Date   

Memorial Plaques #general

Sandy Aaronson
 

Genners...
I've been working on my family tree for a number of years now. I know the least
about my paternal grandfather, Mordecai ARONZON's side >from Verbovets, Podolia
Ukraine (close to the border with Moldova). I knew no parents nor siblings names.

Last Friday, I went to Shul and was early for services. I started looking at the
Memorial Plaques that have been there for many years and started at the top row. I
had seen one for one of my aunts who died in the '60's before. Below it was one for
my grandmother, who I was named for, with her actual date of birth...I only knew
the year. Below that was my AARONSON grandfather Mordecai, with his actual date of
death and his father's Hebrew name. We had only guessed at the year, 1919, as it
was when the flu influenza was sweeping the world and did not know his father's
name. I knew the Hebrew letters but asked the Rabbi what the name was.

One never knows where or when they may find information....

Sandy Aaronson
El Paso, Texas

Searching: RUBENSTEIN, ARONZON, GREENBERG, TOPROVER; Verbovets, Podolia, Ukraine
and surrounding area including Bessarabia, Romania, Moldova; COHEN, LEIBOWITZ,
WEISS, SHAIKOFSKY; possibly around Makow Mazowiecki; HIRTZ Austria


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Memorial Plaques #general

Sandy Aaronson
 

Genners...
I've been working on my family tree for a number of years now. I know the least
about my paternal grandfather, Mordecai ARONZON's side >from Verbovets, Podolia
Ukraine (close to the border with Moldova). I knew no parents nor siblings names.

Last Friday, I went to Shul and was early for services. I started looking at the
Memorial Plaques that have been there for many years and started at the top row. I
had seen one for one of my aunts who died in the '60's before. Below it was one for
my grandmother, who I was named for, with her actual date of birth...I only knew
the year. Below that was my AARONSON grandfather Mordecai, with his actual date of
death and his father's Hebrew name. We had only guessed at the year, 1919, as it
was when the flu influenza was sweeping the world and did not know his father's
name. I knew the Hebrew letters but asked the Rabbi what the name was.

One never knows where or when they may find information....

Sandy Aaronson
El Paso, Texas

Searching: RUBENSTEIN, ARONZON, GREENBERG, TOPROVER; Verbovets, Podolia, Ukraine
and surrounding area including Bessarabia, Romania, Moldova; COHEN, LEIBOWITZ,
WEISS, SHAIKOFSKY; possibly around Makow Mazowiecki; HIRTZ Austria


Need help with Tombstone translation #general

Julia Lombardo <julialombardo@...>
 

Hello everyone, can someone please help me translate the Hebrew portion
of this tombstone? http://geneofun.on.ca/names/photo/668817

Thank you!!!

Julia Lombardo


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Need help with Tombstone translation #general

Julia Lombardo <julialombardo@...>
 

Hello everyone, can someone please help me translate the Hebrew portion
of this tombstone? http://geneofun.on.ca/names/photo/668817

Thank you!!!

Julia Lombardo


JGSCT Program, JEWISH GENEALOGY ASSISTED RESEARCH, Sunday, February 17, 1:30, Middletown, CT #general

gkr
 

JEWISH GENEALOGY ASSISTED RESEARCH

Join the Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut on Sunday, February 17, 2013 at
1:30 pm for an afternoon of personal research time at Godfrey Memorial Library,
134 Newfield Street, Middletown.

This informal session is free and open to anyone researching Jewish ancestors.
Board members will be available to answer questions and suggest resources.

For additional information, please visit
www.jgsct-jewish-genealogy.org/programs.html.

Gail K Reynolds


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen JGSCT Program, JEWISH GENEALOGY ASSISTED RESEARCH, Sunday, February 17, 1:30, Middletown, CT #general

gkr
 

JEWISH GENEALOGY ASSISTED RESEARCH

Join the Jewish Genealogical Society of Connecticut on Sunday, February 17, 2013 at
1:30 pm for an afternoon of personal research time at Godfrey Memorial Library,
134 Newfield Street, Middletown.

This informal session is free and open to anyone researching Jewish ancestors.
Board members will be available to answer questions and suggest resources.

For additional information, please visit
www.jgsct-jewish-genealogy.org/programs.html.

Gail K Reynolds


Re: What is the meaning of the name BOLKER? #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dear Martin:
It's "Roger," not "Robin." The recently retired BBC News Hour reader may or may
not be a cousin, but he's not me. I can only hope he's as flattered as I am.

I'm quite aware of the different patterns of surname adoption in various parts of
the three Partitioning realms (Prussia, Austria, Russia) and also of the different
statuses enjoyed (?) by Poland vs. the Pale. Apologies for missing your intention
in pointing to those Russian-Polish and Galician cities, but please note that your
sentence about Przasnysz (which was Polish) and the one with the Galician towns
follow directly upon the one about Prussia.

In any event, surnames with -ER suffix or other Germanic characteristics were
adopted in Prussia, Galicia and the Pale of Settlement, albeit more so in some
regions than in others. The Russian portion of Ukraine undoubtedly had different
patterns >from those observed in Poland or Galicia, but a quick check of Mogilev in
the Family Finder shows surnames like TREGER, BADER, FARBER, ZASLAVER, LUCHINITZER,
KRASNER along with many bearing -SKY, -NIK and -VITZ (i.e., Slavic) suffixes.

The surnames we encounter today are not necessarily the result of the first attempt
at requiring surnames in the particular region; but quite possibly >from the *last*
such event. And in most cases the language spoken by the authorities was only one
of several factors that influenced the characteristics of the surname.

Regarding the 1795-7 Prussian surname adoption/assignment:
In Prussia it's hard to trace surnames back to the period after the 3rd Partition
when legislation mandated surname-adoption in New East Prussia and South Prussia.
The Jewish populations of those territories having exceeded 150,000--several times
that of all the rest of Prussia--the task must have been enormous. Beider states
that in the 1790s surnames were "assigned by Prussian clerks," a claim for which
I'd be grateful to see more evidence. Note that 1797 is the date of the general
regulations for the Jewish population of those regions, which mandated a gradual
approach to any assimilation, naturalization, etc.; it may be that the
surname-adoption (or -assignment) effort was suspended then. Can anyone help me
here?

How often those surnames "stuck" through the following decade of Prussian Rule, the
Napoleonic occupation (actually administered by the King of Saxony, Frederick
August I) and the early years of Congress-Poland is equally hard to determine. A
surname-adoption list >from Thorn (Torun) >from 1808 indicates that the Jews there
had not previously used surnames when dealing with the authorities. Thorn became
Prussian in the 2nd Partition and was part of the Duchy of Warsaw under Frederick
August. Not having been Prussian in 1812, the Jews of the city and the Culm region
around it were not emancipated by the Prussians--and finally required to adopt
fixed surnames--until 1845. Most of the 1808 surnames in Thorn seem to have
stuck, i.e., weren't changed or dropped in or before 1845, but that was certainly
not the case in the region as a whole.

Certainly in 1812 and 1845 Prussia did not assign surnames, instead issuing only
the broadest of guidelines to prevent confusion, fraud or the adoption of abusive
names. I don't know the details of the statutes for the 1790-4 Silesian surname
assignments, which were universal and almost all of which were final, as far as I
can tell, but then as in 1812 and 1845 there were quite a few names with Polish
roots or suffixes, e.g., -SKY instead of -ER. My Upper Silesian family includes
surnames derived >from places in their region: TROPLOWITZ (no suffix), LANDSBERGER
(-ER, probably ancient/rabbinical), BIELSCHOWSKY (>from Bielschowitz), etc.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

Martin Davis wrote:

Robin Lustig wrote: I don't think Prussia had anything to do with the matter
[of the origin of Beth Galleto's family name of Bolker]. Sokolow (Podlaski,
Malopolski, whichever), Szczucin, etc. were never part of the Kingdom of Prussia.
Plock was, but briefly (1795-1806).

As Robin may not be aware, Jewish family names, >from the area that is now Poland,
follow distinct patterns which are derived >from the Republic's complicated
history. Unlike the Ukraine, where the institution of family names was the
responsibility of the Jewish Council (Kahal), on the authority of the Imperial
Russian government Poland was different. For a more detailed description of
that difference, I would refer to 'Names and Naming', the brilliant article
written by Alexander Beider for the Yivo Encyclopaedia, which can be found at
http://tinyurl.com/ae2bhj2 . Specifically, I would draw attention to the
following sentence, "In Polish provinces annexed by Prussia in 1795 (covering the
Warsaw area), many names were assigned by Prussian clerks after the law of 1797.
Here, as elsewhere, almost all names were drawn >from German vocabulary."

Beth Galleto's ancestors, as she stated (and as JRI Poland's data base advises
us)are recorded as living in Przasnysz. >from 1795 to 1807, this town was called
Prasnics and was centrally located in New East Prussia(German: Neuostpreussen),
a province of the Kingdom of Prussia. It thus makes sense that anyone living in
Przasnysz/Prasnics during that period would be given a family name based upon
German/Prussian naming traditions; whether they originated in the Prussian
controlled area or not.

By the way, not that it matters to the central point, but although Sokolow
Podlaski and Szczucin were not part of Prussia (but then I never said they
were just that related names appear in the JRI Poland database for the town
of Przasnysz), they were both towns of Austro-Hungarian Galicia, which had
its own distinct German based naming traditions.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What is the meaning of the name BOLKER? #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dear Martin:
It's "Roger," not "Robin." The recently retired BBC News Hour reader may or may
not be a cousin, but he's not me. I can only hope he's as flattered as I am.

I'm quite aware of the different patterns of surname adoption in various parts of
the three Partitioning realms (Prussia, Austria, Russia) and also of the different
statuses enjoyed (?) by Poland vs. the Pale. Apologies for missing your intention
in pointing to those Russian-Polish and Galician cities, but please note that your
sentence about Przasnysz (which was Polish) and the one with the Galician towns
follow directly upon the one about Prussia.

In any event, surnames with -ER suffix or other Germanic characteristics were
adopted in Prussia, Galicia and the Pale of Settlement, albeit more so in some
regions than in others. The Russian portion of Ukraine undoubtedly had different
patterns >from those observed in Poland or Galicia, but a quick check of Mogilev in
the Family Finder shows surnames like TREGER, BADER, FARBER, ZASLAVER, LUCHINITZER,
KRASNER along with many bearing -SKY, -NIK and -VITZ (i.e., Slavic) suffixes.

The surnames we encounter today are not necessarily the result of the first attempt
at requiring surnames in the particular region; but quite possibly >from the *last*
such event. And in most cases the language spoken by the authorities was only one
of several factors that influenced the characteristics of the surname.

Regarding the 1795-7 Prussian surname adoption/assignment:
In Prussia it's hard to trace surnames back to the period after the 3rd Partition
when legislation mandated surname-adoption in New East Prussia and South Prussia.
The Jewish populations of those territories having exceeded 150,000--several times
that of all the rest of Prussia--the task must have been enormous. Beider states
that in the 1790s surnames were "assigned by Prussian clerks," a claim for which
I'd be grateful to see more evidence. Note that 1797 is the date of the general
regulations for the Jewish population of those regions, which mandated a gradual
approach to any assimilation, naturalization, etc.; it may be that the
surname-adoption (or -assignment) effort was suspended then. Can anyone help me
here?

How often those surnames "stuck" through the following decade of Prussian Rule, the
Napoleonic occupation (actually administered by the King of Saxony, Frederick
August I) and the early years of Congress-Poland is equally hard to determine. A
surname-adoption list >from Thorn (Torun) >from 1808 indicates that the Jews there
had not previously used surnames when dealing with the authorities. Thorn became
Prussian in the 2nd Partition and was part of the Duchy of Warsaw under Frederick
August. Not having been Prussian in 1812, the Jews of the city and the Culm region
around it were not emancipated by the Prussians--and finally required to adopt
fixed surnames--until 1845. Most of the 1808 surnames in Thorn seem to have
stuck, i.e., weren't changed or dropped in or before 1845, but that was certainly
not the case in the region as a whole.

Certainly in 1812 and 1845 Prussia did not assign surnames, instead issuing only
the broadest of guidelines to prevent confusion, fraud or the adoption of abusive
names. I don't know the details of the statutes for the 1790-4 Silesian surname
assignments, which were universal and almost all of which were final, as far as I
can tell, but then as in 1812 and 1845 there were quite a few names with Polish
roots or suffixes, e.g., -SKY instead of -ER. My Upper Silesian family includes
surnames derived >from places in their region: TROPLOWITZ (no suffix), LANDSBERGER
(-ER, probably ancient/rabbinical), BIELSCHOWSKY (>from Bielschowitz), etc.

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ USA

Martin Davis wrote:

Robin Lustig wrote: I don't think Prussia had anything to do with the matter
[of the origin of Beth Galleto's family name of Bolker]. Sokolow (Podlaski,
Malopolski, whichever), Szczucin, etc. were never part of the Kingdom of Prussia.
Plock was, but briefly (1795-1806).

As Robin may not be aware, Jewish family names, >from the area that is now Poland,
follow distinct patterns which are derived >from the Republic's complicated
history. Unlike the Ukraine, where the institution of family names was the
responsibility of the Jewish Council (Kahal), on the authority of the Imperial
Russian government Poland was different. For a more detailed description of
that difference, I would refer to 'Names and Naming', the brilliant article
written by Alexander Beider for the Yivo Encyclopaedia, which can be found at
http://tinyurl.com/ae2bhj2 . Specifically, I would draw attention to the
following sentence, "In Polish provinces annexed by Prussia in 1795 (covering the
Warsaw area), many names were assigned by Prussian clerks after the law of 1797.
Here, as elsewhere, almost all names were drawn >from German vocabulary."

Beth Galleto's ancestors, as she stated (and as JRI Poland's data base advises
us)are recorded as living in Przasnysz. >from 1795 to 1807, this town was called
Prasnics and was centrally located in New East Prussia(German: Neuostpreussen),
a province of the Kingdom of Prussia. It thus makes sense that anyone living in
Przasnysz/Prasnics during that period would be given a family name based upon
German/Prussian naming traditions; whether they originated in the Prussian
controlled area or not.

By the way, not that it matters to the central point, but although Sokolow
Podlaski and Szczucin were not part of Prussia (but then I never said they
were just that related names appear in the JRI Poland database for the town
of Przasnysz), they were both towns of Austro-Hungarian Galicia, which had
its own distinct German based naming traditions.


Restitution Case Records of Berlin Restitution Offices Now Online #germany

Judith Elam
 

On 1 September 2012 the Berlin State Archive (Landesarchiv Berlin) began a
project to create an online database for the records of the Berlin
restitution offices (B Rep. 025). The records are held in the Berlin State
Archive (Landesarchiv Berlin) and consist of the record group B Rep 025,
Wiedergutmachungsaemter von Berlin, containing more than 800,000 files. The
Berlin restitution offices were in charge of resolving restitution claims in
West-Berlin on the basis of the Berlin Restitution Order of 1949. In 1957
the Federal Restitution Law included also property confiscated or acquired
by the Reich, the NSDAP, and the state of Prussia or other Nazi
institutions. The Berlin Restitution Offices also became responsible for
those claims, so they were not only in charge of Berlin related claims, but
also other claims, where the Reich, the NSDAP etc. confiscated or acquired
property. More details can be found at www.wga-datenbank.de

[There is a toggle >from German to English on the upper right side of the home page.]

During the pilot phase, about 5,000 records >from cards with names starting
with the letter A were revised and published online. These are not all the
entries >from Group A. The remaining records will be continually added to the
database during the course of the project.
[According to a note at the site, all of the records will be on line by end 2014.]

The database can be searched [in English] at
http://www.wga-datenbank.de/en/search.html
[The site provides unusually clear search instructions. Click the "background" tab.]

Judith Elam, Kihei, Hawaii <elamj@hawaii.rr.com>


German SIG #Germany Restitution Case Records of Berlin Restitution Offices Now Online #germany

Judith Elam
 

On 1 September 2012 the Berlin State Archive (Landesarchiv Berlin) began a
project to create an online database for the records of the Berlin
restitution offices (B Rep. 025). The records are held in the Berlin State
Archive (Landesarchiv Berlin) and consist of the record group B Rep 025,
Wiedergutmachungsaemter von Berlin, containing more than 800,000 files. The
Berlin restitution offices were in charge of resolving restitution claims in
West-Berlin on the basis of the Berlin Restitution Order of 1949. In 1957
the Federal Restitution Law included also property confiscated or acquired
by the Reich, the NSDAP, and the state of Prussia or other Nazi
institutions. The Berlin Restitution Offices also became responsible for
those claims, so they were not only in charge of Berlin related claims, but
also other claims, where the Reich, the NSDAP etc. confiscated or acquired
property. More details can be found at www.wga-datenbank.de

[There is a toggle >from German to English on the upper right side of the home page.]

During the pilot phase, about 5,000 records >from cards with names starting
with the letter A were revised and published online. These are not all the
entries >from Group A. The remaining records will be continually added to the
database during the course of the project.
[According to a note at the site, all of the records will be on line by end 2014.]

The database can be searched [in English] at
http://www.wga-datenbank.de/en/search.html
[The site provides unusually clear search instructions. Click the "background" tab.]

Judith Elam, Kihei, Hawaii <elamj@hawaii.rr.com>


Typing letters with accent marks in Microsoft Word #germany

Barbara Algaze
 

If you are transcribing databases using German umlauts, here are directions
to get those umlautted letters using your Microsoft Word software.
In addition, the website covers ** all ** vowels with numerous kinds of accent marks.

Check it out at:

http://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch000657.htm

(or you can google, "How do I get letters with accent marks in Microsoft Word?")

(In addition, it has been suggested to me to use one of these accented
letters in a password; no one will ever be able to hack into your account.)

Barbara Algaze, Los Angeles, California Algaze3@gmail.com


German SIG #Germany Typing letters with accent marks in Microsoft Word #germany

Barbara Algaze
 

If you are transcribing databases using German umlauts, here are directions
to get those umlautted letters using your Microsoft Word software.
In addition, the website covers ** all ** vowels with numerous kinds of accent marks.

Check it out at:

http://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch000657.htm

(or you can google, "How do I get letters with accent marks in Microsoft Word?")

(In addition, it has been suggested to me to use one of these accented
letters in a password; no one will ever be able to hack into your account.)

Barbara Algaze, Los Angeles, California Algaze3@gmail.com


The meaning of ZMW in an 1824 date inscription? #germany

Uri Rosenan <rosenan@...>
 

Hello
An inscription on a wooden beam at the attic story in a house in Nordheim,
Hessen reads: "DIES HAUS HAT GEBAUT DER HERTZ ODENBERG IM JAHR 1824 Z M W"
(This house was built by Hertz ODENBERG in the year 1824 Z M W).

Any idea what Z M W stands for? Regards,

Uri Rosenan, Yehud Israel, uri@rosenan.net


German SIG #Germany The meaning of ZMW in an 1824 date inscription? #germany

Uri Rosenan <rosenan@...>
 

Hello
An inscription on a wooden beam at the attic story in a house in Nordheim,
Hessen reads: "DIES HAUS HAT GEBAUT DER HERTZ ODENBERG IM JAHR 1824 Z M W"
(This house was built by Hertz ODENBERG in the year 1824 Z M W).

Any idea what Z M W stands for? Regards,

Uri Rosenan, Yehud Israel, uri@rosenan.net


Odessa: New article about the Jewish Nursing Home and other news #ukraine

Ariel Parkansky
 

Hi everybody,

The translation of an article about the Jewish Nursing Home originally
published on the Vikna Odessa newspaper is available on the Institutions
section of the Life in Odessa menu. You can directly access it at
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/odessa/lif_ins_nursing.asp

There are also some new images on the Postcards gallery and a new
link I'd like to recommend you.
It's an article where Larissa Oshmyany, an Odessite who graduated
from the Odessa Theatre and Art College, revisits the past and present
of Odessa through images. The article is published
at http://my-lukoshko.blogspot.fr/p/blog-page_1944.html
in russian or you can read the english translation by google directly
from the links page
(sectio at http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/odessa/res_links.asp#3

As always, the translation of records on the Odessa Database project
continues its normal way.

Enjoy

Ariel Parkansky
Odessa Town Leader
kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/odessa


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Odessa: New article about the Jewish Nursing Home and other news #ukraine

Ariel Parkansky
 

Hi everybody,

The translation of an article about the Jewish Nursing Home originally
published on the Vikna Odessa newspaper is available on the Institutions
section of the Life in Odessa menu. You can directly access it at
http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/odessa/lif_ins_nursing.asp

There are also some new images on the Postcards gallery and a new
link I'd like to recommend you.
It's an article where Larissa Oshmyany, an Odessite who graduated
from the Odessa Theatre and Art College, revisits the past and present
of Odessa through images. The article is published
at http://my-lukoshko.blogspot.fr/p/blog-page_1944.html
in russian or you can read the english translation by google directly
from the links page
(sectio at http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/odessa/res_links.asp#3

As always, the translation of records on the Odessa Database project
continues its normal way.

Enjoy

Ariel Parkansky
Odessa Town Leader
kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/odessa


Resaerching family name Raisberg, Raizberg #ukraine

d.riseberg@...
 

My great grandfather's name, according to the U.S. passenger manifest, was
Joseph Raizberg. He was married to Rachel (Zaichek) Raisberg. In the US,
the name was changed to Riseberg. Joseph was born in 1864 and Rachel in
1867, in Korets, Ukraine. Joseph also had a sister named Bessie (Pessie).
According to Joseph's headstone, his father's name was Abraham. I am
estimating that Abraham was probably born about 1845. The only family
members we know, are descendents of Joseph and Rachel. We don't know if
Joseph had any other siblings. We don't know who they are, or where they
are. We also don't know anything about Abraham Raisberg's family. We don't
know his wife's name. We also don't know if Abraham had other siblings,
either. I am sure, there has to be an extended family, we are unaware of.
According to the JRI-Poland Volynia Gubernia List, the list shows 4
Raysberg's in the 1811 Census. Mordekhay (head of household), and sons
Yosef, Avraham and Nutke. All 4 of them show as residents of Kremenets. We
are assuming that we are probably descendents of one of the sons.
Unfortunately, there are probably 2 generations between them and the Abraham
I know, my gr-gr- grandfather.
At this time, I would like to connect with anyone that may be related to
Abraham Raisberg. Whether they were his siblings, or his children.
I would also like to know, if anyone is able to help me fill the 35-55 year
gap, between the census and Abraham and/or Joseph.

Thank you
David Riseberg
d.riseberg@verizon.net


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Resaerching family name Raisberg, Raizberg #ukraine

d.riseberg@...
 

My great grandfather's name, according to the U.S. passenger manifest, was
Joseph Raizberg. He was married to Rachel (Zaichek) Raisberg. In the US,
the name was changed to Riseberg. Joseph was born in 1864 and Rachel in
1867, in Korets, Ukraine. Joseph also had a sister named Bessie (Pessie).
According to Joseph's headstone, his father's name was Abraham. I am
estimating that Abraham was probably born about 1845. The only family
members we know, are descendents of Joseph and Rachel. We don't know if
Joseph had any other siblings. We don't know who they are, or where they
are. We also don't know anything about Abraham Raisberg's family. We don't
know his wife's name. We also don't know if Abraham had other siblings,
either. I am sure, there has to be an extended family, we are unaware of.
According to the JRI-Poland Volynia Gubernia List, the list shows 4
Raysberg's in the 1811 Census. Mordekhay (head of household), and sons
Yosef, Avraham and Nutke. All 4 of them show as residents of Kremenets. We
are assuming that we are probably descendents of one of the sons.
Unfortunately, there are probably 2 generations between them and the Abraham
I know, my gr-gr- grandfather.
At this time, I would like to connect with anyone that may be related to
Abraham Raisberg. Whether they were his siblings, or his children.
I would also like to know, if anyone is able to help me fill the 35-55 year
gap, between the census and Abraham and/or Joseph.

Thank you
David Riseberg
d.riseberg@verizon.net


Finding Your Familys Story: Genealogy and the Rauh Jewish Archives #general

Susan M. Melnick <SMMelnick@...>
 

Finding Your Familys Story: Genealogy and the Rauh Jewish Archives

Join us for a day of genealogy programming, with demonstrations and discussions of
online resources, and an opportunity to ask questions about your research during an
open-house session.

Date: Sunday, February 17, 2013 Time: 10:00a.m.-3:30pm
Location:Senator John Heinz History Center 1212 Smallman Street Pittsburgh, PA15222

Cost:free

To learn more and to RSVP, call 412-454-6364 or email
library@heinzhistorycenter.org

Schedule
10:00-10:15a.m. Registration
10:15-11:00a.m. Finding and Using Naturalization Records Presenter: Debbie Kapp
Debbie Kapp is a professional genealogist with fourteen years of research
experience. She is a member of the National Genealogical Society, the Association
of Professional Genealogists, and several local genealogy organizations.

Did your immigrant ancestor become a U.S. citizen? If so, naturalization records
might provide a boost to your family history research. This lecture will provide a
general overview of the process of becoming a citizen, the types of information
requested over the years, how to search for these records, and ways to follow up on
the information you discover.

11:15a.m.- noon Searching for Your Family in the Old Country
Presenter: Evan W. Wolfson
Evan W. Wolfson is an attorney who previously worked at the University of Judaism's
library, assisting with research inquiries. He has been researching his family for
twenty years, and currently serves on the Rauh Jewish Archives Advisory Committee
and on the Production and Technical Assistance Committee of Landsmen, a publication
of the Suwalk-Lomza Interest Group for Jewish Genealogists.

This presentation is designed to help you locate your family in ancestral towns and
villages using readily available resources online and explore the availability of
foreign records. The presenter will demonstrate the use of Jewishgen.org, Routes
to Roots Foundation, and FamilySearch.org for information on archival sources for
family research.

Noon-1p.m.Lunch on your own. You can bring your lunch or order >from the cafi
before the program begins.

1:00-1:45p.m.Learning to Use the New Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project Website
Presenter: Bernard Newman

Bernie Newman is an amateur Jewish genealogist with Pittsburgh roots going back
five generations. His interest in genealogy began in 1985 and has developed and
grown as the internet has unlocked formerly hard-to-access resources.

The presentation will demonstrate how genealogists can use the Pittsburgh Jewish
Newspaper Project, an online resource that makes available English-language
Pittsburgh Jewish newspapers published since 1895. Recent changes to the website
will be addressed.

1:45-3:30p.m. Open House
The presenters will be available to assist you with your research. Refreshments
will be provided. Dietary laws observed.

Underwritten with the generous support of the William M. Lowenstein Genealogical
Research Endowment Fund at the Jewish Community Foundation of the Jewish Federation
of Greater Pittsburgh

Susan M. Melnick
Archivist, Rauh Jewish Archives
Senator John Heinz History Center
1212 Smallman Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
412-454-6406

A Tradition of Giving: The History of Jewish Philanthropy in Pittsburgh
www.jewishhistoryhhc.org

The Senator John Heinz History Center
www.heinzhistorycenter.org


JGS of Montreal - Annual 'Schmoozarama" - Monday, Feb. 25,2012 #general

Merle Kastner <merlek@...>
 

Monday, February 25th – JGS of Montreal – *Special Event* - Our 5th annual super
program - JGS of Montreal Members-only 'Schmoozarama' Get-together Event:
*Please note - you must be a paid up member to attend this event or pay your
membership upon arrival!* Once again, we are holding our popular and informal
**members-only** evening again this year - the JGS of Montreal's "Schmoozarama"
event.

On Monday evening, February 25th (>from 7:30 – 9:30 pm), Hymie & Annie London will
host a coffee and dessert get-together. All refreshments will be strictly kosher.
Here's the schedule:
7:30 to 8:00 pm - schmoozing time and the opportunity to treat yourself to
delightful desserts and coffee, tea or soft drinks.
8:00 pm - members will be invited to give a brief (3-5 minutes maximum) synopsis
or update of his or her research (no one will be obliged to speak to the group).

Spouses/partners are welcome.
There will be a $5.00 admission charge per person.
The place: 626 Powell Avenue, Town of Mount Royal (*by reservation only*)

*Please RSVP by Monday, February 18th *
Send your confirmation by email to Merle Kastner:
merlek@videotron.ca

139561 - 139580 of 654736