Date   

Searching for descendants of Joseph NEWMAN and Paul NEUMAN #general

Steven D. Bloom <sbloom@...>
 

I am looking for information on the descendants of Joseph Newman, b.
about 1898 in Narodichi, Ukraine to Abram Dov NEMOY and Ethel Glassbaum.
He married Esther (don't know the married name). He seems likely to
be the same Joseph Newman who died in Chicago in 1970 (though I don't
know for sure).

I am also looking for information on Joseph's brother, Paul Neuman
(yes, it seems he used the alternate spelling), born about a year later,
and married to Ida Friedman (who may have been some sort of a cousin
of his, since his father's first wife was name Friedman, as were
other cousins). He also lived in Chicago, but may have moved to LA
or Texas, as did some of his siblings. He may have had a son Jerome,
who matches a tree I found on line.

I have combed Ancestry for info, so I know about when they came to
the US via Canada (as NEMOY), and found them in the censuses,
etc. But I'd like to be able to find out about folks still living who
descend >from my great grandfather's brothers Joseph and Paul.

Please respond to me directly with specific information.

Thank you.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for descendants of Joseph NEWMAN and Paul NEUMAN #general

Steven D. Bloom <sbloom@...>
 

I am looking for information on the descendants of Joseph Newman, b.
about 1898 in Narodichi, Ukraine to Abram Dov NEMOY and Ethel Glassbaum.
He married Esther (don't know the married name). He seems likely to
be the same Joseph Newman who died in Chicago in 1970 (though I don't
know for sure).

I am also looking for information on Joseph's brother, Paul Neuman
(yes, it seems he used the alternate spelling), born about a year later,
and married to Ida Friedman (who may have been some sort of a cousin
of his, since his father's first wife was name Friedman, as were
other cousins). He also lived in Chicago, but may have moved to LA
or Texas, as did some of his siblings. He may have had a son Jerome,
who matches a tree I found on line.

I have combed Ancestry for info, so I know about when they came to
the US via Canada (as NEMOY), and found them in the censuses,
etc. But I'd like to be able to find out about folks still living who
descend >from my great grandfather's brothers Joseph and Paul.

Please respond to me directly with specific information.

Thank you.

Steve Bloom
Central Virginia


Re: Jews of German origin living in the Ukraine #germany

Jules Levin
 

On 1/21/2013 12:03 AM, Gene Golovchinsky wrote:
I've been doing some research on a branch of my wife's family who came to
the United States >from Berditchev, Ukraine, around 1900-1920. I noticed
that a number of last names -- e.g., SCHILLER and SCHLUGLAIT -- were distinctly
German-sounding rather than Russian or Ukranian. I know that there were many
Germans (non-Jewish) who migrated east to Ukraine and Russia in the 19th century.


These Germans were invited by Catherine the Great (herself German of course)
in the 18th Century to settle in the steppe lands in the south-east. I believe
that most of them were members of German sects (Amish, Hutterites, Mennonites
are names that come to mind), like those that came to North America around
the same time. Not because Catherine wanted the sects, but because they were
more likely to make the move. Of course, at the same time Catherine staffed
the newly established Academy of Science, etc., with German scholars, etc.,
who settled down and became Russian. Look at the administrative structure of
Russia in the 19th Century and you will see many German and other foreign names.
Of course, many became Orthodox and thoroughly Russian while retaining German
surnames. (Although both Lutheranism and RC were officially recognized
religions to accomodate the Germans.)

What happened to the ethnic Germans 1941-45 is another question...
In general this population did not include Jews, who were not welcome
in Catherine's Russia.

Jules Levin
Los Angeles


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jews of German origin living in the Ukraine #general

Jules Levin
 

On 1/21/2013 12:03 AM, Gene Golovchinsky wrote:
I've been doing some research on a branch of my wife's family who came to
the United States >from Berditchev, Ukraine, around 1900-1920. I noticed
that a number of last names -- e.g., SCHILLER and SCHLUGLAIT -- were distinctly
German-sounding rather than Russian or Ukranian. I know that there were many
Germans (non-Jewish) who migrated east to Ukraine and Russia in the 19th century.


These Germans were invited by Catherine the Great (herself German of course)
in the 18th Century to settle in the steppe lands in the south-east. I believe
that most of them were members of German sects (Amish, Hutterites, Mennonites
are names that come to mind), like those that came to North America around
the same time. Not because Catherine wanted the sects, but because they were
more likely to make the move. Of course, at the same time Catherine staffed
the newly established Academy of Science, etc., with German scholars, etc.,
who settled down and became Russian. Look at the administrative structure of
Russia in the 19th Century and you will see many German and other foreign names.
Of course, many became Orthodox and thoroughly Russian while retaining German
surnames. (Although both Lutheranism and RC were officially recognized
religions to accomodate the Germans.)

What happened to the ethnic Germans 1941-45 is another question...
In general this population did not include Jews, who were not welcome
in Catherine's Russia.

Jules Levin
Los Angeles


ViewMate - Translation needed #germany

Howard & Sara Adler <hnsadler@...>
 

I was hoping someone >from this group could help with a translation.
I've posted two vital records in what I believe is German Script for
which I need a translation. It is a letter that was found in
the passport file of my great grand uncle. They were sent froom
Wloclawek, Poland. They both are on ViewMate at the following addresses

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM25694
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM25695

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

Sara Adler
Thank those who help you and support ViewMate, GerSIG and JewishGen
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


German SIG #Germany ViewMate - Translation needed #germany

Howard & Sara Adler <hnsadler@...>
 

I was hoping someone >from this group could help with a translation.
I've posted two vital records in what I believe is German Script for
which I need a translation. It is a letter that was found in
the passport file of my great grand uncle. They were sent froom
Wloclawek, Poland. They both are on ViewMate at the following addresses

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM25694
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM25695

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much.

Sara Adler
Thank those who help you and support ViewMate, GerSIG and JewishGen
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Re: Jews of German origin living in the Ukraine #germany

Roger Lustig
 

Gene:
Most Jewish surnames >from Eastern Europe derive >from Yiddish. Yiddish is
a Germanic language, and a large part of its vocabulary derives >from
late-medieval German. All throughout Eastern Europe, Jews adopted
surnames taken >from words in the language they used every day,
especially those who lived in shtetls, where it was often the case that
the majority of the population was Jewish.

In other words, there was not necessarily any particular reason for Jews
in Russia, Lithuania, Ukraine, etc. to adopt surnames derived >from the
language spoken by the authorities or the local Gentiles. So we have a
mixture of surnames derived >from given names, place names, occupations,
personal attributes and esthetic considerations--and all in a mix of
languages. Even the place-names that became surnames often show
awareness of German origins >from long ago: SHAPIRO (Speyer), MINTZ
(Mainz), WORMSER (Worms), WIENER (Vienna), PRAGER (Prague).

Also, keep in mind that many of the people we're talking about didn't
use Latin letters in their writing. The Cyrillic and Hebrew alphabets
were far more likely to be used, especially in the Russian Empire. So
the names in question might have been spelled in our alphabet for the
very first time on the occasion of the purchase of a steamship ticket,
or even when boarding the boat--almost certainly in a German-speaking
port. And thus the spelling they used might have been more
German-looking than otherwise.

The colonization you refer to--Germans moving east into Russia,
etc.--rarely involved Jews, not least because Catherine the Great and
her successors specifically excluded Jews when they invited Germans to
colonize and keep their language and culture, but also because there
were few reasons for Western Jews to move there. (Agricultural
colonization would have to wait for Zionism before it became a serious
"Jewish thing.") Jewish migration eastward in the 19thC was mainly to
cities like Lemberg or Czernowitz in the Austrian empire, and then often
for specific business purposes.

Finally, SHLUGLAIT is not a name I've encountered in connection with
Germans, Jewish or otherwise. There's exactly one in the German phone
book--and based on the spelling (SHLUGLEYT), she's not German--probably
from the former Soviet Union. Nor does it seem to be common anywhere
else that I've looked. Soundex matches in genealogical databases point
exclusively to Russia.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

Gene Golovchinsky wrote:
I've been doing some research on a branch of my wife's family who came
to the United States >from Berditchev, Ukraine, around 1900-1920. I
noticed that a number of last names -- e.g., SCHILLER and SCHLUGLAIT
-- were distinctly German-sounding rather than Russian or Ukranian. I
know that there were many Germans (non-Jewish) who migrated east to
Ukraine and Russia in the 19th century. Did that migration also
include Jews, and, if so, are these Jewish immigrants documented
somewhere both in historical works (for background), and with respect
to names of specific individuals?

I have found a few families with the SCHLUGLAIT last name in the
Jewish Gen Bessarabia databases, but nothing >from Berditchev, as
presumably all those records have been destroyed.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jews of German origin living in the Ukraine #general

Roger Lustig
 

Gene:
Most Jewish surnames >from Eastern Europe derive >from Yiddish. Yiddish is
a Germanic language, and a large part of its vocabulary derives >from
late-medieval German. All throughout Eastern Europe, Jews adopted
surnames taken >from words in the language they used every day,
especially those who lived in shtetls, where it was often the case that
the majority of the population was Jewish.

In other words, there was not necessarily any particular reason for Jews
in Russia, Lithuania, Ukraine, etc. to adopt surnames derived >from the
language spoken by the authorities or the local Gentiles. So we have a
mixture of surnames derived >from given names, place names, occupations,
personal attributes and esthetic considerations--and all in a mix of
languages. Even the place-names that became surnames often show
awareness of German origins >from long ago: SHAPIRO (Speyer), MINTZ
(Mainz), WORMSER (Worms), WIENER (Vienna), PRAGER (Prague).

Also, keep in mind that many of the people we're talking about didn't
use Latin letters in their writing. The Cyrillic and Hebrew alphabets
were far more likely to be used, especially in the Russian Empire. So
the names in question might have been spelled in our alphabet for the
very first time on the occasion of the purchase of a steamship ticket,
or even when boarding the boat--almost certainly in a German-speaking
port. And thus the spelling they used might have been more
German-looking than otherwise.

The colonization you refer to--Germans moving east into Russia,
etc.--rarely involved Jews, not least because Catherine the Great and
her successors specifically excluded Jews when they invited Germans to
colonize and keep their language and culture, but also because there
were few reasons for Western Jews to move there. (Agricultural
colonization would have to wait for Zionism before it became a serious
"Jewish thing.") Jewish migration eastward in the 19thC was mainly to
cities like Lemberg or Czernowitz in the Austrian empire, and then often
for specific business purposes.

Finally, SHLUGLAIT is not a name I've encountered in connection with
Germans, Jewish or otherwise. There's exactly one in the German phone
book--and based on the spelling (SHLUGLEYT), she's not German--probably
from the former Soviet Union. Nor does it seem to be common anywhere
else that I've looked. Soundex matches in genealogical databases point
exclusively to Russia.

Roger Lustig Princeton, NJ USA research coordinator, GerSIG

Gene Golovchinsky wrote:
I've been doing some research on a branch of my wife's family who came
to the United States >from Berditchev, Ukraine, around 1900-1920. I
noticed that a number of last names -- e.g., SCHILLER and SCHLUGLAIT
-- were distinctly German-sounding rather than Russian or Ukranian. I
know that there were many Germans (non-Jewish) who migrated east to
Ukraine and Russia in the 19th century. Did that migration also
include Jews, and, if so, are these Jewish immigrants documented
somewhere both in historical works (for background), and with respect
to names of specific individuals?

I have found a few families with the SCHLUGLAIT last name in the
Jewish Gen Bessarabia databases, but nothing >from Berditchev, as
presumably all those records have been destroyed.


Translation Request #germany

Steven Emanuel <steven.emanuel@...>
 

Thank those who help you and support ViewMate, GerSIG and JewishGen
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dear All

While transcribing Birth Archives for Suceava, Romania I've come across a
small puzzle which I hope someone can assist in resolving by deciphering
/translating the following:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM25710

The registry entry for the (apparent) birth of a sibling to my Great
Grandfather has been crossed out and endorsed with the wording shown in the
attached Viewmate listing. Try as I might I cannot decipher it - can any of
you? With thanks in anticipation,

Steven Emanuel Id 185680, Blackwater, UK

Researching BEINER, Suceava, Munich & elsewhere


German SIG #Germany Translation Request #germany

Steven Emanuel <steven.emanuel@...>
 

Thank those who help you and support ViewMate, GerSIG and JewishGen
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dear All

While transcribing Birth Archives for Suceava, Romania I've come across a
small puzzle which I hope someone can assist in resolving by deciphering
/translating the following:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM25710

The registry entry for the (apparent) birth of a sibling to my Great
Grandfather has been crossed out and endorsed with the wording shown in the
attached Viewmate listing. Try as I might I cannot decipher it - can any of
you? With thanks in anticipation,

Steven Emanuel Id 185680, Blackwater, UK

Researching BEINER, Suceava, Munich & elsewhere


Re: Jews of German origin living in the Ukraine #germany

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Gene Golovchinsky wrote on 21 jan 2013 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

I've been doing some research on a branch of my wife's family who came
to the United States >from Berditchev, Ukraine, around 1900-1920. I
noticed that a number of last names -- e.g., SCHILLER and SCHLUGLAIT --
were distinctly German-sounding rather than Russian or Ukranian. I know
that there were many Germans (non-Jewish) who migrated east to Ukraine
and Russia in the 19th century. Did that migration also include Jews,
and, if so, are these Jewish immigrants documented somewhere both in
historical works (for background), and with respect to names of specific
individuals?

You should take into account that Germany is not the only country where
the natives speak German [Austria comes to mind, as do parts of other
European countries], that even "Germany" and so "Germans" means a
different territorial thing depending on the age in question.

You should take into account that Yiddish dialect were spoken wherever
Ashkenazim lived, there chosen names reflecting not German but this
mother-tongue.

You should take into account that family-names are a relatively late
phenomenom among these Ashkenazim, and surrounded by restricting laws and
customs. Probably many Jews only took family-names after moving to what is
present day Ukraine [but could then have been Austria, Poland or Russia],
and devised these names >from these legislative restrictions and Yiddish
customs, choosing kinui of ther liking, or were simply assigned a name by
an [un]scrupulous official in a hurry.

The [unsubstantiated? but imho credible, somewhere in The Kaizer's Greater
Austria?] story, where in a shtetlin/dorf one half of the Jewish
inhabitants were assigned the name "Weiss", and the rest "Schwartz",
depending on their momentary seat in the assembly-room [shullein?], comes
to mind.

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Visit [recently changed URL]: <http://synagogeenschede.nl/>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Jews of German origin living in the Ukraine #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Gene Golovchinsky wrote on 21 jan 2013 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

I've been doing some research on a branch of my wife's family who came
to the United States >from Berditchev, Ukraine, around 1900-1920. I
noticed that a number of last names -- e.g., SCHILLER and SCHLUGLAIT --
were distinctly German-sounding rather than Russian or Ukranian. I know
that there were many Germans (non-Jewish) who migrated east to Ukraine
and Russia in the 19th century. Did that migration also include Jews,
and, if so, are these Jewish immigrants documented somewhere both in
historical works (for background), and with respect to names of specific
individuals?

You should take into account that Germany is not the only country where
the natives speak German [Austria comes to mind, as do parts of other
European countries], that even "Germany" and so "Germans" means a
different territorial thing depending on the age in question.

You should take into account that Yiddish dialect were spoken wherever
Ashkenazim lived, there chosen names reflecting not German but this
mother-tongue.

You should take into account that family-names are a relatively late
phenomenom among these Ashkenazim, and surrounded by restricting laws and
customs. Probably many Jews only took family-names after moving to what is
present day Ukraine [but could then have been Austria, Poland or Russia],
and devised these names >from these legislative restrictions and Yiddish
customs, choosing kinui of ther liking, or were simply assigned a name by
an [un]scrupulous official in a hurry.

The [unsubstantiated? but imho credible, somewhere in The Kaizer's Greater
Austria?] story, where in a shtetlin/dorf one half of the Jewish
inhabitants were assigned the name "Weiss", and the rest "Schwartz",
depending on their momentary seat in the assembly-room [shullein?], comes
to mind.

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Visit [recently changed URL]: <http://synagogeenschede.nl/>


Registration Open for the 33rd IAJGS International Conference #yiddish

bounce-2549633-772983@...
 

January 21, 2013

Boston -- Registration is now open for the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in historic Boston on
August 4-9.

The early registration discount will end on April 30. For more
information or to register, visit www.iajgs2013.org.

The conference is the leading genealogy event of the year for people
researching their family history. Experts will give 200 lectures,
hands-on workshops and programs during the conference.

Over 1000 researchers ranging >from beginners to professional
genealogists >from all over the United States and around the world
are expected to attend the conference in Boston.

Attendees will have a special rate at the centrally located Boston
Park Plaza Hotel (hotelinfo.iajgs2013.org). The rate will be in
effect >from July 29 to August 14, so consider spending extra time
doing research or enjoying Boston and its wonderful vacation areas
nearby. Within a few hours' drive of Boston are Cape Cod, the
Tanglewood Music Center in western Massachusetts, Maine, New
Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont and Connecticut.

For people who have never attended an IAJGS Conference, see this
video, Passport to Your Past, to learn about the experience:
video.iajgs2013.org.

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies
(IAJGS) and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston
(JGSGB) are co-hosts of the conference. Co-chairs are Marlis
Humphrey representing IAJGS and Jay Sage and Heidi Urich for
JGSGB (chairs@...)


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre Registration Open for the 33rd IAJGS International Conference #yiddish

bounce-2549633-772983@...
 

January 21, 2013

Boston -- Registration is now open for the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in historic Boston on
August 4-9.

The early registration discount will end on April 30. For more
information or to register, visit www.iajgs2013.org.

The conference is the leading genealogy event of the year for people
researching their family history. Experts will give 200 lectures,
hands-on workshops and programs during the conference.

Over 1000 researchers ranging >from beginners to professional
genealogists >from all over the United States and around the world
are expected to attend the conference in Boston.

Attendees will have a special rate at the centrally located Boston
Park Plaza Hotel (hotelinfo.iajgs2013.org). The rate will be in
effect >from July 29 to August 14, so consider spending extra time
doing research or enjoying Boston and its wonderful vacation areas
nearby. Within a few hours' drive of Boston are Cape Cod, the
Tanglewood Music Center in western Massachusetts, Maine, New
Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont and Connecticut.

For people who have never attended an IAJGS Conference, see this
video, Passport to Your Past, to learn about the experience:
video.iajgs2013.org.

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies
(IAJGS) and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston
(JGSGB) are co-hosts of the conference. Co-chairs are Marlis
Humphrey representing IAJGS and Jay Sage and Heidi Urich for
JGSGB (chairs@...)


Jews of German origin living in the Ukraine #germany

Gene Golovchinsky
 

Thank those who help you and support ViewMate, GerSIG and JewishGen
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I've been doing some research on a branch of my wife's family that came
to the United States >from Berditchev, Ukraine, around 1900-1920.

I noticed that a number of last names -- e.g., SCHILLER and SCHLUGLAIT --
were distinctly German-sounding rather than Russian or Ukranian. I know
that there were many Germans (non-Jewish) who migrated east to Ukraine
and Russia in the 19th century. Did that migration also include Jews,
and, if so, are these Jewish immigrants documented somewhere both in
historical works (for background), and with respect to names of specific
individuals?

I have found a few families with the SCHLUGLAIT last name in the Jewish
Gen Bessarabia databases, but nothing >from Berditchev, as presumably all
those records have been destroyed. Thanks!

Gene Golovchinsky, Menlo Park, CA, USA genego@...
MAGES / SCHILLER / SCHLUGLAIT -- Chicago, Berditchev


German SIG #Germany Jews of German origin living in the Ukraine #germany

Gene Golovchinsky
 

Thank those who help you and support ViewMate, GerSIG and JewishGen
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/honors.asp
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I've been doing some research on a branch of my wife's family that came
to the United States >from Berditchev, Ukraine, around 1900-1920.

I noticed that a number of last names -- e.g., SCHILLER and SCHLUGLAIT --
were distinctly German-sounding rather than Russian or Ukranian. I know
that there were many Germans (non-Jewish) who migrated east to Ukraine
and Russia in the 19th century. Did that migration also include Jews,
and, if so, are these Jewish immigrants documented somewhere both in
historical works (for background), and with respect to names of specific
individuals?

I have found a few families with the SCHLUGLAIT last name in the Jewish
Gen Bessarabia databases, but nothing >from Berditchev, as presumably all
those records have been destroyed. Thanks!

Gene Golovchinsky, Menlo Park, CA, USA genego@...
MAGES / SCHILLER / SCHLUGLAIT -- Chicago, Berditchev


Registration Open for the 33rd IAJGS International Conference #galicia

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

January 21, 2013

Boston -- Registration is now open for the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in historic Boston on
August 4-9.

The early registration discount will end on April 30. For more
information or to register, visit www.iajgs2013.org.

The conference is the leading genealogy event of the year for people
researching their family history. Experts will give 200 lectures,
hands-on workshops and programs during the conference.

Over 1000 researchers ranging >from beginners to professional
genealogists >from all over the United States and around the world
are expected to attend the conference in Boston.

Attendees will have a special rate at the centrally located Boston Park
Plaza Hotel (hotelinfo.iajgs2013.org). The rate will be in effect >from
July 29 to August 14, so consider spending extra time doing research
or enjoying Boston and its wonderful vacation areas nearby. Within a
few hours' drive of Boston are Cape Cod, the Tanglewood Music
Center in western Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode
Island, Vermont and Connecticut.

For people who have never attended an IAJGS Conference, see this
video, Passport to Your Past, to learn about the experience:
video.iajgs2013.org.

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS)
and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston (JGSGB) are
co-hosts of the conference. Co-chairs are Marlis Humphrey
representing IAJGS and Jay Sage and Heidi Urich for JGSGB
(chairs@...).


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Registration Open for the 33rd IAJGS International Conference #galicia

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

January 21, 2013

Boston -- Registration is now open for the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in historic Boston on
August 4-9.

The early registration discount will end on April 30. For more
information or to register, visit www.iajgs2013.org.

The conference is the leading genealogy event of the year for people
researching their family history. Experts will give 200 lectures,
hands-on workshops and programs during the conference.

Over 1000 researchers ranging >from beginners to professional
genealogists >from all over the United States and around the world
are expected to attend the conference in Boston.

Attendees will have a special rate at the centrally located Boston Park
Plaza Hotel (hotelinfo.iajgs2013.org). The rate will be in effect >from
July 29 to August 14, so consider spending extra time doing research
or enjoying Boston and its wonderful vacation areas nearby. Within a
few hours' drive of Boston are Cape Cod, the Tanglewood Music
Center in western Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode
Island, Vermont and Connecticut.

For people who have never attended an IAJGS Conference, see this
video, Passport to Your Past, to learn about the experience:
video.iajgs2013.org.

The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS)
and the Jewish Genealogical Society of Greater Boston (JGSGB) are
co-hosts of the conference. Co-chairs are Marlis Humphrey
representing IAJGS and Jay Sage and Heidi Urich for JGSGB
(chairs@...).


Jews of German origin living in the Ukraine #general

Gene Golovchinsky
 

I've been doing some research on a branch of my wife's family who came
to the United States >from Berditchev, Ukraine, around 1900-1920. I
noticed that a number of last names -- e.g., SCHILLER and SCHLUGLAIT --
were distinctly German-sounding rather than Russian or Ukranian. I know
that there were many Germans (non-Jewish) who migrated east to Ukraine
and Russia in the 19th century. Did that migration also include Jews,
and, if so, are these Jewish immigrants documented somewhere both in
historical works (for background), and with respect to names of specific
individuals?

I have found a few families with the SCHLUGLAIT last name in the Jewish
Gen Bessarabia databases, but nothing >from Berditchev, as presumably all
those records have been destroyed.

Thanks!

Gene Golovchinsky
MAGES / SCHILLER / SCHLUGLAIT -- Chicago, Berditchev


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Jews of German origin living in the Ukraine #general

Gene Golovchinsky
 

I've been doing some research on a branch of my wife's family who came
to the United States >from Berditchev, Ukraine, around 1900-1920. I
noticed that a number of last names -- e.g., SCHILLER and SCHLUGLAIT --
were distinctly German-sounding rather than Russian or Ukranian. I know
that there were many Germans (non-Jewish) who migrated east to Ukraine
and Russia in the 19th century. Did that migration also include Jews,
and, if so, are these Jewish immigrants documented somewhere both in
historical works (for background), and with respect to names of specific
individuals?

I have found a few families with the SCHLUGLAIT last name in the Jewish
Gen Bessarabia databases, but nothing >from Berditchev, as presumably all
those records have been destroyed.

Thanks!

Gene Golovchinsky
MAGES / SCHILLER / SCHLUGLAIT -- Chicago, Berditchev