Date   

ViewMate translation request - Yiddish-DP Camp letter #poland

Gary Lelonek <goodbachur@...>
 

I hope everyone had a meaning passover. I have posted some letters
that my great grandfather, Yitzchak Meyer Lelonek, wrote while living
in the Lampertheim DP Camp between 1946-1949 to his town's relief
committee, the Sierpc Relief Committee in NY. A direct translation
would be really appreciated. They are on ViewMate at the following
addresses ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26451
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26450
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26449
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26447

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much for your help,
Gary Lelonek


JRI Poland #Poland ViewMate translation request - Yiddish-DP Camp letter #poland

Gary Lelonek <goodbachur@...>
 

I hope everyone had a meaning passover. I have posted some letters
that my great grandfather, Yitzchak Meyer Lelonek, wrote while living
in the Lampertheim DP Camp between 1946-1949 to his town's relief
committee, the Sierpc Relief Committee in NY. A direct translation
would be really appreciated. They are on ViewMate at the following
addresses ...

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26451
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26450
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26449
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM26447

Please respond via the form provided in the ViewMate application.
Thank you very much for your help,
Gary Lelonek


For Litvaks in the Washington, DC area #lithuania

Olga Zabludoff <ozabludoff@...>
 

A new documentary, "Rewriting History," will premiere in Washington, DC,
on April 16 at The George Washington University. Hosted by Dr. Walter Reich,
former Director of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and current Yitzhak
Rabin Memorial Professor of International Affairs, Ethics and Human Behavior
at GWU's Elliott School of International Affairs, the screening will be
followed by a panel discussion and Q & A session.
"Rewriting History" explores disturbing developments that impact on the
perception and memory of the history of the Holocaust in Lithuania.

Date: Tuesday, April 16, 2013, 5:00-7:00 PM
Place: GWU, Funger Hall, Room 103, 2201 G St., N.W., Washington, DC
Further details at:

http://browse.calendar.gwu.edu/EventList.aspx?fromdate=4/1/2013&todate=4/30/
2013&display=&type=public&eventidn=1385&view=EventDetails&information_id=299
9

A second screening will be held on April 18 in Richmond, Virginia. Hosted by
Jay Ipson, Holocaust History Lecturer and Founding Director of the Virginia
Holocaust Museum, the event will include a reception prior to the screening
and a panel discussion and Q & A session following the film.

Date: Thursday, April 18, 2013, 6:30 -9:00 PM
Place: Byrd Theatre, 2908 W. Cary Street, Richmond, Virginia, 23220
Further details at:
http://us6.campaign-archive2.com/?u=82c1a9a4d1&id=d94c33b1db&e=40c9291509

Both events are free and open to the public.

Olga Zabludoff
Washington, DC


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania For Litvaks in the Washington, DC area #lithuania

Olga Zabludoff <ozabludoff@...>
 

A new documentary, "Rewriting History," will premiere in Washington, DC,
on April 16 at The George Washington University. Hosted by Dr. Walter Reich,
former Director of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum and current Yitzhak
Rabin Memorial Professor of International Affairs, Ethics and Human Behavior
at GWU's Elliott School of International Affairs, the screening will be
followed by a panel discussion and Q & A session.
"Rewriting History" explores disturbing developments that impact on the
perception and memory of the history of the Holocaust in Lithuania.

Date: Tuesday, April 16, 2013, 5:00-7:00 PM
Place: GWU, Funger Hall, Room 103, 2201 G St., N.W., Washington, DC
Further details at:

http://browse.calendar.gwu.edu/EventList.aspx?fromdate=4/1/2013&todate=4/30/
2013&display=&type=public&eventidn=1385&view=EventDetails&information_id=299
9

A second screening will be held on April 18 in Richmond, Virginia. Hosted by
Jay Ipson, Holocaust History Lecturer and Founding Director of the Virginia
Holocaust Museum, the event will include a reception prior to the screening
and a panel discussion and Q & A session following the film.

Date: Thursday, April 18, 2013, 6:30 -9:00 PM
Place: Byrd Theatre, 2908 W. Cary Street, Richmond, Virginia, 23220
Further details at:
http://us6.campaign-archive2.com/?u=82c1a9a4d1&id=d94c33b1db&e=40c9291509

Both events are free and open to the public.

Olga Zabludoff
Washington, DC


1811 Paberze Revision List #lithuania

Peggy Freedman <peggyf@...>
 

The Vilnius District Research Group is pleased to announce that we have
translated the 1811 Paberze Revision List. This is a short list of only
89 individuals. Only six surnames are included:
ARAN
DOGIM
JOFFE
OUKUZ
SELIN
SKOL

However, if you know your family came >from Paberze and you know their
given name, it is interesting to note that there are nine families with
no surname listed. These families are extended families including
in-laws, nieces and nephews, and grandchildren

These records are available now to qualified contributors to the Vilnius
District Research Group. You can become a qualified contributor by
going to http://litvaksig.org/contribute and contributing US$100 to the
Vilnius District Research Group.

If you have questions about the Vilnius District Research Group, please
contact me at peggyf@mindspring.com.

Peggy Mosinger Freedman
Vilnius District Research Group Coordinator


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania 1811 Paberze Revision List #lithuania

Peggy Freedman <peggyf@...>
 

The Vilnius District Research Group is pleased to announce that we have
translated the 1811 Paberze Revision List. This is a short list of only
89 individuals. Only six surnames are included:
ARAN
DOGIM
JOFFE
OUKUZ
SELIN
SKOL

However, if you know your family came >from Paberze and you know their
given name, it is interesting to note that there are nine families with
no surname listed. These families are extended families including
in-laws, nieces and nephews, and grandchildren

These records are available now to qualified contributors to the Vilnius
District Research Group. You can become a qualified contributor by
going to http://litvaksig.org/contribute and contributing US$100 to the
Vilnius District Research Group.

If you have questions about the Vilnius District Research Group, please
contact me at peggyf@mindspring.com.

Peggy Mosinger Freedman
Vilnius District Research Group Coordinator


Vilnius Internal Passport Records, 1919-1940 #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

Another 317 Vilnius internal passport records have been translated and are
available. So far, a total of 6,485 Vilnius internal passport records have
been translated. A grand total of 111,289 internal passport records have
been translated covering most areas of Lithuania.

The Vilnius I.P. records include some very important information, including
where the person was born. Not everyone was born in Vilnius.

Some of the information included - German passports issued during World
War II, Mother's name, Marriage certificates, and most important, Birth
certificates issued in the early 1920's. Due to the 100 year privacy law
on birth records, we are not allowed to translate post 1912 birth records.
However, you can contact the Central archive, and request a copy of all
of the documents in an individual file, and they will send it.

To learn about internal passports, and see examples of various documents
in the files, go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/InternalPassports.htm

If you contribute a minimum of $100 to Litvak SIG, I will send you all of
the Vilnius internal passport records. Go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute
and scroll down to Special Projects. Select Internal Passports. In the NOTES
block, key in Vilnius. Feel free to use your credit card as the site is
secure.

Your interest of the project is very much appreciated. If you have any
questions, or would like to see all of the Vilnius internal passport records,
please contact me personally and not to the digest.

Howard Margol
homargol@aol.com
Founder - Coordinator - Internal Passport Project


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Vilnius Internal Passport Records, 1919-1940 #lithuania

Howard Margol
 

Another 317 Vilnius internal passport records have been translated and are
available. So far, a total of 6,485 Vilnius internal passport records have
been translated. A grand total of 111,289 internal passport records have
been translated covering most areas of Lithuania.

The Vilnius I.P. records include some very important information, including
where the person was born. Not everyone was born in Vilnius.

Some of the information included - German passports issued during World
War II, Mother's name, Marriage certificates, and most important, Birth
certificates issued in the early 1920's. Due to the 100 year privacy law
on birth records, we are not allowed to translate post 1912 birth records.
However, you can contact the Central archive, and request a copy of all
of the documents in an individual file, and they will send it.

To learn about internal passports, and see examples of various documents
in the files, go to
http://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/InternalPassports.htm

If you contribute a minimum of $100 to Litvak SIG, I will send you all of
the Vilnius internal passport records. Go to www.litvaksig.org/contribute
and scroll down to Special Projects. Select Internal Passports. In the NOTES
block, key in Vilnius. Feel free to use your credit card as the site is
secure.

Your interest of the project is very much appreciated. If you have any
questions, or would like to see all of the Vilnius internal passport records,
please contact me personally and not to the digest.

Howard Margol
homargol@aol.com
Founder - Coordinator - Internal Passport Project


The Passover Effect #general

Nicolas Trokiner
 

Dear all,

Whereas I usually receive a contact message >from JGFF (Family Finder)
once a month, this past week I received 5! I wonder if it due to
Passover and family discussions hold during the Seders?
Has anyone else experienced the same?

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris-France


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The Passover Effect #general

Nicolas Trokiner
 

Dear all,

Whereas I usually receive a contact message >from JGFF (Family Finder)
once a month, this past week I received 5! I wonder if it due to
Passover and family discussions hold during the Seders?
Has anyone else experienced the same?

Nicolas Trokiner
Paris-France


Translation of "skladnik" please Yiddish #general

Neil <research13@...>
 

I will be grateful for any translation received.

Thank you for taking the time and effort to respond.

Neil Stein


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translation of "skladnik" please Yiddish #general

Neil <research13@...>
 

I will be grateful for any translation received.

Thank you for taking the time and effort to respond.

Neil Stein


Confusion about Ship's Manifests #general

Natalie & Ernie Hartz
 

For general interest: This is what I learned >from the feedback jewishgen
members gave me about ship's manifests, in addition to the tips offered in
the JewishGen's info files. Keep these tips in mind when searching.

There are many reasons for people's names to have been crossed off or not
indexed properly. People may have been crossed off if they missed the boat
or if they were listed on another page, for example, not necessarily held
for special inquiry or deported. There may be cousins, named after the same
ancestors, coming >from the same town or another town. They may have married
men and women of the same families. Since they had kids almost every year,
they may have a bunch of kids named the same thing. The practice continued
here in the U.S. as well. (such as my father's 2 brothers) My mother's
generation had 3 Normans, her brother and 2 of her cousins all with the same
first name. Because my grandmother and a sister and a brother had different
last names it helped keep the confusion to a minimum. One worked for NASA as
an engineer, one was a writer and poet, and one was a prominent lawyer. My
gm also named her daughter Lillian and had a sister in law named Lillian, so
the sister in law was referred to as "Lillie Morrises". (Morris's wife
Lillie) So much for names.

A reminder about indexes: These manifests were indexed by volunteers both
for Ellis Island and Ancestry. It is important (as I sometimes forget) to
keep in mind that volunteers are human and these indexes were created by
humans who make errors. The original microfilmed documents have been
digitized and are online and true copies of the originals, but the indexes
are not true copies, so reading everything on the digital copies is
extremely important, as that information can be more accurate than the
indexes, and yield much more information than the indexes provide. I have
begun to be extremely careful when reading these now that I have learned to
look at all markings and notes in addition to the obvious information. Many
times I need to save these images to my computer to look at (and zoom in on)
later.

Also, I've learned that searching other ports may yield more information
because not everyone came through New York. Many came through Boston,
Philadelphia, Baltimore and Canadian Border Crossings. This became apparent
from one relative's naturalization papers, if they can be found. (Women were
not always independently naturalized except through marriage.)

Finally, I liked Sally Bruckheimer's comment in her email to me that
expressed what a challenge it is to try and document our family's personal
history: "You wouldn't like genealogy if it were easy. It would all be done
by now."

And that is true, as it is the challenge and mystery that always draws me in
to these searches. The more I learn, the more curious I become. For me, it
is like Alice in Wonderland, "curiouser and curiouser". I hope these tips on
ship's manifests help the people who are new to this research.

Natalie Hartz
East Windsor NJ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Confusion about Ship's Manifests #general

Natalie & Ernie Hartz
 

For general interest: This is what I learned >from the feedback jewishgen
members gave me about ship's manifests, in addition to the tips offered in
the JewishGen's info files. Keep these tips in mind when searching.

There are many reasons for people's names to have been crossed off or not
indexed properly. People may have been crossed off if they missed the boat
or if they were listed on another page, for example, not necessarily held
for special inquiry or deported. There may be cousins, named after the same
ancestors, coming >from the same town or another town. They may have married
men and women of the same families. Since they had kids almost every year,
they may have a bunch of kids named the same thing. The practice continued
here in the U.S. as well. (such as my father's 2 brothers) My mother's
generation had 3 Normans, her brother and 2 of her cousins all with the same
first name. Because my grandmother and a sister and a brother had different
last names it helped keep the confusion to a minimum. One worked for NASA as
an engineer, one was a writer and poet, and one was a prominent lawyer. My
gm also named her daughter Lillian and had a sister in law named Lillian, so
the sister in law was referred to as "Lillie Morrises". (Morris's wife
Lillie) So much for names.

A reminder about indexes: These manifests were indexed by volunteers both
for Ellis Island and Ancestry. It is important (as I sometimes forget) to
keep in mind that volunteers are human and these indexes were created by
humans who make errors. The original microfilmed documents have been
digitized and are online and true copies of the originals, but the indexes
are not true copies, so reading everything on the digital copies is
extremely important, as that information can be more accurate than the
indexes, and yield much more information than the indexes provide. I have
begun to be extremely careful when reading these now that I have learned to
look at all markings and notes in addition to the obvious information. Many
times I need to save these images to my computer to look at (and zoom in on)
later.

Also, I've learned that searching other ports may yield more information
because not everyone came through New York. Many came through Boston,
Philadelphia, Baltimore and Canadian Border Crossings. This became apparent
from one relative's naturalization papers, if they can be found. (Women were
not always independently naturalized except through marriage.)

Finally, I liked Sally Bruckheimer's comment in her email to me that
expressed what a challenge it is to try and document our family's personal
history: "You wouldn't like genealogy if it were easy. It would all be done
by now."

And that is true, as it is the challenge and mystery that always draws me in
to these searches. The more I learn, the more curious I become. For me, it
is like Alice in Wonderland, "curiouser and curiouser". I hope these tips on
ship's manifests help the people who are new to this research.

Natalie Hartz
East Windsor NJ


Photo Taking prohibited at Evergreen Cemetery Tucson AZ #general

lrl <biaxial@...>
 

I wanted to start a project to document the headstones in the several
Jewish sections of Evergreen Cemetery in Tucson. I asked the cemetery
about their policy for photo taking and received the following reply:
The policy for taking photographs of headstones anywhere within the
cemetery is prohibited. In the past, families have expressed concern of
people taking photos of headstones due to privacy issues, therefore,
Evergreen had to create the policy.

Is this policy common in other cities around the U.S.?

Lee Levin, Tucson, AZ


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Photo Taking prohibited at Evergreen Cemetery Tucson AZ #general

lrl <biaxial@...>
 

I wanted to start a project to document the headstones in the several
Jewish sections of Evergreen Cemetery in Tucson. I asked the cemetery
about their policy for photo taking and received the following reply:
The policy for taking photographs of headstones anywhere within the
cemetery is prohibited. In the past, families have expressed concern of
people taking photos of headstones due to privacy issues, therefore,
Evergreen had to create the policy.

Is this policy common in other cities around the U.S.?

Lee Levin, Tucson, AZ


Military Service Austria 1917 #general

Palekaiko
 

With the assistance of a kind contributor, a document I received from
the Ivano-Frankivsk Archives was posted on Viewmate and translated.
The translation is as follow:

Declaration
That the undersigned Meier Weisberg hereby confirms he is of Jewish origin.
from January 5 1917 to November 1918 he was a private in Zamosc in the
30th infantry regiment (of Austrian army).
Stanislawow, April 27, 1921

Where would I search for more information on my great-great-uncle
Meier Weissberg with regard to his military service?

Thanks in advance to all who will respond.

Michael Diamant
Hawaii


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Military Service Austria 1917 #general

Palekaiko
 

With the assistance of a kind contributor, a document I received from
the Ivano-Frankivsk Archives was posted on Viewmate and translated.
The translation is as follow:

Declaration
That the undersigned Meier Weisberg hereby confirms he is of Jewish origin.
from January 5 1917 to November 1918 he was a private in Zamosc in the
30th infantry regiment (of Austrian army).
Stanislawow, April 27, 1921

Where would I search for more information on my great-great-uncle
Meier Weissberg with regard to his military service?

Thanks in advance to all who will respond.

Michael Diamant
Hawaii


Re: What is Fiakierstwo (occupation - Polish)? #general

Alexander Sharon <olek.sharon@...>
 

Alexander Sharon wrote:

Fiakier, fiacre, cab, cab (fr. fiacre) - light vehicle for hire for
commercial purposes. The vehicle was equipped with a folding roof over
the rear (passenger) part.
Fiacre name comes >from the tavern St. Fiacre in Paris. In this tavern,
in the 17th century, one could rent a carriage. Fiakier was a carriage
cabby.
Not to be confused with balagula (>from Hebrew baal hagulah), a driver
of a less elegant vehicle.
Just to supplement my earlier post:

Fiakier and fiakarstwo was eventually phased out and replaced with
wording: doroz'ka (doroz'karz - a driver) and doroz'karstwo (a trade).
Russian words for this profession (used also in Central/Eastern Poland
and Ukraine/Lithuania) was "Izvozchick"

Jewish "balagula" was also known as a Furman (German origin), a driver
of vehicle transporing goods.

Alexander Sharon


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: What is Fiakierstwo (occupation - Polish)? #general

Alexander Sharon <olek.sharon@...>
 

Alexander Sharon wrote:

Fiakier, fiacre, cab, cab (fr. fiacre) - light vehicle for hire for
commercial purposes. The vehicle was equipped with a folding roof over
the rear (passenger) part.
Fiacre name comes >from the tavern St. Fiacre in Paris. In this tavern,
in the 17th century, one could rent a carriage. Fiakier was a carriage
cabby.
Not to be confused with balagula (>from Hebrew baal hagulah), a driver
of a less elegant vehicle.
Just to supplement my earlier post:

Fiakier and fiakarstwo was eventually phased out and replaced with
wording: doroz'ka (doroz'karz - a driver) and doroz'karstwo (a trade).
Russian words for this profession (used also in Central/Eastern Poland
and Ukraine/Lithuania) was "Izvozchick"

Jewish "balagula" was also known as a Furman (German origin), a driver
of vehicle transporing goods.

Alexander Sharon

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