Date   

Karsruhe online collection [Request direct URL & navigation help] #germany

Gene Golovchinsky
 

Dear Genners,

A number of recent messages mentioned a Karsruhe online collection of
records, which apparently includes a collection of duplicate church
registers >from various parts of Germany. The moderator helpfully
included a link to a site devoted to different aspects of German
genealogy, on which I found this link:
http://www.ubka.uni-karlsruhe.de/kvk_en.html

This seems to be the closest I could find to the afore-mentioned database.
Yet I could not figure out, searching on the the KVK site, how to find this collection
of duplicate church records. Am I looking in the wrong place? Or using
the wrong database within KVK? Thanks in advance!

Gene Golovchinsky, Menlo Park, California genego@...


German SIG #Germany Karsruhe online collection [Request direct URL & navigation help] #germany

Gene Golovchinsky
 

Dear Genners,

A number of recent messages mentioned a Karsruhe online collection of
records, which apparently includes a collection of duplicate church
registers >from various parts of Germany. The moderator helpfully
included a link to a site devoted to different aspects of German
genealogy, on which I found this link:
http://www.ubka.uni-karlsruhe.de/kvk_en.html

This seems to be the closest I could find to the afore-mentioned database.
Yet I could not figure out, searching on the the KVK site, how to find this collection
of duplicate church records. Am I looking in the wrong place? Or using
the wrong database within KVK? Thanks in advance!

Gene Golovchinsky, Menlo Park, California genego@...


Baden-Wuerttemberg Cemetery Documentation [and grave photos] Online - SITE CITE #germany

Alex Calzareth
 

The Baden-Wuerttemberg State Archive (Landesarchiv) has recently made
another important resource available online. It is a database of the
work done by the Landesdenkmalamt Baden-Wuerttemberg, which contains
basic documentation and photographs of gravestones for 141 Jewish
cemeteries in the region.

The collection is part of the digital collections of the Staatsarchiv
Ludwigsburg (Record Group EL 228 b II) and can be found at
https://www2.landesarchiv-bw.de/ofs21/olf/index.php?bestand=24368

To browse a particular cemetery click on ** "Strukturansicht" **
and then on the next page click the folder with the plus to the left of the
cemetery name.

The folders listed below will each contain twenty
gravestones. After clicking on one of the ** Grabstein ** folders a page
with names and basic gravestone information will appear on the right.

To access the photo of the gravestone click on the
** Archivalieneinheiten ** link in each gravestone entry.
Clicking on the photo brings you to another page where you can zoom or rotate the photo.

Alternatively, you can search for individuals. To do this click on
full text search ** (Volltextsuche) ** and enter a name in the ** Suchtext ** box.

After you click on Suche you will get a page of results. In order to
see the full information for the gravestone select ** Strukturansicht ** in
the relevant search result.

If you are searching for a first and last name together
it may be useful to change the ** Verknuepfung ** (search operation) setting
>from "zusammenhaengender Ausdruck" (phrase) to
"Jeder Begriff muss gefunden werden (UND)" (each term must be found)
so that the names are found regardless of their order in the database entry.

The photographs on the web site were primarily taken in the 1980s by
the Zentralarchiv zur Erforschung der Geschichte der Juden in
Deutschland (http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/institute/sonst/aj/).
I believe the organization also had a role in preparing some of the
cemetery documentation.

The Landesdenkmalamt originally published documentation for most
cemeteries consisting of a list of all the gravestones in the cemetery
along with at least basic additional information on each gravestone.
It is this basic information, such as birth and death dates, place of
origin, and spouse's or parents' names, that is found with each entry
on the archive's web site.

What appears to not yet be available is the full documentation for
select gravestones. This full documentation is a transcription of the
Hebrew inscription along with a translation into German. To access
this information it would still be necessary to consult the original
paper documentation. The title of the collection has a note indicating
that it is still in progress, so it's possible that more materials may
be added in the future.

Alex Calzareth Wantagh, New York alcalz@...

Many thanks to Alex for this important link and user guide.
Like all email to this Forum, this message will become part
of our permanent searchable archive. If a volunteer is willing
to compile a compact list of the names of the 141 cemeteries, please
write to <gersigmod@...> for format instructions.
I would post the above message again with the community list included.
That will allow archive searchers to find this valuable link and guide with
a search for any of the town names GerSIG Moderator

A link to the SIG Archive Search Engine
appears at the end of every GerSIG email.


German SIG #Germany Baden-Wuerttemberg Cemetery Documentation [and grave photos] Online - SITE CITE #germany

Alex Calzareth
 

The Baden-Wuerttemberg State Archive (Landesarchiv) has recently made
another important resource available online. It is a database of the
work done by the Landesdenkmalamt Baden-Wuerttemberg, which contains
basic documentation and photographs of gravestones for 141 Jewish
cemeteries in the region.

The collection is part of the digital collections of the Staatsarchiv
Ludwigsburg (Record Group EL 228 b II) and can be found at
https://www2.landesarchiv-bw.de/ofs21/olf/index.php?bestand=24368

To browse a particular cemetery click on ** "Strukturansicht" **
and then on the next page click the folder with the plus to the left of the
cemetery name.

The folders listed below will each contain twenty
gravestones. After clicking on one of the ** Grabstein ** folders a page
with names and basic gravestone information will appear on the right.

To access the photo of the gravestone click on the
** Archivalieneinheiten ** link in each gravestone entry.
Clicking on the photo brings you to another page where you can zoom or rotate the photo.

Alternatively, you can search for individuals. To do this click on
full text search ** (Volltextsuche) ** and enter a name in the ** Suchtext ** box.

After you click on Suche you will get a page of results. In order to
see the full information for the gravestone select ** Strukturansicht ** in
the relevant search result.

If you are searching for a first and last name together
it may be useful to change the ** Verknuepfung ** (search operation) setting
>from "zusammenhaengender Ausdruck" (phrase) to
"Jeder Begriff muss gefunden werden (UND)" (each term must be found)
so that the names are found regardless of their order in the database entry.

The photographs on the web site were primarily taken in the 1980s by
the Zentralarchiv zur Erforschung der Geschichte der Juden in
Deutschland (http://www.uni-heidelberg.de/institute/sonst/aj/).
I believe the organization also had a role in preparing some of the
cemetery documentation.

The Landesdenkmalamt originally published documentation for most
cemeteries consisting of a list of all the gravestones in the cemetery
along with at least basic additional information on each gravestone.
It is this basic information, such as birth and death dates, place of
origin, and spouse's or parents' names, that is found with each entry
on the archive's web site.

What appears to not yet be available is the full documentation for
select gravestones. This full documentation is a transcription of the
Hebrew inscription along with a translation into German. To access
this information it would still be necessary to consult the original
paper documentation. The title of the collection has a note indicating
that it is still in progress, so it's possible that more materials may
be added in the future.

Alex Calzareth Wantagh, New York alcalz@...

Many thanks to Alex for this important link and user guide.
Like all email to this Forum, this message will become part
of our permanent searchable archive. If a volunteer is willing
to compile a compact list of the names of the 141 cemeteries, please
write to <gersigmod@...> for format instructions.
I would post the above message again with the community list included.
That will allow archive searchers to find this valuable link and guide with
a search for any of the town names GerSIG Moderator

A link to the SIG Archive Search Engine
appears at the end of every GerSIG email.


Re: Looking for Ittlingen vital records. [for 1870 and later] #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear Paula,
>from 1876 onward all vital records in Germany were kept by the local
registry office (Standesamt) and not separated out by religion.

Those records are available to the public after a certain interval:
110 years for births;
80 years for marriages;
30 years for deaths.

Each Land (state, in this case Baden-Wuerttemberg) is in the process of
gathering the 2nd copies of the vital registers and placing them in
archives especially suited to the purpose.

Hessen is so far the only Land that has scanned a substantial portion of
the publicly available registry-office records and put them on line.

Most of these can only be viewed at Family History Centers or by members
of the LDS (Mormon) Church. I don't know whether Baden-Wuerttemberg has any plans to
follow suit, but for now the records can be viewed only in Germany.
(Some vital records >from Poland, including Standesamt records >from
formerly German parts are beginning to appear at
http://www.szukajwarchiwach.pl/.)

As to 1871-5 records, I have no idea what the situation is. Let us know if you
find out, please!

The Baden-Wuerttemberg archives have placed their collection of
Gatermann films on line. These are films of vital records made for the
Nazis toward the end of WW II. The originals are lost. Go to

https://www2.landesarchiv-bw.de/ofs21/olf/startbild.php?bestand=5632

and click on Strukturansicht at the left. The collection is arranged
alphabetically. There are several items for Ittlingen, including a
Chevra Kadisha register that goes to 1893 and a grave register for
1887-1929.

Best of luck, and keep us posted on what you find!

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

Paula Weil, North Salem NY nofrillsfarm@... wrote:
Can anyone tell me where to find the birth-marriage-death records for
the town of Ittlingen in Baden 1870 and later? What LDS has stops at
1870 before the supposed date of the birth of my grandfather and some
of his siblings.
Would copies of post 1870 Itlingen vital records be available to me here in the U.S.?


German SIG #Germany Re: Looking for Ittlingen vital records. [for 1870 and later] #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Dear Paula,
>from 1876 onward all vital records in Germany were kept by the local
registry office (Standesamt) and not separated out by religion.

Those records are available to the public after a certain interval:
110 years for births;
80 years for marriages;
30 years for deaths.

Each Land (state, in this case Baden-Wuerttemberg) is in the process of
gathering the 2nd copies of the vital registers and placing them in
archives especially suited to the purpose.

Hessen is so far the only Land that has scanned a substantial portion of
the publicly available registry-office records and put them on line.

Most of these can only be viewed at Family History Centers or by members
of the LDS (Mormon) Church. I don't know whether Baden-Wuerttemberg has any plans to
follow suit, but for now the records can be viewed only in Germany.
(Some vital records >from Poland, including Standesamt records >from
formerly German parts are beginning to appear at
http://www.szukajwarchiwach.pl/.)

As to 1871-5 records, I have no idea what the situation is. Let us know if you
find out, please!

The Baden-Wuerttemberg archives have placed their collection of
Gatermann films on line. These are films of vital records made for the
Nazis toward the end of WW II. The originals are lost. Go to

https://www2.landesarchiv-bw.de/ofs21/olf/startbild.php?bestand=5632

and click on Strukturansicht at the left. The collection is arranged
alphabetically. There are several items for Ittlingen, including a
Chevra Kadisha register that goes to 1893 and a grave register for
1887-1929.

Best of luck, and keep us posted on what you find!

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

Paula Weil, North Salem NY nofrillsfarm@... wrote:
Can anyone tell me where to find the birth-marriage-death records for
the town of Ittlingen in Baden 1870 and later? What LDS has stops at
1870 before the supposed date of the birth of my grandfather and some
of his siblings.
Would copies of post 1870 Itlingen vital records be available to me here in the U.S.?


Photo help: Beth Abraham cemetery, Detroit #general

Carolyn Simon
 

I am anxious to obtain a sharp, readable photo of the tombstone of my GGF David
Natowitz (Natowicz) He died 1/25/1917 and is buried in Detroit's Beth Abraham
Section A, Street: 44. Address 12. Ref: 185. An effort has already been made by the
official contact for the cemeterybut after efforts by skilled family members to
enhance the image, it remains illegible.

I would be very appreciative if someone in the area could take a photo of the
stone using more sensitive photo equipment and obtain a sharper image.. There is a
great deal of Hebrew on the stone and I have someone here in Tucson who can
translate it for me. I have never been able to trace my GGF prior to his marriage
to Feigel (Fanny) Appel in Krakow. The wedding record says his parents were Abraham
and Ewy [sic]. I do know that after his marriage he lived in Jordanow. Prior to
moving to Detroit, he lived in Chicago for many years.
Carolyn Simon
Tucson, AZ
JewishGen # 139371

MODERATOR NOTE: Please let Carolyn know privately, before you go to the cemetery to
avoid duplicating efforts.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Photo help: Beth Abraham cemetery, Detroit #general

Carolyn Simon
 

I am anxious to obtain a sharp, readable photo of the tombstone of my GGF David
Natowitz (Natowicz) He died 1/25/1917 and is buried in Detroit's Beth Abraham
Section A, Street: 44. Address 12. Ref: 185. An effort has already been made by the
official contact for the cemeterybut after efforts by skilled family members to
enhance the image, it remains illegible.

I would be very appreciative if someone in the area could take a photo of the
stone using more sensitive photo equipment and obtain a sharper image.. There is a
great deal of Hebrew on the stone and I have someone here in Tucson who can
translate it for me. I have never been able to trace my GGF prior to his marriage
to Feigel (Fanny) Appel in Krakow. The wedding record says his parents were Abraham
and Ewy [sic]. I do know that after his marriage he lived in Jordanow. Prior to
moving to Detroit, he lived in Chicago for many years.
Carolyn Simon
Tucson, AZ
JewishGen # 139371

MODERATOR NOTE: Please let Carolyn know privately, before you go to the cemetery to
avoid duplicating efforts.


JGS Conejo Valley and Ventura County Feb 10 Annual Assisted Research Afternoon at LAFHL #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The JGSCV will hold a meeting, on Sunday, February 10, 2013 at the Los Angeles
Family History Library 10741 Santa Monica Blvd. West Los Angeles (on grounds of
the LDS Temple) >from 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Parking is free.

Note: This special program is open only to current (2013) dues paid members of
JGSCV. Anyone may join or renew their JGSCV membership at door. Single membership
$25.00 ; family $30.00 (two people residing in the same household). JGSCV is open
to anyone interested in researching their Jewish roots.

The Topic: Assisted Research Afternoon at the L.A. Family History Library (LAFHL)

Experienced JGSCV members and Family History Library volunteers will be available
to help members get the most out of the L.A. Family History Library's resources,
including computer assistance with many popular genealogical databases including
Ancestry.com (full access), Fold3.com, Heritage Quest, World Vital Records,
Godfrey Memorial Library on-line resources and more! The LAFHL has many computers
so everyone can use them simultaneously. In addition, there are Jewish microfilms
of Eastern Europe and a selection of others, including maps and gazetteers. Bring
your research documents with you and bring a flash drive if you want to download
electronic images of online images. Hard copying is also available. Our sister JGS,
JGSLA's library is available for research at the LAFHL therefore, we are not
bringing the JGSCV traveling to this meeting

Barbara Algaze, volunteer at the LAFHL, and librarian for the JGSLA, will give an
introduction to the resources at the L.A. Family History Library starting at 1:30
PM. This is a new presentation including using books to help with your Jewish
Research, getting started on the Family History Library computers and navigating
the Family Search website.

Remember to bring some small bills and coins in case you wish to make copies of
anything off the computers, books, journals or microfilms. We will have very
limited cash on hand to make change.

Directions:
The LAFHL is located at: 10741 Santa Monica Blvd in Los Angeles on the
grounds of the LDS (Mormon) Temple. >from the 405 freeway get off at Santa
Monica Blvd. and go east to Manning Ave. Turn north on Manning Ave, make the
first left into the LDS Temple compound, proceed right until reaching the
Visitor's Center then, park along the fence. The entrance to the LAFHL is
on the right (east) side of the Visitor's Center. The library is on the
lower floor of the FHL-there are stairs and an elevator >from the first
floor.

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County is
dedicated to sharing genealogical information, techniques and research tools
with anyone interested in Jewish genealogy and family history.

For more information please see the JGSCV website: www.jgscv.org

Jan Meisels Allen
President, JGSCV


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGS Conejo Valley and Ventura County Feb 10 Annual Assisted Research Afternoon at LAFHL #general

Jan Meisels Allen
 

The JGSCV will hold a meeting, on Sunday, February 10, 2013 at the Los Angeles
Family History Library 10741 Santa Monica Blvd. West Los Angeles (on grounds of
the LDS Temple) >from 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. Parking is free.

Note: This special program is open only to current (2013) dues paid members of
JGSCV. Anyone may join or renew their JGSCV membership at door. Single membership
$25.00 ; family $30.00 (two people residing in the same household). JGSCV is open
to anyone interested in researching their Jewish roots.

The Topic: Assisted Research Afternoon at the L.A. Family History Library (LAFHL)

Experienced JGSCV members and Family History Library volunteers will be available
to help members get the most out of the L.A. Family History Library's resources,
including computer assistance with many popular genealogical databases including
Ancestry.com (full access), Fold3.com, Heritage Quest, World Vital Records,
Godfrey Memorial Library on-line resources and more! The LAFHL has many computers
so everyone can use them simultaneously. In addition, there are Jewish microfilms
of Eastern Europe and a selection of others, including maps and gazetteers. Bring
your research documents with you and bring a flash drive if you want to download
electronic images of online images. Hard copying is also available. Our sister JGS,
JGSLA's library is available for research at the LAFHL therefore, we are not
bringing the JGSCV traveling to this meeting

Barbara Algaze, volunteer at the LAFHL, and librarian for the JGSLA, will give an
introduction to the resources at the L.A. Family History Library starting at 1:30
PM. This is a new presentation including using books to help with your Jewish
Research, getting started on the Family History Library computers and navigating
the Family Search website.

Remember to bring some small bills and coins in case you wish to make copies of
anything off the computers, books, journals or microfilms. We will have very
limited cash on hand to make change.

Directions:
The LAFHL is located at: 10741 Santa Monica Blvd in Los Angeles on the
grounds of the LDS (Mormon) Temple. >from the 405 freeway get off at Santa
Monica Blvd. and go east to Manning Ave. Turn north on Manning Ave, make the
first left into the LDS Temple compound, proceed right until reaching the
Visitor's Center then, park along the fence. The entrance to the LAFHL is
on the right (east) side of the Visitor's Center. The library is on the
lower floor of the FHL-there are stairs and an elevator >from the first
floor.

The Jewish Genealogical Society of the Conejo Valley and Ventura County is
dedicated to sharing genealogical information, techniques and research tools
with anyone interested in Jewish genealogy and family history.

For more information please see the JGSCV website: www.jgscv.org

Jan Meisels Allen
President, JGSCV


Horowitz Schlacter #poland

irenehn@...
 

Looking for names of the parents of Eleazer Horowitz and Esther Schlacter.
They were in Bialystok around 1870-1900.

Irene Betsy Horowitz

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Index listings of Jewish birth, marriage and death
records >from Bialystok >from 1826 through 1905 may be found by searching
the Jewish Records Indexing-Poland database at www.jri-poland.org


BialyGen: Bialystok Region #Bialystok #Poland Horowitz Schlacter #poland

irenehn@...
 

Looking for names of the parents of Eleazer Horowitz and Esther Schlacter.
They were in Bialystok around 1870-1900.

Irene Betsy Horowitz

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Index listings of Jewish birth, marriage and death
records >from Bialystok >from 1826 through 1905 may be found by searching
the Jewish Records Indexing-Poland database at www.jri-poland.org


Additional Real Property Data for Panevezys District #lithuania

William Yoffee
 

Additional Real Property Data for the Panevezys District

The Panevezys District Research Group (PDRG) is adding additional data
concerning real estate ownership in two towns of the District. The data
concerns property owned by Jews in Panevezys town which was mortgaged in
1910 and 1911 and property owned by Jews in Pumpenai which was insured in
1910. There were 113 mortgaged properties listed in Panevezys town in 1910,
but in 1911 there were only 90 listed. There were 152 properties listed as
insured in Pumpenai in 1910.

The mortgage listings for Panevezys town in 1910 and 1911 appear to be two
versions of the same information. The listing for 1910 contains many names
that are omitted >from the 1911 listing. The 1911 listing contains surnames
that were also listed in 1910, and some additional surnames of common
property owners. However some surnames are misspelled and some given names
and patronymics are recorded differently in 1911. In these cases, other
features are an indication that the same property is referenced.

The 1910 list, in its "Comments" column, gives the names of the streets
where the properties are located, and in a number of cases notes that a
property is held in common. In some cases it also names the holder of the
mortgage. The "Comments" column in the 1911 listing, in many cases, gives a
more detailed description of the location of the property. The 1911 list
also includes a column showing the amount of each mortgage. A potentially
confusing and misleading feature of the 1911 listing is that it gives the
names of persons (usually persons with the same surname) who have a common
interest in the property, and the total amount of the mortgage is restated
or a smaller amount of a person's common obligation is noted.

Pumpenai was primarily an agricultural village where 1017 Jews lived in
1900. The number had nearly doubled in the previous century and a half. This
constituted about 69% of the total population. At the beginning of the 20th
Century, a considerable number emigrated mostly to South Africa. It is
interesting to note that 27 (18%) of the properties listed as insured in
1910 were in the town's market place where presumably the goods made by
local craftsmen and agricultural products of the farming population were
sold. The Yizkor book for Lithuania quotes the Pumpenai-born poet B.
Byalostotsky who described the town's market place thus : "The market place
was shaped like a hand with five fingers that pointed in different
directions; one finger pointed to the small town of Pushalot in which only a
few dozen Jewish families lived; the second finger, in the direction to the
town Posvol, that was seen by the Jews as an aristocratic and exclusive
place; the third led to the town Vabolnik about which rumors were spreading
that robbers and murderers were controlling it, which made Pumpyan Jews
afraid to use this road; the fourth finger led to the big town of Ponevezh
that was the ideal of every Pumpyan Jew; the fifth road was the shortest
route to the Beth Midrash and the small Shtibl next door in which the
Hasidim went to pray. Between the Hasidim and the Mithnagdim friendly and
peaceful relations existed".

The Panevezys District Research Group invites everyone who is interested in
tracing family in the Panevezys District of Lithuania before and during WWI
and in the inter-war period to join in our effort to have additional records
translated. Access to the Panevezys District Research Group's (PDRG)
Shutterfly website is available to participants. Contributions totaling $100
or more qualifies an individual, and, for the next five years, provides
access to the website, as well as exclusive access to all newly translated
records for at least 18 months before they are made publicly available on
the All Lithuania Database (ALD). Your tax deductible (for US taxpayers)
contributions can be made to www.litvaksig.org/contribute by credit
card, or by check at the address that is listed there. Please be sure to
designate the Panevezys DRG as the recipient.

Lists of surnames for either of the towns are available to ANYONE upon
request to me.

Bill Yoffee,
Panevezys District Research Coordinator,
kidsbks@...


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Additional Real Property Data for Panevezys District #lithuania

William Yoffee
 

Additional Real Property Data for the Panevezys District

The Panevezys District Research Group (PDRG) is adding additional data
concerning real estate ownership in two towns of the District. The data
concerns property owned by Jews in Panevezys town which was mortgaged in
1910 and 1911 and property owned by Jews in Pumpenai which was insured in
1910. There were 113 mortgaged properties listed in Panevezys town in 1910,
but in 1911 there were only 90 listed. There were 152 properties listed as
insured in Pumpenai in 1910.

The mortgage listings for Panevezys town in 1910 and 1911 appear to be two
versions of the same information. The listing for 1910 contains many names
that are omitted >from the 1911 listing. The 1911 listing contains surnames
that were also listed in 1910, and some additional surnames of common
property owners. However some surnames are misspelled and some given names
and patronymics are recorded differently in 1911. In these cases, other
features are an indication that the same property is referenced.

The 1910 list, in its "Comments" column, gives the names of the streets
where the properties are located, and in a number of cases notes that a
property is held in common. In some cases it also names the holder of the
mortgage. The "Comments" column in the 1911 listing, in many cases, gives a
more detailed description of the location of the property. The 1911 list
also includes a column showing the amount of each mortgage. A potentially
confusing and misleading feature of the 1911 listing is that it gives the
names of persons (usually persons with the same surname) who have a common
interest in the property, and the total amount of the mortgage is restated
or a smaller amount of a person's common obligation is noted.

Pumpenai was primarily an agricultural village where 1017 Jews lived in
1900. The number had nearly doubled in the previous century and a half. This
constituted about 69% of the total population. At the beginning of the 20th
Century, a considerable number emigrated mostly to South Africa. It is
interesting to note that 27 (18%) of the properties listed as insured in
1910 were in the town's market place where presumably the goods made by
local craftsmen and agricultural products of the farming population were
sold. The Yizkor book for Lithuania quotes the Pumpenai-born poet B.
Byalostotsky who described the town's market place thus : "The market place
was shaped like a hand with five fingers that pointed in different
directions; one finger pointed to the small town of Pushalot in which only a
few dozen Jewish families lived; the second finger, in the direction to the
town Posvol, that was seen by the Jews as an aristocratic and exclusive
place; the third led to the town Vabolnik about which rumors were spreading
that robbers and murderers were controlling it, which made Pumpyan Jews
afraid to use this road; the fourth finger led to the big town of Ponevezh
that was the ideal of every Pumpyan Jew; the fifth road was the shortest
route to the Beth Midrash and the small Shtibl next door in which the
Hasidim went to pray. Between the Hasidim and the Mithnagdim friendly and
peaceful relations existed".

The Panevezys District Research Group invites everyone who is interested in
tracing family in the Panevezys District of Lithuania before and during WWI
and in the inter-war period to join in our effort to have additional records
translated. Access to the Panevezys District Research Group's (PDRG)
Shutterfly website is available to participants. Contributions totaling $100
or more qualifies an individual, and, for the next five years, provides
access to the website, as well as exclusive access to all newly translated
records for at least 18 months before they are made publicly available on
the All Lithuania Database (ALD). Your tax deductible (for US taxpayers)
contributions can be made to www.litvaksig.org/contribute by credit
card, or by check at the address that is listed there. Please be sure to
designate the Panevezys DRG as the recipient.

Lists of surnames for either of the towns are available to ANYONE upon
request to me.

Bill Yoffee,
Panevezys District Research Coordinator,
kidsbks@...


divorce records in Lviv #poland

Feige Stern
 

Hello,
I wondered if anyone knows if any records of Jewish divorces exist for
the area of Lvov? Have records like that survived?

If so, how would I find them?

Thank you very much,
Feige Kauvar Stern
Cleveland, OH
Researching:

YUDKOVITCH, Warsaw, Poland; SOBEL, Kleparov, (Lvov), Ukraine; PROBST,
Kleparov (Lvov), Ukraine;
SINSHEIMER, Kleparov, Lvov, Ukraine and Wurzburg and Friedburg,
Germany


JRI Poland #Poland divorce records in Lviv #poland

Feige Stern
 

Hello,
I wondered if anyone knows if any records of Jewish divorces exist for
the area of Lvov? Have records like that survived?

If so, how would I find them?

Thank you very much,
Feige Kauvar Stern
Cleveland, OH
Researching:

YUDKOVITCH, Warsaw, Poland; SOBEL, Kleparov, (Lvov), Ukraine; PROBST,
Kleparov (Lvov), Ukraine;
SINSHEIMER, Kleparov, Lvov, Ukraine and Wurzburg and Friedburg,
Germany


Yizkor Book Project, January 2013 #hungary

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

With the first month of 2013 passed (where did it evaporate to? <g>), I have
an optimistic feeling that the Yizkor Book Project can look forward to a
great deal of activity over this year and beyond.

First signs of this, apart >from a respectable quantity of new books, new
entries and updates in January, is the fact that three new Translation Funds
were set up last month and more are brewing. The projects that were added in
January:

- Akkerman (Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy), Ukraine Yizkor Book
- Klobuck, Poland Yizkor Book
- Wyszkow, Poland Yizkor Book

These join the 60 odd Translation Funds currently running. These funds have
been set up to allow those people interested in seeing Yizkor Books
translated, to help out with donations going towards the professional
translation of these books. The Yizkor Books do contain a wealth of
information about the communities and people that were wiped >from the face
of the earth during the Holocaust and making this information freely
available in English and other languages is what the Yizkor Book Project is
all about.

If you feel able to contribute something towards this lofty goal, please go
to the following page to see the list of Translation Fund projects.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that for those of you who are US citizens, donations to these funds are
also tax-deductible.

A further encouraging sign is the fact that the Yizkor-Books-In-Print
project is celebrating having sold its 500th book since starting publication
in April 2012. In the past month alone, 82 books have been sold which is
very promising news. Also this month the translation of the Dzialoszyce
Memorial Book was issued and there are ten more books currently in the
works. If you would like to know more about this project, please go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

Finally, I am encouraged by the fact that several books are rapidly
approaching that sort-after goal of being completed translated. Hopefully,
in the months to come I will be able to announce the completion of quite a
number of books.

Now to facts and figures for January, during this last month we have added
these 4 new projects:

- Pustkow, Poland (Pustkow - The Almost Forgotten Death Camp)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pustkow/pustkow.html

- Roman, Romania (The Jewish Community of Roman)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Roman/Roman.html

- Sarvar, Hungary (Scroll of Sarvar)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sarvar/sarvar.html

- Torgovitsa, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Targovica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Torgovitsa/Torgovitsa.html

Added in 3 new entries:

- Beroun, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh029.html

- Khust, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar249.html

- Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar003.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Brzozow, Poland (A Memorial to the Brzozow Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brzozow/brzozow.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Resurrection and Destruction in Ghetto Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa4/Czestochowa4.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Garwolin, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish & English]

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lyakhavichy, Belarus (Memorial book of Lachowicze)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyakhovichi/Lyakhovichi.html

- Lyubcha, Belarus (Lubtch and Delatich; in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyubcha/lyubcha.html

- Mowchadz', Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Szczuczyn, Poland (>from the Inferno Back to Life)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczuczyn_pol1/Szczuczyn_pol1.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tighina, Moldova (Bendery Community Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bender/Bender.html

- Vynohradiv, Ukraine (The Book of Remembrance to the Community of Sollus
and Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/vinogradov/vinogradov.html

- Zdunska Wola, Poland (The Zdunska-Wola Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zdunska_Wola/Zdunska_Wola.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them. Also remember that if you have queries, questions or whims
about anything regarding the Yizkor Book Project, I'd be more than happy to
hear >from you.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Need ViewMate Translation from Polish #general

Feige Stern
 

Hello my fellow JewishGener's,

I am posting a document on ViewMate for translation >from Polish to English. It is
the marriage record of Chaja TEICHMANN to David SPRINGMANN in 1885 in Lvov, then
Poland.

There are two pages to the document and I was hoping that someone who is familiar
with the language would be kind enough to help me figure out a few things:

On the first page I can't read the name of David Springmann's father. I think it
says Yosle but there is a name before that that I just can't make out. Also on the
first page, I believe it says that Chaja is >from Rokitno but there is something
written just after that I can't read. I am hoping it would help me to locate more
records for her.

On the second page I wondered about the names, there are a couple of columns with
names. Are they witnesses? Rabbis? Can you tell me exactly what it says please?

In the last column are some numbers. I can see 1885 but was hoping for some
clarification on the what it says.

The ViewMate listings are at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM25789

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM25790

Please respond using the form in the ViewMate page.

Thanks so much for your help,

Feige Kauvar Stern
Cleveland, OH

Researching:
KLEVARSKY (KAUVAR), Seduva, Lithuania; SILVERSTEIN, Rasseiniai,Lithuania;
NAFTEL, Rasseiniai, Lithuania; SCHENKER, Dankera,Latvia and Birzai, Lithuania;
MEYLACH, Dankera, Latvia and Birzai,Lithuania; HOFFMAN, Kishinev, Moldova;
SCHWARTZ, Braila, Romania;STERN, Kovno, Lithuania; YUDKOVITCH, Warsaw, Poland;
SOBEL,Kleparov, (Lvov), Ukraine; PROBST, Kleparov (Lvov), Ukraine; SINSHEIMER,
Kleparov, Lvov, Ukraine and Wurzburg and Friedburg, Ascaffenburg,Germany;


Hungary SIG #Hungary Yizkor Book Project, January 2013 #hungary

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

With the first month of 2013 passed (where did it evaporate to? <g>), I have
an optimistic feeling that the Yizkor Book Project can look forward to a
great deal of activity over this year and beyond.

First signs of this, apart >from a respectable quantity of new books, new
entries and updates in January, is the fact that three new Translation Funds
were set up last month and more are brewing. The projects that were added in
January:

- Akkerman (Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy), Ukraine Yizkor Book
- Klobuck, Poland Yizkor Book
- Wyszkow, Poland Yizkor Book

These join the 60 odd Translation Funds currently running. These funds have
been set up to allow those people interested in seeing Yizkor Books
translated, to help out with donations going towards the professional
translation of these books. The Yizkor Books do contain a wealth of
information about the communities and people that were wiped >from the face
of the earth during the Holocaust and making this information freely
available in English and other languages is what the Yizkor Book Project is
all about.

If you feel able to contribute something towards this lofty goal, please go
to the following page to see the list of Translation Fund projects.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that for those of you who are US citizens, donations to these funds are
also tax-deductible.

A further encouraging sign is the fact that the Yizkor-Books-In-Print
project is celebrating having sold its 500th book since starting publication
in April 2012. In the past month alone, 82 books have been sold which is
very promising news. Also this month the translation of the Dzialoszyce
Memorial Book was issued and there are ten more books currently in the
works. If you would like to know more about this project, please go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

Finally, I am encouraged by the fact that several books are rapidly
approaching that sort-after goal of being completed translated. Hopefully,
in the months to come I will be able to announce the completion of quite a
number of books.

Now to facts and figures for January, during this last month we have added
these 4 new projects:

- Pustkow, Poland (Pustkow - The Almost Forgotten Death Camp)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pustkow/pustkow.html

- Roman, Romania (The Jewish Community of Roman)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Roman/Roman.html

- Sarvar, Hungary (Scroll of Sarvar)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sarvar/sarvar.html

- Torgovitsa, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Targovica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Torgovitsa/Torgovitsa.html

Added in 3 new entries:

- Beroun, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh029.html

- Khust, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar249.html

- Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar003.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Brzozow, Poland (A Memorial to the Brzozow Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brzozow/brzozow.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Resurrection and Destruction in Ghetto Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa4/Czestochowa4.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Garwolin, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish & English]

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lyakhavichy, Belarus (Memorial book of Lachowicze)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyakhovichi/Lyakhovichi.html

- Lyubcha, Belarus (Lubtch and Delatich; in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyubcha/lyubcha.html

- Mowchadz', Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Szczuczyn, Poland (>from the Inferno Back to Life)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczuczyn_pol1/Szczuczyn_pol1.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tighina, Moldova (Bendery Community Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bender/Bender.html

- Vynohradiv, Ukraine (The Book of Remembrance to the Community of Sollus
and Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/vinogradov/vinogradov.html

- Zdunska Wola, Poland (The Zdunska-Wola Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zdunska_Wola/Zdunska_Wola.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them. Also remember that if you have queries, questions or whims
about anything regarding the Yizkor Book Project, I'd be more than happy to
hear >from you.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need ViewMate Translation from Polish #general

Feige Stern
 

Hello my fellow JewishGener's,

I am posting a document on ViewMate for translation >from Polish to English. It is
the marriage record of Chaja TEICHMANN to David SPRINGMANN in 1885 in Lvov, then
Poland.

There are two pages to the document and I was hoping that someone who is familiar
with the language would be kind enough to help me figure out a few things:

On the first page I can't read the name of David Springmann's father. I think it
says Yosle but there is a name before that that I just can't make out. Also on the
first page, I believe it says that Chaja is >from Rokitno but there is something
written just after that I can't read. I am hoping it would help me to locate more
records for her.

On the second page I wondered about the names, there are a couple of columns with
names. Are they witnesses? Rabbis? Can you tell me exactly what it says please?

In the last column are some numbers. I can see 1885 but was hoping for some
clarification on the what it says.

The ViewMate listings are at:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM25789

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM25790

Please respond using the form in the ViewMate page.

Thanks so much for your help,

Feige Kauvar Stern
Cleveland, OH

Researching:
KLEVARSKY (KAUVAR), Seduva, Lithuania; SILVERSTEIN, Rasseiniai,Lithuania;
NAFTEL, Rasseiniai, Lithuania; SCHENKER, Dankera,Latvia and Birzai, Lithuania;
MEYLACH, Dankera, Latvia and Birzai,Lithuania; HOFFMAN, Kishinev, Moldova;
SCHWARTZ, Braila, Romania;STERN, Kovno, Lithuania; YUDKOVITCH, Warsaw, Poland;
SOBEL,Kleparov, (Lvov), Ukraine; PROBST, Kleparov (Lvov), Ukraine; SINSHEIMER,
Kleparov, Lvov, Ukraine and Wurzburg and Friedburg, Ascaffenburg,Germany;