Date   

Re: TRA(C)HOS (Trahos) and GIATA surnames. Anyone have any information? #sephardic

Anne-Marie Faraggi <amfaraggi@...>
 

Hello Michael,
I cannot confirm the origin of the surnames TRAHOS and GIATA. Among the
typical Salonican Sephardic surnames, none appears close to yours.
They may be surnames >from Thrace (Thraki in Greek and Trakya in Turkish) in
the north-east of Greece and I don't really know these names very well.

Anne-Marie Faraggi
Switzerland
Researching: FARAGGI and MALLAH

---
From: MIHALIS <mike@strouthidis.freeserve.co.uk>
Date: Mon, 22 Apr 2013 13:56:36 +0200 (CEST)

I have discovered that my Great Great Mother on my Mother's side
was possibly Sephardic Jewish and converted to Greek Orthodox
Christianity in the mid to late 1800's. She was in northern Greece
in the area of Siatista/Xserolimni and near to Thessaloniki. Her
maiden name prior to marriage was TRAHOS or TRACHOS, and her married
surname was GIATA. Both these surnames seem to be of Sephardic Jewish
origin, >from what I have gleaned >from very basic investigation online.
Can anyone confirm this?

Michael Strouthidis


Sephardic SIG #Sephardim Re: TRA(C)HOS (Trahos) and GIATA surnames. Anyone have any information? #sephardic

Anne-Marie Faraggi <amfaraggi@...>
 

Hello Michael,
I cannot confirm the origin of the surnames TRAHOS and GIATA. Among the
typical Salonican Sephardic surnames, none appears close to yours.
They may be surnames >from Thrace (Thraki in Greek and Trakya in Turkish) in
the north-east of Greece and I don't really know these names very well.

Anne-Marie Faraggi
Switzerland
Researching: FARAGGI and MALLAH

---
From: MIHALIS <mike@strouthidis.freeserve.co.uk>
Date: Mon, 22 Apr 2013 13:56:36 +0200 (CEST)

I have discovered that my Great Great Mother on my Mother's side
was possibly Sephardic Jewish and converted to Greek Orthodox
Christianity in the mid to late 1800's. She was in northern Greece
in the area of Siatista/Xserolimni and near to Thessaloniki. Her
maiden name prior to marriage was TRAHOS or TRACHOS, and her married
surname was GIATA. Both these surnames seem to be of Sephardic Jewish
origin, >from what I have gleaned >from very basic investigation online.
Can anyone confirm this?

Michael Strouthidis


KANTOROVICH family from SLONIM, GUB. GRODNO, BELORUS #belarus

r.dupuis@...
 

Dear genners,

I'm searching for members of the KANTOROVICH family >from Slonim,
Gub. Grodno:

My gggrandfather the railway official JAKOB DAVID KANTOROVICH
/KANTOROWITZ/KANTEROWITZ/KANTOROWICZ was born 1830/35 in Slonim as first
of three sons of the petty bourgeois and merchant DAVID LEIB KANTOROVICH
(b. 1821, d. 1845) and his wife DOROTA, nee ?.
JAKOB DAVID/YAKOV DUVID/ KANTOROVICH was married on March 18, 1860
in Riga with WILHELMINA/MINNE MINDEL
/ bat ISAAK KEILMAN (b. 1835 in Riga, Latvia, d. 1914 in St. Petersburg,
Russia). They had five childrens:
Leon, Izabella Dorote, Sofia, Alexander and
Evgenia/Eugenie (EUGENIE JAKOBOVNA KEILMANN, nee KANTOROWITZ was my ggrand-
mother. She was born 1868 in Vilnius and was killed during the Shoa. She
eas married 1885 in Riga with the dentist ISIDOR NOAKH ben PHILIPP KEILMAN,
b. 1856 in Riga, d. 1942 in Riga)

My gggrandfsather JAKOB KANTOROVICH had
two brothers: SHOLOM DAVID KANTOROVICH (b. 1838 in Slonim, d.?) and SHLIOMA
DAVID KANTOROVICH (b. 1842 in Slonim, d.?).

DAVID LEIB KANTOROVICH had two
brothers: LIPA LEIB KANTOROVICH (b. 1803 in Slonim, d.?) and LAZER LEIB
KANTOROVICH (b. 1806 in Slonim, d. 1853 in Slonim).

LAZER LEIB KANTOROVICH
had a son: SENDER-MOVSHA ben LAZER KANTOROVICH (b. 1832 in Slonim, married?
, d.?)

LIPA LEIB KANTOROVICH had two sons: JANKEL LIPA KANTOROVICH (b. 1822
in Slonim,d.? ) and DAVID LIPA KANTOROVICH (b. 1835 in Slonim).

JANKEL LIPA KANTOROVICH was married and had a son: HONON LEIB KANTOROVICH
(b. 1852 in Slonim, married? d.?).

DAVID LIPA KANTOROVICH was married with GITLA.
They had a son: GERSH DAVID KANTOROVICH (b. 1857 in Slonim, married? d.?)


I am looking for descendants of this KANTOROVICH family coming >from Slonim
, Gub. Grodno, Belorus. Looking forward for your reply.

B'Shalom

Robert

Robert Dupuis
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately with family information


Belarus SIG #Belarus KANTOROVICH family from SLONIM, GUB. GRODNO, BELORUS #belarus

r.dupuis@...
 

Dear genners,

I'm searching for members of the KANTOROVICH family >from Slonim,
Gub. Grodno:

My gggrandfather the railway official JAKOB DAVID KANTOROVICH
/KANTOROWITZ/KANTEROWITZ/KANTOROWICZ was born 1830/35 in Slonim as first
of three sons of the petty bourgeois and merchant DAVID LEIB KANTOROVICH
(b. 1821, d. 1845) and his wife DOROTA, nee ?.
JAKOB DAVID/YAKOV DUVID/ KANTOROVICH was married on March 18, 1860
in Riga with WILHELMINA/MINNE MINDEL
/ bat ISAAK KEILMAN (b. 1835 in Riga, Latvia, d. 1914 in St. Petersburg,
Russia). They had five childrens:
Leon, Izabella Dorote, Sofia, Alexander and
Evgenia/Eugenie (EUGENIE JAKOBOVNA KEILMANN, nee KANTOROWITZ was my ggrand-
mother. She was born 1868 in Vilnius and was killed during the Shoa. She
eas married 1885 in Riga with the dentist ISIDOR NOAKH ben PHILIPP KEILMAN,
b. 1856 in Riga, d. 1942 in Riga)

My gggrandfsather JAKOB KANTOROVICH had
two brothers: SHOLOM DAVID KANTOROVICH (b. 1838 in Slonim, d.?) and SHLIOMA
DAVID KANTOROVICH (b. 1842 in Slonim, d.?).

DAVID LEIB KANTOROVICH had two
brothers: LIPA LEIB KANTOROVICH (b. 1803 in Slonim, d.?) and LAZER LEIB
KANTOROVICH (b. 1806 in Slonim, d. 1853 in Slonim).

LAZER LEIB KANTOROVICH
had a son: SENDER-MOVSHA ben LAZER KANTOROVICH (b. 1832 in Slonim, married?
, d.?)

LIPA LEIB KANTOROVICH had two sons: JANKEL LIPA KANTOROVICH (b. 1822
in Slonim,d.? ) and DAVID LIPA KANTOROVICH (b. 1835 in Slonim).

JANKEL LIPA KANTOROVICH was married and had a son: HONON LEIB KANTOROVICH
(b. 1852 in Slonim, married? d.?).

DAVID LIPA KANTOROVICH was married with GITLA.
They had a son: GERSH DAVID KANTOROVICH (b. 1857 in Slonim, married? d.?)


I am looking for descendants of this KANTOROVICH family coming >from Slonim
, Gub. Grodno, Belorus. Looking forward for your reply.

B'Shalom

Robert

Robert Dupuis
MODERATOR NOTE: Please reply privately with family information


Re: Cost of Travel #ukraine

suewelsh@...
 

I believe that there was something in the law at the end of the 19th century
and beginning of the 20th century that specified that immigrants had to have
a certain amount of money with them so that they would not become a public
burden. They also had to pass a medical examination for the same reason.
And also swear that they were not an anarchist (as if they'd tell the
truth!)

As to the cost of the ticket cleaning a person out; that, like most things
was relative. If you had more money in the Old County, you had more upon
arrival. And if you had a larger family, it took more time to raise the
money for the ticket. If you look at the The Gjenvick-Gjønvik Archives
website: http://www.gjenvick.com/#axzz2FkwQrjum they have samples of
steamship tickets and contracts >from the era you are interested in which
will provide information about cost and so forth. The site is quite
interesteding although not particularly well-known.

Hope this helps,

Susan Granite Welsh


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine RE:Cost of Travel #ukraine

suewelsh@...
 

I believe that there was something in the law at the end of the 19th century
and beginning of the 20th century that specified that immigrants had to have
a certain amount of money with them so that they would not become a public
burden. They also had to pass a medical examination for the same reason.
And also swear that they were not an anarchist (as if they'd tell the
truth!)

As to the cost of the ticket cleaning a person out; that, like most things
was relative. If you had more money in the Old County, you had more upon
arrival. And if you had a larger family, it took more time to raise the
money for the ticket. If you look at the The Gjenvick-Gjønvik Archives
website: http://www.gjenvick.com/#axzz2FkwQrjum they have samples of
steamship tickets and contracts >from the era you are interested in which
will provide information about cost and so forth. The site is quite
interesteding although not particularly well-known.

Hope this helps,

Susan Granite Welsh


Researching GELLIN or GELIN (originally from Gellin, France) then Slonim, Grodno, Russia (Belarus) #belarus

Karen Wyman <ancestoire@...>
 

I am looking for assistance locating an ancestor GELLIN (or GELIN)
believed to be >from Gellen, Doubs, Franche-Comt, France. He fought in
the Russian Campaign of 1812 and was wounded and it is believed that he
made his way to Slonim, Grodno, Russia (Belarus) where he married a
Russian woman and remained.

The next ancestor known is probably a grandson, Alexander GELLIN, born
Slonim, Grodno about 1840. Do not know his wife's name. His children
were: Rivka, Sarah and David GELLEN. (David GELLEN was born around 1867
in Slonim).

David GELLEN married Goldie SOLOMON presumably in Slonim, then
immigrated to New York about 1900.

Goldie and children: Abram, Herschel (Harry) Schlame (Samuel) and
Weiwel (William) all immigrated on 20 Jul 1906 on the SS Mississippi.
Daughters Celia and Pauline traveled separately (I have not located
their manifests.) Son Hyman was born in NYC.

I have not been able to locate any information on the family pre-1906,
when Goldie and children emigrated.

Any assistance with locating information or additional ideas where to
search for the family in Russia/Belarus (and France), would be most
appreciated!

Thank you,
Karen Katz Wyman
Cleveland, Ohio, USA

Please reply to: ancestoire@gmail.com=


Re: Emigration to England #ukraine

Alex Girshovich
 

Hi Wendy,

I think it is best described in "Wandering Stars" by Sholom Aleichem.

Cheers,

BR,
Alex Girshovich


Belarus SIG #Belarus Researching GELLIN or GELIN (originally from Gellin, France) then Slonim, Grodno, Russia (Belarus) #belarus

Karen Wyman <ancestoire@...>
 

I am looking for assistance locating an ancestor GELLIN (or GELIN)
believed to be >from Gellen, Doubs, Franche-Comt, France. He fought in
the Russian Campaign of 1812 and was wounded and it is believed that he
made his way to Slonim, Grodno, Russia (Belarus) where he married a
Russian woman and remained.

The next ancestor known is probably a grandson, Alexander GELLIN, born
Slonim, Grodno about 1840. Do not know his wife's name. His children
were: Rivka, Sarah and David GELLEN. (David GELLEN was born around 1867
in Slonim).

David GELLEN married Goldie SOLOMON presumably in Slonim, then
immigrated to New York about 1900.

Goldie and children: Abram, Herschel (Harry) Schlame (Samuel) and
Weiwel (William) all immigrated on 20 Jul 1906 on the SS Mississippi.
Daughters Celia and Pauline traveled separately (I have not located
their manifests.) Son Hyman was born in NYC.

I have not been able to locate any information on the family pre-1906,
when Goldie and children emigrated.

Any assistance with locating information or additional ideas where to
search for the family in Russia/Belarus (and France), would be most
appreciated!

Thank you,
Karen Katz Wyman
Cleveland, Ohio, USA

Please reply to: ancestoire@gmail.com=


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Emigration to England #ukraine

Alex Girshovich
 

Hi Wendy,

I think it is best described in "Wandering Stars" by Sholom Aleichem.

Cheers,

BR,
Alex Girshovich


Re: Cost of Passage to America #ukraine

Alex Girshovich
 

Hi Sherwin,

Cost of move was only one of the reasons. Yet, there were many others,
Just a few examples >from my family.
1. My grand grandfather went to the US in 1913 alone, leaving the
family behind him in Belarus, a part of the Russian empire. The idea
behind this was that it would be easier for him to settle there alone,
make all the arrangements and the wife with 8 children would join in
2-3 years, when everything is ready. It was a popular state of mind at
that time and it could work, if not for the reason #2.
2. In 1914 WWI broke out, followed by two Russian revolutions and
Civil War. These were really hard times, and travelling via Europe was
an enormous challenge, full of life dangers.
3. It was not before 1924 that my grand grandfather managed to invite
his family to the US, However, the Bolsheviks did not give permits to
children above 18. So, the 3 elder children had to stay in the USSR,
including my grandfather who had married and born a child (my mom) by
this time,
4. The 3rd brother that was still single managed to escape >from the
USSR in 1925 via Latvia, being smuggled in a ship's cargo deck,
reached Canada and only then joined the family in Cleveland, OH.

All these challenges were naturally on top of the cost of move.
And I believe that almost every family had to overcome its own hurdles.

BR,
Alex Girshovich
Jerusalem Israel.


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: Cost of Passage to America #ukraine

Alex Girshovich
 

Hi Sherwin,

Cost of move was only one of the reasons. Yet, there were many others,
Just a few examples >from my family.
1. My grand grandfather went to the US in 1913 alone, leaving the
family behind him in Belarus, a part of the Russian empire. The idea
behind this was that it would be easier for him to settle there alone,
make all the arrangements and the wife with 8 children would join in
2-3 years, when everything is ready. It was a popular state of mind at
that time and it could work, if not for the reason #2.
2. In 1914 WWI broke out, followed by two Russian revolutions and
Civil War. These were really hard times, and travelling via Europe was
an enormous challenge, full of life dangers.
3. It was not before 1924 that my grand grandfather managed to invite
his family to the US, However, the Bolsheviks did not give permits to
children above 18. So, the 3 elder children had to stay in the USSR,
including my grandfather who had married and born a child (my mom) by
this time,
4. The 3rd brother that was still single managed to escape >from the
USSR in 1925 via Latvia, being smuggled in a ship's cargo deck,
reached Canada and only then joined the family in Cleveland, OH.

All these challenges were naturally on top of the cost of move.
And I believe that almost every family had to overcome its own hurdles.

BR,
Alex Girshovich
Jerusalem Israel.


Russian databases #ukraine

annefeinberg@...
 

Hello everybody,
I wonder why there is no jewish databases for Russia in its current
borders. Has anyone got a clue about this lack ?
Some people of my family were >from Kaliningrad oblast and others went
to St Peterburg at the very end of the 19th century. I can not find
anything about them...
regards
Anne


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Russian databases #ukraine

annefeinberg@...
 

Hello everybody,
I wonder why there is no jewish databases for Russia in its current
borders. Has anyone got a clue about this lack ?
Some people of my family were >from Kaliningrad oblast and others went
to St Peterburg at the very end of the 19th century. I can not find
anything about them...
regards
Anne


Emigration to England #ukraine

dawidowicz@...
 

Wendy Freebourne asked: Can anybody tell me how immigrants >from Russia would
have travelled to London, England at the end of the 19th and beginning of
the 20th centuries? So far, and it is early days, I have found no records. I
also wonder how relatively poor people with several children managed the
cost.

There is an excellent series of descriptions about Jewish migration to the
UK to be found at the 'Moving Here' website at http://tinyurl.com/c5t3msc

Essentially, the average Jewish individual or family would sell up
everything they had to purchase travel tickets: a rail ticket which would
take them across Europe to a sea port such as Antwerp in Belgium or Hamburg
in Germany, where they would normally take a passage to the Port of London.

Each family story is bound to be slightly different - ways of raising the
costs of the travel; preferred routes; passages with or without official
papers; those who travelled by night as it was cheaper or those who went on
ships which they thought would take them to the States only to find
themselves in the East end of London without a place to stay etc.


Martin Davis
London (UK)


Re: ukraine digest: April 20, 2013 #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger
 

"Wendy Freebourne writes:

"Can anybody tell me how immigrants >from Russia would have travelled to
London, England at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries?
So far, and it is early days, I have found no records. I also wonder how
relatively poor people with several children managed the cost."

Professor Nicholas Evans is giving two talks on this exact topic at
the Latvia luncheon and as a regular session at the IAJGS Conference
in Boston this August:

The Russian American Line and Direct Jewish Emigration to New York

Between 1900 and 1924 a direct emigrant route between Libau (modern
Latvia) and America (New York) provided tens of thousands of Eastern
European Jews with a direct method of emigration >from Imperial Russia.
Though more often known as a conduit for indirect emigration the port
of Libau (modern day Liepaja) was crucial in the westward migration of
Eastern European Jews. Situated within six hours of Vilna tracing
emigrants through this route provides a fascinating understanding of
how Jews were tracked by Russian and US agencies as they migrated to
America's eastern seaboard. Utilising recently available medical
inspection reports of Federal Immigration officials this illustrated
talk demonstrates how it is possible to recreate the experiences of
these emigrants.

Jewish Refugee Travel Across the North Atlantic on the Eve of the Shoah

On the eve of the Shoah tens of thousands of Jews sought to flee to
the west through the passenger operations of transoceanic shipping
companies in Western Europe and America. This illustrated lecture
provides an insight into Jewish travel before and during Hitler's rise
to power. Utilising the archives of shipping companies it will bring
to life the process of emigration for Orthodox Jewish refugees between
1933 and 1939.

If you can't attend the conference, there are usually audio tape
recordings of these talks...

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@gmail.com


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Emigration to England #ukraine

dawidowicz@...
 

Wendy Freebourne asked: Can anybody tell me how immigrants >from Russia would
have travelled to London, England at the end of the 19th and beginning of
the 20th centuries? So far, and it is early days, I have found no records. I
also wonder how relatively poor people with several children managed the
cost.

There is an excellent series of descriptions about Jewish migration to the
UK to be found at the 'Moving Here' website at http://tinyurl.com/c5t3msc

Essentially, the average Jewish individual or family would sell up
everything they had to purchase travel tickets: a rail ticket which would
take them across Europe to a sea port such as Antwerp in Belgium or Hamburg
in Germany, where they would normally take a passage to the Port of London.

Each family story is bound to be slightly different - ways of raising the
costs of the travel; preferred routes; passages with or without official
papers; those who travelled by night as it was cheaper or those who went on
ships which they thought would take them to the States only to find
themselves in the East end of London without a place to stay etc.


Martin Davis
London (UK)


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Re: ukraine digest: April 20, 2013 #ukraine

Pamela Weisberger
 

"Wendy Freebourne writes:

"Can anybody tell me how immigrants >from Russia would have travelled to
London, England at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries?
So far, and it is early days, I have found no records. I also wonder how
relatively poor people with several children managed the cost."

Professor Nicholas Evans is giving two talks on this exact topic at
the Latvia luncheon and as a regular session at the IAJGS Conference
in Boston this August:

The Russian American Line and Direct Jewish Emigration to New York

Between 1900 and 1924 a direct emigrant route between Libau (modern
Latvia) and America (New York) provided tens of thousands of Eastern
European Jews with a direct method of emigration >from Imperial Russia.
Though more often known as a conduit for indirect emigration the port
of Libau (modern day Liepaja) was crucial in the westward migration of
Eastern European Jews. Situated within six hours of Vilna tracing
emigrants through this route provides a fascinating understanding of
how Jews were tracked by Russian and US agencies as they migrated to
America's eastern seaboard. Utilising recently available medical
inspection reports of Federal Immigration officials this illustrated
talk demonstrates how it is possible to recreate the experiences of
these emigrants.

Jewish Refugee Travel Across the North Atlantic on the Eve of the Shoah

On the eve of the Shoah tens of thousands of Jews sought to flee to
the west through the passenger operations of transoceanic shipping
companies in Western Europe and America. This illustrated lecture
provides an insight into Jewish travel before and during Hitler's rise
to power. Utilising the archives of shipping companies it will bring
to life the process of emigration for Orthodox Jewish refugees between
1933 and 1939.

If you can't attend the conference, there are usually audio tape
recordings of these talks...

Pamela Weisberger
Santa Monica, CA
pweisberger@gmail.com


Warsaw directories newly searchable #warsaw #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

A Warsaw address and business directory for 1896 and telephone
directories for 1930/31, 1935/36, 1937/38, 1940, and 1942 have been
added to the search engine at http://genealogyindexer.org. Thanks to
the Mazovian Digital Library for digitizing these important sources.

Search results link to the corresponding images on the Mazovian
Digital Library's website. To view the images, you might need to
install (once) a .DjVu plugin for your web browser. I use the free
plugin >from http://www.caminova.net/en/downloads/download.aspx?id=1.

For the full list of 79 Warsaw-specific directories included in the
search engine, see http://genealogyindexer.org/directories#Warsaw.
Warsaw is also covered by many all-Poland and multinational
directories on the site. With the default options, all directories
are searched.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.


Warszawa Research Group #Warsaw #Poland Warsaw directories newly searchable #warsaw #poland

Logan J. Kleinwaks
 

A Warsaw address and business directory for 1896 and telephone
directories for 1930/31, 1935/36, 1937/38, 1940, and 1942 have been
added to the search engine at http://genealogyindexer.org. Thanks to
the Mazovian Digital Library for digitizing these important sources.

Search results link to the corresponding images on the Mazovian
Digital Library's website. To view the images, you might need to
install (once) a .DjVu plugin for your web browser. I use the free
plugin >from http://www.caminova.net/en/downloads/download.aspx?id=1.

For the full list of 79 Warsaw-specific directories included in the
search engine, see http://genealogyindexer.org/directories#Warsaw.
Warsaw is also covered by many all-Poland and multinational
directories on the site. With the default options, all directories
are searched.

Logan Kleinwaks
kleinwaks@alumni.princeton.edu
near Washington, D.C.

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