Date   

A thank you to Jewish Gen #general

Ian and Bea Bowie <ibbowie@...>
 

Alexander Sharon has suggested that I might post a copy of something I wrote
by way of thanks to JG and others. So, here goes

By way of explanation I should say that I and husband Ian are essentially
'anglophone' and that I have no significant current connections with the
Jewish 'establishment' in Australia. Even as our genealogical researches
took us beyond my mother's work on her Anglo-Jewish forebears, we discovered
quickly the problems for us in dealing with names and dates in Hebrew
script. Once we started trying to explore my eastern European Jewish
ancestries beyond what was stated in my maternal grandmother's Australian
death registration and in her children's Australian marriage registrations,
we really hit problems - of finding records as well as of dealing with the
challenges of multiple transliterations into latinate script and
anglo-sounding names.

So, I want to tell the world how remarkable I have found the facilities on
JewishGen to be and how wonderful often anonymous helpers around the world
have been. I could talk at length about ViewMate and its potential, with the
help of volunteers given freely, to turn photographs into real records and
Hebrew scripts into anglicised information seemingly unknown previously to
generations. ViewMate really is the most extraordinarily powerful research
tool for family historians and I hope that the now thousands of images on it
may become a treasure trove for future Jewish genealogists. Thank you to
those who created it and who have extended it, and to those who watch for
material on it.

In my note to Alexander I wanted to thank particularly a number of other
people who have enabled us to qualify the information in century-old
Australian certificates, and to extend our knowledge of these forebears
several generations back beyond what I'd have thought possible, once we got
our minds around that the fact that we might be searching for names rather
different to the ways in which they have been spelt in Australia. For
example, Sarah who was really Ziporah has her name in official records as
something like Cypru. It was a big step for us to understand this before we
could use Jewish Records Indexing effectively, especially in our dealings
with Polish State Archives.

We are particularly indebted to Yale Reisner of the Jewish Historical
Institute in Warszawa who spent time with Ian and me, showing us that there
was material in Jewish Records Indexing (Poland) that we could use and for
encouraging us to tackle it on our own. The first step in a long journey can
be the biggest because, after some fruitless early contacts with Polish
State Archives, we became brave enough to explore JRI data more closely and
then to tackle the Archives with more specific enquiries. [Making an upfront
transfer that was more than enough to cover our initial queries, and which
avoided multiple transfer fees, probably helped as well]

We then found Polish State Archives in Lodz and Lowicz Polish Records to be
so helpful, without going beyond their remit which (obviously) is to find
records but not to do our research. Again, it helped to have many but not
all archival references >from JRI. It also helped to have access to Google
Translate. Obviously Google Translate isn't a perfect means of translation
(and we're still wondering whether skolnik' might be a latinate rendering of
a yiddish word for scholar or scribe) but it gave us enough understanding
of Polish to comprehend the meaning of letter replies (even though we had to
rekey words >from scanned documents in several cases to produce text to enter
into Google Translate).

Lastly, but certainly not leastly, to David and Emma and Witold and others
for their time and expertise in translating records which weren't always
clearly written, in cursive Polish and Russian with smatterings in Cyrillic
and yiddish scrip, always quickly with grace and generosity. I've thanked
each of them but it's worth my repeating here that ViewMate could only
succeed because of people such as these who are making efforts to volunteer
their help. There's more that could be done, no doubt, but we're more than
happy to have information that takes my polish ancestries two generations
back beyond my great-grandmother and correct information about her and her
husband.

So, Jewishgen, you have a very grateful family at this other end of the earth.

Bea and Ian Bowie

MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen and our active community of genealogists continue to
astound and gratify. We always appreciate thank yous. Another way to appreciate
JewishGen is to donate in support of continued successes:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A thank you to Jewish Gen #general

Ian and Bea Bowie <ibbowie@...>
 

Alexander Sharon has suggested that I might post a copy of something I wrote
by way of thanks to JG and others. So, here goes

By way of explanation I should say that I and husband Ian are essentially
'anglophone' and that I have no significant current connections with the
Jewish 'establishment' in Australia. Even as our genealogical researches
took us beyond my mother's work on her Anglo-Jewish forebears, we discovered
quickly the problems for us in dealing with names and dates in Hebrew
script. Once we started trying to explore my eastern European Jewish
ancestries beyond what was stated in my maternal grandmother's Australian
death registration and in her children's Australian marriage registrations,
we really hit problems - of finding records as well as of dealing with the
challenges of multiple transliterations into latinate script and
anglo-sounding names.

So, I want to tell the world how remarkable I have found the facilities on
JewishGen to be and how wonderful often anonymous helpers around the world
have been. I could talk at length about ViewMate and its potential, with the
help of volunteers given freely, to turn photographs into real records and
Hebrew scripts into anglicised information seemingly unknown previously to
generations. ViewMate really is the most extraordinarily powerful research
tool for family historians and I hope that the now thousands of images on it
may become a treasure trove for future Jewish genealogists. Thank you to
those who created it and who have extended it, and to those who watch for
material on it.

In my note to Alexander I wanted to thank particularly a number of other
people who have enabled us to qualify the information in century-old
Australian certificates, and to extend our knowledge of these forebears
several generations back beyond what I'd have thought possible, once we got
our minds around that the fact that we might be searching for names rather
different to the ways in which they have been spelt in Australia. For
example, Sarah who was really Ziporah has her name in official records as
something like Cypru. It was a big step for us to understand this before we
could use Jewish Records Indexing effectively, especially in our dealings
with Polish State Archives.

We are particularly indebted to Yale Reisner of the Jewish Historical
Institute in Warszawa who spent time with Ian and me, showing us that there
was material in Jewish Records Indexing (Poland) that we could use and for
encouraging us to tackle it on our own. The first step in a long journey can
be the biggest because, after some fruitless early contacts with Polish
State Archives, we became brave enough to explore JRI data more closely and
then to tackle the Archives with more specific enquiries. [Making an upfront
transfer that was more than enough to cover our initial queries, and which
avoided multiple transfer fees, probably helped as well]

We then found Polish State Archives in Lodz and Lowicz Polish Records to be
so helpful, without going beyond their remit which (obviously) is to find
records but not to do our research. Again, it helped to have many but not
all archival references >from JRI. It also helped to have access to Google
Translate. Obviously Google Translate isn't a perfect means of translation
(and we're still wondering whether skolnik' might be a latinate rendering of
a yiddish word for scholar or scribe) but it gave us enough understanding
of Polish to comprehend the meaning of letter replies (even though we had to
rekey words >from scanned documents in several cases to produce text to enter
into Google Translate).

Lastly, but certainly not leastly, to David and Emma and Witold and others
for their time and expertise in translating records which weren't always
clearly written, in cursive Polish and Russian with smatterings in Cyrillic
and yiddish scrip, always quickly with grace and generosity. I've thanked
each of them but it's worth my repeating here that ViewMate could only
succeed because of people such as these who are making efforts to volunteer
their help. There's more that could be done, no doubt, but we're more than
happy to have information that takes my polish ancestries two generations
back beyond my great-grandmother and correct information about her and her
husband.

So, Jewishgen, you have a very grateful family at this other end of the earth.

Bea and Ian Bowie

MODERATOR NOTE: JewishGen and our active community of genealogists continue to
astound and gratify. We always appreciate thank yous. Another way to appreciate
JewishGen is to donate in support of continued successes:
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen-erosity/


Latvia, Lithuania, Memel 19th century photos - on ViewMate #general

Ian and Bea Bowie <ibbowie@...>
 

I wonder whether anyone in the JewishGen Discussion Group knows enough about
photographer Julius Gessau - or other 19th century commercial
photographers - to help solve a problem I have with a photograph I have
posted on ViewMate (23526 and 23527).
[MOD NOTE: http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=23526
and http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=23527 ]

The photo in question was taken by Julius Gessau of Goldingen (Kuldiga)
Latvia (commercial details are on the rear). It is of my great grandmother
Perel YUDELSON (maiden name unknown, though KIRSNER, the name taken by two
of her sons, has been suggested) and her two daughters Sarah (married later
as HURWITZ) and Yetta (married later as URDANG) in the mid 1880s.

The YUDELSON family lived in Lithuania (a birth record and family lore
confirm this) and I think was probably the family of Markus Yudelson shown
in Lithuanian taxpayers' lists in 1877, 1881, 1892 but neither later (which
corresponds with a report that Markus had died by 1896) or in 1883. Is it
possible that the family was in Latvia or Memel in 1883?

To put that question in another way - would Julius Gessau have travelled
across borders to NW Lithuania and/or Memelland in the course of his
photography? If he was unlikely to have travelled across borders then,
maybe, I have the possibility that the Yudelsons crossed borders, perhaps
because of pogroms or related in some way to the fact that son Jacob Kirsner
(Yankel Yudelson, I believe) and two children Martha and Elias Kirsner were
in Memel about the time of the death of Jacob's first wife about 1885).

Thoughts would be appreciated

Bea Bowie (NSW, Australia)
ibbowie@...


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Latvia, Lithuania, Memel 19th century photos - on ViewMate #general

Ian and Bea Bowie <ibbowie@...>
 

I wonder whether anyone in the JewishGen Discussion Group knows enough about
photographer Julius Gessau - or other 19th century commercial
photographers - to help solve a problem I have with a photograph I have
posted on ViewMate (23526 and 23527).
[MOD NOTE: http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=23526
and http://www.jewishgen.org/ViewMate/viewmateview.asp?key=23527 ]

The photo in question was taken by Julius Gessau of Goldingen (Kuldiga)
Latvia (commercial details are on the rear). It is of my great grandmother
Perel YUDELSON (maiden name unknown, though KIRSNER, the name taken by two
of her sons, has been suggested) and her two daughters Sarah (married later
as HURWITZ) and Yetta (married later as URDANG) in the mid 1880s.

The YUDELSON family lived in Lithuania (a birth record and family lore
confirm this) and I think was probably the family of Markus Yudelson shown
in Lithuanian taxpayers' lists in 1877, 1881, 1892 but neither later (which
corresponds with a report that Markus had died by 1896) or in 1883. Is it
possible that the family was in Latvia or Memel in 1883?

To put that question in another way - would Julius Gessau have travelled
across borders to NW Lithuania and/or Memelland in the course of his
photography? If he was unlikely to have travelled across borders then,
maybe, I have the possibility that the Yudelsons crossed borders, perhaps
because of pogroms or related in some way to the fact that son Jacob Kirsner
(Yankel Yudelson, I believe) and two children Martha and Elias Kirsner were
in Memel about the time of the death of Jacob's first wife about 1885).

Thoughts would be appreciated

Bea Bowie (NSW, Australia)
ibbowie@...


Teachers in NYC 1940s #general

RENEEP8546@...
 

Dear Genners,
Does anyone know hw I can find out information about a High School
teacher in Manhattan in the 1940s.

Thank you,
Renee Payne
Washington, D.C.

searching: JAKOBOWICZ/JACOBOWITZ Sanok to NY
RAUCH. Sanok
WEISZ/WEISS Ungvar to Braddock, Pa


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Teachers in NYC 1940s #general

RENEEP8546@...
 

Dear Genners,
Does anyone know hw I can find out information about a High School
teacher in Manhattan in the 1940s.

Thank you,
Renee Payne
Washington, D.C.

searching: JAKOBOWICZ/JACOBOWITZ Sanok to NY
RAUCH. Sanok
WEISZ/WEISS Ungvar to Braddock, Pa


Political Terror--Shot in Moscow: Individuals from throughout the USSR #general

Marilyn Robinson
 

http://mos.memo.ru/

On this Russian language site are the names of many individuals (about
12,000) born in the USSR and other areas of the world, but who were
residents of the "Old Moscow" at the time they were executed. Both Jews
and non-Jews are included.

On the left side of the page is an alphabetical listing of streets, which
you need to click on to gain access to the individuals' names. Included,
in most cases, is place of birth, DOB, DOD, employment, address, and place
of burial.

Use an online translator such as Bing translator
(http://www.microsofttranslator.com/) if needed.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Political Terror--Shot in Moscow: Individuals from throughout the USSR #general

Marilyn Robinson
 

http://mos.memo.ru/

On this Russian language site are the names of many individuals (about
12,000) born in the USSR and other areas of the world, but who were
residents of the "Old Moscow" at the time they were executed. Both Jews
and non-Jews are included.

On the left side of the page is an alphabetical listing of streets, which
you need to click on to gain access to the individuals' names. Included,
in most cases, is place of birth, DOB, DOD, employment, address, and place
of burial.

Use an online translator such as Bing translator
(http://www.microsofttranslator.com/) if needed.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Searching for documents - Patent Applications #general

e l
 

Jan R. Fine has asked about obtaining and using patent applications in
genealogical research. The Library of Congress has The Annual report of
the Commissioner of Patents for the year ... for the years 1840 onward.
See http://lccn.loc.gov/sf93094336

Many other libraries hold the series. Check www.worldcat.org for a library
near you.

The publication ceased in 1965. The series can be searched at
www.genealogybank.com/
See "Two Useful Newspaper Search Web Sites for Genealogists," Rodziny:
Journal of the Polish Genealogical Society of America, Vol. 34, No. 3,
Summer 2011, pp. 17-20. [CS49.P64]. Reprinted in Gen Dobry!, November 2011
issue, pp. 7-12, at
<http://www.polishroots.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=9FXcUrw4QQA%3d&tabid=60&mid=377>.
[MOD. NOTE: or shortened URL - http://goo.gl/6qjGc ]

European countries also publish their patent reports in the local language.

The original patent term under the 1790 Patent Act was decided individually
for each patent, but "not exceeding fourteen years." The 1836 Patent Act
(5 Stat. 117, 119, 5) provided (in addition to the fourteen year term) an
extension "for the term of seven years >from and after the expiration of the
first term" in certain circumstances. In 1861 the seven year extension was
eliminated and the term changed to seventeen years (12 Stat. 246, 249, 16).

The signing of the 1994 Uruguay Round Agreements Act then changed the
patent term >from seventeen years >from the date of issue to the current
twenty years >from the earliest filing date.

Patent applications contain very little basic genealogical information but
often reveal related persons and sometimes reveal related patents which
might reveal associates. They also reveal areas of interest to the person
researched.

Edward David Luft
Washington, DC
http://www.GetCited.org/mbrx/PT/99/MBR/11078005

Jan Fine <janrandyfine@...> wrote:
Can anyone shed light on patent applications - specifically, are there
searchable records, how far back do these records go, and how long is the
period under which a patent is protected? Does it make sense to anyone else
that a patent application might actually be beneficial to someone doing
family genealogy?


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching for documents - Patent Applications #general

e l
 

Jan R. Fine has asked about obtaining and using patent applications in
genealogical research. The Library of Congress has The Annual report of
the Commissioner of Patents for the year ... for the years 1840 onward.
See http://lccn.loc.gov/sf93094336

Many other libraries hold the series. Check www.worldcat.org for a library
near you.

The publication ceased in 1965. The series can be searched at
www.genealogybank.com/
See "Two Useful Newspaper Search Web Sites for Genealogists," Rodziny:
Journal of the Polish Genealogical Society of America, Vol. 34, No. 3,
Summer 2011, pp. 17-20. [CS49.P64]. Reprinted in Gen Dobry!, November 2011
issue, pp. 7-12, at
<http://www.polishroots.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=9FXcUrw4QQA%3d&tabid=60&mid=377>.
[MOD. NOTE: or shortened URL - http://goo.gl/6qjGc ]

European countries also publish their patent reports in the local language.

The original patent term under the 1790 Patent Act was decided individually
for each patent, but "not exceeding fourteen years." The 1836 Patent Act
(5 Stat. 117, 119, 5) provided (in addition to the fourteen year term) an
extension "for the term of seven years >from and after the expiration of the
first term" in certain circumstances. In 1861 the seven year extension was
eliminated and the term changed to seventeen years (12 Stat. 246, 249, 16).

The signing of the 1994 Uruguay Round Agreements Act then changed the
patent term >from seventeen years >from the date of issue to the current
twenty years >from the earliest filing date.

Patent applications contain very little basic genealogical information but
often reveal related persons and sometimes reveal related patents which
might reveal associates. They also reveal areas of interest to the person
researched.

Edward David Luft
Washington, DC
http://www.GetCited.org/mbrx/PT/99/MBR/11078005

Jan Fine <janrandyfine@...> wrote:
Can anyone shed light on patent applications - specifically, are there
searchable records, how far back do these records go, and how long is the
period under which a patent is protected? Does it make sense to anyone else
that a patent application might actually be beneficial to someone doing
family genealogy?


Marcel Rosenfeld died on the Struma - Brick Wall Help #romania

Joel Ives
 

Lisa;

I maintain a database of the victims of the Struma tragedy since I had
relatives aboard the ship, namely, Itic and Sophia IANCU or JANCU. I have
no information about Marcel ROSENFELD except that he was 15 years old at the
time of his death and the was no one else aboard the Struma with this
surname. I have a hunch that his parents were not poor since the tickets
were relatively expensive. I guess there is a story as to why a 15 year old
was traveling without his parents or siblings, if he had any!

There is no database of Struma victims I'm aware of that lists cities where
individuals came from. I would suggest you get a copy of the book, "Death on
the Black Seas" by Douglas Frantz and Catherine Collins. This gives the
best account of the story of the Struma and has a complete listing of those
who died. There are other books; some written in Romanian, Hebrew and some
in English and many articles where you might get lucky and find additional
information about Marcel.

There was also an HBO documentary by Simcha Jacobovici but this could prove
to very difficult to get a copy of. I am mentioned in the credits of the
book and the HBO documentary since I supplied my research notes. Good luck
in your search, I've added you to my database.

Joel Ives
Fair Lawn, New jersey

...She also filled one out for Marcel Rosenfeld, listing him as a cousin as
well.
Marcel Rosenfeld died on the Struma.

I've considered perhaps finding a biography of the Struma victims that
might be
able to tell me where Marcel Rosenfeld was from.

Thanks,
Lisa Cohn
ROSENFELD, LITMAN, COHN - Romania (Botosani, Novoselitsa, Chernovitz)
COHEN, SWOFF - Zagare, Lithuania


Romania SIG #Romania Marcel Rosenfeld died on the Struma - Brick Wall Help #romania

Joel Ives
 

Lisa;

I maintain a database of the victims of the Struma tragedy since I had
relatives aboard the ship, namely, Itic and Sophia IANCU or JANCU. I have
no information about Marcel ROSENFELD except that he was 15 years old at the
time of his death and the was no one else aboard the Struma with this
surname. I have a hunch that his parents were not poor since the tickets
were relatively expensive. I guess there is a story as to why a 15 year old
was traveling without his parents or siblings, if he had any!

There is no database of Struma victims I'm aware of that lists cities where
individuals came from. I would suggest you get a copy of the book, "Death on
the Black Seas" by Douglas Frantz and Catherine Collins. This gives the
best account of the story of the Struma and has a complete listing of those
who died. There are other books; some written in Romanian, Hebrew and some
in English and many articles where you might get lucky and find additional
information about Marcel.

There was also an HBO documentary by Simcha Jacobovici but this could prove
to very difficult to get a copy of. I am mentioned in the credits of the
book and the HBO documentary since I supplied my research notes. Good luck
in your search, I've added you to my database.

Joel Ives
Fair Lawn, New jersey

...She also filled one out for Marcel Rosenfeld, listing him as a cousin as
well.
Marcel Rosenfeld died on the Struma.

I've considered perhaps finding a biography of the Struma victims that
might be
able to tell me where Marcel Rosenfeld was from.

Thanks,
Lisa Cohn
ROSENFELD, LITMAN, COHN - Romania (Botosani, Novoselitsa, Chernovitz)
COHEN, SWOFF - Zagare, Lithuania


Political Terror--Shot in Moscow: Individuals from throughout the USSR #ukraine

Marilyn Robinson
 

http://mos.memo.ru/

On this Russian language site are the names of many individuals (about 12,000) born in the USSR and other areas of the world, but who were residents of the "Old Moscow" at the time they were executed. Both Jews and non-Jews are included. On the left side of the page is an alphabetical listing of streets, which you need to click on to gain access to the individuals' names. Included, in most cases, is place of birth, DOB, DOD, employment, address, and place of burial.

A few names >from the Ukraine include: Kaplan (Kiev), Vul (kamenetz-Podolsk), Akkershteyn (Kherson), Stoklitsky (Kharkov), Edelstein (Odessa), Maori (Zolotonosha), et al.



Use an online translator such as Bing translator
(http://www.microsofttranslator.com/) if needed.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Political Terror--Shot in Moscow: Individuals from throughout the USSR #ukraine

Marilyn Robinson
 

http://mos.memo.ru/

On this Russian language site are the names of many individuals (about 12,000) born in the USSR and other areas of the world, but who were residents of the "Old Moscow" at the time they were executed. Both Jews and non-Jews are included. On the left side of the page is an alphabetical listing of streets, which you need to click on to gain access to the individuals' names. Included, in most cases, is place of birth, DOB, DOD, employment, address, and place of burial.

A few names >from the Ukraine include: Kaplan (Kiev), Vul (kamenetz-Podolsk), Akkershteyn (Kherson), Stoklitsky (Kharkov), Edelstein (Odessa), Maori (Zolotonosha), et al.



Use an online translator such as Bing translator
(http://www.microsofttranslator.com/) if needed.

Marilyn Robinson
Florida


Search Engine of Holdings in the Belarus Archives #belarus

davefox73@...
 

I accidently found a search engine in English that will find what records
are in the the Belarus Archives, not only the National Historical Archives
of Minsk and Grodno, but all the other archives as well.

Go to: <http://archives.gov.by/eng/index.php?id=search>

To get an idea of what is in the archives, do a search on "Jews" and then do
a separate search on your town or shtetl. You may have to try spelling
variations for your town or shtetl because I do not think the database
recognizes "sounds like".

Be sure to click on the individual search results to see the details along
with the fond, etc.

If you find something exciting, please share it on this discussion group.

Dave
David Fox
Belarus SIG Founder & Past Coordinator
davefox73@...
Arnold, Maryland, USA
http://www.davefox73.com


Belarus SIG #Belarus Search Engine of Holdings in the Belarus Archives #belarus

davefox73@...
 

I accidently found a search engine in English that will find what records
are in the the Belarus Archives, not only the National Historical Archives
of Minsk and Grodno, but all the other archives as well.

Go to: <http://archives.gov.by/eng/index.php?id=search>

To get an idea of what is in the archives, do a search on "Jews" and then do
a separate search on your town or shtetl. You may have to try spelling
variations for your town or shtetl because I do not think the database
recognizes "sounds like".

Be sure to click on the individual search results to see the details along
with the fond, etc.

If you find something exciting, please share it on this discussion group.

Dave
David Fox
Belarus SIG Founder & Past Coordinator
davefox73@...
Arnold, Maryland, USA
http://www.davefox73.com


New functionalities on the Odessa KehilaLinks #ukraine

Ariel Parkansky
 

Hi everybody,

I've added some new functionalities to the Odessa KehilaLinks:

1) A virtual tour (on the Gallery section) powered by Google StreetView allows you to walk through the city and  to visit several of its main attractions.
2) I've added a multi-language virtual keyboard and soundex search capability to the Odessa Books Database.

Enjoy,
Ariel Parkansky


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine New functionalities on the Odessa KehilaLinks #ukraine

Ariel Parkansky
 

Hi everybody,

I've added some new functionalities to the Odessa KehilaLinks:

1) A virtual tour (on the Gallery section) powered by Google StreetView allows you to walk through the city and  to visit several of its main attractions.
2) I've added a multi-language virtual keyboard and soundex search capability to the Odessa Books Database.

Enjoy,
Ariel Parkansky


Re: Glossary of Old Medical Terms #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Joyaa Antares wrote on 14 jul 2012 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

In trying to decipher a copy of an old English death certificate I
received the other day, I came across this very helpful site,
http://www.thornber.net/medicine/html/medgloss.html

I eventually decided my certificate said "Inanition" and "Asthenia".
"Inanition" was a new term to me. I hope you find this site helpful.
The exhausted condition that results >from lack of food and water

<http://www.merriam-webster.com/medical/inanition>

<http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/inanition>

<http://www.memidex.com/inanition>

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Visit: <http://www.synagoge-enschede.nl/>


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Glossary of Old Medical Terms #general

Evertjan. <exxjxw.hannivoort@...>
 

Joyaa Antares wrote on 14 jul 2012 in soc.genealogy.jewish:

In trying to decipher a copy of an old English death certificate I
received the other day, I came across this very helpful site,
http://www.thornber.net/medicine/html/medgloss.html

I eventually decided my certificate said "Inanition" and "Asthenia".
"Inanition" was a new term to me. I hope you find this site helpful.
The exhausted condition that results >from lack of food and water

<http://www.merriam-webster.com/medical/inanition>

<http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/inanition>

<http://www.memidex.com/inanition>

Evertjan Hannivoort.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Visit: <http://www.synagoge-enschede.nl/>