Date   

Re: expressions for Polish Uncle #galicia

Dan Oren <doren@...>
 

My friends >from Rzeszow Poland are visiting and report the following.

Uncle is "wujek" in Polish, pronounced "Wuyek" as you remember.
To say Uncle Ozek, they would say, "Wujek Ozek".

Dan Oren
Woodbridge, Connecticut, USA

Just a few days ago refering to a relative as "ciocia" (aunt), I tried
to remember how to say "uncle" in Polish, and remember I did: I
don't know how to write this Polish word but it sounds like
"Wuyek," and (together with the uncle's name) "Wuycho," like -
Wuicho Ozek (uncle Ozek).

What I found on the list of Polish family relationships compiled
generously by Alexander Sharon is only "Stryj."

I went through the list searching for (what sounds like)
"Wuyek.Wuycho" but didn't find it. Maybe I overlooked
something?...


Re: expressions for Polish Family Relationships #galicia

Peter Jassem <pjassem@...>
 

"Wujek" (or "wuj") - is used in contemporary Polish to describe a
relative, who is the brother of the mother or father or husband of
mother's or father's sister. Sometimes also the term "wujek" is used
to describe any further relative or next of kin of higher generation.

Originally the term "wujek" only referred to mother's brother, while
father's brother was called "stryj". Wujek's wife was traditionally
called "wujna" or "wujenka" and stryj's wife was called "stryjna" or
"stryjenka", while in contemporary Polish any female relative or
next of kin of higher generation is called "ciocia".

I hope that helps,
Peter Jassem
Toronto

Talila Stan <talilastan@yahoo.com> wrote:

Just a few days ago refering to a relative as "ciocia" (aunt), I tried to
remember how to say "uncle" in Polish, and remember I did: I
don't know how to write this Polish word but it sounds like
"Wuyek," and (together with the uncle's name) "Wuycho," like -
Wuicho Ozek (uncle Ozek).

What I found on the list of Polish family relationships compiled
generously by Alexander Sharon is only "Stryj."

I went through the list searching for (what sounds like)
"Wuyek.Wuycho" but didn't find it....

Maybe I overlooked something?

With much appreciation to Mr. Sharon's vast knowledge,

Talila Stan
Tel Aviv, Israel

Researching:
SCHWAGER, FREUDENTHAL, BLAUSTEIN, POHORYLES, PASTERNAK -
Galicia (Eastern), PASTERNAK - Tula, Odessa

Howard Fink <howgen@verizon.net> wrote:

Thanks to Alexander Sharon we now have a very large table
describing many different family relationships. A link has been
added to this table on the JRI-Poland Help Links web page.

The direct link to the new table is:
http://www.jri-poland.org/polish_family_terms.htm


Re: expressions for Polish Family Relationships #galicia

Henryk Gruder <henrygruder@...>
 

You did not find "wuyek", since in Polish it is spelled "wuj" or
"wujek". By the way, the name "SCHWAGER" also corresponds to
a relationship: means "brother in law".

Henryk Gruder,
Ottawa

Talila Stan <talilastan@yahoo.com> wrote:

Just a few days ago refering to a relative as "ciocia" (aunt), I tried
to remember how to say "uncle" in Polish, and remember I did: I
don't know how to write this Polish word but it sounds like
"Wuyek," and (together with the uncle's name) "Wuycho," like -
Wuicho Ozek (uncle Ozek).

What I found on the list of Polish family relationships compiled
generously by Alexander Sharon is only "Stryj."....


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: expressions for Polish Uncle #galicia

Dan Oren <doren@...>
 

My friends >from Rzeszow Poland are visiting and report the following.

Uncle is "wujek" in Polish, pronounced "Wuyek" as you remember.
To say Uncle Ozek, they would say, "Wujek Ozek".

Dan Oren
Woodbridge, Connecticut, USA

Just a few days ago refering to a relative as "ciocia" (aunt), I tried
to remember how to say "uncle" in Polish, and remember I did: I
don't know how to write this Polish word but it sounds like
"Wuyek," and (together with the uncle's name) "Wuycho," like -
Wuicho Ozek (uncle Ozek).

What I found on the list of Polish family relationships compiled
generously by Alexander Sharon is only "Stryj."

I went through the list searching for (what sounds like)
"Wuyek.Wuycho" but didn't find it. Maybe I overlooked
something?...


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia RE: expressions for Polish Family Relationships #galicia

Peter Jassem <pjassem@...>
 

"Wujek" (or "wuj") - is used in contemporary Polish to describe a
relative, who is the brother of the mother or father or husband of
mother's or father's sister. Sometimes also the term "wujek" is used
to describe any further relative or next of kin of higher generation.

Originally the term "wujek" only referred to mother's brother, while
father's brother was called "stryj". Wujek's wife was traditionally
called "wujna" or "wujenka" and stryj's wife was called "stryjna" or
"stryjenka", while in contemporary Polish any female relative or
next of kin of higher generation is called "ciocia".

I hope that helps,
Peter Jassem
Toronto

Talila Stan <talilastan@yahoo.com> wrote:

Just a few days ago refering to a relative as "ciocia" (aunt), I tried to
remember how to say "uncle" in Polish, and remember I did: I
don't know how to write this Polish word but it sounds like
"Wuyek," and (together with the uncle's name) "Wuycho," like -
Wuicho Ozek (uncle Ozek).

What I found on the list of Polish family relationships compiled
generously by Alexander Sharon is only "Stryj."

I went through the list searching for (what sounds like)
"Wuyek.Wuycho" but didn't find it....

Maybe I overlooked something?

With much appreciation to Mr. Sharon's vast knowledge,

Talila Stan
Tel Aviv, Israel

Researching:
SCHWAGER, FREUDENTHAL, BLAUSTEIN, POHORYLES, PASTERNAK -
Galicia (Eastern), PASTERNAK - Tula, Odessa

Howard Fink <howgen@verizon.net> wrote:

Thanks to Alexander Sharon we now have a very large table
describing many different family relationships. A link has been
added to this table on the JRI-Poland Help Links web page.

The direct link to the new table is:
http://www.jri-poland.org/polish_family_terms.htm


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia RE: expressions for Polish Family Relationships #galicia

Henryk Gruder <henrygruder@...>
 

You did not find "wuyek", since in Polish it is spelled "wuj" or
"wujek". By the way, the name "SCHWAGER" also corresponds to
a relationship: means "brother in law".

Henryk Gruder,
Ottawa

Talila Stan <talilastan@yahoo.com> wrote:

Just a few days ago refering to a relative as "ciocia" (aunt), I tried
to remember how to say "uncle" in Polish, and remember I did: I
don't know how to write this Polish word but it sounds like
"Wuyek," and (together with the uncle's name) "Wuycho," like -
Wuicho Ozek (uncle Ozek).

What I found on the list of Polish family relationships compiled
generously by Alexander Sharon is only "Stryj."....


Re: expressions for Polish Family Relationships #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Talila Stan wrote

Just a few days ago refering to a relative as "ciocia" (aunt), I tried
to remember how to say "uncle" in Polish, and remember I did: I
don't know how to write this Polish word but it sounds like
"Wuyek," and (together with the uncle's name) "Wuycho," like -
Wuicho Ozek (uncle Ozek).

What I found on the list of Polish family relationships compiled
generously by Alexander Sharon is only "Stryj."

I went through the list searching for (what sounds like)
"Wuyek.Wuycho" but didn't find it. Maybe I overlooked
something?

---------------------------------

Dear Talila,

It is there.

A complete list of Polish families relationship terms organized in
alphabetical order is now hosted by Jewish Records Indexing-Poland (JRI-P)
site at:

http://www.jri-poland.org/polish_family_terms.htm

Wuj [vooy] - maternal uncle, and the related to this term, other family
forms such as "wujek," "wujenka," "wujowstwo," "wujeczna babcia" and "wujeczny
dziadek."

I have been avoiding use of the caressing variations (so popular in Polish)
of the formal "wuj," such as "wujcio" and "wujaszek."

Best

Alexander


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Re: expressions for Polish Family Relationships #galicia

Alexander Sharon
 

Talila Stan wrote

Just a few days ago refering to a relative as "ciocia" (aunt), I tried
to remember how to say "uncle" in Polish, and remember I did: I
don't know how to write this Polish word but it sounds like
"Wuyek," and (together with the uncle's name) "Wuycho," like -
Wuicho Ozek (uncle Ozek).

What I found on the list of Polish family relationships compiled
generously by Alexander Sharon is only "Stryj."

I went through the list searching for (what sounds like)
"Wuyek.Wuycho" but didn't find it. Maybe I overlooked
something?

---------------------------------

Dear Talila,

It is there.

A complete list of Polish families relationship terms organized in
alphabetical order is now hosted by Jewish Records Indexing-Poland (JRI-P)
site at:

http://www.jri-poland.org/polish_family_terms.htm

Wuj [vooy] - maternal uncle, and the related to this term, other family
forms such as "wujek," "wujenka," "wujowstwo," "wujeczna babcia" and "wujeczny
dziadek."

I have been avoiding use of the caressing variations (so popular in Polish)
of the formal "wuj," such as "wujcio" and "wujaszek."

Best

Alexander


Irish Jewish Ancestors #southafrica

Ann Rabinowitz
 

There are many places to find information about Irish Jews and in the past I
have written about some of them on the JewishGen Digest and the JewishGen Blog.
Today, however, I provide another means of looking up Irish ancestors. It is
checking them out on Ancestry.com which not only has records >from America, but
those >from Ireland and other places as well.

This is not a comprehensive listing, but a snapshot of what you can find if you
have a mind to. I started by looking up my favorite search name of COHEN and
plugged in Dublin in the Ancestry.com search engine on its front page. There I
found some of the following:

Records - There are immigration records, particularly of individuals who crossed
over Canadian and Mexican borders. For instance, Leah and Alfred Cohen arrived
through Niagara Falls, NY, on September 23, 1929. Anna Cohen Shiller arrived
through Laredo, Texas on July 26, 1941. A number of the Irish immigrants are
listed as leaving >from the port of Queenstown, Ireland, and others >from various
ports in England such as Liverpool and Southampton.

In addition, there are naturalization records. One is Jacob Cohen who was born
in Dublin in 1899 and who lived in Baltimore, Maryland.

Another group of records are those >from Griffith's Valuation, 1848-1864. There,
I found Abraham Cohen, Esq., who had a residence in 1853 in Ranelegh, North, at
13 Ranelegh Road (west side) which was comprised of a house, office and small
garden.

Also, there is the England and Wales Probate Calendar, 1858-1966, which lists
Jane Cohen who died October 2, 1877, late of 67 Grafton-street, Dublin.

The great record sets are the Ireland, Births and Baptisms, 1602-1911, where I
found Caroline Cohen, born April 16, 1880, the daughter of Abraham Cohen and
Henrietta Hamburgher; the Ireland, Civil Registration Marriages Index,
1845-1958, where I found David Isaac Cohen and Annie Leventon who married in
1882; and the Ireland, Civil Registration Deaths Index, 1864-1958, where I found
Hyman Cohen (1876-1951).

Photographs - Not only did records pop up, but also photos of individuals as
well as tombstones in Dublin's Dolphin Barn Cemetery. For example, there is a
photo of Miriam Leah Cohen who married a Rosenberg and also found is her
tombstone with her dates of 1840-1913.

This give you some idea of what is available and there is so much more to wade
through. Good luck!!!

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Irish Jewish Ancestors #southafrica

Ann Rabinowitz
 

There are many places to find information about Irish Jews and in the past I
have written about some of them on the JewishGen Digest and the JewishGen Blog.
Today, however, I provide another means of looking up Irish ancestors. It is
checking them out on Ancestry.com which not only has records >from America, but
those >from Ireland and other places as well.

This is not a comprehensive listing, but a snapshot of what you can find if you
have a mind to. I started by looking up my favorite search name of COHEN and
plugged in Dublin in the Ancestry.com search engine on its front page. There I
found some of the following:

Records - There are immigration records, particularly of individuals who crossed
over Canadian and Mexican borders. For instance, Leah and Alfred Cohen arrived
through Niagara Falls, NY, on September 23, 1929. Anna Cohen Shiller arrived
through Laredo, Texas on July 26, 1941. A number of the Irish immigrants are
listed as leaving >from the port of Queenstown, Ireland, and others >from various
ports in England such as Liverpool and Southampton.

In addition, there are naturalization records. One is Jacob Cohen who was born
in Dublin in 1899 and who lived in Baltimore, Maryland.

Another group of records are those >from Griffith's Valuation, 1848-1864. There,
I found Abraham Cohen, Esq., who had a residence in 1853 in Ranelegh, North, at
13 Ranelegh Road (west side) which was comprised of a house, office and small
garden.

Also, there is the England and Wales Probate Calendar, 1858-1966, which lists
Jane Cohen who died October 2, 1877, late of 67 Grafton-street, Dublin.

The great record sets are the Ireland, Births and Baptisms, 1602-1911, where I
found Caroline Cohen, born April 16, 1880, the daughter of Abraham Cohen and
Henrietta Hamburgher; the Ireland, Civil Registration Marriages Index,
1845-1958, where I found David Isaac Cohen and Annie Leventon who married in
1882; and the Ireland, Civil Registration Deaths Index, 1864-1958, where I found
Hyman Cohen (1876-1951).

Photographs - Not only did records pop up, but also photos of individuals as
well as tombstones in Dublin's Dolphin Barn Cemetery. For example, there is a
photo of Miriam Leah Cohen who married a Rosenberg and also found is her
tombstone with her dates of 1840-1913.

This give you some idea of what is available and there is so much more to wade
through. Good luck!!!

Ann Rabinowitz
annrab@bellsouth.net


Memories of Muizenberg Exhibition to come to London #southafrica

Saul Issroff
 

The Memories of Muizenberg Exhibition that smashed attendance records
in Cape Town, Johannesburg and Israel will be put on in London. In a
move that destined to delight ex-Muizenbergers and other members of
the South African Jewish diaspora in Britain, the London Jewish
Cultural Centre at Ivy House, once home of the famous ballerina, Anna
Pavlova, is hosting the exhibition.

Memories of Muizenberg will be opened by Sir Jeremy Isaacs (legendary
TV producer responsible for creating the prize-winning "The World At
War" series) and introduced by Muizenberg-born Leonard Weinreich, on
May 21. Using personal photos and reminiscences, all focussed
on Muizenberg's Jewish community and the visitors who descended during
"The Season", carefully selected by Joy Kropman and her team, the
exhibition celebrates the period between 1900 and 1965 as "the brief
summer of South African Jewry".

If you, or anyone in the vicinity of London, wants further
information, e.g. about associated lectures, opening times etc, please
contact me privately. This will run >from 22 May until the 6th June.

Saul Issroff


South Africa SIG #SouthAfrica Memories of Muizenberg Exhibition to come to London #southafrica

Saul Issroff
 

The Memories of Muizenberg Exhibition that smashed attendance records
in Cape Town, Johannesburg and Israel will be put on in London. In a
move that destined to delight ex-Muizenbergers and other members of
the South African Jewish diaspora in Britain, the London Jewish
Cultural Centre at Ivy House, once home of the famous ballerina, Anna
Pavlova, is hosting the exhibition.

Memories of Muizenberg will be opened by Sir Jeremy Isaacs (legendary
TV producer responsible for creating the prize-winning "The World At
War" series) and introduced by Muizenberg-born Leonard Weinreich, on
May 21. Using personal photos and reminiscences, all focussed
on Muizenberg's Jewish community and the visitors who descended during
"The Season", carefully selected by Joy Kropman and her team, the
exhibition celebrates the period between 1900 and 1965 as "the brief
summer of South African Jewry".

If you, or anyone in the vicinity of London, wants further
information, e.g. about associated lectures, opening times etc, please
contact me privately. This will run >from 22 May until the 6th June.

Saul Issroff


Seeking contact information for Jim Bennett, Israel #general

hollysolomon@...
 

Anyone have a current email for Jim Bennett in Israel? I found letters >from
him in my Grandpas genealogy files and want to get in touch. ISRAELSKI family.

Thx

Holly Solomon
hollysolomon at gmail dot com

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Seeking contact information for Jim Bennett, Israel #general

hollysolomon@...
 

Anyone have a current email for Jim Bennett in Israel? I found letters >from
him in my Grandpas genealogy files and want to get in touch. ISRAELSKI family.

Thx

Holly Solomon
hollysolomon at gmail dot com

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately.


Update for the month of February, 2013 #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear Bessarabers,

There is one section where I received very interesting material in February,
and posted recently at the Bessarabia SIG website, at Landsmanshaften
section: http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/Landsmanshaften.html

It is about First Kishinever Progressive Society of New York. You can see
now at the website the Program for 40th Anniversary Banquet, held on
November 22, 1947, the Jubilee Journal booklet commemorating the society's
40th Anniversary and also article written by Robin Leidner, whose
great-grandfather, Leon Weinshank, was an officer of the society. Thank you
to Robin Leindner for all that terrific documentation and photos >from the
society.

Please send your comments, suggestions, critique, new ideas, proposals of
how to make our Bessarabia group better.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania.


Bessarabia SIG #Bessarabia Update for the month of February, 2013 #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Dear Bessarabers,

There is one section where I received very interesting material in February,
and posted recently at the Bessarabia SIG website, at Landsmanshaften
section: http://www.jewishgen.org/Bessarabia/Landsmanshaften.html

It is about First Kishinever Progressive Society of New York. You can see
now at the website the Program for 40th Anniversary Banquet, held on
November 22, 1947, the Jubilee Journal booklet commemorating the society's
40th Anniversary and also article written by Robin Leidner, whose
great-grandfather, Leon Weinshank, was an officer of the society. Thank you
to Robin Leindner for all that terrific documentation and photos >from the
society.

Please send your comments, suggestions, critique, new ideas, proposals of
how to make our Bessarabia group better.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Coordinator
Researching KOGAN, SPIVAK, KHAYMOVICH, SRULEVICH, LEVIT in Kaushany,
Bendery, Tarutino, Akkerman, Kiliya - all in Bessarabia, KHAIMOVICH in
Galatz, Romania.


Re: Gersig program at Boston Conference #germany

Evelyn Frybort <efrybort@...>
 

Moderator Note:
The Boston 2013 Program Committee has been requesting and
reviewing speaker and topic proposals since November 2012.
GerSIG has sent readers many reminders that suggestions are
needed for formal lectures and less formal "BOF" topic based meetings.
Deadlines for these proposals were announced frequently here and at
the Boston 2013 website.

The official formal program for 2013 was announced last week. It is still possible
to organize private, topic-based gatherings for Boston.

Proposals like the one below should be considered and sent to the
organizers of SLC 2014 according to the deadlines to be announced later.

That said, Roger Lustig and others *** will *** address Westpreussen and
Pommerania in Boston. Details to follow. MOD 1
========>

I shall be attending the Boston Conference and I shall be interested to hear
the latest on German Jewish research.
I would like to make a plea that former Prussia, specifically Westpreussen
and Pommerania be included in material that is addressed at the Conference.
I believe that this area has been largely overlooked, possibly because it is
presently part of Poland. Regards,

Evelyn Frybort, Sydney, Australia efrybort@optusnet.com.au


German SIG #Germany RE: Gersig program at Boston Conference #germany

Evelyn Frybort <efrybort@...>
 

Moderator Note:
The Boston 2013 Program Committee has been requesting and
reviewing speaker and topic proposals since November 2012.
GerSIG has sent readers many reminders that suggestions are
needed for formal lectures and less formal "BOF" topic based meetings.
Deadlines for these proposals were announced frequently here and at
the Boston 2013 website.

The official formal program for 2013 was announced last week. It is still possible
to organize private, topic-based gatherings for Boston.

Proposals like the one below should be considered and sent to the
organizers of SLC 2014 according to the deadlines to be announced later.

That said, Roger Lustig and others *** will *** address Westpreussen and
Pommerania in Boston. Details to follow. MOD 1
========>

I shall be attending the Boston Conference and I shall be interested to hear
the latest on German Jewish research.
I would like to make a plea that former Prussia, specifically Westpreussen
and Pommerania be included in material that is addressed at the Conference.
I believe that this area has been largely overlooked, possibly because it is
presently part of Poland. Regards,

Evelyn Frybort, Sydney, Australia efrybort@optusnet.com.au


Re: Request suggestions - German record collections to put on line #germany

Parkworth <parkworth@...>
 

Dear Roger
Thank you for your great work. Your question about a database to be
indexed. May I suggest that the 1939 Minority Census of Berlin to be
included. There is an LDS film for this census. Many years ago I viewed
this record and found family listed there. Best regards,

Rene Eisner, Melbourne, Australia

Roger Lustig, GerSIG Research Director wrote:
I need your help. In August, at the IAJGS conference in Boston, I plan to
give a talk on the NALDEX (surname-adoption lists) database and future
database projects for GerSIG.

Now, I can think of a hundred databases I'd like to see, but I can't wish
them into existence, nor can I create them all myself--not even if I work
full-time at them. That's where you come in. My questions to each of you:

--Is there a database you'd particularly like to have on line? What is it,
about how many records would it involve, and what makes it special to you?

--Have you created databases of genealogical info? If so, tell me about
them!

--Do you have particular skills that you could contribute to a project?
We need transcribers, proofreaders, people to gather raw data and more.


German SIG #Germany RE: Request suggestions - German record collections to put on line #germany

Parkworth <parkworth@...>
 

Dear Roger
Thank you for your great work. Your question about a database to be
indexed. May I suggest that the 1939 Minority Census of Berlin to be
included. There is an LDS film for this census. Many years ago I viewed
this record and found family listed there. Best regards,

Rene Eisner, Melbourne, Australia

Roger Lustig, GerSIG Research Director wrote:
I need your help. In August, at the IAJGS conference in Boston, I plan to
give a talk on the NALDEX (surname-adoption lists) database and future
database projects for GerSIG.

Now, I can think of a hundred databases I'd like to see, but I can't wish
them into existence, nor can I create them all myself--not even if I work
full-time at them. That's where you come in. My questions to each of you:

--Is there a database you'd particularly like to have on line? What is it,
about how many records would it involve, and what makes it special to you?

--Have you created databases of genealogical info? If so, tell me about
them!

--Do you have particular skills that you could contribute to a project?
We need transcribers, proofreaders, people to gather raw data and more.

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