Date   

Re: Help Stop USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Hikes

Marilen Pitler
 

Has any grope put up a petition to sign? There are people who may prefer signing a petition then writing letters.


Re: Trip to Lvov (Lviv) Ukraine on April 2020 #galicia

Sherri Venezia
 

Hi Daniel:

As a fellow Galitzianer, wanted to share my experience. I went on a
genealogical journey to Lviv and nearby villages my family came >from
early in 20th C. My trip was in 2012.

Flying into Lviv right after the world soccer event, we had the new airport
and a quick entry through passport control. Recommended by my guide
I made prior reservations at the Reikartz Medievale, a modern European
boutique hotel near the central Rynok Square, an amazing world heritage
area with the 19th C City Hall tower and Renaissance and Italianate
townhouses arranged in real time before your eyes.

I had a complex agenda: genealogical research, Holocaust era sites
(ghetto, memorial, Janowska camp, Golden Rose Synagogue memorial),
and a general historical tour of the city, general region and targeted
towns, to the west and east of Lviv, including ancient Castle Hill, above
the city.

I was touched by this remaining grand dame of the Hapsburg era. It is
stunningly beautiful, poor (with the elderly poor visible in doorways in
center section near old city wall) selling old cameras, personal items, a
scarf, etc.), as though time stood still....all buildings in center prior to
19th C, with Soviet era monoliths in distance. We went to the outdoor
architectural museum, the oldest brewery in Lviv (400 years old).... and
the memorial area where slain Jews are honored.... the looming
beseeching sculptured figure in the center.... unforgettable and tragic....
in the former confined ghetto area. There has been no renovation, no
improvements.... this is raw history. The open market built on top of the
Jewish Cemetery is haunting and unbelievable. The Rappaport Jewish
Hospital survives as the current maternity hospital with Magen David
designs in the wrought iron of the gates. The old Temple intellectuals
synagogue.... destroyed by Nazis, but a plaque shows the spot. The
other spared former synagogue, used for horses and hay, by the Nazis,
(Sholem Aleichem plaque) remains there in an old former Jewish
neighborhood, but no museum nor renovation. We visited the
contemporary Chabad synagogue and chatted with the staff,
contributing a bit. The members may be immigrants to Lviv such as
former Jewish Soviets.

The elegant coffee houses.... coffee is king in Lviv.... we went during the
amazing Coffee Festival in late September.... are wonderful. The high
end and emigree spots, bakery Svit Kavy, restaurants such as Amadeus,
were amazing.... down to the amuse bouche! Check out the art museum,
historical museum in Rynok and walk the streets.... Boim Chapel,
beautiful old Armenian Church.... ancient sidewalks, Opera House, city
arsenal ancient wall.... Being there and finding the exact villages my
family came from, plus smaller memorials, the cemetery in Busk.... intact
ancient Jewish graves the old 2-sided old synagogue (now a type of poor
housing on one side and evangelical church on the other).... broke my
heart.... my forebears prayed there.... and a mass grave found by Father
Patrick Desbois and the Yahad-In Unum research team.... site in the old
Jewish Cemetery on the hill. The memorial in Horodok ( former Grodek)
was touching because there were Holocaust mass grave stones lined up
with some plaque about Russian soldiers, and neighbors who knew
nothing about where this was. A glimpse into the past.... since Ukraine,
so poor and clearly still recovering >from its 19th- 20th C destruction,
dislocation and horrors.

I had research >from JRI Poland, Gesher Galicia, and a few documents my
guide found.... all of this together was a trip back in time.... sad,
connective, awesome, illuminating for you.... your mother and your
children. I didn't have direct contact with Archives.... but I did find my
past and made sense if my gr grandparents and grandmother's formative
experiences in the old world.... finding a piece of myself.... and profoundly
moved.... remembering each detail of that week to spontaneously share
with you.

Enjoy!

Sherri Venezia
Davis, Ca

Researching Rottenberg, Kurz families

Daniel Horowitz <daniel@...> wrote:

I am planning a trip to Lvov (Lviv) next April 2020 for the first time,
and would like to hear any suggestions and comments about the
city.

I have some addresses >from ancestors that lived in the area, but I
also would like to visit the archive to do some research, go to the
cemetery looking for records or burials, visit synagogues and
Jewish areas (if they are) and of course do a bit of regular tourism
with my wife, mom and 2 kids (17 & 11).

Any suggestions, comments or tips would be appreciated. If you
have recommendations of locals that can help, much better.

Feel free to answer me directly.

Best regards

Daniel Horowitz
Daniel@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send privately any recommendations
of paid guides and/or researchers.


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: Trip to Lvov (Lviv) Ukraine on April 2020 #galicia

Sherri Venezia
 

Hi Daniel:

As a fellow Galitzianer, wanted to share my experience. I went on a
genealogical journey to Lviv and nearby villages my family came >from
early in 20th C. My trip was in 2012.

Flying into Lviv right after the world soccer event, we had the new airport
and a quick entry through passport control. Recommended by my guide
I made prior reservations at the Reikartz Medievale, a modern European
boutique hotel near the central Rynok Square, an amazing world heritage
area with the 19th C City Hall tower and Renaissance and Italianate
townhouses arranged in real time before your eyes.

I had a complex agenda: genealogical research, Holocaust era sites
(ghetto, memorial, Janowska camp, Golden Rose Synagogue memorial),
and a general historical tour of the city, general region and targeted
towns, to the west and east of Lviv, including ancient Castle Hill, above
the city.

I was touched by this remaining grand dame of the Hapsburg era. It is
stunningly beautiful, poor (with the elderly poor visible in doorways in
center section near old city wall) selling old cameras, personal items, a
scarf, etc.), as though time stood still....all buildings in center prior to
19th C, with Soviet era monoliths in distance. We went to the outdoor
architectural museum, the oldest brewery in Lviv (400 years old).... and
the memorial area where slain Jews are honored.... the looming
beseeching sculptured figure in the center.... unforgettable and tragic....
in the former confined ghetto area. There has been no renovation, no
improvements.... this is raw history. The open market built on top of the
Jewish Cemetery is haunting and unbelievable. The Rappaport Jewish
Hospital survives as the current maternity hospital with Magen David
designs in the wrought iron of the gates. The old Temple intellectuals
synagogue.... destroyed by Nazis, but a plaque shows the spot. The
other spared former synagogue, used for horses and hay, by the Nazis,
(Sholem Aleichem plaque) remains there in an old former Jewish
neighborhood, but no museum nor renovation. We visited the
contemporary Chabad synagogue and chatted with the staff,
contributing a bit. The members may be immigrants to Lviv such as
former Jewish Soviets.

The elegant coffee houses.... coffee is king in Lviv.... we went during the
amazing Coffee Festival in late September.... are wonderful. The high
end and emigree spots, bakery Svit Kavy, restaurants such as Amadeus,
were amazing.... down to the amuse bouche! Check out the art museum,
historical museum in Rynok and walk the streets.... Boim Chapel,
beautiful old Armenian Church.... ancient sidewalks, Opera House, city
arsenal ancient wall.... Being there and finding the exact villages my
family came from, plus smaller memorials, the cemetery in Busk.... intact
ancient Jewish graves the old 2-sided old synagogue (now a type of poor
housing on one side and evangelical church on the other).... broke my
heart.... my forebears prayed there.... and a mass grave found by Father
Patrick Desbois and the Yahad-In Unum research team.... site in the old
Jewish Cemetery on the hill. The memorial in Horodok ( former Grodek)
was touching because there were Holocaust mass grave stones lined up
with some plaque about Russian soldiers, and neighbors who knew
nothing about where this was. A glimpse into the past.... since Ukraine,
so poor and clearly still recovering >from its 19th- 20th C destruction,
dislocation and horrors.

I had research >from JRI Poland, Gesher Galicia, and a few documents my
guide found.... all of this together was a trip back in time.... sad,
connective, awesome, illuminating for you.... your mother and your
children. I didn't have direct contact with Archives.... but I did find my
past and made sense if my gr grandparents and grandmother's formative
experiences in the old world.... finding a piece of myself.... and profoundly
moved.... remembering each detail of that week to spontaneously share
with you.

Enjoy!

Sherri Venezia
Davis, Ca

Researching Rottenberg, Kurz families

Daniel Horowitz <daniel@...> wrote:

I am planning a trip to Lvov (Lviv) next April 2020 for the first time,
and would like to hear any suggestions and comments about the
city.

I have some addresses >from ancestors that lived in the area, but I
also would like to visit the archive to do some research, go to the
cemetery looking for records or burials, visit synagogues and
Jewish areas (if they are) and of course do a bit of regular tourism
with my wife, mom and 2 kids (17 & 11).

Any suggestions, comments or tips would be appreciated. If you
have recommendations of locals that can help, much better.

Feel free to answer me directly.

Best regards

Daniel Horowitz
Daniel@...

MODERATOR NOTE: Please send privately any recommendations
of paid guides and/or researchers.


Re: Technical Questions About Belarus Database #belarus

Martha Forsyth
 

You know, in International Folk Dancing, those of us interested in
Slavic dances soon learned that there are different ways of
transliterating the same Slavic letters - and a very wise and savvy person

taught us that which one you get for a particular item depends a lot on
which COUNTRY it came through. So the same character could be rendered
as e, a, or u: if you're talking about the word "
" (which happens to be Bulgarian), you will get 'reka', 'raka', or 'ruka'.
In French, would be normal; in German something else, in England yet something else.
yes, the could all be different spellings of the same name when you
add pronunciation differences >from different regions, AND the vagaries
of the way people THINK it might be spelled.... That's what a "fuzzy search is
all about!

(In the interests of transparency, I'll say that I also have an MA
focused in Russian, and speak Bulgarian well enough to sometimes be
mistaken for a native.)

Good luck,
Martha (Schecter) Forsyth


Belarus SIG #Belarus Re: Technical Questions About Belarus Database #belarus

Martha Forsyth
 

You know, in International Folk Dancing, those of us interested in
Slavic dances soon learned that there are different ways of
transliterating the same Slavic letters - and a very wise and savvy person

taught us that which one you get for a particular item depends a lot on
which COUNTRY it came through. So the same character could be rendered
as e, a, or u: if you're talking about the word "
" (which happens to be Bulgarian), you will get 'reka', 'raka', or 'ruka'.
In French, would be normal; in German something else, in England yet something else.
yes, the could all be different spellings of the same name when you
add pronunciation differences >from different regions, AND the vagaries
of the way people THINK it might be spelled.... That's what a "fuzzy search is
all about!

(In the interests of transparency, I'll say that I also have an MA
focused in Russian, and speak Bulgarian well enough to sometimes be
mistaken for a native.)

Good luck,
Martha (Schecter) Forsyth


Re: Relationship question

jbonline1111@...
 

Betty is NOT the stepmother of Edgar as she is not married to Edgar's father and was not married to him when he was born. Of course, if for some reason she is involved with the family due to sharing Charles with Allen and his family, she might be given the honorific of stepmother, but that is not a legal designation.  Furthermore, if Daisy divorces Allen, she may or may not be the stepmother of Charles any longer.  That depends on whether Daisy and Charles choose to continue that relationship.  


Re: More on USCIS Proposes Fee Increases - has this been posted on FB groups, yet?

Marjorie Geiser
 

I've tried to stay on top of all the posts on this topic, and even spent some time trying to read all the legal-talk on the website yesterday.
So, if this has already been asked, my apologies.

Has this been shared on all the genealogy Facebook groups, yet, in order to get the word out? I was going to post on some of the groups I'm on, but I didn't want to duplicate the notice.

Also, the site that's been put together for genealogists might have been updated further since I was on it, yesterday, but reading the materials indicates that just saying it's a shame the rates are going  up won't carry as much weight as details of what the proposition is, as well as perhaps how it will impact each of us who writes, personally.

MY personal observation is I JUST received the email saying that naturalization papers were found for my g-aunt, Helen LEVINE DENISON, and then if I just pay $65 for each (which is two), I can get copies. Even at THIS amount, I'm hesitating, trying to find the forms on my own.... But I also feel that my days are numbered if there aren't thousands of people who contact them.

Margie Geiser

LEVINE/LEWIN, SILBERNAGEL/SILVER, EPSTEJN, MOCZYDLOWER/MOCHEDLOVER, ERLICH, GRUNPELTZ, JOSKOWICZ, ZYLBERSZTEJN, ABRAHAMOWICZ


Re: National Archives Social Security Numident Files Database Has Extractions from Some SS-5 Forms # United States #Archives #Social Security

Marjorie Geiser
 

Just to share from Jan's message, I have requested SS5 forms twice. The first one was for my grandfather, Jacob Levine, when trying to find who his parents, my g-grandparents, were. It was very helpful and broke open SOME of that brick wall.

The second one was for one of his sisters, Helen Levine Denison, because I haven't been able to find her birth info in Poland. Unfortunately, that SS5 didn't provide me with any info, because although she came to the US in 1906, when she was 6 years old, on the form, she put that she was born in the US...

However, I share this because this form can be VERY helpful!

Margie Geiser

LEVINE/LEWIN, SILBERNAGEL/SILVER, EPSTEJN, MOCZYDLOWER/MOCHEDLOVER, ERLICH, GRUNPELTZ, JOSKOWICZ, ZYLBERSZTEJN, ABRAHAMOWICZ


Chaikin Researchers #ukraine

Rochelle Gershenow
 

I am looking for any researchers who have Shlioma Chaikin (b. 1869) and
Beile Chaikin (b. 1872) in their trees. Shlioma and Beile were probably
both born in Gomel but moved to Priluki with their father, Leivik, when he
remarried in 1878 after the death of his first wife. Another brother, David
(b.1875 in Gomel), lived with his father and stepmother and lived in Kharkov
as an adult. I have contacted researchers listed in JGFF.

Rochelle Gershenow
Connecticut, USA

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Chaikin Researchers #ukraine

Rochelle Gershenow
 

I am looking for any researchers who have Shlioma Chaikin (b. 1869) and
Beile Chaikin (b. 1872) in their trees. Shlioma and Beile were probably
both born in Gomel but moved to Priluki with their father, Leivik, when he
remarried in 1878 after the death of his first wife. Another brother, David
(b.1875 in Gomel), lived with his father and stepmother and lived in Kharkov
as an adult. I have contacted researchers listed in JGFF.

Rochelle Gershenow
Connecticut, USA

MODERATOR'S NOTE: Please respond privately.


This week's Yizkor book excerpt on the JewishGen facebook page

Bruce Drake
 

The phrase “turning back the clock” takes on a whole new meaning in this week’s chapter, “In Mezritch,” from the Yizkor book of Miedzyrzec Podlaski, Poland.

Brush-making was one of the big industries in Mezritch. The town had more bristle workers (1,200) than any other city in the Siedlce region in eastern Poland. At the beginning of the 1890s, the day of the bristle workers In Mezritch was 17-18 hours. They worked in low, small houses with awful sanitary conditions as they toiled with iron combs used to comb raw pig hair. They worked amid clouds of dust in the air during the work, making breathing difficult. The odor of pig hair mixed with that from the kerosene which was used to oil the combs, and heightened the stench that came from the lamps.

One wealthy factory owner named Mosehl Chazirnik put his own finishing touch on the long days of his workers. His factories would operate on Saturdays, after the Sabbath was over, until midnight. Workers, of course, had their eyes on the clock, but it “was a strange clock... it played tricks. It would be 11:30, and then suddenly move back to 11:15. When it was already 11:45…one would look at the clock, and see that it had fallen back by ten minutes.” That went on until, one night, a worker looked down the hallway and saw that “Moshel Chazirnik, wearing his housecoat, was standing on a stool near the wall clock, turning back the hands of the clock.” (I won't spoil the fun of reading what ensued after Chazimik was caught red-handed). To make a long story short, there was no more pig hair brushed that night. And for some time after. It was 1900 and the bristle workers went out on strike for the first time.


URL: https://www.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/2648188375203301?__tn__=K-R-R


Bruce Drake

Silver Spring MD

Researching: DRACH, EBERT, KIMMEL, ZLOTNICK

Towns: Wojnilow, Kovel


Chaikin Researchers

Rochelle Gershenow
 

I am looking for any researchers who have Shlioma Chaikin (b. 1869) and Beile Chaikin (b. 1872) in their trees.  Shlioma and Beile were probably both born in Gomel but moved to Priluki with their father, Leivik, when he remarried in 1878 after the death of his first wife.  Another brother, David (b.1875 in Gomel), lived with his father and stepmother and lived in Kharkov as an adult.  I have contacted researchers listed in JGFF.

 

Rochelle Gershenow

Connecticut, USA

 


Re: Jewish ancestry

rv Kaplan
 

Depends on what side this is.  Orthodox definition of Jewish status is being the child of a Jewish mother, or by conversion.
 
Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland 

{Mod. note: the JewishGen Discussion Group is not a forum to engage in the “who is a Jew” question. Please continue this conversation offline}.

On Fri, 22 Nov 2019 at 14:00, gandmbc via Groups.Jewishgen.Org <gandmbc=yahoo.co.uk@...> wrote:
I have a Jewish ancestor - my 3 x great-grandmother. Am I able to call myself Jewish?

 

 

 


Kennkarten #germany

Ruth Kraut <ruthkraut@...>
 

Hello,

I am searching for the Identity Card (Kennkarten) of a man who was
living in Frankfurt in 1938. During the November Pogrom he was taken
to Buchenwald. His wife got him out and they escaped to Shanghai.

Would an identity card be on file somewhere? And if so, where would
that be/who would I write to?

(Name: Max/Motek/Mosek Fajwusiewicz. He was a Jew >from western Poland
who moved to Frankfurt around 1920.)

Thanks so much for your help.

Ruth Kraut, Ann Arbor, MI ruthkraut@...


German SIG #Germany Kennkarten #germany

Ruth Kraut <ruthkraut@...>
 

Hello,

I am searching for the Identity Card (Kennkarten) of a man who was
living in Frankfurt in 1938. During the November Pogrom he was taken
to Buchenwald. His wife got him out and they escaped to Shanghai.

Would an identity card be on file somewhere? And if so, where would
that be/who would I write to?

(Name: Max/Motek/Mosek Fajwusiewicz. He was a Jew >from western Poland
who moved to Frankfurt around 1920.)

Thanks so much for your help.

Ruth Kraut, Ann Arbor, MI ruthkraut@...


Re: Relationship question

Alberto Guido Chester
 

I love your question.

The key part, in my view, is why NOT, and the answer is cultural, not logical.

There is a chance that the second wife helps raising the child to justify the attribution of step mother.

Or it can be used to stress the step mother is not the biological mother.

In Spanish (as spoken in Argentina at least), the child would be "hijo de la primera mujer" = son of his first spouse.

BTW, step mother as an attribution is decreasing steeply probably because of Cinderella and other sour examples.

Regards


Alberto Guido Chester


Re: Benjamin and James VORZIMER

Barbara Mannlein <bsmannlein@...>
 

Renee, you are wonderful! 

I theorized that the sons might have used their mother’s maiden name….(Wonder what the father did that both boys dropped his name)
but could not make the connection to the one in London.

Could you use your magic and see if you can find obits for her or the boys? 

Many thanks!
Barbara

On Nov 22, 2019, at 12:57 AM, Renee Steinig <genmaven@...> wrote:

Barbara Mannlein <bsmannlein@...> asked about Bettina nee
WORMSER (1902 NYC - 1987) and her two sons, Benjamin VORZIMER (born
1924) and James VORZIMER (born c1930), whom she last saw on the 1940
census.


The sons appear to have used the name Wormser.

Benjamin Vorzimer was born in Manhattan on 22 April 1924. Ancestry's
Public Records Index has two listings for a Benjamin Y. Wormser born
on that same date. Among his past addresses are several in Sherman,
Connecticut -- six miles from New Milford -- and one in White Plains,
New York. Edythe J. Wormser (born 1925) shows up at some of the same
addresses; she's probably the Edythe J. Krug who married Benjamin
Wormser in 1945 in Manhattan.

Ancestry also has records for a James Wormser with the same birth date
as James Vorzimer's (5 Nov. 1930), including a London death record (2
June 2004).

Confirmation that these are the right people comes from their
stepfather Paul Miller's obituary, which mentions, among other
relatives, his wife Bettina of Poplar Bluff, Missouri, and sons
Benjamin Wormser of White Plains and James Wormser of London
(Baltimore Evening Sun, 5 Jul 1973, viewed on newspapers.com). Paul
was buried in Shaarei Tfiloh Congregation Cemetery in Baltimore
County, Maryland. Last residence in his Social Security record: Poplar
Bluff, Missouri. You'll see that the obit mentions a daughter and
brother in Baltimore; perhaps he was visiting them.

According to beenverified.com, Benjamin Wormser died in July 2014;
last residence Sunny Isles, Florida. Edythe may still be alive. (Their
apartment is still listed in Miami-Dade property records --
https://www8.miamidade.gov/Apps/PA/propertysearch/#/ .)

As for Bettina's burial place... Her parents are buried at Mount Neboh
in Queens. Perhaps check there?

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...



Re: Relationship question

Trudy Barch
 


Betty is NOT legally related to Edgar.   Being that it is her current husband's son from his first marriage and assuming that he has visitation rights.....Edgar might refer to her as Betty or mother out of respect.   Also depends upon Edgar's age when the 2nd marriage occurred.  Was Edgar a child or adult?  Also different scenario IF Betty adopted Edgar.  Also depends upon what year you are referring - in the 1940s children did not call adults by their first name.  In the 2000s first names are accepted by most adults.


Chaikin Researchers #belarus

Rochelle Gershenow
 

I am looking for any researchers who have Shlioma Chaikin (b. 1869) and
Beile Chaikin (b. 1872) in their trees. Shlioma and Beile were probably
both born in Gomel but moved to Priluki with their father, Leivik, when he
remarried in 1878 after the death of his first wife. Another brother, David
(b.1875 in Gomel), lived with his father and stepmother and lived in Kharkov
as an adult. I have contacted researchers listed in JGFF.

Rochelle Gershenow
Connecticut, USA
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately


Belarus SIG #Belarus Chaikin Researchers #belarus

Rochelle Gershenow
 

I am looking for any researchers who have Shlioma Chaikin (b. 1869) and
Beile Chaikin (b. 1872) in their trees. Shlioma and Beile were probably
both born in Gomel but moved to Priluki with their father, Leivik, when he
remarried in 1878 after the death of his first wife. Another brother, David
(b.1875 in Gomel), lived with his father and stepmother and lived in Kharkov
as an adult. I have contacted researchers listed in JGFF.

Rochelle Gershenow
Connecticut, USA
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately