Date   

Yizkor Book Project, July 2012 #general

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I would like to hope that those of you who attended the IAJGS International
Conference returned home with their genealogy "tank" refilled and eager to become
involved in one of the JewishGen projects - for instance, let's say the Yizkor Book
Project <g> I'm quite sure that those of you who attended the Yizkor Book Birds of
a Feather meeting under the leadership of Jan Meisels Allen are particularly
inspired by her to become involved in our project. Anyway, if you were or weren't
at the conference and would like to take some part in the Yizkor Book Project in
some fashion - translating, transliterating, coordinating, editing or... I would
certainly like hear >from you and discuss what part of the project calls out to you.

Once again, I am pleased to let you know that a further book is now completely
online - "Rabka Four - Instruments of Genocide and Grand Larceny" that was written
by Robin O'Neil, who researches the Holocaust with insights and skills he acquired
in his years as police major crimes investigator at Scotland Yard. Robin has
generously donated a number of his manuscripts and for those who are yet to be
familiar with this unique research, I'm sure you will find them a real eye-opener.

We are very fortunate to have a long-standing arrangement with Yad Vashem,
Jerusalem, which enables us to receive Excel files of necrologies extracted >from a
wide range of Yizkor books. On our side, a team of conscientious volunteers
transliterate these lists into English and allow us to make them available to the
general public. This month, in particular, we've added in a number of necrologies
which come >from books that are not widely available and are particularly important
for researchers and, at the same time, allow us to immortalize the names of our
people who met their death during the Holocaust. Later on, yet another team of
conscientious volunteers led by Max Heffler, convert these lists into a format
which can be uploaded to our necrology database and the help of all these
volunteers is very much appreciated and allow us this wide range of research
options.

Now to facts and figures - as far as the July figures go, during this last month we
have added these 5 new projects:

- Kremenets, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kremenets, Vyshgorodok, and Pochayiv)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets3/kremenets3.html

- Regierungsbezirk Schwaben (region), Germany (The ordeal of the Jews in
Swabia) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/schwaben/schwaben.html

- Satoraljaujhely, Hungary (Vanished Communities in Hungary)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Satoraljaujhely/Satoraljaujhely.html

- Secovce, Slovakia (The History of the Jewish community in Secovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/secovce/secovce.html

- Skala Podolskaya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Skala)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/skala/skala.html

Added in 4 new entries:

- Cepeleuti, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00394a.html

- Lyublino, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00361.html

- Telice, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh113.html

- Tuchola, Poland (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland, Volume VI)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol6_00071.html

We have continued to update 25 of our existing projects:

- Bedzin, Poland (A Memorial to the Jewish Community of Bedzin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bedzin/Bedzin.html

- Biala Rawska, Poland (Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Biala Rawska)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Biala_Rawska/Biala_Rawska.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Galicia, Poland (Rabka Four - Instruments of Genocide and Grand Larceny)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Galicia3/galicia3.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Jaroslaw, Poland (Jaroslaw Book: a Memorial to Our Town)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jaroslaw/Jaroslaw.html

- Korets, Ukraine (The Korets book; in memory of our community that is no
more) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Korets/Korets.html

- Krivichi, Belarus (Kryvitsh Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krzywicze/Krzywicze.html

- Leczyca, Poland (Memorial Book of Leczyca)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Leczyca/Leczyca.html

- Molchadz, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Ostrolenka, Poland (Book of Kehilat Ostrolenka; Yizkor Book of the Jewish
Community of Ostrolenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrolenka1/ostrolenka1.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Smarhon (Smorgon), Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Sokolka, Poland (Memorial Book of Sokolka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sokolka/sokolka.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Volodymyr Volynskyy, Ukraine (Wladimir Wolynsk; in memory of the Jewish
community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Volodymyr_Volynskyy/Volodymyr_Volynskyy.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Yizkor Book Project, July 2012 #general

Lance Ackerfeld <lance.ackerfeld@...>
 

Shalom,

I would like to hope that those of you who attended the IAJGS International
Conference returned home with their genealogy "tank" refilled and eager to become
involved in one of the JewishGen projects - for instance, let's say the Yizkor Book
Project <g> I'm quite sure that those of you who attended the Yizkor Book Birds of
a Feather meeting under the leadership of Jan Meisels Allen are particularly
inspired by her to become involved in our project. Anyway, if you were or weren't
at the conference and would like to take some part in the Yizkor Book Project in
some fashion - translating, transliterating, coordinating, editing or... I would
certainly like hear >from you and discuss what part of the project calls out to you.

Once again, I am pleased to let you know that a further book is now completely
online - "Rabka Four - Instruments of Genocide and Grand Larceny" that was written
by Robin O'Neil, who researches the Holocaust with insights and skills he acquired
in his years as police major crimes investigator at Scotland Yard. Robin has
generously donated a number of his manuscripts and for those who are yet to be
familiar with this unique research, I'm sure you will find them a real eye-opener.

We are very fortunate to have a long-standing arrangement with Yad Vashem,
Jerusalem, which enables us to receive Excel files of necrologies extracted >from a
wide range of Yizkor books. On our side, a team of conscientious volunteers
transliterate these lists into English and allow us to make them available to the
general public. This month, in particular, we've added in a number of necrologies
which come >from books that are not widely available and are particularly important
for researchers and, at the same time, allow us to immortalize the names of our
people who met their death during the Holocaust. Later on, yet another team of
conscientious volunteers led by Max Heffler, convert these lists into a format
which can be uploaded to our necrology database and the help of all these
volunteers is very much appreciated and allow us this wide range of research
options.

Now to facts and figures - as far as the July figures go, during this last month we
have added these 5 new projects:

- Kremenets, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Kremenets, Vyshgorodok, and Pochayiv)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/kremenets3/kremenets3.html

- Regierungsbezirk Schwaben (region), Germany (The ordeal of the Jews in
Swabia) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/schwaben/schwaben.html

- Satoraljaujhely, Hungary (Vanished Communities in Hungary)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Satoraljaujhely/Satoraljaujhely.html

- Secovce, Slovakia (The History of the Jewish community in Secovce)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/secovce/secovce.html

- Skala Podolskaya, Ukraine (Memorial Book of Skala)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/skala/skala.html

Added in 4 new entries:

- Cepeleuti, Moldova (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00394a.html

- Lyublino, Ukraine (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania, Volume
II) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom2_00361.html

- Telice, Czech Republic (The Jews and Jewish Communities of Bohemia in the
past and present) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/bohemia/boh113.html

- Tuchola, Poland (Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Poland, Volume VI)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_poland/pol6_00071.html

We have continued to update 25 of our existing projects:

- Bedzin, Poland (A Memorial to the Jewish Community of Bedzin)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bedzin/Bedzin.html

- Biala Rawska, Poland (Memorial Book to the Martyrs of Biala Rawska)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Biala_Rawska/Biala_Rawska.html

- Bialystok, Poland (The chronicle of Bialystok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Bialystok/Bialystok.html

- Chelm, Poland (Commemoration book Chelm)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/chelm/chelm.html

- Czestochowa, Poland (The Jews of Czestochowa)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czestochowa1/Czestochowa1.html

- Czyzew, Poland (Czyzewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Czyzew/Czyzew.html

- Dieveniskes, Lithuania (Devenishki book; memorial book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/dieveniskes/dieveniskes.html

- Galicia, Poland (Rabka Four - Instruments of Genocide and Grand Larceny)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Galicia3/galicia3.html

- Golub-Dobrzyn, Poland (In Memory of the Communities Dobrzyn-Gollob)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/golub_dobrzyn/golub_dobrzyn.html

- Goniadz, Poland (Our hometown Goniondz)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/goniadz/goniadz.html

- Grajewo, Poland (Grayewo Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Grajewo/Grajewo.html

- Jaroslaw, Poland (Jaroslaw Book: a Memorial to Our Town)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Jaroslaw/Jaroslaw.html

- Korets, Ukraine (The Korets book; in memory of our community that is no
more) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Korets/Korets.html

- Krivichi, Belarus (Kryvitsh Yizkor Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Krzywicze/Krzywicze.html

- Leczyca, Poland (Memorial Book of Leczyca)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Leczyca/Leczyca.html

- Molchadz, Belarus (Molchadz, In Memory of the Jewish Community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Molchadz/Molchadz.html

- Ostrolenka, Poland (Book of Kehilat Ostrolenka; Yizkor Book of the Jewish
Community of Ostrolenka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/ostrolenka1/ostrolenka1.html

- Serock, Poland (The book of Serock)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/serock/serock.html

- Sierpc, Poland (The Community of Sierpc; Memorial Book)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Sierpc/Sierpc.html

- Smarhon (Smorgon), Belarus (Smorgonie, District Vilna; memorial book and
testimony) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/smorgon/smorgon.html

- Sokolka, Poland (Memorial Book of Sokolka)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sokolka/sokolka.html

- Stowbtsy, Belarus (Memorial volume of Steibtz-Swerznie and the neighboring
villages Rubezhevitz, Derevna, Nalibok)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Stowbtsy/Stowbtsy.html

- Tarnogrod, Poland (Book of Tarnogrod; in memory of the destroyed Jewish
community) http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnogrod/tarnogrod.html

- Tarnow, Poland (The life and decline of a Jewish city)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/tarnow/tarnow.html

- Volodymyr Volynskyy, Ukraine (Wladimir Wolynsk; in memory of the Jewish
community)
http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/Volodymyr_Volynskyy/Volodymyr_Volynskyy.html

Please remember that all this month's additions and updates have been
flagged at http://www.jewishgen.org/Yizkor/translations.html to make it easy
to find them.

All the best,
Lance Ackerfeld
Yizkor Book Project Manager


Re: Ordering records from the Lithuanian State Historical Archives (from Israel) #lithuania

Peter Cohen <pcohen@...>
 

What kind of information might one hope to receive >from the LVIA
that is not in the DRG or vital records work that has been done?

Peter Cohen

-----Original Message-----

<< From: "Shosh Kalson" shosh@...
I'm interested in hearing >from people in Israel who have ordered records
from the archives. How did you pay? How long did it take? Etc. >>
Ordering records >from the LVIA, >from Israel, is no different than ordering
records >from anywhere else in the world. Send a request to Galina Baranova
galinao@... via email. She will notify you of the cost and you will
have to pay via a bank transfer.

I am not sure but I think she left today on a two week vacation so you may
not receive an immediate response.

I notice you are interested in Sakiai which is in the Suwalki District of
Lithuania. If you are not already a member I suggest you join the Suwalki
Gub. Research Group (SGRG). Contribute $100 to www.litvaksig.org/contribute
and scroll down to Special Projects. Choose Suwalki.

Howard Margol
Litvak SIG Coordinator for Records Acquisition


Lithuania SIG #Lithuania Re: Ordering records from the Lithuanian State Historical Archives (from Israel) #lithuania

Peter Cohen <pcohen@...>
 

What kind of information might one hope to receive >from the LVIA
that is not in the DRG or vital records work that has been done?

Peter Cohen

-----Original Message-----

<< From: "Shosh Kalson" shosh@...
I'm interested in hearing >from people in Israel who have ordered records
from the archives. How did you pay? How long did it take? Etc. >>
Ordering records >from the LVIA, >from Israel, is no different than ordering
records >from anywhere else in the world. Send a request to Galina Baranova
galinao@... via email. She will notify you of the cost and you will
have to pay via a bank transfer.

I am not sure but I think she left today on a two week vacation so you may
not receive an immediate response.

I notice you are interested in Sakiai which is in the Suwalki District of
Lithuania. If you are not already a member I suggest you join the Suwalki
Gub. Research Group (SGRG). Contribute $100 to www.litvaksig.org/contribute
and scroll down to Special Projects. Choose Suwalki.

Howard Margol
Litvak SIG Coordinator for Records Acquisition


Donating Files to Archives #general

Isabel Cymerman
 

Dear Genners,
Has anyone had experience donating their genealogical files to selected Archives?
Are there any particular questions I should ask before I give these files away?
Do the Archives generally give you a copy? Do they create an index?

Is there anything else I should think about before I take this big step!?

Thank you All!

Isabel Cymerman
Roxbury, CT

MODERATOR NOTE: Posting this message is not intended to invite follow up messages
that praise or criticize organizations, people or governments. Endorsement or
criticism is against JewishGen policy. If you have information which will be of
general interest that does not violate JewishGen policy, please submit your
message to the group. You are of course welcome to respond privately to Isabel.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Donating Files to Archives #general

Isabel Cymerman
 

Dear Genners,
Has anyone had experience donating their genealogical files to selected Archives?
Are there any particular questions I should ask before I give these files away?
Do the Archives generally give you a copy? Do they create an index?

Is there anything else I should think about before I take this big step!?

Thank you All!

Isabel Cymerman
Roxbury, CT

MODERATOR NOTE: Posting this message is not intended to invite follow up messages
that praise or criticize organizations, people or governments. Endorsement or
criticism is against JewishGen policy. If you have information which will be of
general interest that does not violate JewishGen policy, please submit your
message to the group. You are of course welcome to respond privately to Isabel.


Rabbi Isaac Sassoon #general

Tamar Gold <trgold@...>
 

I am trying to contact a "very" distant relative, Rabbi Isaac Sassoon, son of the
late noted Rabbi Solomon David Sassoon of London and Israel. The family is listed in
my book "The Unbroken Chain." They are both well-known in the Sefardic community.
If anyone can get me his contact info - current address, email or phone number, etc
I would be most grateful.
Thanks
Neil Rosenstein
*Please respond to neilgenealogy@... only.

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Rabbi Isaac Sassoon #general

Tamar Gold <trgold@...>
 

I am trying to contact a "very" distant relative, Rabbi Isaac Sassoon, son of the
late noted Rabbi Solomon David Sassoon of London and Israel. The family is listed in
my book "The Unbroken Chain." They are both well-known in the Sefardic community.
If anyone can get me his contact info - current address, email or phone number, etc
I would be most grateful.
Thanks
Neil Rosenstein
*Please respond to neilgenealogy@... only.

MODERATOR NOTE: Please respond privately


A Quick Inquiry #general

Jacob Kubasiak <yaacovkuba@...>
 

I am a Jewishgen member and researcher, and I was just wondering about the 1929
Polish Business Directory. I have found it to be very helpful in tracking Jewish
ancestry >from towns my ancestors came from. At the top of it it doesn't state that
it is specifically "Jewish", it just says "Polish", so my question is how do we
know that these were all Jews? Were they all Jews listed in there specifically?

~Jacob Kubasiak
JewishGen ID #: 118976


Rabbi Somerstein--Thank you to everyone who replied. #general

Susan Viuker Lieberman <viukerville11@...>
 

No more information is needed. Barbara Zimmer sent it all!

Thank you,
Susan Viuker Lieberman


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen A Quick Inquiry #general

Jacob Kubasiak <yaacovkuba@...>
 

I am a Jewishgen member and researcher, and I was just wondering about the 1929
Polish Business Directory. I have found it to be very helpful in tracking Jewish
ancestry >from towns my ancestors came from. At the top of it it doesn't state that
it is specifically "Jewish", it just says "Polish", so my question is how do we
know that these were all Jews? Were they all Jews listed in there specifically?

~Jacob Kubasiak
JewishGen ID #: 118976


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Rabbi Somerstein--Thank you to everyone who replied. #general

Susan Viuker Lieberman <viukerville11@...>
 

No more information is needed. Barbara Zimmer sent it all!

Thank you,
Susan Viuker Lieberman


Re: Lulenetz #general

seforimlover
 

As l and n are frequently interchanged, I am guessing you might be looking for
Lunenitz.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luninets

Best wishes,

Yehuda Herskowitz

From: Alexander Sharon <olek.sharon@...>
Martha Forsyth wrote:
First, using Google in Cyrillic, I found a reference: someone is looking
for her brother born in "Ukraine (village Lyulenets Kalinowski district of
Vinnitsa region)". So I started looking with JewishGen and the JewishGen
Gazeteer: first for Vinnitsa - found that; then for Kalinovsky - found that too.
... north of Kalinovsky is a little town called Lyulintsy!
Good scouting, Martha! Only the name of the town that you have located is
Luchinets, not "Lyulenets". This is one of the larger (over one thousand souls)
Jewish communities located in the borshch belt where such known shtetlakh as
Shargorod, Brailov,Kalinovka and few others are situated.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Lulenetz #general

seforimlover
 

As l and n are frequently interchanged, I am guessing you might be looking for
Lunenitz.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luninets

Best wishes,

Yehuda Herskowitz

From: Alexander Sharon <olek.sharon@...>
Martha Forsyth wrote:
First, using Google in Cyrillic, I found a reference: someone is looking
for her brother born in "Ukraine (village Lyulenets Kalinowski district of
Vinnitsa region)". So I started looking with JewishGen and the JewishGen
Gazeteer: first for Vinnitsa - found that; then for Kalinovsky - found that too.
... north of Kalinovsky is a little town called Lyulintsy!
Good scouting, Martha! Only the name of the town that you have located is
Luchinets, not "Lyulenets". This is one of the larger (over one thousand souls)
Jewish communities located in the borshch belt where such known shtetlakh as
Shargorod, Brailov,Kalinovka and few others are situated.


Re: 1809/10 Donner(s)berg List of Jewish Householders #germany

Fran Luebke <franluebke@...>
 

Eva Lawrence’s post regarding the book “Pfaelizisches Judentum gestern
und heute” edited by Alfred Hans Kuby and article by Wilhelm Kreutz
might use some further elaboration on his chapter.

It is entitled “Die pfaelzischen Juden der napoleonischen Aera:
Bevoelkerungsentwicklung, regionale Ausbreitung und Sozialstruktur”,
pg 33-83.

Earlier pages 46-56 in the chapter list the number of Jews residing in each
Arrondissement, Canton and village in 1801, 1808 and 1825 and the
percentage of the total population.

Seeing his name in the post reminded me to look in my files where I
found a portion of a 322 page revised edition of a bibliography edited
by Kuby entitled “Juden in der Provinz: Beitraege zur Geschichte der
Juden in der Pfalz zwischen Emanzipation und Vernichtung”, March 1989,
in German. Bibliography cites works in German and English. Information
taken >from a photocopy of the table of contents and pages 244-322.
Part A: Reference works, journals, introductions and standard works,
pages 245-247
Part B: History of the Jews in the neighboring areas of the Palatinate,
pages 247-251
Part C: Books and essays on the history of the Jews of the Palatinate,
pages 252-272
Part C miss lettered?: Gurs (?) – October 22, 1940, p. 273-281
Part D: Local histories of Jews of the Palatinate, p. 282-322

This was a reminder to go through my files of photocopies given to me
about 10 years ago. I will be doing extensive traveling >from mid-August
to mid-October and will have very limited time to answer questions about
this material but I will assist Eva when possible.
If you have a question, please identify the Arrondissement, Canton and
village you are interested in before contacting me.

Fran Luebke, Brookfield WI, USA franluebke@...


German SIG #Germany Re: 1809/10 Donner(s)berg List of Jewish Householders #germany

Fran Luebke <franluebke@...>
 

Eva Lawrence’s post regarding the book “Pfaelizisches Judentum gestern
und heute” edited by Alfred Hans Kuby and article by Wilhelm Kreutz
might use some further elaboration on his chapter.

It is entitled “Die pfaelzischen Juden der napoleonischen Aera:
Bevoelkerungsentwicklung, regionale Ausbreitung und Sozialstruktur”,
pg 33-83.

Earlier pages 46-56 in the chapter list the number of Jews residing in each
Arrondissement, Canton and village in 1801, 1808 and 1825 and the
percentage of the total population.

Seeing his name in the post reminded me to look in my files where I
found a portion of a 322 page revised edition of a bibliography edited
by Kuby entitled “Juden in der Provinz: Beitraege zur Geschichte der
Juden in der Pfalz zwischen Emanzipation und Vernichtung”, March 1989,
in German. Bibliography cites works in German and English. Information
taken >from a photocopy of the table of contents and pages 244-322.
Part A: Reference works, journals, introductions and standard works,
pages 245-247
Part B: History of the Jews in the neighboring areas of the Palatinate,
pages 247-251
Part C: Books and essays on the history of the Jews of the Palatinate,
pages 252-272
Part C miss lettered?: Gurs (?) – October 22, 1940, p. 273-281
Part D: Local histories of Jews of the Palatinate, p. 282-322

This was a reminder to go through my files of photocopies given to me
about 10 years ago. I will be doing extensive traveling >from mid-August
to mid-October and will have very limited time to answer questions about
this material but I will assist Eva when possible.
If you have a question, please identify the Arrondissement, Canton and
village you are interested in before contacting me.

Fran Luebke, Brookfield WI, USA franluebke@...


Looking for birth records #general

Linda Harper <ljharper62@...>
 

I am looking for birth records for my grandmother Jeanette Baskin including parent
names. I know that she was born in 1903 or 1904 in either Lithuania or Russia. She
was one of 13 children and was sent over to the United States in 1911 at age 14
from Lithuania. One of her sisters is Becky or Rebecca, one brother is Philip.
Unfortunately I do not have the names of her parents or the exact location. I
would be grateful for any information or any resources that can point me in the
right direction.

Linda (Kahn) Harper
Phoenix, Arizona
USA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for birth records #general

Linda Harper <ljharper62@...>
 

I am looking for birth records for my grandmother Jeanette Baskin including parent
names. I know that she was born in 1903 or 1904 in either Lithuania or Russia. She
was one of 13 children and was sent over to the United States in 1911 at age 14
from Lithuania. One of her sisters is Becky or Rebecca, one brother is Philip.
Unfortunately I do not have the names of her parents or the exact location. I
would be grateful for any information or any resources that can point me in the
right direction.

Linda (Kahn) Harper
Phoenix, Arizona
USA


Why would a husband assume his wife's maiden name? #galicia

Rivka Schirman <capitetes@...>
 

The simplest answer is embedded in your question: so as he, his wife
and his children all have the same surname.

Obviously, >from what you have written, Chasia and children had legal
Austrian documents with the Chasia's maiden name, which indicates
that prior to Herman's departure for the US he and Chasia did not
register their Jewish marriage in the State registration and were not
considered legally married.

I do not know to what extent a Ketuba >from Austria would have
sufficed, in 1921, to have the Jewish marriage legally recognized as
valid in the US overriding the Austrian official documents stating they
were two unmarried persons and have all the papers of Chasia and the
children changed to STARYSOLER. The simplest - and probably also the
quickest - solution seems to have been for Herman to change his
surname to match that of his wife and children.

Otherwise, in "the Old Country," there were cases in which a husband
took up his wife's family name. They were Jewishly 'authorised' in
such cases when, for example, there were no male descendants on the
wife's side to carry on the name. The Israeli law (Law of Names 1956)
enables every citizen, once married according to the State law, to either
go on carrying the previous surname, or choose the spouse's surname,
or join the spouse's surname to his/her own or to choose - together
with the spouse- a whole new surname for the couple.

Rivka

Roy Star <roystar20@...> wrote:

Herman STARYSOLER >from Tarnopol, Galicia, immigrated to New York USA
originally around 1913. He most probably returned to Tarnopol and then
back to New York, where, in 1921 his wife and children joined him there....

His wife and 3 children travelled under Chasia's maiden name CZYGLIK.
He assumed this name for himself and the children, and dropped the 'Z'
replacing it with an 'H' thus changing it to CHYGLIK....

Can anyone give an insight as to why someone would change their
family's surname to his wife's maiden name in this way?


Re: Why would a husband assume his wife's maiden name? #galicia

Stephen Weinstein
 

Historically, this sometimes happened if the wife had the more
prestigious/desirable name. (I imagine it might also happen if the
husband had a name that had come into disgrace because of a scandal
involving someone else with the same name.)

A related, but distinct, phenomenon is when the wife is >from a famous
family and the husband will be known as someone who is part of that
family, rather than the wife being known as someone who is part of his
family. For example, we often refer to the Queen's husband as one of
the Windsors, but most of us do not even know his ancestry (even
though his father was the King of Greece), much less refer to his wife
as part of that family.

However, in this particular case, you seem to believe that the
children had the wife's surname before the husband did. Therefore,
the most likely explanation seems to be that he took their surname to
make it appear as though they had been given his surname at birth,
when, in reality, they were either illegitimate or >from a previous
marriage. Research into whether the wife's name was her maiden name
or the name of a prior husband may shed light on this.

More modern, real examples include:

1. A man who believed that it was important for his children to have
the same last name as both of their parents and a woman who wanted
to keep her maiden name were getting married. Since he did not want
them to have different last names, and she did not want to change her
last name, they agreed that the best solution would be for him to take
her name.

2. Japanese law required a husband and wife to use the same name on
government documents. A female professor at a government university
got married and wanted to keep being listed in the catalog under the
name by which she was already known in her field. Therefore, her
husband had to take her name. (However, he kept using his original
name professionally, and being teased on business trips about having
his wife's name in his passport, so they finally decided to get
divorced on paper, so that the Japanese government would let them use
different last names, but continued to live as though they were still
married.)

Stephen Weinstein
Camarillo, California, USA
stephenweinstein@...

Roy Star <roystar20@...> wrote:

Herman STARYSOLER >from Tarnopol, Galicia, immigrated to New York USA
originally around 1913. He most probably returned to Tarnopol and then
back to New York, where, in 1921 his wife and children joined him there....

His wife and 3 children travelled under Chasia's maiden name CZYGLIK.
He assumed this name for himself and the children, and dropped the 'Z'
replacing it with an 'H' thus changing it to CHYGLIK....

Can anyone give an insight as to why someone would change their
family's surname to his wife's maiden name in this way?