme.  People need to understand that the process was nowhere near as pristine as advocates for the meme assume, and once one realizes how messy it was, all kinds of possibilities arise.
 
Incidentally, in reply to David Rosen, in my conversations with the USCIS Historians' Office, they reported that what happened in the case of Mary Johnson/Frank Woodhull was a change in listing rather than a change in name.  The evidence I have establishes that she continued to live as Frank Woodhull.
 
Yale Zussman


Names of headings for un-indexed data in vital records #general #hungary

erikagottfried53@...
 

I'm grateful that JewishGen-created indexes to microfilmed Hungarian birth (and other vital) records  contain so much data.  But I understand that with limited resources only part of the data in the original records could be indexed. My question is, what (kinds of) information is contained in the un-indexed portion of the records?  What are the categories of information, what are the names of headings for the columns with unindexed data? 
--
Erika Gottfried
Teaneck, New Jersey


Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names

Bob Roudman
 

Most if not all names were changed by the immigrant after arrival in the
US. Clerks were very careful not to change or modify names. Since the
manifest was used as proof of legal arrival immigration and Nat would
sometimes go back to the manifest to verify identities. Many times the
declaration would mention the name change made by the immigrant. It is
largely myth that the clerks changed the names at either Ellis Island or
Castle Garden.

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