Date   

Re: Prussia in Poland #general

Roger Lustig
 

Chuck:
Thanks for your succinct historical description. (Someday I hope to learn how to
do that!)

One small point: almost all of Farther Pomerania (Hinterpommern) remained German
after WWI. (Hither Pomerania--Vorpommern--was unaffected and is part of Germany
even today.) East Prussia lost little territory to the creation of the new Poland,
the most important change there being that the newly created Lithuania took the
coastline, a.k.a. the Memel region.

What became Polish was the larger part of Posen province plus much of West Prussia
(the so-called Polish Corridor). Danzig became a "free city" under League of
Nations protection. In 1921 the southeastern part of Upper Silesia was annexed by
Poland also.

As to the ethnic cleansing of Germans after WWII, the Poles may have finished the
job, but the Red Army was responsible for the bulk of the expulsions and flights,
most of them before the war was over.

Interwar records in Poland are indeed in Polish. In a few towns
(Zempelburg/Sepolno comes to mind) the old German civil registers were translated/
copied into Polish--on new printed forms corresponding to the old German ones--
after WW II.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

Chuck Weinstein wrote:

First of all, Poland did not exist as a country >from 1795 to 1918. It was
partitioned between Germany (Prussia), Austria, and the Russian Empire. What is
now western Poland was part of what became Germany by 1871. The language was
German and records were generally kept in German by the authorities. Poland was
created after World War I by carving out much of Galicia >from the
Austro-Hungarian Empire, part of Pomerania and much of East Prussia >from the
German Empire, and a large portion of western USSR and Lithuania (including parts
of Belarus and Ukraine).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Prussia in Poland #general

Roger Lustig
 

Chuck:
Thanks for your succinct historical description. (Someday I hope to learn how to
do that!)

One small point: almost all of Farther Pomerania (Hinterpommern) remained German
after WWI. (Hither Pomerania--Vorpommern--was unaffected and is part of Germany
even today.) East Prussia lost little territory to the creation of the new Poland,
the most important change there being that the newly created Lithuania took the
coastline, a.k.a. the Memel region.

What became Polish was the larger part of Posen province plus much of West Prussia
(the so-called Polish Corridor). Danzig became a "free city" under League of
Nations protection. In 1921 the southeastern part of Upper Silesia was annexed by
Poland also.

As to the ethnic cleansing of Germans after WWII, the Poles may have finished the
job, but the Red Army was responsible for the bulk of the expulsions and flights,
most of them before the war was over.

Interwar records in Poland are indeed in Polish. In a few towns
(Zempelburg/Sepolno comes to mind) the old German civil registers were translated/
copied into Polish--on new printed forms corresponding to the old German ones--
after WW II.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

Chuck Weinstein wrote:

First of all, Poland did not exist as a country >from 1795 to 1918. It was
partitioned between Germany (Prussia), Austria, and the Russian Empire. What is
now western Poland was part of what became Germany by 1871. The language was
German and records were generally kept in German by the authorities. Poland was
created after World War I by carving out much of Galicia >from the
Austro-Hungarian Empire, part of Pomerania and much of East Prussia >from the
German Empire, and a large portion of western USSR and Lithuania (including parts
of Belarus and Ukraine).


SHUBER/SHUBER descendants in U.S.A: SPIEGLER, TAUBMAN, KOCH, SCHUBER/SHUBER/SCHUBERT #general

אלי טייכר <anafa-e@...>
 

Dear Genners,
My husband's maternal family was SCHUBER/SHUBER/SCHUBERT/SHUBERT. They were
originally >from a village near Zablotiv/Zablotow then Poland now Ukraine named
KULASZKOWCE/KLITVICHY. His grandmother and another brother stayed in the village
married and had families; most were perished during the Holocaust.

Last week I discovered >from a letter written by late father in law (to the
Jewish Agency) which is now in the Zionist Archive that he had family in the U.S.A.
A research I am working on these days discovered 6 brothers and sisters who
immigrated one after another (>from 1901 - 1913).All lived in New York: Bronx and
Brooklyn.

I know for sure that they had married and have children and grand children. As my
husband and my sister in law do not have any extended family - I ask >from those
who know or are the descendants or related or know of:
Their father was ARON/AHARON SCHUBER mother?
1) Chaje CLARA Schuber Shpiegler who married Jacob SHPIEGLER both had Rosa (b1914),
Nathan (b. 1917), and Anna (b. 1920).
2) REBBECA/REBECCA/ SCHUBER married to?
3) MARKUS/MAX/MARCUS SCHUBER married to EVA, both had: ROSA (b.1897), CLARA (b.
1899), PASSIE/PESSIE (b. 1900), all were born in Poland, their father Max
immigrated on 1901), HELEN (b. 1913 in New York). Eva, their mother immigrated to
the U.S.A after her husband on 1910 with their children.
4) ISRAEL and BRUCHE/BERTHA SCHUBER
5) YETTA /YETTE SCHUBER married to JACOB TAUMBMAN both had Hyman (B. 1908),
ISIDORE (b.1909), HARRY (b.1915), JOSEPH (1918/9), CLARA (b.1922).
6) Leah/LEIE SCHUBER TEICHER married Chaim Teicher she remained in Poland, I assume
because she was on those years a little girl.
7) Gershon SCHUBER married? (Stayed also because he was young) he was perished with
his wife and daughters, one son escaped to Siberia. We discovered his descendants
(on 2006) here in Israel, among the mass Aliya to Israel >from Russia.

ROSA SCHUBER was the daughter of MORDECHO/MORDECHAY/MOTTLE SCHUBER And probably the
cousin of those above!
ROSA married JACOB KOCH had EDITH (b.1924) and DANIEL KOCH b.1928
If you know their descendants or are related to those families or this rings you a
bell, I will be glad to know and most thankful for helping in reestablishing family
relations.
Best regards,
Leah Teicher
anafa-e@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen SHUBER/SHUBER descendants in U.S.A: SPIEGLER, TAUBMAN, KOCH, SCHUBER/SHUBER/SCHUBERT #general

אלי טייכר <anafa-e@...>
 

Dear Genners,
My husband's maternal family was SCHUBER/SHUBER/SCHUBERT/SHUBERT. They were
originally >from a village near Zablotiv/Zablotow then Poland now Ukraine named
KULASZKOWCE/KLITVICHY. His grandmother and another brother stayed in the village
married and had families; most were perished during the Holocaust.

Last week I discovered >from a letter written by late father in law (to the
Jewish Agency) which is now in the Zionist Archive that he had family in the U.S.A.
A research I am working on these days discovered 6 brothers and sisters who
immigrated one after another (>from 1901 - 1913).All lived in New York: Bronx and
Brooklyn.

I know for sure that they had married and have children and grand children. As my
husband and my sister in law do not have any extended family - I ask >from those
who know or are the descendants or related or know of:
Their father was ARON/AHARON SCHUBER mother?
1) Chaje CLARA Schuber Shpiegler who married Jacob SHPIEGLER both had Rosa (b1914),
Nathan (b. 1917), and Anna (b. 1920).
2) REBBECA/REBECCA/ SCHUBER married to?
3) MARKUS/MAX/MARCUS SCHUBER married to EVA, both had: ROSA (b.1897), CLARA (b.
1899), PASSIE/PESSIE (b. 1900), all were born in Poland, their father Max
immigrated on 1901), HELEN (b. 1913 in New York). Eva, their mother immigrated to
the U.S.A after her husband on 1910 with their children.
4) ISRAEL and BRUCHE/BERTHA SCHUBER
5) YETTA /YETTE SCHUBER married to JACOB TAUMBMAN both had Hyman (B. 1908),
ISIDORE (b.1909), HARRY (b.1915), JOSEPH (1918/9), CLARA (b.1922).
6) Leah/LEIE SCHUBER TEICHER married Chaim Teicher she remained in Poland, I assume
because she was on those years a little girl.
7) Gershon SCHUBER married? (Stayed also because he was young) he was perished with
his wife and daughters, one son escaped to Siberia. We discovered his descendants
(on 2006) here in Israel, among the mass Aliya to Israel >from Russia.

ROSA SCHUBER was the daughter of MORDECHO/MORDECHAY/MOTTLE SCHUBER And probably the
cousin of those above!
ROSA married JACOB KOCH had EDITH (b.1924) and DANIEL KOCH b.1928
If you know their descendants or are related to those families or this rings you a
bell, I will be glad to know and most thankful for helping in reestablishing family
relations.
Best regards,
Leah Teicher
anafa-e@...


Re: When were church book duplicates written? #germany

Gerhard Buck <buckidstein@...>
 

Generally speaking, "Duplikat" = duplicate means a second version of the
original. Both versions must be identical and were often written at the
same time. How reliable a handwritten copy is, can not be judged in
general, because that depends on the writer and the person who
controlled him. My experience with 19^th century vital records with
Jewish entries in the region north-west of Frankfurt tells me that even
the original registers, which I study, have to be read with a certain
amount of mistrust.

Jewish researchers should also mistrust the term "Duplikat", which is
sometimes used in the wrong sense. In the catalogues of Familysearch
"Kirchenbuchduplikat" often does not mean that in these volumes only
members of a church were registered. The word is often used for 19th
century civil vital registers in which all inhabitants of a locality
were registered.

Real duplicates of the church books, registers for the whole Jewish
population and civil vital registers are a typical feature of the 19^th
century, when the German states wanted to have exact information of the
whole population. Usually the persons, who had kept the registers for a
certain denomination for a long time already, were ordered to give the
state duplicates of their registers in a prescribed form or to keep
separate state registers.

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germanybuckidstein@...


German SIG #Germany Re: When were church book duplicates written? #germany

Gerhard Buck <buckidstein@...>
 

Generally speaking, "Duplikat" = duplicate means a second version of the
original. Both versions must be identical and were often written at the
same time. How reliable a handwritten copy is, can not be judged in
general, because that depends on the writer and the person who
controlled him. My experience with 19^th century vital records with
Jewish entries in the region north-west of Frankfurt tells me that even
the original registers, which I study, have to be read with a certain
amount of mistrust.

Jewish researchers should also mistrust the term "Duplikat", which is
sometimes used in the wrong sense. In the catalogues of Familysearch
"Kirchenbuchduplikat" often does not mean that in these volumes only
members of a church were registered. The word is often used for 19th
century civil vital registers in which all inhabitants of a locality
were registered.

Real duplicates of the church books, registers for the whole Jewish
population and civil vital registers are a typical feature of the 19^th
century, when the German states wanted to have exact information of the
whole population. Usually the persons, who had kept the registers for a
certain denomination for a long time already, were ordered to give the
state duplicates of their registers in a prescribed form or to keep
separate state registers.

Gerhard Buck, Idstein, Germanybuckidstein@...


Re: Theresienstadt interview #austria-czech

beuginr@...
 

Thank you June for posting this interview with Friedrich SCHLAEFRIG
describing his deportation >from Vienna to Theresienstadt, and what life
was like there. My grandfather was also deported to Theresienstadt
from his Vienna apartment, in July of 1942; with his older brother to
follow in late August - shortly before your Friedrich was deported in
September. The brother did not last long - he perished in October,
while my grandfather managed to survive until the following April. This
interview has given me and my family a fascinating glimpse of what these
relatives we never new likely endured during the last months of their
lives, and for that I am grateful. It was also interesting to hear
Friedrich mention that the Jewish doctors were very good, as my
grandfather was a medical doctor. Who knows, perhaps he even treated
your Friedrich.

Ron Beugin
Calgary, Canada


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Re: Theresienstadt interview #austria-czech

beuginr@...
 

Thank you June for posting this interview with Friedrich SCHLAEFRIG
describing his deportation >from Vienna to Theresienstadt, and what life
was like there. My grandfather was also deported to Theresienstadt
from his Vienna apartment, in July of 1942; with his older brother to
follow in late August - shortly before your Friedrich was deported in
September. The brother did not last long - he perished in October,
while my grandfather managed to survive until the following April. This
interview has given me and my family a fascinating glimpse of what these
relatives we never new likely endured during the last months of their
lives, and for that I am grateful. It was also interesting to hear
Friedrich mention that the Jewish doctors were very good, as my
grandfather was a medical doctor. Who knows, perhaps he even treated
your Friedrich.

Ron Beugin
Calgary, Canada


Yizkor Book Project, January 2013 #austria-czech

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

With the first month of 2013 passed (where did it evaporate to? <g>), I have
an optimistic feeling that the Yizkor Book Project can look forward to a
great deal of activity over this year and beyond.

First signs of this, apart >from a respectable quantity of new books, new
entries and updates in January, is the fact that three new Translation Funds
were set up last month and more are brewing. The projects that were added in
January:

- Akkerman (Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy), Ukraine Yizkor Book
- Klobuck, Poland Yizkor Book
- Wyszkow, Poland Yizkor Book

These join the 60 odd Translation Funds currently running. These funds have
been set up to allow those people interested in seeing Yizkor Books
translated, to help out with donations going towards the professional
translation of these books. The Yizkor Books do contain a wealth of
information about the communities and people that were wiped >from the face
of the earth during the Holocaust and making this information freely
available in English and other languages is what the Yizkor Book Project is
all about.

If you feel able to contribute something towards this lofty goal, please go
to the following page to see the list of Translation Fund projects.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that for those of you who are US citizens, donations to these funds are
also tax-deductible.

A further encouraging sign is the fact that the Yizkor-Books-In-Print
project is celebrating having sold its 500th book since starting publication
in April 2012. In the past month alone, 82 books have been sold which is
very promising news. Also this month the translation of the Dzialoszyce
Memorial Book was issued and there are ten more books currently in the
works. If you would like to know more about this project, please go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

Finally, I am encouraged by the fact that several books are rapidly
approaching that sort-after goal of being completed translated. Hopefully,
in the months to come I will be able to announce the completion of quite a
number of books.

Now to facts and figures for January, during this last month we have added
these 4 new projects:

- Pustkow, Poland (Pustkow - The Almost Forgotten Death Camp)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pustkow/pustkow.html

- Roman, Romania (The Jewish Community of Roman)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Roman/Roman.html

- Sarvar, Hungary (Scroll of Sarvar)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sarvar/sarvar.html

- Torgovitsa, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Targovica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Torgovitsa/Torgovitsa.html

Added in 3 new entries:

- Beroun, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh029.html

- Khust, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar249.html

- Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar003.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Brzozow, Poland (A Memorial to the Brzozow Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brzozow/brzozow.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Resurrection and Destruction in Ghetto Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa4/Czestochowa4.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Garwolin, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish & English]

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lyakhavichy, Belarus (Memorial book of Lachowicze)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyakhovichi/Lyakhovichi.html

- Lyubcha, Belarus (Lubtch and Delatich; in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyubcha/lyubcha.html

- Mowchadz', Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Szczuczyn, Poland (>from the Inferno Back to Life)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczuczyn_pol1/Szczuczyn_pol1.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tighina, Moldova (Bendery Community Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bender/Bender.html

- Vynohradiv, Ukraine (The Book of Remembrance to the Community of Sollus
and Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/vinogradov/vinogradov.html

- Zdunska Wola, Poland (The Zdunska-Wola Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zdunska_Wola/Zdunska_Wola.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them. Also remember that if you have queries, questions or whims
about anything regarding the Yizkor Book Project, I'd be more than happy to
hear >from you.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Austria-Czech SIG #Austria-Czech Yizkor Book Project, January 2013 #austria-czech

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

With the first month of 2013 passed (where did it evaporate to? <g>), I have
an optimistic feeling that the Yizkor Book Project can look forward to a
great deal of activity over this year and beyond.

First signs of this, apart >from a respectable quantity of new books, new
entries and updates in January, is the fact that three new Translation Funds
were set up last month and more are brewing. The projects that were added in
January:

- Akkerman (Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy), Ukraine Yizkor Book
- Klobuck, Poland Yizkor Book
- Wyszkow, Poland Yizkor Book

These join the 60 odd Translation Funds currently running. These funds have
been set up to allow those people interested in seeing Yizkor Books
translated, to help out with donations going towards the professional
translation of these books. The Yizkor Books do contain a wealth of
information about the communities and people that were wiped >from the face
of the earth during the Holocaust and making this information freely
available in English and other languages is what the Yizkor Book Project is
all about.

If you feel able to contribute something towards this lofty goal, please go
to the following page to see the list of Translation Fund projects.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that for those of you who are US citizens, donations to these funds are
also tax-deductible.

A further encouraging sign is the fact that the Yizkor-Books-In-Print
project is celebrating having sold its 500th book since starting publication
in April 2012. In the past month alone, 82 books have been sold which is
very promising news. Also this month the translation of the Dzialoszyce
Memorial Book was issued and there are ten more books currently in the
works. If you would like to know more about this project, please go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

Finally, I am encouraged by the fact that several books are rapidly
approaching that sort-after goal of being completed translated. Hopefully,
in the months to come I will be able to announce the completion of quite a
number of books.

Now to facts and figures for January, during this last month we have added
these 4 new projects:

- Pustkow, Poland (Pustkow - The Almost Forgotten Death Camp)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pustkow/pustkow.html

- Roman, Romania (The Jewish Community of Roman)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Roman/Roman.html

- Sarvar, Hungary (Scroll of Sarvar)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sarvar/sarvar.html

- Torgovitsa, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Targovica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Torgovitsa/Torgovitsa.html

Added in 3 new entries:

- Beroun, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh029.html

- Khust, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar249.html

- Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar003.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Brzozow, Poland (A Memorial to the Brzozow Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brzozow/brzozow.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Resurrection and Destruction in Ghetto Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa4/Czestochowa4.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Garwolin, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish & English]

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lyakhavichy, Belarus (Memorial book of Lachowicze)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyakhovichi/Lyakhovichi.html

- Lyubcha, Belarus (Lubtch and Delatich; in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyubcha/lyubcha.html

- Mowchadz', Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Szczuczyn, Poland (>from the Inferno Back to Life)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczuczyn_pol1/Szczuczyn_pol1.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tighina, Moldova (Bendery Community Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bender/Bender.html

- Vynohradiv, Ukraine (The Book of Remembrance to the Community of Sollus
and Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/vinogradov/vinogradov.html

- Zdunska Wola, Poland (The Zdunska-Wola Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zdunska_Wola/Zdunska_Wola.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them. Also remember that if you have queries, questions or whims
about anything regarding the Yizkor Book Project, I'd be more than happy to
hear >from you.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Yizkor Book Project, January 2013 #ukraine

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

With the first month of 2013 passed (where did it evaporate to? <g>), I have
an optimistic feeling that the Yizkor Book Project can look forward to a
great deal of activity over this year and beyond.

First signs of this, apart >from a respectable quantity of new books, new
entries and updates in January, is the fact that three new Translation Funds
were set up last month and more are brewing. The projects that were added in
January:

- Akkerman (Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy), Ukraine Yizkor Book
- Klobuck, Poland Yizkor Book
- Wyszkow, Poland Yizkor Book

These join the 60 odd Translation Funds currently running. These funds have
been set up to allow those people interested in seeing Yizkor Books
translated, to help out with donations going towards the professional
translation of these books. The Yizkor Books do contain a wealth of
information about the communities and people that were wiped >from the face
of the earth during the Holocaust and making this information freely
available in English and other languages is what the Yizkor Book Project is
all about.

If you feel able to contribute something towards this lofty goal, please go
to the following page to see the list of Translation Fund projects.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that for those of you who are US citizens, donations to these funds are
also tax-deductible.

A further encouraging sign is the fact that the Yizkor-Books-In-Print
project is celebrating having sold its 500th book since starting publication
in April 2012. In the past month alone, 82 books have been sold which is
very promising news. Also this month the translation of the Dzialoszyce
Memorial Book was issued and there are ten more books currently in the
works. If you would like to know more about this project, please go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

Finally, I am encouraged by the fact that several books are rapidly
approaching that sort-after goal of being completed translated. Hopefully,
in the months to come I will be able to announce the completion of quite a
number of books.

Now to facts and figures for January, during this last month we have added
these 4 new projects:

- Pustkow, Poland (Pustkow - The Almost Forgotten Death Camp)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pustkow/pustkow.html

- Roman, Romania (The Jewish Community of Roman)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Roman/Roman.html

- Sarvar, Hungary (Scroll of Sarvar)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sarvar/sarvar.html

- Torgovitsa, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Targovica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Torgovitsa/Torgovitsa.html

Added in 3 new entries:

- Beroun, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh029.html

- Khust, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar249.html

- Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar003.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Brzozow, Poland (A Memorial to the Brzozow Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brzozow/brzozow.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Resurrection and Destruction in Ghetto Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa4/Czestochowa4.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Garwolin, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish & English]

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lyakhavichy, Belarus (Memorial book of Lachowicze)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyakhovichi/Lyakhovichi.html

- Lyubcha, Belarus (Lubtch and Delatich; in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyubcha/lyubcha.html

- Mowchadz', Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Szczuczyn, Poland (>from the Inferno Back to Life)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczuczyn_pol1/Szczuczyn_pol1.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tighina, Moldova (Bendery Community Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bender/Bender.html

- Vynohradiv, Ukraine (The Book of Remembrance to the Community of Sollus
and Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/vinogradov/vinogradov.html

- Zdunska Wola, Poland (The Zdunska-Wola Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zdunska_Wola/Zdunska_Wola.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them. Also remember that if you have queries, questions or whims
about anything regarding the Yizkor Book Project, I'd be more than happy to
hear >from you.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Yizkor Book Project, January 2013 #ukraine

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

With the first month of 2013 passed (where did it evaporate to? <g>), I have
an optimistic feeling that the Yizkor Book Project can look forward to a
great deal of activity over this year and beyond.

First signs of this, apart >from a respectable quantity of new books, new
entries and updates in January, is the fact that three new Translation Funds
were set up last month and more are brewing. The projects that were added in
January:

- Akkerman (Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy), Ukraine Yizkor Book
- Klobuck, Poland Yizkor Book
- Wyszkow, Poland Yizkor Book

These join the 60 odd Translation Funds currently running. These funds have
been set up to allow those people interested in seeing Yizkor Books
translated, to help out with donations going towards the professional
translation of these books. The Yizkor Books do contain a wealth of
information about the communities and people that were wiped >from the face
of the earth during the Holocaust and making this information freely
available in English and other languages is what the Yizkor Book Project is
all about.

If you feel able to contribute something towards this lofty goal, please go
to the following page to see the list of Translation Fund projects.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that for those of you who are US citizens, donations to these funds are
also tax-deductible.

A further encouraging sign is the fact that the Yizkor-Books-In-Print
project is celebrating having sold its 500th book since starting publication
in April 2012. In the past month alone, 82 books have been sold which is
very promising news. Also this month the translation of the Dzialoszyce
Memorial Book was issued and there are ten more books currently in the
works. If you would like to know more about this project, please go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

Finally, I am encouraged by the fact that several books are rapidly
approaching that sort-after goal of being completed translated. Hopefully,
in the months to come I will be able to announce the completion of quite a
number of books.

Now to facts and figures for January, during this last month we have added
these 4 new projects:

- Pustkow, Poland (Pustkow - The Almost Forgotten Death Camp)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pustkow/pustkow.html

- Roman, Romania (The Jewish Community of Roman)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Roman/Roman.html

- Sarvar, Hungary (Scroll of Sarvar)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sarvar/sarvar.html

- Torgovitsa, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Targovica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Torgovitsa/Torgovitsa.html

Added in 3 new entries:

- Beroun, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh029.html

- Khust, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar249.html

- Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar003.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Brzozow, Poland (A Memorial to the Brzozow Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brzozow/brzozow.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Resurrection and Destruction in Ghetto Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa4/Czestochowa4.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Garwolin, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish & English]

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lyakhavichy, Belarus (Memorial book of Lachowicze)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyakhovichi/Lyakhovichi.html

- Lyubcha, Belarus (Lubtch and Delatich; in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyubcha/lyubcha.html

- Mowchadz', Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Szczuczyn, Poland (>from the Inferno Back to Life)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczuczyn_pol1/Szczuczyn_pol1.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tighina, Moldova (Bendery Community Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bender/Bender.html

- Vynohradiv, Ukraine (The Book of Remembrance to the Community of Sollus
and Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/vinogradov/vinogradov.html

- Zdunska Wola, Poland (The Zdunska-Wola Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zdunska_Wola/Zdunska_Wola.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them. Also remember that if you have queries, questions or whims
about anything regarding the Yizkor Book Project, I'd be more than happy to
hear >from you.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Re: Translation of Ekaterinoslav yizkor book #ukraine

Max Heffler
 

Marilyn,
I would contact Lance Ackerfeld, who manages the JewishGen Yizkor
Book Translation Project.

Max

-----Original Message-----
From: Wallachlevinson@... [mailto:Wallachlevinson@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 1:41 PM
To: Ukraine SIG
Subject: [ukraine] Translation of Ekaterinoslav yizkor book

~~~~~
Dear Fellow genners:
I believe there is an Ekaterinoslav yizkor book currently available in
Hebrew. I would like to to
contribute funds toward having the book translated into English. Would
any one know whom I
should contact to make the necessary arrangements? Thank you.
Marilyn Levinson
Spring Lake NC

Moderator's Note: Look at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/donation/how-to.html for information on how
to set up a fundraising project Address your forum messages to
<ukraine@...>


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE: Translation of Ekaterinoslav yizkor book #ukraine

Max Heffler
 

Marilyn,
I would contact Lance Ackerfeld, who manages the JewishGen Yizkor
Book Translation Project.

Max

-----Original Message-----
From: Wallachlevinson@... [mailto:Wallachlevinson@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 1:41 PM
To: Ukraine SIG
Subject: [ukraine] Translation of Ekaterinoslav yizkor book

~~~~~
Dear Fellow genners:
I believe there is an Ekaterinoslav yizkor book currently available in
Hebrew. I would like to to
contribute funds toward having the book translated into English. Would
any one know whom I
should contact to make the necessary arrangements? Thank you.
Marilyn Levinson
Spring Lake NC

Moderator's Note: Look at
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/donation/how-to.html for information on how
to set up a fundraising project Address your forum messages to
<ukraine@...>


Yizkor Book Project, January 2013 #belarus

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

With the first month of 2013 passed (where did it evaporate to? <g>), I have
an optimistic feeling that the Yizkor Book Project can look forward to a
great deal of activity over this year and beyond.

First signs of this, apart >from a respectable quantity of new books, new
entries and updates in January, is the fact that three new Translation Funds
were set up last month and more are brewing. The projects that were added in
January:

- Akkerman (Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy), Ukraine Yizkor Book
- Klobuck, Poland Yizkor Book
- Wyszkow, Poland Yizkor Book

These join the 60 odd Translation Funds currently running. These funds have
been set up to allow those people interested in seeing Yizkor Books
translated, to help out with donations going towards the professional
translation of these books. The Yizkor Books do contain a wealth of
information about the communities and people that were wiped >from the face
of the earth during the Holocaust and making this information freely
available in English and other languages is what the Yizkor Book Project is
all about.

If you feel able to contribute something towards this lofty goal, please go
to the following page to see the list of Translation Fund projects.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that for those of you who are US citizens, donations to these funds are
also tax-deductible.

A further encouraging sign is the fact that the Yizkor-Books-In-Print
project is celebrating having sold its 500th book since starting publication
in April 2012. In the past month alone, 82 books have been sold which is
very promising news. Also this month the translation of the Dzialoszyce
Memorial Book was issued and there are ten more books currently in the
works. If you would like to know more about this project, please go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

Finally, I am encouraged by the fact that several books are rapidly
approaching that sort-after goal of being completed translated. Hopefully,
in the months to come I will be able to announce the completion of quite a
number of books.

Now to facts and figures for January, during this last month we have added
these 4 new projects:

- Pustkow, Poland (Pustkow - The Almost Forgotten Death Camp)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pustkow/pustkow.html

- Roman, Romania (The Jewish Community of Roman)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Roman/Roman.html

- Sarvar, Hungary (Scroll of Sarvar)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sarvar/sarvar.html

- Torgovitsa, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Targovica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Torgovitsa/Torgovitsa.html

Added in 3 new entries:

- Beroun, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh029.html

- Khust, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar249.html

- Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar003.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Brzozow, Poland (A Memorial to the Brzozow Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brzozow/brzozow.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Resurrection and Destruction in Ghetto Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa4/Czestochowa4.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Garwolin, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish & English]

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lyakhavichy, Belarus (Memorial book of Lachowicze)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyakhovichi/Lyakhovichi.html

- Lyubcha, Belarus (Lubtch and Delatich; in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyubcha/lyubcha.html

- Mowchadz', Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Szczuczyn, Poland (>from the Inferno Back to Life)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczuczyn_pol1/Szczuczyn_pol1.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tighina, Moldova (Bendery Community Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bender/Bender.html

- Vynohradiv, Ukraine (The Book of Remembrance to the Community of Sollus
and Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/vinogradov/vinogradov.html

- Zdunska Wola, Poland (The Zdunska-Wola Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zdunska_Wola/Zdunska_Wola.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them. Also remember that if you have queries, questions or whims
about anything regarding the Yizkor Book Project, I'd be more than happy to
hear >from you.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Belarus SIG #Belarus Yizkor Book Project, January 2013 #belarus

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

With the first month of 2013 passed (where did it evaporate to? <g>), I have
an optimistic feeling that the Yizkor Book Project can look forward to a
great deal of activity over this year and beyond.

First signs of this, apart >from a respectable quantity of new books, new
entries and updates in January, is the fact that three new Translation Funds
were set up last month and more are brewing. The projects that were added in
January:

- Akkerman (Bilhorod-Dnistrovs'kyy), Ukraine Yizkor Book
- Klobuck, Poland Yizkor Book
- Wyszkow, Poland Yizkor Book

These join the 60 odd Translation Funds currently running. These funds have
been set up to allow those people interested in seeing Yizkor Books
translated, to help out with donations going towards the professional
translation of these books. The Yizkor Books do contain a wealth of
information about the communities and people that were wiped >from the face
of the earth during the Holocaust and making this information freely
available in English and other languages is what the Yizkor Book Project is
all about.

If you feel able to contribute something towards this lofty goal, please go
to the following page to see the list of Translation Fund projects.
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/v_projectslist.asp?project_cat=23
Note that for those of you who are US citizens, donations to these funds are
also tax-deductible.

A further encouraging sign is the fact that the Yizkor-Books-In-Print
project is celebrating having sold its 500th book since starting publication
in April 2012. In the past month alone, 82 books have been sold which is
very promising news. Also this month the translation of the Dzialoszyce
Memorial Book was issued and there are ten more books currently in the
works. If you would like to know more about this project, please go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/ybip.html

Finally, I am encouraged by the fact that several books are rapidly
approaching that sort-after goal of being completed translated. Hopefully,
in the months to come I will be able to announce the completion of quite a
number of books.

Now to facts and figures for January, during this last month we have added
these 4 new projects:

- Pustkow, Poland (Pustkow - The Almost Forgotten Death Camp)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/pustkow/pustkow.html

- Roman, Romania (The Jewish Community of Roman)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Roman/Roman.html

- Sarvar, Hungary (Scroll of Sarvar)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/sarvar/sarvar.html

- Torgovitsa, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Targovica)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Torgovitsa/Torgovitsa.html

Added in 3 new entries:

- Beroun, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh029.html

- Khust, Ukraine (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish Communities)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar249.html

- Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania (The Marmaros Book; In Memory of 160 Jewish
Communities) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/maramures/mar003.html

We have continued to update 21 of our existing projects:

- Brzozow, Poland (A Memorial to the Brzozow Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/brzozow/brzozow.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (Resurrection and Destruction in Ghetto Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa4/Czestochowa4.html

- Dabrowa Gornicza, Poland (Book of the Jewish community of Dabrowa Gornicza
and its destruction) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dabrowa/dabrowa.html

- Dotnuva, Lithuania (Letters >from Dotnuva)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Dotnuva/Dotnuva.html

- Garwolin, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/garwolin/garp000.html [Polish & English]

- Gostynin, Poland (Book of Gostynin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Gostynin/Gostynin.html

- Karelichy, Belarus (Korelitz; the life and destruction of a Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/korelicze/korelicze.html

- Kovel, Ukraine (Kowel; Testimony and Memorial Book of Our Destroyed
Community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kovel1/kovel1.html

- Kurow, Poland (Yiskor book in memoriam of our hometown Kurow)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kurow/kurow.html

- Lyakhavichy, Belarus (Memorial book of Lachowicze)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyakhovichi/Lyakhovichi.html

- Lyubcha, Belarus (Lubtch and Delatich; in memory of the Jewish community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/lyubcha/lyubcha.html

- Mowchadz', Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Suwalki, Poland (Memorial book of Suvalk)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Suwalki1/Suwalki1.html

- Szczuczyn, Poland (>from the Inferno Back to Life)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Szczuczyn_pol1/Szczuczyn_pol1.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tighina, Moldova (Bendery Community Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bender/Bender.html

- Vynohradiv, Ukraine (The Book of Remembrance to the Community of Sollus
and Vicinity) http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/vinogradov/vinogradov.html

- Zdunska Wola, Poland (The Zdunska-Wola Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/Zdunska_Wola/Zdunska_Wola.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them. Also remember that if you have queries, questions or whims
about anything regarding the Yizkor Book Project, I'd be more than happy to
hear >from you.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Re: Finding US naturalization records which aren't in the National Archives,fro #general

Adelle Gloger
 

I would like to add a suggestion to what Herbert Lazerow lazer@...
wrote regarding locating naturalization records that are not in the US National
Archives.

To pin-point the exact court in which the naturalization took place it is wise to
contact the Board of Elections in the County in which the person resided. Most
immigrants registered to vote almost before the ink had dried on the naturalization
documents. In order to register to vote an individual must show proof of
citizenship -- either a US birth certificate or naturalization papers. The
original voter registration documents will indicate the court in which the
naturalization took place. Voter registration documents are public record.

Although the original post by Mark London indicated that the cousin did not become
naturalized, if he contacts the Board of Elections he will be able to confirm that.
Also, a good resource might the Wilson County Archives who might have the
Declaration of Intention even if the cousin was not naturalized.

So, there are now two resources -- the Wilson County Board of elections as well as
the Wilson County Archives.

Adelle Weintraub Gloger
Shaker Hts., Ohio
agloger@...

Herbert Lazerow wrote:
U.S. naturalizations could be then (and can be now) done by any court, federal or
state. Naturalizations were frequently done in both federal and state courts
through the 1920s. By the end of the 1920s in most urban areas, naturalizations
had been concentrated in the United States District Courts. If you are unable to
find the naturalization papers in the Federal Archives, it is likely that the
naturalization papers were filed in a North Carolina state court. In that case,
you would need to seek the document >from the court itself (and there may be more
than one with jurisdiction over the city) or a North Carolina state archive to
which the records of that court were sent.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Finding US naturalization records which aren't in the National Archives,fro #general

Adelle Gloger
 

I would like to add a suggestion to what Herbert Lazerow lazer@...
wrote regarding locating naturalization records that are not in the US National
Archives.

To pin-point the exact court in which the naturalization took place it is wise to
contact the Board of Elections in the County in which the person resided. Most
immigrants registered to vote almost before the ink had dried on the naturalization
documents. In order to register to vote an individual must show proof of
citizenship -- either a US birth certificate or naturalization papers. The
original voter registration documents will indicate the court in which the
naturalization took place. Voter registration documents are public record.

Although the original post by Mark London indicated that the cousin did not become
naturalized, if he contacts the Board of Elections he will be able to confirm that.
Also, a good resource might the Wilson County Archives who might have the
Declaration of Intention even if the cousin was not naturalized.

So, there are now two resources -- the Wilson County Board of elections as well as
the Wilson County Archives.

Adelle Weintraub Gloger
Shaker Hts., Ohio
agloger@...

Herbert Lazerow wrote:
U.S. naturalizations could be then (and can be now) done by any court, federal or
state. Naturalizations were frequently done in both federal and state courts
through the 1920s. By the end of the 1920s in most urban areas, naturalizations
had been concentrated in the United States District Courts. If you are unable to
find the naturalization papers in the Federal Archives, it is likely that the
naturalization papers were filed in a North Carolina state court. In that case,
you would need to seek the document >from the court itself (and there may be more
than one with jurisdiction over the city) or a North Carolina state archive to
which the records of that court were sent.


Re: Town identification assistance requested #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

Jeff Miller asked for help locating Russian towns....Ruchane Kovna Russia (which I
take to be Lithuania... I Google and also checked JewishGen without being able to
identify this place...and Pogave, Russia....relatives were >from Panevezys,
Lithuania, and Pumpenai.

Ok, here's what i did...I am not the expert Alexander Sharon is, but the JewishGen
Community Page Query often makes it easy to narrow the possibilities.

So i begin with the known town: Panevezys...query the database and find Panevezys,
Lithuania 55 44' N 24 21' E (i note down the latitude/longitude). Then i do the
query again, for Ruchane and Pogave....and ask for the distance >from 55 44/24 21...
and when the results come, i focus on the distance and the Yiddish names for the
towns.

I found Raseiniai, Lithuania at 55 22' N 23 7' E ...54 mi WSW of 55 44' N 24 21'E
also known as: Raseiniai [Lith], Rasayn [Yid], Rossieny [Rus],Raseinen [Ger],
Rosienie [Pol], Rasei [Latv], Rasein, Raseyn,Raseinai, Rasseyn, Resein, Rossein
Raseiniai.

I say the town names out loud, and it sounds something like Ruchane...and another
clue, it was is Kovno before WWI. A likely candidate...

Then for Pogave.. i did the same thing but came up empty handed. So next i tried
the gazetteer (which as all the towns in eastern europe, not just the ones with a
Jewish presence circa 1900)...looked up Panevezys, then clicked on thetarget icon,
the listing of all the towns within 10 miles around it.
Found these (1) Pagiegala, Pagiegalos, Poglevela populated place 55 47' N 24 30' E
6.3miles ENE and (2) Puki, Pkiai populated place 55 52' N 24 23' E 9.3 miles N...
long shots but still possible....

Isn't JewishGen wonderful!!
Phyllis Kramer, New York City, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
V.P.Education, JewishGen Inc: www.JewishGen.org/education
Researching (all Galicia) KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna
...SCHEINER, KANDEL >from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
...LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burstyn
...STECHER, TRACHMAN >from Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla
family web site: www.KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org/Krosno/Kramer.htm


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen RE:Town identification assistance requested #general

Phyllis Kramer
 

Jeff Miller asked for help locating Russian towns....Ruchane Kovna Russia (which I
take to be Lithuania... I Google and also checked JewishGen without being able to
identify this place...and Pogave, Russia....relatives were >from Panevezys,
Lithuania, and Pumpenai.

Ok, here's what i did...I am not the expert Alexander Sharon is, but the JewishGen
Community Page Query often makes it easy to narrow the possibilities.

So i begin with the known town: Panevezys...query the database and find Panevezys,
Lithuania 55 44' N 24 21' E (i note down the latitude/longitude). Then i do the
query again, for Ruchane and Pogave....and ask for the distance >from 55 44/24 21...
and when the results come, i focus on the distance and the Yiddish names for the
towns.

I found Raseiniai, Lithuania at 55 22' N 23 7' E ...54 mi WSW of 55 44' N 24 21'E
also known as: Raseiniai [Lith], Rasayn [Yid], Rossieny [Rus],Raseinen [Ger],
Rosienie [Pol], Rasei [Latv], Rasein, Raseyn,Raseinai, Rasseyn, Resein, Rossein
Raseiniai.

I say the town names out loud, and it sounds something like Ruchane...and another
clue, it was is Kovno before WWI. A likely candidate...

Then for Pogave.. i did the same thing but came up empty handed. So next i tried
the gazetteer (which as all the towns in eastern europe, not just the ones with a
Jewish presence circa 1900)...looked up Panevezys, then clicked on thetarget icon,
the listing of all the towns within 10 miles around it.
Found these (1) Pagiegala, Pagiegalos, Poglevela populated place 55 47' N 24 30' E
6.3miles ENE and (2) Puki, Pkiai populated place 55 52' N 24 23' E 9.3 miles N...
long shots but still possible....

Isn't JewishGen wonderful!!
Phyllis Kramer, New York City, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla
V.P.Education, JewishGen Inc: www.JewishGen.org/education
Researching (all Galicia) KRAMER, BEIM >from Jasienica Rosielna
...SCHEINER, KANDEL >from Strzyzow & Dubiecko
...LINDNER, EICHEL >from Rohatyn, Burstyn
...STECHER, TRACHMAN >from Nowy Zmigrod, Dukla
family web site: www.KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org/Krosno/Kramer.htm