Date   

Gesher Galicia launches The Map Room! A vitual portal to a world of cadastral maps #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the launch of the Gesher Galicia Map
Room!

This new web page is a spin-off of our Cadastral Map & Landowner
Records Project and can be found here:

http://maps.GesherGalicia.org

We began this project in 2007 with the goal of acquiring maps and
indexing land and homeowner records >from the former Austro-Hungarian
province of Galicia, now Poland and Ukraine. These records would
function as an adjunct to traditional genealogical resources, being
especially useful when no vital records exits for a town. They
include the names of landowners and homeowners and provide details
ranging >from businesses in the market square that your ancestors might
have owned to the fields they tilled, and taverns, mills and inns that
they leased or operated. Many names are written directly on to these
maps, and used in conjunction with the information found on vital
records, you may be able to identify the exact place in a village
where your family once lived.

Maps for the following places are currently available in the Map Room:
Belz, Bohorodczany, Brody, Bukaczowce, Chodorow, Dobromil, Grzymalow,
Korolowka, Kazimierz, Krakow, Lancut, Lwow (Lviv, Lemberg), Nienadowa,
Podhajce, Polupanowka, Przemysl, Rohatyn, Romanowe Siolo, Ropczyce,
Skala, Usciedzko, Nowy Wisnicz, Zborow, and Zurawno. Many more are in
the pipeline and are coming soon!

There are also specialty maps, including a 1939 map showing the
voivodeships of Krakow, Lwow, Stanislawow, and Tarnopol, with the
administrative districts highlighted in a four-color scheme. This map
provides and easy way to identify smaller villages surrounding a main
town. There is also a 1799 map of the third partition of Poland, a
1941 map of the Lwow Jewish ghetto and Cram's Railway System Atlas map
of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy >from 1901.

The interface is easy: scroll down to see the maps in alphabetical
order. Click on a title or thumbnail to enlarge the map and navigate
using your mouse. Click on the zoom bar on the left to get a closer
view. The initial overview shows you how the pages appear when
stitched together and reflects the challenges in bringing these maps
to life online. In their original size, many are huge, often covering
an area of of four feet by six feet. They must be scanned in small
sections to provide the extremely high resolution necessary to view
the smallest detail as sketched on the map.

Is your town is part of the Cadastral Map & Landowner Records Project?
Search the project inventory here:

http://inventory.GesherGalicia.org

A list of all towns in the project now can be found at the bottom of
the home page in alphabetical order. (Due to spelling variations in
the Polish, German, Ukrainian and Yiddish versions of the town names,
checking this list may prove helpful.) If Gesher Galicia has
inventoried your town this search engine will show you the maps and
records that exist in the archive, along with information on
acquisitions. Once digitized, map images are put in the queue to be
"stitched" together so they can be uploaded. This is an ongoing
process and our goal is to provide maps for many different time
periods in the life of a town or shtetl. Acquired landowner (along
with voter and school) records are indexed, with the results added to
the All Galicia Database at:

http://search.GesherGalicia.org.

As described by Brian J. Lenius, author of "The Genealogical Gazetteer
of Galicia," "Three distinct property land surveys were conducted for
all of Galicia during the Austrian period of the 18th and 19th
centuries. The Austrian Stable Cadastral Survey of the 1830s to 1860s
consisted of records and extremely detailed maps showing the smallest
parcels of land, individual yards, houses, barns, roads, field plots,
synagogues and even large trees. At least three versions of these maps
were created at the time including a field sketch, a preliminary
drafted version and the Cadastral Map in full color. At least one or
more versions of these maps still exist for most villages." This
ongoing research enables you not only to add to the genealogy of your
family, but to create a genealogy for a specific house, following its
inhabitants over a hundred years.

Gesher Galicia would like to acknowledge and thank Jay Osborn, who was
instrumental in designing the Map Room site and is responsible for
tackling the challenging process of stitching the maps together and
creating the interface by which researchers can view them. We'd also
like to thank Brian Lenius, Alexander Dunai and Natalie Dunai, who
copied, photographed or scanned these maps, Logan Kleinwaks, who also
contributed maps along with the other donors and international
libraries who provided many of the "specialty" maps you see here.
Also thanks to our AGD web designer, Brooke Schreier Ganz who created
the template for the page. If you have a map that you think would be
of interest to our research group and belongs on our site, please
contact me. We welcome all contributions to this effort. The archives
are currently closed for the summer vacation, but the project will
resume in early September. If you have questions about it, feel free
to contact me.

Again, kudos to everyone involved in the creation of this virtual map
repository, which is sure to enhance your Galician family history
research. If you have success using this resource, please let us
know!

Pamela Weisberger
President & Research Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.GesherGalicia.org
www.search.GesherGalicia.org
www.maps.GesherGalicia.org
www.inventory.GesherGalicia.org


JRI Poland #Poland Gesher Galicia launches The Map Room! A vitual portal to a world of cadastral maps #poland

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the launch of the Gesher Galicia Map
Room!

This new web page is a spin-off of our Cadastral Map & Landowner
Records Project and can be found here:

http://maps.GesherGalicia.org

We began this project in 2007 with the goal of acquiring maps and
indexing land and homeowner records >from the former Austro-Hungarian
province of Galicia, now Poland and Ukraine. These records would
function as an adjunct to traditional genealogical resources, being
especially useful when no vital records exits for a town. They
include the names of landowners and homeowners and provide details
ranging >from businesses in the market square that your ancestors might
have owned to the fields they tilled, and taverns, mills and inns that
they leased or operated. Many names are written directly on to these
maps, and used in conjunction with the information found on vital
records, you may be able to identify the exact place in a village
where your family once lived.

Maps for the following places are currently available in the Map Room:
Belz, Bohorodczany, Brody, Bukaczowce, Chodorow, Dobromil, Grzymalow,
Korolowka, Kazimierz, Krakow, Lancut, Lwow (Lviv, Lemberg), Nienadowa,
Podhajce, Polupanowka, Przemysl, Rohatyn, Romanowe Siolo, Ropczyce,
Skala, Usciedzko, Nowy Wisnicz, Zborow, and Zurawno. Many more are in
the pipeline and are coming soon!

There are also specialty maps, including a 1939 map showing the
voivodeships of Krakow, Lwow, Stanislawow, and Tarnopol, with the
administrative districts highlighted in a four-color scheme. This map
provides and easy way to identify smaller villages surrounding a main
town. There is also a 1799 map of the third partition of Poland, a
1941 map of the Lwow Jewish ghetto and Cram's Railway System Atlas map
of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy >from 1901.

The interface is easy: scroll down to see the maps in alphabetical
order. Click on a title or thumbnail to enlarge the map and navigate
using your mouse. Click on the zoom bar on the left to get a closer
view. The initial overview shows you how the pages appear when
stitched together and reflects the challenges in bringing these maps
to life online. In their original size, many are huge, often covering
an area of of four feet by six feet. They must be scanned in small
sections to provide the extremely high resolution necessary to view
the smallest detail as sketched on the map.

Is your town is part of the Cadastral Map & Landowner Records Project?
Search the project inventory here:

http://inventory.GesherGalicia.org

A list of all towns in the project now can be found at the bottom of
the home page in alphabetical order. (Due to spelling variations in
the Polish, German, Ukrainian and Yiddish versions of the town names,
checking this list may prove helpful.) If Gesher Galicia has
inventoried your town this search engine will show you the maps and
records that exist in the archive, along with information on
acquisitions. Once digitized, map images are put in the queue to be
"stitched" together so they can be uploaded. This is an ongoing
process and our goal is to provide maps for many different time
periods in the life of a town or shtetl. Acquired landowner (along
with voter and school) records are indexed, with the results added to
the All Galicia Database at:

http://search.GesherGalicia.org.

As described by Brian J. Lenius, author of "The Genealogical Gazetteer
of Galicia," "Three distinct property land surveys were conducted for
all of Galicia during the Austrian period of the 18th and 19th
centuries. The Austrian Stable Cadastral Survey of the 1830s to 1860s
consisted of records and extremely detailed maps showing the smallest
parcels of land, individual yards, houses, barns, roads, field plots,
synagogues and even large trees. At least three versions of these maps
were created at the time including a field sketch, a preliminary
drafted version and the Cadastral Map in full color. At least one or
more versions of these maps still exist for most villages." This
ongoing research enables you not only to add to the genealogy of your
family, but to create a genealogy for a specific house, following its
inhabitants over a hundred years.

Gesher Galicia would like to acknowledge and thank Jay Osborn, who was
instrumental in designing the Map Room site and is responsible for
tackling the challenging process of stitching the maps together and
creating the interface by which researchers can view them. We'd also
like to thank Brian Lenius, Alexander Dunai and Natalie Dunai, who
copied, photographed or scanned these maps, Logan Kleinwaks, who also
contributed maps along with the other donors and international
libraries who provided many of the "specialty" maps you see here.
Also thanks to our AGD web designer, Brooke Schreier Ganz who created
the template for the page. If you have a map that you think would be
of interest to our research group and belongs on our site, please
contact me. We welcome all contributions to this effort. The archives
are currently closed for the summer vacation, but the project will
resume in early September. If you have questions about it, feel free
to contact me.

Again, kudos to everyone involved in the creation of this virtual map
repository, which is sure to enhance your Galician family history
research. If you have success using this resource, please let us
know!

Pamela Weisberger
President & Research Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.GesherGalicia.org
www.search.GesherGalicia.org
www.maps.GesherGalicia.org
www.inventory.GesherGalicia.org


Israel Genealogy Research Association announces a new version of its Beta Search Engine #poland

Carol Hoffman
 

The Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA)
http://www.genealogy.org.il announces a new version of its Beta
Search Engine for the All Israel Database (AID)
http://geneaology.org.il/aidsearch/ allowing you to search names in
Hebrew or Latin letters. All databases include the transliteration of
the names. Double names are split into separate fields. The search
engine checks all fields that are names. First and last names and the
name of the Database appear in both Hebrew and English. The rest of
the information is in the language of the database. The accompanying
scans of the documents are not attached yet to the records.
While we are in this time of transition (our new search engine is
currently being developed) we have added five new databases and have
had to temporarily remove access to three others.

The new databases:
* Rehavia Address Book June 1935 - This address book was found in the
collection of the Goldstein-Goren Diaspora Center. It was published by
the "Rehavia" Mutual Benefit Society Committee and was sold for 25
Eretz Israel mil. It includes people's names, addresses and
occupations.
* Members in Agricultural Organizations in Petah Tikvah 1931-1936 - A
list of 1,802 members in agricultural organizations during the years
1931-6. The collection of documents is >from the Oded Yarkoni Petah
Tikva History Archive .
* List of Candidates for the First Knesset (Constituent Assembly) 1949 -
A list of 1,282 candidates for the 1st Knesset published in Yalkut
HaPirsumim (the official publication of the government of Israel) on
January 19, 1949.
* Practical Nurses 1951-52 - A list of 169 pratical nurses, where they
studied and when they passed their exam. The list is a composite of a
number of lists published in Yalkut HaPirsumim.
* List of Persons Authorized to Act as Lawyers in Civil Courts in 1956 -
A list of 1,544 authorized lawyers for the civil courts published in
Yalkut HaPirsumim on various dates in 1956.

You can now search through 41,000 entries. Many more databases will
be added in the coming weeks. Still others are being prepared.
IGRA welcomes people who can help with them.

Carol Hoffman
Tel Aviv


JRI Poland #Poland Israel Genealogy Research Association announces a new version of its Beta Search Engine #poland

Carol Hoffman
 

The Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA)
http://www.genealogy.org.il announces a new version of its Beta
Search Engine for the All Israel Database (AID)
http://geneaology.org.il/aidsearch/ allowing you to search names in
Hebrew or Latin letters. All databases include the transliteration of
the names. Double names are split into separate fields. The search
engine checks all fields that are names. First and last names and the
name of the Database appear in both Hebrew and English. The rest of
the information is in the language of the database. The accompanying
scans of the documents are not attached yet to the records.
While we are in this time of transition (our new search engine is
currently being developed) we have added five new databases and have
had to temporarily remove access to three others.

The new databases:
* Rehavia Address Book June 1935 - This address book was found in the
collection of the Goldstein-Goren Diaspora Center. It was published by
the "Rehavia" Mutual Benefit Society Committee and was sold for 25
Eretz Israel mil. It includes people's names, addresses and
occupations.
* Members in Agricultural Organizations in Petah Tikvah 1931-1936 - A
list of 1,802 members in agricultural organizations during the years
1931-6. The collection of documents is >from the Oded Yarkoni Petah
Tikva History Archive .
* List of Candidates for the First Knesset (Constituent Assembly) 1949 -
A list of 1,282 candidates for the 1st Knesset published in Yalkut
HaPirsumim (the official publication of the government of Israel) on
January 19, 1949.
* Practical Nurses 1951-52 - A list of 169 pratical nurses, where they
studied and when they passed their exam. The list is a composite of a
number of lists published in Yalkut HaPirsumim.
* List of Persons Authorized to Act as Lawyers in Civil Courts in 1956 -
A list of 1,544 authorized lawyers for the civil courts published in
Yalkut HaPirsumim on various dates in 1956.

You can now search through 41,000 entries. Many more databases will
be added in the coming weeks. Still others are being prepared.
IGRA welcomes people who can help with them.

Carol Hoffman
Tel Aviv


Israel Genealogy Research Assocation announces new version of its Beta Search Engine #lithuania

Carol Hoffman
 

The Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA)
http://www.genealogy.org.il announces a new version of its Beta
Search Engine for the All Israel Database (AID)
http://geneaology.org.il/aidsearch/ allowing you to search names in
Hebrew or Latin letters. All databases include the transliteration of
the names. Double names are split into separate fields. The search
engine checks all fields that are names. First and last names and the
name of the Database appear in both Hebrew and English. The rest of
the information is in the language of the database. The accompanying
scans of the documents are not attached yet to the records.
While we are in this time of transition (our new search engine is
currently being developed) we have added five new databases and have
had to temporarily remove access to three others.

The new databases:
* Rehavia Address Book June 1935 - This address book was found in the
collection of the Goldstein-Goren Diaspora Center. It was published by
the "Rehavia" Mutual Benefit Society Committee and was sold for 25
Eretz Israel mil. It includes people's names, addresses and
occupations.
* Members in Agricultural Organizations in Petah Tikvah 1931-1936 - A
list of 1,802 members in agricultural organizations during the years
1931-6. The collection of documents is >from the Oded Yarkoni Petah
Tikva History Archive .
* List of Candidates for the First Knesset (Constituent Assembly) 1949 -
A list of 1,282 candidates for the 1st Knesset published in Yalkut
HaPirsumim (the official publication of the government of Israel) on
January 19, 1949.
* Practical Nurses 1951-52 - A list of 169 pratical nurses, where they
studied and when they passed their exam. The list is a composite of a
number of lists published in Yalkut HaPirsumim.
* List of Persons Authorized to Act as Lawyers in Civil Courts in 1956 -
A list of 1,544 authorized lawyers for the civil courts published in
Yalkut HaPirsumim on various dates in 1956.

You can now search through 41,000 entries. Many more databases will
be added in the coming weeks. Still others are being prepared.
IGRA welcomes people who can help with them.

Carol Hoffman
Tel Aviv


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Israel Genealogy Research Assocation announces new version of its Beta Search Engine #lithuania

Carol Hoffman
 

The Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA)
http://www.genealogy.org.il announces a new version of its Beta
Search Engine for the All Israel Database (AID)
http://geneaology.org.il/aidsearch/ allowing you to search names in
Hebrew or Latin letters. All databases include the transliteration of
the names. Double names are split into separate fields. The search
engine checks all fields that are names. First and last names and the
name of the Database appear in both Hebrew and English. The rest of
the information is in the language of the database. The accompanying
scans of the documents are not attached yet to the records.
While we are in this time of transition (our new search engine is
currently being developed) we have added five new databases and have
had to temporarily remove access to three others.

The new databases:
* Rehavia Address Book June 1935 - This address book was found in the
collection of the Goldstein-Goren Diaspora Center. It was published by
the "Rehavia" Mutual Benefit Society Committee and was sold for 25
Eretz Israel mil. It includes people's names, addresses and
occupations.
* Members in Agricultural Organizations in Petah Tikvah 1931-1936 - A
list of 1,802 members in agricultural organizations during the years
1931-6. The collection of documents is >from the Oded Yarkoni Petah
Tikva History Archive .
* List of Candidates for the First Knesset (Constituent Assembly) 1949 -
A list of 1,282 candidates for the 1st Knesset published in Yalkut
HaPirsumim (the official publication of the government of Israel) on
January 19, 1949.
* Practical Nurses 1951-52 - A list of 169 pratical nurses, where they
studied and when they passed their exam. The list is a composite of a
number of lists published in Yalkut HaPirsumim.
* List of Persons Authorized to Act as Lawyers in Civil Courts in 1956 -
A list of 1,544 authorized lawyers for the civil courts published in
Yalkut HaPirsumim on various dates in 1956.

You can now search through 41,000 entries. Many more databases will
be added in the coming weeks. Still others are being prepared.
IGRA welcomes people who can help with them.

Carol Hoffman
Tel Aviv


Yizkor Book Project, July 2012 #latvia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I would like to hope that those of you who attended the IAJGS International
Conference returned home with their genealogy "tank" refilled and eager to
become involved in one of the JewishGen projects - for instance, let's say
the Yizkor Book Project <g> I'm quite sure that those of you who attended
the Yizkor Book Birds of a Feather meeting under the leadership of Jan
Meisels Allen are particularly inspired by her to become involved in our
project. Anyway, if you were or weren't at the conference and would like to
take some part in the Yizkor Book Project in some fashion - translating,
transliterating, coordinating, editing or... I would certainly like hear
from you and discuss what part of the project calls out to you.
Once again, I am pleased to let you know that a further book is now
completely online - "Rabka Four - Instruments of Genocide and Grand Larceny"
that was written by Robin O'Neil, who researches the Holocaust with insights
and skills he acquired in his years as police major crimes investigator at
Scotland Yard. Robin has generously donated a number of his manuscripts and
for those who are yet to be familiar with this unique research, I'm sure you
will find them a real eye-opener.

We are very fortunate to have a long-standing arrangement with Yad Vashem,
Jerusalem, which enables us to receive Excel files of necrologies extracted
from a wide range of Yizkor books. On our side, a team of conscientious
volunteers transliterate these lists into English and allow us to make them
available to the general public. This month, in particular, we've added in a
number of necrologies which come >from books that are not widely available
and are particularly important for researchers and, at the same time, allow
us to immortalize the names of our people who met their death during the
Holocaust. Later on, yet another team of conscientious volunteers led by Max
Heffler, convert these lists into a format which can be uploaded to our
necrology database and the help of all these volunteers is very much
appreciated and allow us this wide range of research options.

Now to facts and figures - as far as the July figures go, during this last
month we have added these 5 new projects:

- Kremenets, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kremenets, Vyshgorodok, and Pochayiv)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets3/kremenets3.html

- Regierungsbezirk Schwaben (region), Germany (The ordeal of the Jews in
Swabia) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/schwaben/schwaben.html

- Satoraljaujhely, Hungary (Vanished Communities in Hungary)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Satoraljaujhely/Satoraljaujhely.html

- Secovce, Slovakia (The History of the Jewish community in Secovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/secovce/secovce.html

- Skala Podolskaya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Skala)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/skala/skala.html

Added in 4 new entries:

- Cepeleuti, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00394a.html

- Lyublino, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00361.html

- Telice, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh113.html

- Tuchola, Poland (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland, Volume VI)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol6_00071.html

We have continued to update 25 of our existing projects:

- Bedzin, Poland (A Memorial to the Jewish Community of Bedzin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bedzin/Bedzin.html

- Biala Rawska, Poland (Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Biala Rawska)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Biala_Rawska/Biala_Rawska.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Galicia, Poland (Rabka Four - Instruments of Genocide and Grand Larceny)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Galicia3/galicia3.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Jaroslaw, Poland (Jaroslaw Book: a Memorial to Our Town)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jaroslaw/Jaroslaw.html

- Korets, Ukraine (The Korets book; in memory of our community that is no
more) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Korets/Korets.html

- Krivichi, Belarus (Kryvitsh Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krzywicze/Krzywicze.html

- Leczyca, Poland (Memorial Book of Leczyca)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Leczyca/Leczyca.html

- Molchadz, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Ostrolenka, Poland (Book of Kehilat Ostrolenka; Yizkor Book of the Jewish
Community of Ostrolenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrolenka1/ostrolenka1.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Smarhon (Smorgon), Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Sokolka, Poland (Memorial Book of Sokolka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sokolka/sokolka.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Volodymyr Volynskyy, Ukraine (Wladimir Wolynsk; in memory of the Jewish
community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Volodymyr_Volynskyy/Volodymyr_Volynskyy.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Latvia SIG #Latvia Yizkor Book Project, July 2012 #latvia

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I would like to hope that those of you who attended the IAJGS International
Conference returned home with their genealogy "tank" refilled and eager to
become involved in one of the JewishGen projects - for instance, let's say
the Yizkor Book Project <g> I'm quite sure that those of you who attended
the Yizkor Book Birds of a Feather meeting under the leadership of Jan
Meisels Allen are particularly inspired by her to become involved in our
project. Anyway, if you were or weren't at the conference and would like to
take some part in the Yizkor Book Project in some fashion - translating,
transliterating, coordinating, editing or... I would certainly like hear
from you and discuss what part of the project calls out to you.
Once again, I am pleased to let you know that a further book is now
completely online - "Rabka Four - Instruments of Genocide and Grand Larceny"
that was written by Robin O'Neil, who researches the Holocaust with insights
and skills he acquired in his years as police major crimes investigator at
Scotland Yard. Robin has generously donated a number of his manuscripts and
for those who are yet to be familiar with this unique research, I'm sure you
will find them a real eye-opener.

We are very fortunate to have a long-standing arrangement with Yad Vashem,
Jerusalem, which enables us to receive Excel files of necrologies extracted
from a wide range of Yizkor books. On our side, a team of conscientious
volunteers transliterate these lists into English and allow us to make them
available to the general public. This month, in particular, we've added in a
number of necrologies which come >from books that are not widely available
and are particularly important for researchers and, at the same time, allow
us to immortalize the names of our people who met their death during the
Holocaust. Later on, yet another team of conscientious volunteers led by Max
Heffler, convert these lists into a format which can be uploaded to our
necrology database and the help of all these volunteers is very much
appreciated and allow us this wide range of research options.

Now to facts and figures - as far as the July figures go, during this last
month we have added these 5 new projects:

- Kremenets, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kremenets, Vyshgorodok, and Pochayiv)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets3/kremenets3.html

- Regierungsbezirk Schwaben (region), Germany (The ordeal of the Jews in
Swabia) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/schwaben/schwaben.html

- Satoraljaujhely, Hungary (Vanished Communities in Hungary)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Satoraljaujhely/Satoraljaujhely.html

- Secovce, Slovakia (The History of the Jewish community in Secovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/secovce/secovce.html

- Skala Podolskaya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Skala)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/skala/skala.html

Added in 4 new entries:

- Cepeleuti, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00394a.html

- Lyublino, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00361.html

- Telice, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh113.html

- Tuchola, Poland (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland, Volume VI)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol6_00071.html

We have continued to update 25 of our existing projects:

- Bedzin, Poland (A Memorial to the Jewish Community of Bedzin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bedzin/Bedzin.html

- Biala Rawska, Poland (Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Biala Rawska)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Biala_Rawska/Biala_Rawska.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Galicia, Poland (Rabka Four - Instruments of Genocide and Grand Larceny)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Galicia3/galicia3.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Jaroslaw, Poland (Jaroslaw Book: a Memorial to Our Town)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jaroslaw/Jaroslaw.html

- Korets, Ukraine (The Korets book; in memory of our community that is no
more) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Korets/Korets.html

- Krivichi, Belarus (Kryvitsh Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krzywicze/Krzywicze.html

- Leczyca, Poland (Memorial Book of Leczyca)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Leczyca/Leczyca.html

- Molchadz, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Ostrolenka, Poland (Book of Kehilat Ostrolenka; Yizkor Book of the Jewish
Community of Ostrolenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrolenka1/ostrolenka1.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Smarhon (Smorgon), Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Sokolka, Poland (Memorial Book of Sokolka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sokolka/sokolka.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Volodymyr Volynskyy, Ukraine (Wladimir Wolynsk; in memory of the Jewish
community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Volodymyr_Volynskyy/Volodymyr_Volynskyy.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Report on Paris meeting, July 15-19 2012 #latvia

Michael Eliastam <eliastamm@...>
 

My apologies for this belated report on the Paris meeting of the
International Association of Jewish Genealogy Societies, July 15-19,
2012.

The Organizing Committee, a partnership of the French CGJ, and the
Jewish Genealogy Societies of Switzerland, Belgium, and Luxembourg
reported that about 800 people attended the meeting at the Marriott
Rive Gauche Hotel Conference center on blvd Saint-Jaques near the
Seine, of course. The gathering was very spirited as people >from all
over the world pursued their genealogy interests. The majority of
attendees were French, but many other countries were represented. US
and Canadian attendance was obviously impacted by distance and economy.
The meeting was very well-organized, with many volunteers offering
their help. The format was very similar to recent annual meetings
though being in Paris made simultaneous translation essential and it
worked well. The program with all its wonderful speakers is listed on
the conference web site.
Most of the SIG's have a session focused on its activities and
interests. This time we tried organizing our whole session to ensure we
had all our activities at one time in one place. Therefore the Latvia
SIG organized its program into one 4 hour session for the Tuesday lunch
and afternoon inviting two sets of speakers. A large audience showed
up, especially for the afternoon sessions. During the lunch session
Nicholas Evans >from Hull University spoke eloquently and emotionally
on The Rise, Demise, then Annihilation of Libau Jewry, describing his
visits there and his scholarly findings. Immediately after lunch
Nicholas then generously gave a second talk on Documenting Litvak
(Latvian and Lithuanian) migrations to the West, 1876 to 1930.
. These two excellent presentations were followed by our invited
archivists >from the Latvia Archives in Riga, Rita Bogdanova and Jelena
Polovceva. They conducted an interactive session focused on what they
do, and how they help anyone seeking ancestor knowledge. The fact that
they had assisted several of us, including me, in our personal searches
made it even more of a family event.
To round out the afternoon of wonderful exchanges and discussion, Henry
Blumberg >from Toronto gave a wide rangingl presentation describing his
personal quest to find his family roots starting off faced with an old
photograph that he did not recognize!
During the lunch we also honored the two Latvian archivists thanking
them for producing the Dvinsk database working with Arlene Beare and
Constance Whittman over a 10 year period to complete it. Its
publication was recently announced by Arlene Beare.
After the presentations we held a very brief business meeting to
confirm that I would continue as President for the next year. He
thanked Marion Werle and Bruce Dumas for their continuing contribution,
and noted the silent but important contribution of D as ListServe
Moderator. She resigned very recently.
. We discussed the poor success I had finding volunteers to continue
our newsletter and collect the dues. We briefly discussed my failure to
collect dues and recruit an editor for our newsletter and agreed on
the importance of both.
We committed ourselves to find volunteers for the open board positions
as soon as possible. While Barry Shay is generously serving as our
interim treasurer, we need volunteers for the permanent position of
Treasurer, plus the Newsletter Editor, and the ListServe Moderator.
If YOU want to do something but these positions don't fit for you, the
roles are negotiable to make it work. Please email me
(eliastamm@...).
Any comments or questions are very welcome!

President

Michael Eliastam
eliastamm@...
Treasurer Open

Newsletter Editor Open

Web Page Editor Marion Werle
werle@...
Webmaster Bruce Dumes
brucedumes@...

ListServe Moderator Open

Be well
Michael Eliastam MD
Weston, near Boston


Latvia SIG #Latvia Report on Paris meeting, July 15-19 2012 #latvia

Michael Eliastam <eliastamm@...>
 

My apologies for this belated report on the Paris meeting of the
International Association of Jewish Genealogy Societies, July 15-19,
2012.

The Organizing Committee, a partnership of the French CGJ, and the
Jewish Genealogy Societies of Switzerland, Belgium, and Luxembourg
reported that about 800 people attended the meeting at the Marriott
Rive Gauche Hotel Conference center on blvd Saint-Jaques near the
Seine, of course. The gathering was very spirited as people >from all
over the world pursued their genealogy interests. The majority of
attendees were French, but many other countries were represented. US
and Canadian attendance was obviously impacted by distance and economy.
The meeting was very well-organized, with many volunteers offering
their help. The format was very similar to recent annual meetings
though being in Paris made simultaneous translation essential and it
worked well. The program with all its wonderful speakers is listed on
the conference web site.
Most of the SIG's have a session focused on its activities and
interests. This time we tried organizing our whole session to ensure we
had all our activities at one time in one place. Therefore the Latvia
SIG organized its program into one 4 hour session for the Tuesday lunch
and afternoon inviting two sets of speakers. A large audience showed
up, especially for the afternoon sessions. During the lunch session
Nicholas Evans >from Hull University spoke eloquently and emotionally
on The Rise, Demise, then Annihilation of Libau Jewry, describing his
visits there and his scholarly findings. Immediately after lunch
Nicholas then generously gave a second talk on Documenting Litvak
(Latvian and Lithuanian) migrations to the West, 1876 to 1930.
. These two excellent presentations were followed by our invited
archivists >from the Latvia Archives in Riga, Rita Bogdanova and Jelena
Polovceva. They conducted an interactive session focused on what they
do, and how they help anyone seeking ancestor knowledge. The fact that
they had assisted several of us, including me, in our personal searches
made it even more of a family event.
To round out the afternoon of wonderful exchanges and discussion, Henry
Blumberg >from Toronto gave a wide rangingl presentation describing his
personal quest to find his family roots starting off faced with an old
photograph that he did not recognize!
During the lunch we also honored the two Latvian archivists thanking
them for producing the Dvinsk database working with Arlene Beare and
Constance Whittman over a 10 year period to complete it. Its
publication was recently announced by Arlene Beare.
After the presentations we held a very brief business meeting to
confirm that I would continue as President for the next year. He
thanked Marion Werle and Bruce Dumas for their continuing contribution,
and noted the silent but important contribution of D as ListServe
Moderator. She resigned very recently.
. We discussed the poor success I had finding volunteers to continue
our newsletter and collect the dues. We briefly discussed my failure to
collect dues and recruit an editor for our newsletter and agreed on
the importance of both.
We committed ourselves to find volunteers for the open board positions
as soon as possible. While Barry Shay is generously serving as our
interim treasurer, we need volunteers for the permanent position of
Treasurer, plus the Newsletter Editor, and the ListServe Moderator.
If YOU want to do something but these positions don't fit for you, the
roles are negotiable to make it work. Please email me
(eliastamm@...).
Any comments or questions are very welcome!

President

Michael Eliastam
eliastamm@...
Treasurer Open

Newsletter Editor Open

Web Page Editor Marion Werle
werle@...
Webmaster Bruce Dumes
brucedumes@...

ListServe Moderator Open

Be well
Michael Eliastam MD
Weston, near Boston


Free Webinar, Sunday August 5 - Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA #dna

Elise
 

JewishGenners,

Join us for our monthly free Genetic Genealogy webinar!

What: Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA
Date: Sunday, August 5, 2012
Time: 1pm Eastern
(10am Pacific, 11am Mountain, 12pm Central, 5pm GMT, 8pm Israel)
Where: Your computer!

Unable to attend live? Register to view the recording after!

*Registration*

To register for either the live session or recording of this webinar, please
visit:

http://relativeroots.net/webinars/intro-ftdna/

*Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA*

What is Genetic Genealogy? What tests are available and which one should I
order? How much does a Genetic Genealogy test cost? Do I need to be a
geneticist to understand my results?

If you're a complete beginner to Genetic Genealogy and want answers to these
questions and more, then this webinar is for you! Attendees will learn
about the history of genetic genealogy, be introduced to DNA basics, learn
about the different types of DNA tests available for genealogy, and learn
about resources that will help you make the most of your genetic genealogy
experience. Focus will be on the genetic genealogy tests offered by
JewishGen's DNA testing partner, Family Tree DNA.

*Discount >from Family Tree DNA*

Attendees of this webinar receive an exclusive, limited-time discount on
select new test kits and upgrades >from Family Tree DNA.

*What is a Webinar?*

Webinars are "web-based seminars" -- presentations given via the internet.
You attend >from the comfort of your own home, see and hear the presentation
via your own computer (or you can listen by phone if your computer doesn't
have speakers), and you can ask questions just like you can at an in-person
presentation.

Regards,
Elise Friedman


DNA Research #DNA Free Webinar, Sunday August 5 - Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA #dna

Elise
 

JewishGenners,

Join us for our monthly free Genetic Genealogy webinar!

What: Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA
Date: Sunday, August 5, 2012
Time: 1pm Eastern
(10am Pacific, 11am Mountain, 12pm Central, 5pm GMT, 8pm Israel)
Where: Your computer!

Unable to attend live? Register to view the recording after!

*Registration*

To register for either the live session or recording of this webinar, please
visit:

http://relativeroots.net/webinars/intro-ftdna/

*Introduction to Genetic Genealogy at Family Tree DNA*

What is Genetic Genealogy? What tests are available and which one should I
order? How much does a Genetic Genealogy test cost? Do I need to be a
geneticist to understand my results?

If you're a complete beginner to Genetic Genealogy and want answers to these
questions and more, then this webinar is for you! Attendees will learn
about the history of genetic genealogy, be introduced to DNA basics, learn
about the different types of DNA tests available for genealogy, and learn
about resources that will help you make the most of your genetic genealogy
experience. Focus will be on the genetic genealogy tests offered by
JewishGen's DNA testing partner, Family Tree DNA.

*Discount >from Family Tree DNA*

Attendees of this webinar receive an exclusive, limited-time discount on
select new test kits and upgrades >from Family Tree DNA.

*What is a Webinar?*

Webinars are "web-based seminars" -- presentations given via the internet.
You attend >from the comfort of your own home, see and hear the presentation
via your own computer (or you can listen by phone if your computer doesn't
have speakers), and you can ask questions just like you can at an in-person
presentation.

Regards,
Elise Friedman


Misleading heading - Re: Yizkor Book Project #germany

ga304n@...
 

" Subject: No German places mentioned in Yizkor Book Project, July 2012 "

-- sorry, there is an entry for Schwaben which emphatically is
in Germany, in this case primarily Bavaria.

"Now to facts and figures - as far as the July figures go, during this last
month we have added these 5 new projects: ….. [including]

- Regierungsbezirk Schwaben (region), Germany (The ordeal of the Jews in Swabia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/schwaben/schwaben.html ……"

George Arnstein, Washington, DC

Moderator Note: Thank you, George and apologies to all. Time for stronger reading glasses.


German SIG #Germany Misleading heading - Re: Yizkor Book Project #germany

ga304n@...
 

" Subject: No German places mentioned in Yizkor Book Project, July 2012 "

-- sorry, there is an entry for Schwaben which emphatically is
in Germany, in this case primarily Bavaria.

"Now to facts and figures - as far as the July figures go, during this last
month we have added these 5 new projects: ….. [including]

- Regierungsbezirk Schwaben (region), Germany (The ordeal of the Jews in Swabia)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/schwaben/schwaben.html ……"

George Arnstein, Washington, DC

Moderator Note: Thank you, George and apologies to all. Time for stronger reading glasses.


German transcriptions and translations #galicia

Carol Sicherman <csicher@...>
 

I have posted the following requests for German transcription and
translation on ViewMate:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=23706
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=23707
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=23708
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=23709

Please reply using the form on the website.

Many thanks
Carol Sicherman

=


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia German transcriptions and translations #galicia

Carol Sicherman <csicher@...>
 

I have posted the following requests for German transcription and
translation on ViewMate:

http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=23706
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=23707
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=23708
http://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=23709

Please reply using the form on the website.

Many thanks
Carol Sicherman

=


Migration from France to Lwow #galicia

isak@bm.technion.ac.il
 

Dear Genners

During the middle ages there was a prosperous Jewish community in
Joigny-Sur-Yonne in France. In Hebrew this place was called Yona or Yoni,
and people coming >from this place "MeYona" or "MeYoni". >from the end of
the 16-century one can find in Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) a family of Jewish
Rabbis and medical doctors with the surname "MeYona". Does anybody have
info concerning a possible connection between the Medieval Jewish
community in Joigny-Sur-Yonne and the family in Lwow? Where can I find
precise copies of the grave stone inscriptions >from the old Lwow cemetery?
I know well the books "Anshei Shem" (by R' Shlomo Buber) and "Matzevet
Kodesh" (R' Gavriel Suchestow).

Thank you

Isak Gath, Haifa


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Migration from France to Lwow #galicia

isak@bm.technion.ac.il
 

Dear Genners

During the middle ages there was a prosperous Jewish community in
Joigny-Sur-Yonne in France. In Hebrew this place was called Yona or Yoni,
and people coming >from this place "MeYona" or "MeYoni". >from the end of
the 16-century one can find in Lwow (now Lviv, Ukraine) a family of Jewish
Rabbis and medical doctors with the surname "MeYona". Does anybody have
info concerning a possible connection between the Medieval Jewish
community in Joigny-Sur-Yonne and the family in Lwow? Where can I find
precise copies of the grave stone inscriptions >from the old Lwow cemetery?
I know well the books "Anshei Shem" (by R' Shlomo Buber) and "Matzevet
Kodesh" (R' Gavriel Suchestow).

Thank you

Isak Gath, Haifa


Gesher Galicia launches the "Map Room" - a virtual portal to cadastral maps #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the launch of the Gesher Galicia
Map Room!

This new web page is a spin-off of our Cadastral Map & Landowner
Records Project and can be found here:

http://maps.GesherGalicia.org

We began this project in 2007 with the goal of acquiring maps and
indexing land and homeowner records >from the former Austro-Hungarian
province of Galicia, now Poland and Ukraine. These records would
function as an adjunct to traditional genealogical resources, being
especially useful when no vital records exits for a town. They include the
names of landowners and homeowners and provide details ranging >from
businesses in the market square that your ancestors might have owned to
the fields they tilled, and taverns, mills and inns that they leased or
operated. Many names are written directly on to these maps, and used in
conjunction with the information found on vital records, you may be able
to identify the exact place in a village where your family once lived.

Maps for the following places are currently available in the Map Room:
Belz, Bohorodczany, Brody, Bukaczowce, Chodorow, Dobromil,
Grzymalow, Korolowka, Kazimierz, Krakow, Lancut, Lwow (Lviv, Lemberg),
Nienadowa, Podhajce, Polupanowka, Przemysl, Rohatyn, Romanowe Siolo,
Ropczyce, Skala, Usciedzko, Nowy Wisnicz, Zborow, and Zurawno. Many
more are in the pipeline and are coming soon!

There are also specialty maps, including a 1939 map showing the
voivodeships of Krakow, Lwow, Stanislawow, and Tarnopol, with the
administrative districts highlighted in a four-color scheme. This map
provides and easy way to identify smaller villages surrounding a main
town. There is also a 1799 map of the third partition of Poland, a 1941
map of the Lwow Jewish ghetto and Cram's Railway System Atlas map of
the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy >from 1901.

The interface is easy: scroll down to see the maps in alphabetical order.
Click on a title or thumbnail to enlarge the map and navigate using your
mouse. Click on the zoom bar on the left to get a closer view. The initial
overview shows you how the pages appear when stitched together and
reflects the challenges in bringing these maps to life online. In their
original size, many are huge, often covering an area of of four feet by six
feet. They must be scanned in small sections to provide the extremely
high resolution necessary to view the smallest detail as sketched on the
map.

Is your town is part of the Cadastral Map & Landowner Records Project?
Search the project inventory here:

http://inventory.GesherGalicia.org

A list of all towns in the project now can be found at the bottom of the
home page in alphabetical order. (Due to spelling variations in the Polish,
German, Ukrainian and Yiddish versions of the town names, checking this
list may prove helpful.) If Gesher Galicia has inventoried your town this
search engine will show you the maps and records that exist in the
archive, along with information on acquisitions. Once digitized, map
images are put in the queue to be "stitched" together so they can be
uploaded. This is an ongoing process and our goal is to provide maps for
many different time periods in the life of a town or shtetl. Acquired
landowner (along with voter and school) records are indexed, with the
results added to the All Galicia Database at:

http://search.GesherGalicia.org.

As described by Brian J. Lenius, author of "The Genealogical Gazetteer of
Galicia," "Three distinct property land surveys were conducted for all of
Galicia during the Austrian period of the 18th and 19th centuries. The
Austrian Stable Cadastral Survey of the 1830s to 1860s consisted of
records and extremely detailed maps showing the smallest parcels of land,
individual yards, houses, barns, roads, field plots, synagogues and even
large trees. At least three versions of these maps were created at the time
including a field sketch, a preliminary drafted version and the Cadastral
Map in full color. At least one or more versions of these maps still exist
for most villages." This ongoing research enables you not only to add to
the genealogy of your family, but to create a genealogy for a specific
house, following its inhabitants over a hundred years.

Gesher Galicia would like to acknowledge and thank Jay Osborn, who was
instrumental in designing the Map Room site and is responsible for
tackling the challenging process of stitching the maps together and
creating the interface by which researchers can view them. We'd also like
to thank Brian Lenius, Alexander Dunai and Natalie Dunai, who copied,
photographed or scanned these maps, Logan Kleinwaks, who also
contributed maps along with the other donors and international libraries
who provided many of the "specialty" maps you see here. Also thanks to
our AGD web designer, Brooke Schreier Ganz who created the template
for the page. If you have a map that you think would be of interest to our
research group and belongs on our site, please contact me. We welcome
all contributions to this effort.

If your town is not yet part of the project, it is because it has not yet been
funded. To join the project, Gesher Galicia requires $250 in start-up
funds, after which GG matches that amount with an additional $250. (This
amount can be donated by one individual, or several researchers can pool
resources to achieve the total.) Once a project is established, we inventory
the fonds of various archives that may hold records for your town and
then prioritize the acquisition of maps and records based on funding and
anticipated costs. Note that while the Map Room and All Galicia Database
are free for everyone to use, if you contribute a minimum of $25 to the
initial project when it starts you will get a password to view all the
original documents for your town. If a project has already been
established and you now wish to view the original record images, a
contribution of $50 is required. For more specific information, please
contact me after you have searched the inventory page to see the status
of your town project -- if one already exists -- or to inquire about
starting a new project. The archives are currently closed for the summer
vacation, but the project will resume in early September.

Again, kudos to everyone involved in the creation of this virtual map
repository, which is sure to enhance your Galician family history research.
If you have success using this resource, please let us know!

Pamela Weisberger
President & Research Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.GesherGalicia.org
www.search.GesherGalicia.org
www.maps.GesherGalicia.org
www.inventory.GesherGalicia.org


Gesher Galicia SIG #Galicia Gesher Galicia launches the "Map Room" - a virtual portal to cadastral maps #galicia

Pamela Weisberger
 

Gesher Galicia is pleased to announce the launch of the Gesher Galicia
Map Room!

This new web page is a spin-off of our Cadastral Map & Landowner
Records Project and can be found here:

http://maps.GesherGalicia.org

We began this project in 2007 with the goal of acquiring maps and
indexing land and homeowner records >from the former Austro-Hungarian
province of Galicia, now Poland and Ukraine. These records would
function as an adjunct to traditional genealogical resources, being
especially useful when no vital records exits for a town. They include the
names of landowners and homeowners and provide details ranging >from
businesses in the market square that your ancestors might have owned to
the fields they tilled, and taverns, mills and inns that they leased or
operated. Many names are written directly on to these maps, and used in
conjunction with the information found on vital records, you may be able
to identify the exact place in a village where your family once lived.

Maps for the following places are currently available in the Map Room:
Belz, Bohorodczany, Brody, Bukaczowce, Chodorow, Dobromil,
Grzymalow, Korolowka, Kazimierz, Krakow, Lancut, Lwow (Lviv, Lemberg),
Nienadowa, Podhajce, Polupanowka, Przemysl, Rohatyn, Romanowe Siolo,
Ropczyce, Skala, Usciedzko, Nowy Wisnicz, Zborow, and Zurawno. Many
more are in the pipeline and are coming soon!

There are also specialty maps, including a 1939 map showing the
voivodeships of Krakow, Lwow, Stanislawow, and Tarnopol, with the
administrative districts highlighted in a four-color scheme. This map
provides and easy way to identify smaller villages surrounding a main
town. There is also a 1799 map of the third partition of Poland, a 1941
map of the Lwow Jewish ghetto and Cram's Railway System Atlas map of
the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy >from 1901.

The interface is easy: scroll down to see the maps in alphabetical order.
Click on a title or thumbnail to enlarge the map and navigate using your
mouse. Click on the zoom bar on the left to get a closer view. The initial
overview shows you how the pages appear when stitched together and
reflects the challenges in bringing these maps to life online. In their
original size, many are huge, often covering an area of of four feet by six
feet. They must be scanned in small sections to provide the extremely
high resolution necessary to view the smallest detail as sketched on the
map.

Is your town is part of the Cadastral Map & Landowner Records Project?
Search the project inventory here:

http://inventory.GesherGalicia.org

A list of all towns in the project now can be found at the bottom of the
home page in alphabetical order. (Due to spelling variations in the Polish,
German, Ukrainian and Yiddish versions of the town names, checking this
list may prove helpful.) If Gesher Galicia has inventoried your town this
search engine will show you the maps and records that exist in the
archive, along with information on acquisitions. Once digitized, map
images are put in the queue to be "stitched" together so they can be
uploaded. This is an ongoing process and our goal is to provide maps for
many different time periods in the life of a town or shtetl. Acquired
landowner (along with voter and school) records are indexed, with the
results added to the All Galicia Database at:

http://search.GesherGalicia.org.

As described by Brian J. Lenius, author of "The Genealogical Gazetteer of
Galicia," "Three distinct property land surveys were conducted for all of
Galicia during the Austrian period of the 18th and 19th centuries. The
Austrian Stable Cadastral Survey of the 1830s to 1860s consisted of
records and extremely detailed maps showing the smallest parcels of land,
individual yards, houses, barns, roads, field plots, synagogues and even
large trees. At least three versions of these maps were created at the time
including a field sketch, a preliminary drafted version and the Cadastral
Map in full color. At least one or more versions of these maps still exist
for most villages." This ongoing research enables you not only to add to
the genealogy of your family, but to create a genealogy for a specific
house, following its inhabitants over a hundred years.

Gesher Galicia would like to acknowledge and thank Jay Osborn, who was
instrumental in designing the Map Room site and is responsible for
tackling the challenging process of stitching the maps together and
creating the interface by which researchers can view them. We'd also like
to thank Brian Lenius, Alexander Dunai and Natalie Dunai, who copied,
photographed or scanned these maps, Logan Kleinwaks, who also
contributed maps along with the other donors and international libraries
who provided many of the "specialty" maps you see here. Also thanks to
our AGD web designer, Brooke Schreier Ganz who created the template
for the page. If you have a map that you think would be of interest to our
research group and belongs on our site, please contact me. We welcome
all contributions to this effort.

If your town is not yet part of the project, it is because it has not yet been
funded. To join the project, Gesher Galicia requires $250 in start-up
funds, after which GG matches that amount with an additional $250. (This
amount can be donated by one individual, or several researchers can pool
resources to achieve the total.) Once a project is established, we inventory
the fonds of various archives that may hold records for your town and
then prioritize the acquisition of maps and records based on funding and
anticipated costs. Note that while the Map Room and All Galicia Database
are free for everyone to use, if you contribute a minimum of $25 to the
initial project when it starts you will get a password to view all the
original documents for your town. If a project has already been
established and you now wish to view the original record images, a
contribution of $50 is required. For more specific information, please
contact me after you have searched the inventory page to see the status
of your town project -- if one already exists -- or to inquire about
starting a new project. The archives are currently closed for the summer
vacation, but the project will resume in early September.

Again, kudos to everyone involved in the creation of this virtual map
repository, which is sure to enhance your Galician family history research.
If you have success using this resource, please let us know!

Pamela Weisberger
President & Research Coordinator
Gesher Galicia
pweisberger@...
www.GesherGalicia.org
www.search.GesherGalicia.org
www.maps.GesherGalicia.org
www.inventory.GesherGalicia.org