Date   

International Conference on Jewish Genealogy Speakers #galicia

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

A rich and varied roster of speakers will be presenting during the
five and a half days of the 33rd IAJGS International Conference on
Jewish Genealogy to be held in Boston beginning August 4.

Attendees will be able to choose >from 250 programs on seven
different tracks covering a wide range of topics including a
beginner's track on August 4/5, as well as computer tracks and a film
festival. The preliminary program (subject to change) will be posted
on the conference website on Tuesday, April 16th
(http://www.iajgs2013.org/program_schedule.cfm).

Many IAJGS Lifetime Achievement award winners, the luminaries of
Jewish genealogy, will give talks, including Steve Morse, Miriam
Weiner, Peter Lande, Jeff Malka, Hal Bookbinder, Warren Blatt,
Michael Tobias, and Stanley Diamond. Archivists >from Belgium, the
Czech Republic, Hungary, Israel, and Ukraine will be giving the latest
information about doing research in their countries. Historians and
experts >from England, Germany, Ireland, Lithuania, Poland, Spain,
Sweden, and the U.S. will provide the historical context to our
ancestors' lives and the methodologies to find them.

Unique to the Boston location of the conference will be several
talented local experts who have never presented at previous IAJGS
conferences. The keynote speaker will be Aaron Lanksy, the famous
and dynamic founder of the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA.
Ellen Smith, co-author of The Jews of Boston and a well-known
historian, museum curator, and professor at Brandeis University,
will give a talk as well as conduct walking tours of Boston's Jewish
historical sites. Sharon Pucker Rivo, Director of the National Center
for Jewish Film at Brandeis University, will present "Jews in Focus"
about the important Jewish role in film. Genealogical research in the
New England states will be featured, including immigration to the
Port of Boston.

The annual Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Jewish
Genealogical Society of New York, will feature two noted historians,
Annie Polland, Education Vice President at the Tenement Museum in
New York, and Daniel Soyer, professor at Fordham University. They
are co-authors of Emerging Metropolis -- the second volume of the
2012 award-winning book, City of Promises: History of Jews in New
York, which describes New York's transformation into a Jewish city.
They will speak together about the book and separately. Annie will
talk about the "Adaptation of Ritual," the complex adjustments
immigrant ancestors made to succeed, and Daniel will talk about
immigrant "landsmanschaften." Zvi Gitelman, Professor of Judaic
Studies at the University of Michigan and author of several important
books on Jewish ethnicity and identity among Eastern European Jews,
will present "Litvak-Galitsianer Wars, Jewish Cultural Geography."

In addition to updates on DNA, Holocaust research, and immigration,
areas of new focus include Sephardic Jews, Jewish cooking and
cookbooks, and a panel on cemetery restoration in both Europe and
the United States.

There also will be many hands-on computer workshops (for both Mac
and PC) and workshops on photo identification and preservation, on
document restoration, and on various languages (German, Russian,
Polish and Hebrew). Continuing the tradition of excellence of previous
conferences, there will be an Exhibitor Hall, a Resource Center, author
events, and book signings throughout the week.

from the first day's SHARE Fair, featuring an expanded number of
Special Interest Groups (SIGs) and Birds of a Feather (BOFs) as well as
local archives and historical societies, to the many programs offered
all week long, attendees will have trouble choosing which to attend
from Sunday morning to Friday noon.
For more detailed information about the programs and to register,
visit <www.iajgs2013.org>. Early registration discounts end on
April 30, so register today.

Florence Schumacher
Publicity Chair
33rd IAJGS Conference on International Genealogy


German translations #galicia

Carol Sicherman <csicher@...>
 

I've posted images on ViewMate of postcards for which I need translations
from German:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26888
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26904
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26907
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26908

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Carol Sicherman


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia International Conference on Jewish Genealogy Speakers #galicia

Florence Schumacher, Boston 2013 Publicity Chair
 

A rich and varied roster of speakers will be presenting during the
five and a half days of the 33rd IAJGS International Conference on
Jewish Genealogy to be held in Boston beginning August 4.

Attendees will be able to choose >from 250 programs on seven
different tracks covering a wide range of topics including a
beginner's track on August 4/5, as well as computer tracks and a film
festival. The preliminary program (subject to change) will be posted
on the conference website on Tuesday, April 16th
(http://www.iajgs2013.org/program_schedule.cfm).

Many IAJGS Lifetime Achievement award winners, the luminaries of
Jewish genealogy, will give talks, including Steve Morse, Miriam
Weiner, Peter Lande, Jeff Malka, Hal Bookbinder, Warren Blatt,
Michael Tobias, and Stanley Diamond. Archivists >from Belgium, the
Czech Republic, Hungary, Israel, and Ukraine will be giving the latest
information about doing research in their countries. Historians and
experts >from England, Germany, Ireland, Lithuania, Poland, Spain,
Sweden, and the U.S. will provide the historical context to our
ancestors' lives and the methodologies to find them.

Unique to the Boston location of the conference will be several
talented local experts who have never presented at previous IAJGS
conferences. The keynote speaker will be Aaron Lanksy, the famous
and dynamic founder of the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA.
Ellen Smith, co-author of The Jews of Boston and a well-known
historian, museum curator, and professor at Brandeis University,
will give a talk as well as conduct walking tours of Boston's Jewish
historical sites. Sharon Pucker Rivo, Director of the National Center
for Jewish Film at Brandeis University, will present "Jews in Focus"
about the important Jewish role in film. Genealogical research in the
New England states will be featured, including immigration to the
Port of Boston.

The annual Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Jewish
Genealogical Society of New York, will feature two noted historians,
Annie Polland, Education Vice President at the Tenement Museum in
New York, and Daniel Soyer, professor at Fordham University. They
are co-authors of Emerging Metropolis -- the second volume of the
2012 award-winning book, City of Promises: History of Jews in New
York, which describes New York's transformation into a Jewish city.
They will speak together about the book and separately. Annie will
talk about the "Adaptation of Ritual," the complex adjustments
immigrant ancestors made to succeed, and Daniel will talk about
immigrant "landsmanschaften." Zvi Gitelman, Professor of Judaic
Studies at the University of Michigan and author of several important
books on Jewish ethnicity and identity among Eastern European Jews,
will present "Litvak-Galitsianer Wars, Jewish Cultural Geography."

In addition to updates on DNA, Holocaust research, and immigration,
areas of new focus include Sephardic Jews, Jewish cooking and
cookbooks, and a panel on cemetery restoration in both Europe and
the United States.

There also will be many hands-on computer workshops (for both Mac
and PC) and workshops on photo identification and preservation, on
document restoration, and on various languages (German, Russian,
Polish and Hebrew). Continuing the tradition of excellence of previous
conferences, there will be an Exhibitor Hall, a Resource Center, author
events, and book signings throughout the week.

from the first day's SHARE Fair, featuring an expanded number of
Special Interest Groups (SIGs) and Birds of a Feather (BOFs) as well as
local archives and historical societies, to the many programs offered
all week long, attendees will have trouble choosing which to attend
from Sunday morning to Friday noon.
For more detailed information about the programs and to register,
visit <www.iajgs2013.org>. Early registration discounts end on
April 30, so register today.

Florence Schumacher
Publicity Chair
33rd IAJGS Conference on International Genealogy


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia German translations #galicia

Carol Sicherman <csicher@...>
 

I've posted images on ViewMate of postcards for which I need translations
from German:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26888
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26904
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26907
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26908

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.

Thank you very much.

Carol Sicherman


International Conference on Jewish Genealogy Speakers #yiddish

bounce-2592340-772983@...
 

A rich and varied roster of speakers will be presenting during
the five and a half days of the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in Boston beginning
August 4.

Attendees will be able to choose >from 250 programs on seven
different tracks covering a wide range of topics including a
beginner's track on August 4/5, as well as computer tracks and a
film festival. The preliminary program (subject to change) will
be posted on the conference website on Tuesday, April 16th
(http://www.iajgs2013.org/program_schedule.cfm).

Many IAJGS Lifetime Achievement award winners, the luminaries of
Jewish genealogy, will give talks, including Steve Morse, Miriam
Weiner, Peter Lande, Jeff Malka, Hal Bookbinder, Warren Blatt,
Michael Tobias, and Stanley Diamond. Archivists >from Belgium, the
Czech Republic, Hungary, Israel, and Ukraine will be giving the
latest information about doing research in their countries.
Historians and experts >from England, Germany, Ireland, Lithuania,
Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the U.S. will provide the historical
context to our ancestors' lives and the methodologies to find them.

Unique to the Boston location of the conference will be several
talented local experts who have never presented at previous IAJGS
conferences. The keynote speaker will be Aaron Lanksy, the famous
and dynamic founder of the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA.
Ellen Smith, co-author of The Jews of Boston and a well-known
historian, museum curator, and professor at Brandeis University,
will give a talk as well as conduct walking tours of Boston's
Jewish historical sites. Sharon Pucker Rivo, Director of the
National Center for Jewish Film at Brandeis University, will
present "Jews in Focus" about the important Jewish role in film.
Genealogical researchin the New England states will be featured,
including immigration to the Port of Boston.

The annual Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Jewish
Genealogical Society of New York, will feature two noted historians,
Annie Polland, Education Vice President at the Tenement Museum in
New York, and Daniel Soyer, professor at Fordham University. They
are co-authors of Emerging Metropolis -- the second volume of the
2012 award-winning book, City of Promises: History of Jews in New
York, which describes New York's transformation into a Jewish city.
They will speak together about the book and separately. Annie will
talk about the "Adaptation of Ritual," the complex adjustments
immigrant ancestors made to succeed, and Daniel will talk about
immigrant "landsmanschaften." Zvi Gitelman, Professor of Judaic
Studies at the University of Michigan and author of several important
books on Jewish ethnicity and identity among Eastern European Jews,
will present "Litvak-Galitsianer Wars, Jewish Cultural Geography."

In addition to updates on DNA, Holocaust research, and immigration,
areas of new focus include Sephardic Jews, Jewish cooking and
cookbooks, and a panel on cemetery restoration in both Europe and the
United States.

There also will be many hands-on computer workshops (for both Mac and
PC) and workshops on photo identification and preservation, on document
restoration, and on various languages (German, Russian, Polish and
Hebrew). Continuing the tradition of excellence of previous conferences,
there will be an Exhibitor Hall, a Resource Center, author events, and
book signings throughout the week.

from the first day's SHARE Fair, featuring an expanded number of Special
Interest Groups (SIGs) and Birds of a Feather (BOFs) as well as local
archives and historical societies, to the many programs offered all week
long, attendees will have trouble choosing which to attend >from Sunday
morning to Friday noon.

For more detailed information about the programs and to register, visit
<www.iajgs2013.org>. Early registration discounts end on April 30, so
register today.

Florence Schumacher
Publicity Chair
33rd IAJGS Conference on International Genealogy


Yiddish Theatre and Vadeville #YiddishTheatre International Conference on Jewish Genealogy Speakers #yiddish

bounce-2592340-772983@...
 

A rich and varied roster of speakers will be presenting during
the five and a half days of the 33rd IAJGS International
Conference on Jewish Genealogy to be held in Boston beginning
August 4.

Attendees will be able to choose >from 250 programs on seven
different tracks covering a wide range of topics including a
beginner's track on August 4/5, as well as computer tracks and a
film festival. The preliminary program (subject to change) will
be posted on the conference website on Tuesday, April 16th
(http://www.iajgs2013.org/program_schedule.cfm).

Many IAJGS Lifetime Achievement award winners, the luminaries of
Jewish genealogy, will give talks, including Steve Morse, Miriam
Weiner, Peter Lande, Jeff Malka, Hal Bookbinder, Warren Blatt,
Michael Tobias, and Stanley Diamond. Archivists >from Belgium, the
Czech Republic, Hungary, Israel, and Ukraine will be giving the
latest information about doing research in their countries.
Historians and experts >from England, Germany, Ireland, Lithuania,
Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the U.S. will provide the historical
context to our ancestors' lives and the methodologies to find them.

Unique to the Boston location of the conference will be several
talented local experts who have never presented at previous IAJGS
conferences. The keynote speaker will be Aaron Lanksy, the famous
and dynamic founder of the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA.
Ellen Smith, co-author of The Jews of Boston and a well-known
historian, museum curator, and professor at Brandeis University,
will give a talk as well as conduct walking tours of Boston's
Jewish historical sites. Sharon Pucker Rivo, Director of the
National Center for Jewish Film at Brandeis University, will
present "Jews in Focus" about the important Jewish role in film.
Genealogical researchin the New England states will be featured,
including immigration to the Port of Boston.

The annual Lucille Gudis Memorial Lecture, sponsored by the Jewish
Genealogical Society of New York, will feature two noted historians,
Annie Polland, Education Vice President at the Tenement Museum in
New York, and Daniel Soyer, professor at Fordham University. They
are co-authors of Emerging Metropolis -- the second volume of the
2012 award-winning book, City of Promises: History of Jews in New
York, which describes New York's transformation into a Jewish city.
They will speak together about the book and separately. Annie will
talk about the "Adaptation of Ritual," the complex adjustments
immigrant ancestors made to succeed, and Daniel will talk about
immigrant "landsmanschaften." Zvi Gitelman, Professor of Judaic
Studies at the University of Michigan and author of several important
books on Jewish ethnicity and identity among Eastern European Jews,
will present "Litvak-Galitsianer Wars, Jewish Cultural Geography."

In addition to updates on DNA, Holocaust research, and immigration,
areas of new focus include Sephardic Jews, Jewish cooking and
cookbooks, and a panel on cemetery restoration in both Europe and the
United States.

There also will be many hands-on computer workshops (for both Mac and
PC) and workshops on photo identification and preservation, on document
restoration, and on various languages (German, Russian, Polish and
Hebrew). Continuing the tradition of excellence of previous conferences,
there will be an Exhibitor Hall, a Resource Center, author events, and
book signings throughout the week.

from the first day's SHARE Fair, featuring an expanded number of Special
Interest Groups (SIGs) and Birds of a Feather (BOFs) as well as local
archives and historical societies, to the many programs offered all week
long, attendees will have trouble choosing which to attend >from Sunday
morning to Friday noon.

For more detailed information about the programs and to register, visit
<www.iajgs2013.org>. Early registration discounts end on April 30, so
register today.

Florence Schumacher
Publicity Chair
33rd IAJGS Conference on International Genealogy


Re: Escaping from Germany via Japan #germany

Juergen Gramenz <JuergenGramenz@...>
 

Paula Weil <nofrillsfarm@gmail.com> asked: "Why did Jews escaping
Germany travel to Japan instead of leaving >from a port in Europe?
How might they have travelled >from Berlin to Japan?" =======>

Of course, I can't give You the final answer to Your special case but
I already did a lot of research with other Jewish families who escaped
via Japan in 1940/1941. I also wondered why they didn't escape through
a European port.

As one escaped family member later stated literally in 1941 it was
simply the last possible way to get out of Germany. The family escaped
in this case >from Hamburg to Berlin, took a plane to Moscow and crossed
the Soviet Union via whole Sibiria to Vladivostok with the Transsibirian.

from there they took a steamer to Japan and finally a ship >from Yokohama
via Los Angeles to Buenos Aires. In Japan there was an organization who
helped the Jews: The "Jewish Community of Kobe (Ashkenazim)".

As far as I've seen in documents there were two main escape routes in
the Eastern direction: the one directly to Moscow (often only the
wealthier people) and another via or >from the Baltic countries to
Moscow (most of them quite poor people, mainly Eastern Jews). In many
cases - where the escaping Jews were baptized Protestants - a German
organization helped them with money, visa etc.: the "Reichsvereinigung
nichtarischer Christen" (something like: Union of non-Aryan Christs,
sounds evil but it wasn't a Nazi organization).
And especially Heinrich Grueber, a really brave man, with his
"Buero Grueber" helped the Berlin Jews to escape:

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinrich_Gr%C3%BCber
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%BCro_Gr%C3%BCber

I was in contact with the son of the deputy of Heinrich Grueber.
Unfortunately, he told me that the Gestapo destroyed all files after his
arrest. So there are no existing lists at all to find relatives he helped.

Of course, this is all only one possibility in Your special case.

By the way, are You related to the Jewish Weil family >from Mecklenburg
(Neustadt, Parchim, Brueel, Mirow, Doberan). Many of the descendants moved
to Berlin later. If yes, would be great if You could contact me directly.

Best regards, Juergen Gramenz, <juergen@gramenz.de> Halle, Germany


German SIG #Germany Re: Escaping from Germany via Japan #germany

Juergen Gramenz <JuergenGramenz@...>
 

Paula Weil <nofrillsfarm@gmail.com> asked: "Why did Jews escaping
Germany travel to Japan instead of leaving >from a port in Europe?
How might they have travelled >from Berlin to Japan?" =======>

Of course, I can't give You the final answer to Your special case but
I already did a lot of research with other Jewish families who escaped
via Japan in 1940/1941. I also wondered why they didn't escape through
a European port.

As one escaped family member later stated literally in 1941 it was
simply the last possible way to get out of Germany. The family escaped
in this case >from Hamburg to Berlin, took a plane to Moscow and crossed
the Soviet Union via whole Sibiria to Vladivostok with the Transsibirian.

from there they took a steamer to Japan and finally a ship >from Yokohama
via Los Angeles to Buenos Aires. In Japan there was an organization who
helped the Jews: The "Jewish Community of Kobe (Ashkenazim)".

As far as I've seen in documents there were two main escape routes in
the Eastern direction: the one directly to Moscow (often only the
wealthier people) and another via or >from the Baltic countries to
Moscow (most of them quite poor people, mainly Eastern Jews). In many
cases - where the escaping Jews were baptized Protestants - a German
organization helped them with money, visa etc.: the "Reichsvereinigung
nichtarischer Christen" (something like: Union of non-Aryan Christs,
sounds evil but it wasn't a Nazi organization).
And especially Heinrich Grueber, a really brave man, with his
"Buero Grueber" helped the Berlin Jews to escape:

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinrich_Gr%C3%BCber
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/B%C3%BCro_Gr%C3%BCber

I was in contact with the son of the deputy of Heinrich Grueber.
Unfortunately, he told me that the Gestapo destroyed all files after his
arrest. So there are no existing lists at all to find relatives he helped.

Of course, this is all only one possibility in Your special case.

By the way, are You related to the Jewish Weil family >from Mecklenburg
(Neustadt, Parchim, Brueel, Mirow, Doberan). Many of the descendants moved
to Berlin later. If yes, would be great if You could contact me directly.

Best regards, Juergen Gramenz, <juergen@gramenz.de> Halle, Germany


Another Holocaust Mystery Solved - NBC news story #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

Genners might be interested in today's news article showing how one should never
give up hope about learning the fate of those who perished in the Holocaust.

Even in 2013 facts and truths are coming to light. This is a story about a
Holocaust mystery revealed after decades as Amos Cohen, a shipbuilder living in
Haifa, Israel learns the fate of his long-lost relative Rose Kobylinski, who died
in a German death march and was buried in a Roman Catholic cemetery in a small
village in Poland:

http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/04/14/17723483-after-decades-family-unravels-holocaust-mystery?lite

It's also a lesson about how you should never stop asking, inquiring, and
posting/posing your questions in a variety of forums and to many institutions. One
day an answer might find it's way to you because of some trail or inquiry you
started long ago.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@gmail.com


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Another Holocaust Mystery Solved - NBC news story #general

Pamela Weisberger
 

Genners might be interested in today's news article showing how one should never
give up hope about learning the fate of those who perished in the Holocaust.

Even in 2013 facts and truths are coming to light. This is a story about a
Holocaust mystery revealed after decades as Amos Cohen, a shipbuilder living in
Haifa, Israel learns the fate of his long-lost relative Rose Kobylinski, who died
in a German death march and was buried in a Roman Catholic cemetery in a small
village in Poland:

http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/04/14/17723483-after-decades-family-unravels-holocaust-mystery?lite

It's also a lesson about how you should never stop asking, inquiring, and
posting/posing your questions in a variety of forums and to many institutions. One
day an answer might find it's way to you because of some trail or inquiry you
started long ago.

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@gmail.com


AGAD Archive Project: New Indices Added to the JRI-Poland Online Database #galicia

Mark Halpern
 

It was in February that Jewish Records Indexing - Poland announced a
new multi-year agreement with the Polish State Archives to expand
access to Jewish records. At that time, I shared the news that the first
addition to the database as a result of this agreement were some
Rohatyn records indexed by the JRI-Poland team at the AGAD Archive
in Warsaw.

The AGAD Archive project continues and I am again proud to announce
the availability of additional indices online as follows:

Jagielnica 1877-1909 marriages
Jaworow 1848-76, 1900-04, 1905-10 births and 1861-76,
1877-1905 marriages
Mielnica 1896-1900 births
Monasterzyska 1905-07 marriages (regretfully there are only 3
marriages in this register)
Nadworna 1903-08 births and 1902-11 deaths
Podkamien 1907 deaths (regretfully there is only one death in this
register)
Skalat 1906-09 births and 1902-07 deaths
Tarnopol 1906-11 deaths

We hope that these indices lead our fellow genealogists to new and
exciting discoveries.

The indexing continues with the records >from Chodorow, Drohobycz,
Jagielnica, Kozlow, Lwow, Mielnica, Przemyslany, Stary Sambor,
Tarnopol, Zolkiew (Zhovka) and more. The complete list of available
records that JRI-Poland plans to index can be found at
http://www.jri-poland.org/agad/2012transfers.htm.

We plan to index all the Jewish vital records at the AGAD Archive. If
you are interested in seeing records for your town indexed, please
contact me privately.

Thank you and happy hunting.

Mark Halpern
JRI-Poland AGAD Archive Coordinator


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia AGAD Archive Project: New Indices Added to the JRI-Poland Online Database #galicia

Mark Halpern
 

It was in February that Jewish Records Indexing - Poland announced a
new multi-year agreement with the Polish State Archives to expand
access to Jewish records. At that time, I shared the news that the first
addition to the database as a result of this agreement were some
Rohatyn records indexed by the JRI-Poland team at the AGAD Archive
in Warsaw.

The AGAD Archive project continues and I am again proud to announce
the availability of additional indices online as follows:

Jagielnica 1877-1909 marriages
Jaworow 1848-76, 1900-04, 1905-10 births and 1861-76,
1877-1905 marriages
Mielnica 1896-1900 births
Monasterzyska 1905-07 marriages (regretfully there are only 3
marriages in this register)
Nadworna 1903-08 births and 1902-11 deaths
Podkamien 1907 deaths (regretfully there is only one death in this
register)
Skalat 1906-09 births and 1902-07 deaths
Tarnopol 1906-11 deaths

We hope that these indices lead our fellow genealogists to new and
exciting discoveries.

The indexing continues with the records >from Chodorow, Drohobycz,
Jagielnica, Kozlow, Lwow, Mielnica, Przemyslany, Stary Sambor,
Tarnopol, Zolkiew (Zhovka) and more. The complete list of available
records that JRI-Poland plans to index can be found at
http://www.jri-poland.org/agad/2012transfers.htm.

We plan to index all the Jewish vital records at the AGAD Archive. If
you are interested in seeing records for your town indexed, please
contact me privately.

Thank you and happy hunting.

Mark Halpern
JRI-Poland AGAD Archive Coordinator


Re: Where is Waloczyoks Russia looking for family KAUF #general

Rachelle Berliner <rlberliner@...>
 

When I first read the subject in a reply, I thought it might be Volkyvysk as
it was in Russia.

Good luck to the searcher.

Rachelle LEAF BERLINER
rlberliner@comcast.net

MODERATOR NOTE: To avoid having messages returned for editing, please make sure the
subject line is identical to the subject of the original message.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Where is Waloczyoks Russia looking for family KAUF #general

Rachelle Berliner <rlberliner@...>
 

When I first read the subject in a reply, I thought it might be Volkyvysk as
it was in Russia.

Good luck to the searcher.

Rachelle LEAF BERLINER
rlberliner@comcast.net

MODERATOR NOTE: To avoid having messages returned for editing, please make sure the
subject line is identical to the subject of the original message.


Re: Letter From Zeteny #hungary

Mark Strauss
 

The viewmate link to the posting that I sent yesterday is:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM26973

Dear H-Sig,
I just posted a letter for translation in viewmate, but I have not
received viewmate link, yet. The letter comes >from the Mayor of Zatin
(Zeteny) Slovakia.=A0 My family visited this area where my Strauss family
originated, last Spring. The area was part of Hungary and now sits in
Southern Slovakia, about 10km >from Kralovsky Chlmec, near the Hungarian
Border.=A0 (Hungarian is still spoken in the community.)=A0 An article
about our visit was published in the Winter 2012 Issue of Avotaynu.=A0
This week we received this letter >from the Mayor with 50 pages of
images of the old Jewish Cemetery, many of the gravestones, and
townspeople cleaning the cemetery, which sits in a forested area, about
a mile >from the community. I assume the letter is in Hungarian but it
may be written in Slovak. I do not speak either language and would
appreciate if someone would provide a translation of the letter.=A0 If
anyone is also interested in copies of the photos, I plan to scan the
stack and make a pdf of the series.=A0 Please email me, and I will send
pdf.=A0 Thank you.
Mark Strauss in New York City=A0

Mark Strauss
(STRAUSS >from Zeteny/Zatin Slovakia; BERKOVITS >from Humenne)


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Letter From Zeteny #hungary

Mark Strauss
 

The viewmate link to the posting that I sent yesterday is:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=3DVM26973

Dear H-Sig,
I just posted a letter for translation in viewmate, but I have not
received viewmate link, yet. The letter comes >from the Mayor of Zatin
(Zeteny) Slovakia.=A0 My family visited this area where my Strauss family
originated, last Spring. The area was part of Hungary and now sits in
Southern Slovakia, about 10km >from Kralovsky Chlmec, near the Hungarian
Border.=A0 (Hungarian is still spoken in the community.)=A0 An article
about our visit was published in the Winter 2012 Issue of Avotaynu.=A0
This week we received this letter >from the Mayor with 50 pages of
images of the old Jewish Cemetery, many of the gravestones, and
townspeople cleaning the cemetery, which sits in a forested area, about
a mile >from the community. I assume the letter is in Hungarian but it
may be written in Slovak. I do not speak either language and would
appreciate if someone would provide a translation of the letter.=A0 If
anyone is also interested in copies of the photos, I plan to scan the
stack and make a pdf of the series.=A0 Please email me, and I will send
pdf.=A0 Thank you.
Mark Strauss in New York City=A0

Mark Strauss
(STRAUSS >from Zeteny/Zatin Slovakia; BERKOVITS >from Humenne)


Re: Regeczi Hutta, Tokaj, Hungary? #hungary

HungarianRoots
 

Dear Dena,

Regeczi Hutta would be Rege'ci huta (Small smeltery of Rege'c). It is not=
a=20
village but a little place that had a smeltery just outside of Regec. I=20
think you should either look at Regec or Haromhuta (thranslation: three=20
smelteries,), just between Tolcsva and Regec.

The fact that Tolcsva is in the close vicinity explains why she was=20
registered there.

I hope this helps,

Regards,

Karesz Vandor
web: www.hungarianroots.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Regeczi Hutta, Tokaj, Hungary?
From: denawhitman@me.com
Date: Wed, 10 Apr 2013 15:26:27 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Hello,

I recently found a birth record of my ancestor, who was registered in t=
he=20
town of Tolcsva. It says by the comments that her parents are residents=
of=20
Regeczi Hutta. I tried to search for this town in the JGen Community=20
Database, but it is not listed there. I also tried google maps, and I=20
can't seem to find it there either.

Does anyone know if there is an alternate name for this town, and where=
=20
Regeczi Hutta is currently located? Where would this town be included i=
n=20
the Hungarian Census's?

Thank you,

Dena Whitman
New Jersey


Hungary SIG #Hungary Re: Regeczi Hutta, Tokaj, Hungary? #hungary

HungarianRoots
 

Dear Dena,

Regeczi Hutta would be Rege'ci huta (Small smeltery of Rege'c). It is not=
a=20
village but a little place that had a smeltery just outside of Regec. I=20
think you should either look at Regec or Haromhuta (thranslation: three=20
smelteries,), just between Tolcsva and Regec.

The fact that Tolcsva is in the close vicinity explains why she was=20
registered there.

I hope this helps,

Regards,

Karesz Vandor
web: www.hungarianroots.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Regeczi Hutta, Tokaj, Hungary?
From: denawhitman@me.com
Date: Wed, 10 Apr 2013 15:26:27 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Hello,

I recently found a birth record of my ancestor, who was registered in t=
he=20
town of Tolcsva. It says by the comments that her parents are residents=
of=20
Regeczi Hutta. I tried to search for this town in the JGen Community=20
Database, but it is not listed there. I also tried google maps, and I=20
can't seem to find it there either.

Does anyone know if there is an alternate name for this town, and where=
=20
Regeczi Hutta is currently located? Where would this town be included i=
n=20
the Hungarian Census's?

Thank you,

Dena Whitman
New Jersey


Re: Regeczi Hutta, Tokaj, Hungary? #hungary

Madeleine Isenberg
 

Dena,

I found this as a village in the Ukraine:

Kozephutta = Regeczi Harom-Hutta (62--2)

Also, curiously in this index page:
http://www.radixindex.com/placeindex/regeczi-harom-huta.shtml
they list names of people. I personally had members of the Goldstein
family who lived in Tolcsva, although I do not have much information
on them.

Regards,

Madeleine Isenberg
Beverly Hills, CA

madeleine.isenberg@gmail.com
RESEARCHING:
GOLDMAN in parts of Galicia such as: Nowy Targ, Wachsmund, possibly
Krakow, Poland, who migrated into Kezmarok or Straszky/Nagy Eor/Nehre,
both now in Slovakia.
Also family names of STEINER, LANGER, GLUECKSMAN, who married into the
GOLDMAN family, and also lived in Slovakia.
GOLDSTEIN in Abaujszina (Sena) and Kosice, Slovakia; Tolcsva, Hungary;
and Temeswar (very briefly!), Romania


Hungary SIG #Hungary re: Regeczi Hutta, Tokaj, Hungary? #hungary

Madeleine Isenberg
 

Dena,

I found this as a village in the Ukraine:

Kozephutta = Regeczi Harom-Hutta (62--2)

Also, curiously in this index page:
http://www.radixindex.com/placeindex/regeczi-harom-huta.shtml
they list names of people. I personally had members of the Goldstein
family who lived in Tolcsva, although I do not have much information
on them.

Regards,

Madeleine Isenberg
Beverly Hills, CA

madeleine.isenberg@gmail.com
RESEARCHING:
GOLDMAN in parts of Galicia such as: Nowy Targ, Wachsmund, possibly
Krakow, Poland, who migrated into Kezmarok or Straszky/Nagy Eor/Nehre,
both now in Slovakia.
Also family names of STEINER, LANGER, GLUECKSMAN, who married into the
GOLDMAN family, and also lived in Slovakia.
GOLDSTEIN in Abaujszina (Sena) and Kosice, Slovakia; Tolcsva, Hungary;
and Temeswar (very briefly!), Romania

138581 - 138600 of 658638