Date   

Re: Teachers in NYC 1940s #general

Sandy Crystall
 

For Renee and others-

Seeking "information about a High School teacher in Manhattan in the 1940s."

For information about schoolteachers in New York, one good source is
the fultonhistory.com website. I have found when and >from where
relatives graduated >from college, received their teaching
certifications and were associated with certain schools as teachers
later on. I have also found some very interesting articles about
family members. An incredible resource...

Fultonhistory.com :
"Search Over 19,648,000 Old New York State Historical Newspaper Pages"

Good luck!

Best,

Sandy Crystall
New Hampshire

Researching: SOBEL, PASTERNAK, GLECKEL, STUTMAN - Belozerka, Ukraine;
GLASS - Grodno, Belarus; CRYSTAL, KRISTAL - Latvia/Lithuania
(Riga/Sirvintos/Zagare?); SHERMAN - London, (Tompsk?) Russia;
Pasvalys(?), Lithuania; Brooklyn, NY, Baltimore, Maryland; Los
Angeles, California; LEVINSON- Ventspils; STEINGRUB- Latvia/Lithuania

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Belozerka/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Teachers in NYC 1940s #general

Sandy Crystall
 

For Renee and others-

Seeking "information about a High School teacher in Manhattan in the 1940s."

For information about schoolteachers in New York, one good source is
the fultonhistory.com website. I have found when and >from where
relatives graduated >from college, received their teaching
certifications and were associated with certain schools as teachers
later on. I have also found some very interesting articles about
family members. An incredible resource...

Fultonhistory.com :
"Search Over 19,648,000 Old New York State Historical Newspaper Pages"

Good luck!

Best,

Sandy Crystall
New Hampshire

Researching: SOBEL, PASTERNAK, GLECKEL, STUTMAN - Belozerka, Ukraine;
GLASS - Grodno, Belarus; CRYSTAL, KRISTAL - Latvia/Lithuania
(Riga/Sirvintos/Zagare?); SHERMAN - London, (Tompsk?) Russia;
Pasvalys(?), Lithuania; Brooklyn, NY, Baltimore, Maryland; Los
Angeles, California; LEVINSON- Ventspils; STEINGRUB- Latvia/Lithuania

http://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Belozerka/


Translations of documents on ViewMate - Russian #general

ian leiba <leiba@...>
 

Hi. I've posted 3 records in Russian for which I need loose translations.

The records are on Viewmate at the following addresses:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23494
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23495
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23496

Please respond via the form provided in the Viewmate application.

Many thanks and appreciation,
Freda Leiba
Melbourne, Australia


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Translations of documents on ViewMate - Russian #general

ian leiba <leiba@...>
 

Hi. I've posted 3 records in Russian for which I need loose translations.

The records are on Viewmate at the following addresses:
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23494
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23495
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM23496

Please respond via the form provided in the Viewmate application.

Many thanks and appreciation,
Freda Leiba
Melbourne, Australia


Re: Need help finding passenger manifest, please! #general

A. E. Jordan
 

In a message dated 7/15/2012 12:50:39 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
fransegall@... writes:
I have been searching for my great-grandmother's passenger manifest forever,
it seems. It's time to ask for help. I have searched every combination I can
think of..... She **definitely** arrived sometime between 1888 and 1909,
but census info points strongly to 1902.
Narrow the range. Especially when you are working with a difficult to find
record my advice would always be to narrow the range of the search by first
working with other tools that exist. Sometimes you have to go off and work
on other parts of a search to get to the part you really want.

In this instance the individual says the person lived their remaining years
after immigration in New York City. Between 1888 and 1909 there would have
been the

1890 Police Census
1892 New York State Census (which did not include Manhattan)
1900 Federal Census and
1905 New York State Census.

The person does not indicate if they checked each of these sources but
doing that would help to narrow the range of dates. As an older widow it is
very likely the woman was living with a child or other relative as opposed
to being alone. Finding her might take some work to identify who she lived
with.

It is not clear >from the message if the woman died in 1909 or lived on in
New York. Of course the 1910 Census would becoming up but also you might
go to her death, get the death certificate and try to work backwards >from
there. The death certificate in New York would show where she lived and
depending on the date may or may not have the name of a next of kin or
informant.

Another example of the importance of narrowing the range in your searches
through using basic tools like the census. Just this week someone asked me
to do a search for a marriage between 1939 and 1942 and in my rush I did
not notice or stop to think the range spanned 1940 and the census in the
date range of the marriage. If I had checked the 1940 census I would have
found the married couple and immediately cut in half the date range to do the
search.

In the case of this question the early immigration records are among the
more difficult to work with. But if it is truly 1888 then it might pre-date
Ellis Island which did not open till 1892 and closed again after a major
fire. So you might not be looking at Ellis Island but instead Castle
Garden/the Barge office. Castle Garden has a separate web site. Also Ancestry
has a fairly broad source of passenger lists (remember Ancestry can be
accessed for free at many many libraries in the USA so you do not have to pay
for a subscription).

Depending on where the person is >from you might also try the European
departure lists. Both the Hamburg and Holland America Rotterdam lists survive.
Hamburg is indexed and since this particular person was coking >from
Northern Europe Hamburg is a reasonable option.

Allan Jordan


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Need help finding passenger manifest, please! #general

A. E. Jordan
 

In a message dated 7/15/2012 12:50:39 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
fransegall@... writes:
I have been searching for my great-grandmother's passenger manifest forever,
it seems. It's time to ask for help. I have searched every combination I can
think of..... She **definitely** arrived sometime between 1888 and 1909,
but census info points strongly to 1902.
Narrow the range. Especially when you are working with a difficult to find
record my advice would always be to narrow the range of the search by first
working with other tools that exist. Sometimes you have to go off and work
on other parts of a search to get to the part you really want.

In this instance the individual says the person lived their remaining years
after immigration in New York City. Between 1888 and 1909 there would have
been the

1890 Police Census
1892 New York State Census (which did not include Manhattan)
1900 Federal Census and
1905 New York State Census.

The person does not indicate if they checked each of these sources but
doing that would help to narrow the range of dates. As an older widow it is
very likely the woman was living with a child or other relative as opposed
to being alone. Finding her might take some work to identify who she lived
with.

It is not clear >from the message if the woman died in 1909 or lived on in
New York. Of course the 1910 Census would becoming up but also you might
go to her death, get the death certificate and try to work backwards >from
there. The death certificate in New York would show where she lived and
depending on the date may or may not have the name of a next of kin or
informant.

Another example of the importance of narrowing the range in your searches
through using basic tools like the census. Just this week someone asked me
to do a search for a marriage between 1939 and 1942 and in my rush I did
not notice or stop to think the range spanned 1940 and the census in the
date range of the marriage. If I had checked the 1940 census I would have
found the married couple and immediately cut in half the date range to do the
search.

In the case of this question the early immigration records are among the
more difficult to work with. But if it is truly 1888 then it might pre-date
Ellis Island which did not open till 1892 and closed again after a major
fire. So you might not be looking at Ellis Island but instead Castle
Garden/the Barge office. Castle Garden has a separate web site. Also Ancestry
has a fairly broad source of passenger lists (remember Ancestry can be
accessed for free at many many libraries in the USA so you do not have to pay
for a subscription).

Depending on where the person is >from you might also try the European
departure lists. Both the Hamburg and Holland America Rotterdam lists survive.
Hamburg is indexed and since this particular person was coking >from
Northern Europe Hamburg is a reasonable option.

Allan Jordan


Re: Any history buffs?? #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dear Trudy:
Wikipedia.org is a great place to start. Almost every article about a
place (Bavaria, Prussia, a city, town, village, whatever) will include a
historical section that describes what belonged to whom and when.

Prussia and Bavaria were separate kingdoms. In 1871 the German Empire
came into existence; both regions became part of the new nation-state.

Bavaria is still a "Land" (what we'd call a state or province) within
Germany. Prussia was always divided up into provinces; after WW II it
ceased to exist as a whole. Today the eastern part of Prussia has
become the western part of Poland, and the rest is divided up among many
of the remaining states of Germany: all of Brandenburg and Berlin, parts
of most of the rest. Bavaria and Prussia are generally thought of as
cultural opposites in terms of religion, lifestyle, etc.

How to find a small town/city? Well, you could tell us its name, for
one thing. You're probably not the only one with people >from there, and
the Family Finder will tell you if you are.

Otherwise, back to Wikipedia; if you can handle (or look up) a few words
of German, http://verwaltungsgeschichte.de/ortsbuch39.html will give you
an alphabetical list of places great and small, that then takes you to
county pages based on the way things were around 1900.

Finally, look at the community histories index at
http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/communities.htm . There's probably a
book or chapter about your town somewhere.

Let us know what you find!

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ (currently Paris)
Research co-ordinator, GerSIG

On 7/15/2012 6:40 PM, Trudy Barch wrote:
My current research has taken me to 1910 and prior to Bavaria. I have been
on the internet today and found the Kingdom of Bavaria (1806-1918).
I think in Prussia. Then it became the State of Bavaria in Germany.

How do I find a small town/city that my ancestors lived? ...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Any history buffs?? #general

Roger Lustig
 

Dear Trudy:
Wikipedia.org is a great place to start. Almost every article about a
place (Bavaria, Prussia, a city, town, village, whatever) will include a
historical section that describes what belonged to whom and when.

Prussia and Bavaria were separate kingdoms. In 1871 the German Empire
came into existence; both regions became part of the new nation-state.

Bavaria is still a "Land" (what we'd call a state or province) within
Germany. Prussia was always divided up into provinces; after WW II it
ceased to exist as a whole. Today the eastern part of Prussia has
become the western part of Poland, and the rest is divided up among many
of the remaining states of Germany: all of Brandenburg and Berlin, parts
of most of the rest. Bavaria and Prussia are generally thought of as
cultural opposites in terms of religion, lifestyle, etc.

How to find a small town/city? Well, you could tell us its name, for
one thing. You're probably not the only one with people >from there, and
the Family Finder will tell you if you are.

Otherwise, back to Wikipedia; if you can handle (or look up) a few words
of German, http://verwaltungsgeschichte.de/ortsbuch39.html will give you
an alphabetical list of places great and small, that then takes you to
county pages based on the way things were around 1900.

Finally, look at the community histories index at
http://www.jewishgen.org/GerSIG/communities.htm . There's probably a
book or chapter about your town somewhere.

Let us know what you find!

Roger Lustig
Princeton, NJ (currently Paris)
Research co-ordinator, GerSIG

On 7/15/2012 6:40 PM, Trudy Barch wrote:
My current research has taken me to 1910 and prior to Bavaria. I have been
on the internet today and found the Kingdom of Bavaria (1806-1918).
I think in Prussia. Then it became the State of Bavaria in Germany.

How do I find a small town/city that my ancestors lived? ...


Novopoltavka/Novo-Poltavka Photos #ukraine

Marilyn Robinson
 

On the Russian language forum, Jewish Roots, at http://www.forum.j-roots.info/viewtopic.php?f=105&t=3157&start=40 (or http://tinyurl.com/84b597l), "Shariat" posted(as attachments) three shots of 18 photos that are hung in the village hall. You may have to join the forum in order to view the photos.

Use an online translator such as Bing translator
(http://www.microsofttranslator.com/) if needed.
Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Novopoltavka/Novo-Poltavka Photos #ukraine

Marilyn Robinson
 

On the Russian language forum, Jewish Roots, at http://www.forum.j-roots.info/viewtopic.php?f=105&t=3157&start=40 (or http://tinyurl.com/84b597l), "Shariat" posted(as attachments) three shots of 18 photos that are hung in the village hall. You may have to join the forum in order to view the photos.

Use an online translator such as Bing translator
(http://www.microsofttranslator.com/) if needed.
Marilyn Robinson
Florida


News from Marlow Rd cem (East Ham US) #unitedkingdom

Raymond Montanjees
 

Dear membership,

I was told by one of the groundsman at Marlow Rd (EH) cemetery today that
there had been a mini tornado in the area that blew across the cemetery,
way back in January.

It cut a diagonal path across the grounds, causing some damage to several
stones. Some have completely blown down, whilst some others are lose -
thus a bit dangerous. I don't know the extent of damage .

The area affected is (roughly) in a straight line, >from the south west
corner (Row N) to near enough the north east corner (Rows Z,W,Y,V and X) These
plots are to the left of the prayer hall.

If you have internments in the above mentioned area, it may be worth you
contacting the USBS if you are at all concerned. They should have a list of
the exact plots.

Whilst on the subject - after all the recent bad weather - you may well be
advised to check on all your family stones, in all cemeteries.

Last week, a researcher at EH broke a toe and cut her leg after the ground
(near to a stone - it wasn't even a burrow) - collapsed ! The grounds are
very soft and quite dangerous. Hole filling and shoring up is gradually
being carried out by the US.

I have to tell you that the US won't take responsibility for personal
injuries - so please be very careful. Don't rely on any upright stones for
support as you trek through. Many are wobbly.

Regards,

Raymond Montanjees

Researching :

LEVY > < ISAACS > < JESSEL - maternal

MONTANHES, MONTAN(N)ES, MONTANEZ, MONTANJIES - MONTANJEES > < VAN PRAAG(H)

< KURTZ > < PIZER > < TOF(F)LER - TAF(F)LER - paternal


JCR-UK SIG #UnitedKingdom News from Marlow Rd cem (East Ham US) #unitedkingdom

Raymond Montanjees
 

Dear membership,

I was told by one of the groundsman at Marlow Rd (EH) cemetery today that
there had been a mini tornado in the area that blew across the cemetery,
way back in January.

It cut a diagonal path across the grounds, causing some damage to several
stones. Some have completely blown down, whilst some others are lose -
thus a bit dangerous. I don't know the extent of damage .

The area affected is (roughly) in a straight line, >from the south west
corner (Row N) to near enough the north east corner (Rows Z,W,Y,V and X) These
plots are to the left of the prayer hall.

If you have internments in the above mentioned area, it may be worth you
contacting the USBS if you are at all concerned. They should have a list of
the exact plots.

Whilst on the subject - after all the recent bad weather - you may well be
advised to check on all your family stones, in all cemeteries.

Last week, a researcher at EH broke a toe and cut her leg after the ground
(near to a stone - it wasn't even a burrow) - collapsed ! The grounds are
very soft and quite dangerous. Hole filling and shoring up is gradually
being carried out by the US.

I have to tell you that the US won't take responsibility for personal
injuries - so please be very careful. Don't rely on any upright stones for
support as you trek through. Many are wobbly.

Regards,

Raymond Montanjees

Researching :

LEVY > < ISAACS > < JESSEL - maternal

MONTANHES, MONTAN(N)ES, MONTANEZ, MONTANJIES - MONTANJEES > < VAN PRAAG(H)

< KURTZ > < PIZER > < TOF(F)LER - TAF(F)LER - paternal


Paris 2012 Report - 4: End of Sunday Update #germany

Jeanette R Rosenberg OBE
 

Hi GerSiggers

Phew, it's been a long day today (Sunday), I'm writing this at almost 1 am
on Monday!

The Sig fair came, and went, and along with them Janet's DNA talk, and
Bozena's first talk. Both clashed with a talk by Serge Klarsfeld,
which naturally drew the largest audience.

The day ended with the Official Welcome, and a speech >from Dr. David
Marwell, Director of the Museum of Jewish Heritage in NY and then a
reception for all conference attendees.

Tomorrow, (or is that today!) is GerSIG day. The morning will start
at 9am for the keenest GerSiggers, with some Alsace-Lorraine
genealogy, a talk by Pierre-Andre Meyer on his research, and then
another by Georges Weill on the 18th century oirigins of Alsacian
Jews. After that will be Ralph Bloch's session on learning from
tombstones in Bavarian Swabia. These talks are followed by 3
simultaneous sessions of GerSig interest:

A session >from Gil Huettenmeister on Hebrew funeral inscriptions, One
from Fritz Neubauer on sources for thre Lodz Ghetto and a talk by Guy
Worms on the WORMS family of Alsace.

So far we've just reached lunchtime, when we will have the German SIG
luncheon, where GerSIG Director, Roger Lustig will interview our Guest
Speaker Bozena Kubit about the exhibition she worked on about the Jews
of Gleiwitz.

After lunch we will have our German SIG meeting. The German SIG
agenda is as follows:

Website Update >from Arthur Obermayer
Obermayer German Jewish History Awards Update also >from Mr. Obermayer
Mailing List & Moderation Update b>from John Lowens.
Projects Update & Discussion by Roger Lustig
Other Projects >from Nancy Adelson
Frankfurt DNA Project Update - Janet Billstein Akaha
Stammbaum2 - Jeanette Rosenberg
GerSIG UK also by Jeanette Rosenberg
GerSIG plans for future IAJGS conferences & Speaker Bureau Fundraising
(2013 in Boston, 2014 in SLC, Utah, & 2015 in Israel) again by Jeanette.
Prohibitive Access Changes at Deutsche National Bibliothek - Fritz Neubauer

Next up will be two sessions about Bohemian Jewry, which may also be
of interest to some GerSIGGERs.

The day will end with teh JewishGen 2012 presentation - also known as
What's new and coming up with JewishGen.

More tomorrow, when I will have a bit more time! Jeanette


German SIG #Germany Paris 2012 Report - 4: End of Sunday Update #germany

Jeanette R Rosenberg OBE
 

Hi GerSiggers

Phew, it's been a long day today (Sunday), I'm writing this at almost 1 am
on Monday!

The Sig fair came, and went, and along with them Janet's DNA talk, and
Bozena's first talk. Both clashed with a talk by Serge Klarsfeld,
which naturally drew the largest audience.

The day ended with the Official Welcome, and a speech >from Dr. David
Marwell, Director of the Museum of Jewish Heritage in NY and then a
reception for all conference attendees.

Tomorrow, (or is that today!) is GerSIG day. The morning will start
at 9am for the keenest GerSiggers, with some Alsace-Lorraine
genealogy, a talk by Pierre-Andre Meyer on his research, and then
another by Georges Weill on the 18th century oirigins of Alsacian
Jews. After that will be Ralph Bloch's session on learning from
tombstones in Bavarian Swabia. These talks are followed by 3
simultaneous sessions of GerSig interest:

A session >from Gil Huettenmeister on Hebrew funeral inscriptions, One
from Fritz Neubauer on sources for thre Lodz Ghetto and a talk by Guy
Worms on the WORMS family of Alsace.

So far we've just reached lunchtime, when we will have the German SIG
luncheon, where GerSIG Director, Roger Lustig will interview our Guest
Speaker Bozena Kubit about the exhibition she worked on about the Jews
of Gleiwitz.

After lunch we will have our German SIG meeting. The German SIG
agenda is as follows:

Website Update >from Arthur Obermayer
Obermayer German Jewish History Awards Update also >from Mr. Obermayer
Mailing List & Moderation Update b>from John Lowens.
Projects Update & Discussion by Roger Lustig
Other Projects >from Nancy Adelson
Frankfurt DNA Project Update - Janet Billstein Akaha
Stammbaum2 - Jeanette Rosenberg
GerSIG UK also by Jeanette Rosenberg
GerSIG plans for future IAJGS conferences & Speaker Bureau Fundraising
(2013 in Boston, 2014 in SLC, Utah, & 2015 in Israel) again by Jeanette.
Prohibitive Access Changes at Deutsche National Bibliothek - Fritz Neubauer

Next up will be two sessions about Bohemian Jewry, which may also be
of interest to some GerSIGGERs.

The day will end with teh JewishGen 2012 presentation - also known as
What's new and coming up with JewishGen.

More tomorrow, when I will have a bit more time! Jeanette


Paris 2012 Report -3: Update from the SIG & BOF Fair #germany

Jeanette R Rosenberg OBE
 

Dear GerSIGGERS

Roger Lustig and I are sitting here at the GerSIG table in the SIG and
BOF (Birds of a Feather) Fair. So far we have not had too many
visitors, but the bowl of candy on the table means that we have a
steady stream of callers!

We're giving GerSIG stickers out to people who have relatives from
Germany, and that helps "our people" to spot each other around the
conference.

On our table we've got flyers for GerSig - to encourage traffic to our
website, and flyers for Stammbaum2 - we're still seeking articles
leading towards our first re-launched edition. we've also got a copy
of the agenda for the GerSIG business meeting which takes place tomorrow.

I promised a description of the conference bag, a slim-line white zip
up attache case with the conference locgo on the side, which is just
about big enough to hold a notebook computer, containing a myriad of
maps, guides to Paris, shopping guides, literature >from genealogy
vendors and service providers, and most importantly, the up to date
program, congress center floorplan and the conference family finder.
The other vital ingredient in the conference bag is a stick drive
containing all the conference information.

More later time to get ready for the first two GerSIG talks.

Jeanette Rosenberg GerSig Director, now in Paris, France


German SIG #Germany Paris 2012 Report -3: Update from the SIG & BOF Fair #germany

Jeanette R Rosenberg OBE
 

Dear GerSIGGERS

Roger Lustig and I are sitting here at the GerSIG table in the SIG and
BOF (Birds of a Feather) Fair. So far we have not had too many
visitors, but the bowl of candy on the table means that we have a
steady stream of callers!

We're giving GerSIG stickers out to people who have relatives from
Germany, and that helps "our people" to spot each other around the
conference.

On our table we've got flyers for GerSig - to encourage traffic to our
website, and flyers for Stammbaum2 - we're still seeking articles
leading towards our first re-launched edition. we've also got a copy
of the agenda for the GerSIG business meeting which takes place tomorrow.

I promised a description of the conference bag, a slim-line white zip
up attache case with the conference locgo on the side, which is just
about big enough to hold a notebook computer, containing a myriad of
maps, guides to Paris, shopping guides, literature >from genealogy
vendors and service providers, and most importantly, the up to date
program, congress center floorplan and the conference family finder.
The other vital ingredient in the conference bag is a stick drive
containing all the conference information.

More later time to get ready for the first two GerSIG talks.

Jeanette Rosenberg GerSig Director, now in Paris, France


After Registration & Before Bedtime #germany

Jeanette R Rosenberg OBE
 

Dear GerSiggers

So registration has taken place and we think there are about 40 or so
GerSiggers here at conference this year, some have arrived already,
but others are not going to get here until tomorrow Some people have
been to conferences before and for others it is a whole new
experience. Either way, I hope that my messages >from conference will
allow readers of our GerSig list who haven't been able to join the
experience in person here in Paris to share in our proceedings.

This afternoon and evening registration took place, and we all started
the process of comparing names in the conference family finder - which
allows me a timely reminder to you as a reader of GerSIG postings, to
enter your ancestral names in the JewishGen Family Finder, and also to
sign off your messages to our discussion list with a few names that
you are researching. Remember the names are in CAPITAL letters, and
the places have an initial capital. For those of us >from outside the
USA, please help us with geography and spell out your US State in
full, we're not (well, I'm not) too good at the abbreviations!
Conference is pretty much the only time in the year where you are
encouraged to stare at other people's chests, because you are reading
the lists of names researched on their badges, and where chatting in
the lift (elevator) is positively encouraged, even if you don't know
the other people. If thereis someone wearing a badge, talking to them
is a must!

Today was Bastille Day in France, and this morning the annual parade
was on TV, and the day ended with a massive fireworks display in the
area around the Eiffel Tower. The theme this year was disco, and the
Tower has a very large mirror ball suspended at the base, as part of
the celebrations. We had a good view of the display, on TV and live
from the hotel bar. Perhaps not authentic, but it allowed the GerSIG
and UK Sig people we were with to get to know each other, in advance
of the start of conference sessions tomorrow.

Sunday's conference sessions of GerSIG interest are:

Round table - Jewish Genealogy in Europe
The SIG & BOF Fair, where we will have a GerSIG table
The Jews of Frankfurt DNA Project talk by Janet Billstein Akaha
And of course the first of the two talks by our invited GerSIG Guest
speaker - Bozena Kubit, who will be speaking about Documenting Missing
Jewish Heritage in Upper Silesia.

It's getting late now, so time to go to sleep.

More tomorrow >from Paris, and of course that promised description of
the conference information pack

Jeanette
Jeanette Rosenberg GerSig Director, now in Paris, France, but usually
in London UK. @JeanetteRRosenbergOBE


German SIG #Germany After Registration & Before Bedtime #germany

Jeanette R Rosenberg OBE
 

Dear GerSiggers

So registration has taken place and we think there are about 40 or so
GerSiggers here at conference this year, some have arrived already,
but others are not going to get here until tomorrow Some people have
been to conferences before and for others it is a whole new
experience. Either way, I hope that my messages >from conference will
allow readers of our GerSig list who haven't been able to join the
experience in person here in Paris to share in our proceedings.

This afternoon and evening registration took place, and we all started
the process of comparing names in the conference family finder - which
allows me a timely reminder to you as a reader of GerSIG postings, to
enter your ancestral names in the JewishGen Family Finder, and also to
sign off your messages to our discussion list with a few names that
you are researching. Remember the names are in CAPITAL letters, and
the places have an initial capital. For those of us >from outside the
USA, please help us with geography and spell out your US State in
full, we're not (well, I'm not) too good at the abbreviations!
Conference is pretty much the only time in the year where you are
encouraged to stare at other people's chests, because you are reading
the lists of names researched on their badges, and where chatting in
the lift (elevator) is positively encouraged, even if you don't know
the other people. If thereis someone wearing a badge, talking to them
is a must!

Today was Bastille Day in France, and this morning the annual parade
was on TV, and the day ended with a massive fireworks display in the
area around the Eiffel Tower. The theme this year was disco, and the
Tower has a very large mirror ball suspended at the base, as part of
the celebrations. We had a good view of the display, on TV and live
from the hotel bar. Perhaps not authentic, but it allowed the GerSIG
and UK Sig people we were with to get to know each other, in advance
of the start of conference sessions tomorrow.

Sunday's conference sessions of GerSIG interest are:

Round table - Jewish Genealogy in Europe
The SIG & BOF Fair, where we will have a GerSIG table
The Jews of Frankfurt DNA Project talk by Janet Billstein Akaha
And of course the first of the two talks by our invited GerSIG Guest
speaker - Bozena Kubit, who will be speaking about Documenting Missing
Jewish Heritage in Upper Silesia.

It's getting late now, so time to go to sleep.

More tomorrow >from Paris, and of course that promised description of
the conference information pack

Jeanette
Jeanette Rosenberg GerSig Director, now in Paris, France, but usually
in London UK. @JeanetteRRosenbergOBE


Advice on Records Request from Ukraine #general

Steven Greenstein
 

Dear fellow Geners,

I am seeking advice on how to contact the Ukrainian government to request
assistance in locating family records. I know the towns in Podolia where my
family was born and lived (Proskurov, Derazhnya and Galuzintsy), their local
(Yiddish) names, birth dates and year of immigration to the US.

My understanding is that records for towns in the Letichev district of
Podolia including Derazhnya and Galuzintsy were located at the
Kamenets-Podolskiy City-State archive, but due to a fire in 2003, what
remained was transferred to the State Archives of Khmelnitsky Oblast where
the Proskurov records are also located.

I intend to write to the Khmelnitsky State Archives office and wanted some
advice on how/what to ask for. I am under the impression that the State
Archives houses Revision Lists and Vital records of people but I don't know
what else may be there.

I would welcome advice on what to ask for, but also how to do so, given
differences in cultures and communication style. I have been informed that
my initial correspondence should outline my request and inquire about the
cost and requirements for the search. I have a Ukrainian-American friend who
offered to translate my correspondence into Ukrainian if it would help. I
would appreciate your thoughts on this as well.

Many thanks.

Steven Greenstein

Researching: Grinstein/Grinshteyn; Derazhnya, Galuzintsy (Podolia/Ukraine),
Villar; Proskurov (Podolia/Ukraine), Segal; Zalozce (Brody/Galicia),
Pollack; Kuzmin Volhynia/Ukraine), Don; Zasliai (Vilna/Lithuania)


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Advice on Records Request from Ukraine #general

Steven Greenstein
 

Dear fellow Geners,

I am seeking advice on how to contact the Ukrainian government to request
assistance in locating family records. I know the towns in Podolia where my
family was born and lived (Proskurov, Derazhnya and Galuzintsy), their local
(Yiddish) names, birth dates and year of immigration to the US.

My understanding is that records for towns in the Letichev district of
Podolia including Derazhnya and Galuzintsy were located at the
Kamenets-Podolskiy City-State archive, but due to a fire in 2003, what
remained was transferred to the State Archives of Khmelnitsky Oblast where
the Proskurov records are also located.

I intend to write to the Khmelnitsky State Archives office and wanted some
advice on how/what to ask for. I am under the impression that the State
Archives houses Revision Lists and Vital records of people but I don't know
what else may be there.

I would welcome advice on what to ask for, but also how to do so, given
differences in cultures and communication style. I have been informed that
my initial correspondence should outline my request and inquire about the
cost and requirements for the search. I have a Ukrainian-American friend who
offered to translate my correspondence into Ukrainian if it would help. I
would appreciate your thoughts on this as well.

Many thanks.

Steven Greenstein

Researching: Grinstein/Grinshteyn; Derazhnya, Galuzintsy (Podolia/Ukraine),
Villar; Proskurov (Podolia/Ukraine), Segal; Zalozce (Brody/Galicia),
Pollack; Kuzmin Volhynia/Ukraine), Don; Zasliai (Vilna/Lithuania)