Date   

The importance of original documents #lodz #poland

Apollo Israel <apollo@...>
 

Dear fellow JewishGenners,

Apologies in advance for this long email, but please bear with me.

Many of us have had the thrill of seeing a relative's name come up in one of
JewishGen's phenomenal databases or in other genealogy websites, and some of
us have taken the next step and ordered the relevant documents to see what
else we can learn. The reason I'm writing today is because, while it seemed
obvious to me to go ahead and order simple records like birth, marriage,
death or immigration/naturalization certificates, for a long time I simply
didn't think to do so for other, less straightforward kinds of records -
like the Holocaust records held by Israel's Yad Vashem, for example. And yet
now that I have finally done so, I have been blown away by what I have
learned. So I'm writing to tell you all to make the effort to get any
original records you can, not just the obvious or easy ones!

To illustrate, I always knew that most of my late grandmother's family had
been killed in the Holocaust, probably in or around Lodz, Poland, where they
lived. I found some of my grandmother's uncles, aunts and cousins listed in
the Lodz Ghetto population register in JewishGen's Holocaust database, and
while I was both thrilled and saddened to see their names and learn their
ages, addresses, occupations and specific fates, I was puzzled because I
couldn't find one particular uncle there, or in any other online Holocaust
source. I was similarly moved to discover that my grandmother's grandmother
had been in the ghetto and had died there in 1942 at the age of 76, but was
puzzled why the database seemed to show her at several different addresses
in the ghetto before her death.

I knew that the database was based on a set of five books printed after the
war, and that those books had in turn been based on the original,
handwritten population registry lists compiled in the ghetto. I learned that
the original lists are in the Polish State Archives in Lodz and that Yad
Vashem has a copy, which is not available online. Recently I decided to
write to Yad Vashem, and the organization very kindly sent me a number of
pages copied >from the original population registry.

I must say that even before I read the documents properly, I was jolted by
seeing the handwritten lists of names, grouped by families according to
apartment numbers in each building, under printed German column headings,
and seeing how many names were simply crossed out with annotations such as
"gest." (the German abbreviation for "died") or "ausg." (deported, in this
case to the Chelmno death camp). I don't think anything I've read in history
books or seen in documentaries or movies has given me a sense of the scale
and horror of the Holocaust and how it must have affected each and every Jew
in Poland at the time as much as those handwritten documents with their many
crossed-out names.

But what struck me also was that these documents contain quite a few pieces
of information that are not in the database, and some of this information is
quite significant. In just one example out of several, one of my
grandmother's uncles is listed in the database with his wife and three
children, but in the original document with five children. Somehow two of
the children were omitted >from the database (possibly >from the printed
books). We would never have known about these children if not for the
original document.

Other details in the documents clarified things that had puzzled me: My
great-great-grandmother's many addresses in the ghetto, it emerged, came
about because she lived first with her eldest son (who was then deported
with his entire family to the Chelmno death camp - I don't know how my
great-great-grandmother avoided being deported with him); then with her
second son (the uncle who is missing >from the database for reasons unknown);
then with her daughter-in-law, the wife of her third son (the son having
been taken away for forced labor), and finally, her last address, the
address at which she died, must have been some sort of hospital or home,
because, unlike the documents for residential buildings, in which families
are grouped by apartment number, here there is simply a long list of people,
all of them with different surnames, with no apartment numbers, and most of
them crossed off and noted as having died on different dates. Even though I
have read up extensively on the Lodz Ghetto, I have never seen that
particular address mentioned as a hospital or home. It was (sadly)
illuminating for me to learn that, after suffering for two years in the
ghetto and seeing several of her children and grandchildren sent to their
deaths at Chelmno and others dying around her, my great-great-grandmother
must have died alone, in what was possibly a makeshift hospital set up to
cope with the overload of sick, starving, dying people in the ghetto.

I never would have found all this if I had not sought out the original
documents, and I have shared this story to show the importance of obtaining
original documents whenever and wherever possible.

I would also like to offer some information of specific interest to those
whose relatives were in the Lodz Ghetto. Because it puzzled me why my
great-great-uncle and his family did not appear in the database, I started
to search the database for some of the other 11 families who are listed in
the original document at the same address. Sure enough, as far as I could
see, most of them do not appear in the database at all, while some do, but
with somewhat different details, probably >from other entries in the registry
books (many people were listed twice or even three times as the books were
updated during the ghetto's four-year lifespan). I believe these particular
pages were probably (accidentally) omitted >from the printed books and
therefore >from the database. If anyone is interested in the following
families, I feel I would be doing a mitzvah to send them copies of the
original pages. Details as follows:

Address: Krzyzowa (Kreuz) 12.
Apt. 1: NAJMAN, Josek, Laja, Rojza, Mendel, Rutka, Abo, Wowa; STRYKOWSKI,
Mojsio.
Apt. 2: PRZYSUCHA, Bluma and Abram.
Apt. 3: CUKIER, Moszek, Fajga, Ruchla, Miriam, Gerszon; GRINBAUM, Rajzla.
Apt. 4: URBACH, Elka, Estera, Sura, Machla.
Apt. 5: ROMANOWICZ, Izrael, Etta-Fryma, Szymon, Etta.
Apt. 6: ABRAMOWICZ, Mojziesz, Gitla, Alta, Ichok.
Apt. 7: RUSS, Pinkus, Ruchla, Sura, Jankiel.
Apt. 8: KACZMAREK, Mendel, Fraidla, Sara, Rachmil.
Apt. 9: GOLDBERG-WALD, Szlama, Fajga, Estera.
Apt. 10: HERSZKOWICZ, Haja, Rochma; BERNCHOLC, Ita, Bronia.
Apt. 11: ROZENBLUM, Rywka, Rojza, Miriam, Menashe.
Apt. 12: (My great-great-uncle) LICHTENSZTAJN, Fajwel, Chana, Hersz.

The document is dated June 16, 1940, and is signed by a Jacob PURMANN (?)
and N. GLIKSMAN, and contains no further information about the fates of the
people mentioned.

All the best,

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.
Researching: BULWAR (Lodz, Krakow); FRENKIEL (Belz, Krakow); KALUSZYNER,
KUSMIERSKI, (Kaluszyn, Lodz); KUZKA, KASZKIET, RZETELNY, WROBEL (Kaluszyn);
KRYSKA, LICHTENSZTAJN (Sieradz, Lodz); WAKS, BEKER, ENGEL (Nowe Miasto nad
Pilica).


Lodz Area Research Group #Lodz #Poland The importance of original documents #lodz #poland

Apollo Israel <apollo@...>
 

Dear fellow JewishGenners,

Apologies in advance for this long email, but please bear with me.

Many of us have had the thrill of seeing a relative's name come up in one of
JewishGen's phenomenal databases or in other genealogy websites, and some of
us have taken the next step and ordered the relevant documents to see what
else we can learn. The reason I'm writing today is because, while it seemed
obvious to me to go ahead and order simple records like birth, marriage,
death or immigration/naturalization certificates, for a long time I simply
didn't think to do so for other, less straightforward kinds of records -
like the Holocaust records held by Israel's Yad Vashem, for example. And yet
now that I have finally done so, I have been blown away by what I have
learned. So I'm writing to tell you all to make the effort to get any
original records you can, not just the obvious or easy ones!

To illustrate, I always knew that most of my late grandmother's family had
been killed in the Holocaust, probably in or around Lodz, Poland, where they
lived. I found some of my grandmother's uncles, aunts and cousins listed in
the Lodz Ghetto population register in JewishGen's Holocaust database, and
while I was both thrilled and saddened to see their names and learn their
ages, addresses, occupations and specific fates, I was puzzled because I
couldn't find one particular uncle there, or in any other online Holocaust
source. I was similarly moved to discover that my grandmother's grandmother
had been in the ghetto and had died there in 1942 at the age of 76, but was
puzzled why the database seemed to show her at several different addresses
in the ghetto before her death.

I knew that the database was based on a set of five books printed after the
war, and that those books had in turn been based on the original,
handwritten population registry lists compiled in the ghetto. I learned that
the original lists are in the Polish State Archives in Lodz and that Yad
Vashem has a copy, which is not available online. Recently I decided to
write to Yad Vashem, and the organization very kindly sent me a number of
pages copied >from the original population registry.

I must say that even before I read the documents properly, I was jolted by
seeing the handwritten lists of names, grouped by families according to
apartment numbers in each building, under printed German column headings,
and seeing how many names were simply crossed out with annotations such as
"gest." (the German abbreviation for "died") or "ausg." (deported, in this
case to the Chelmno death camp). I don't think anything I've read in history
books or seen in documentaries or movies has given me a sense of the scale
and horror of the Holocaust and how it must have affected each and every Jew
in Poland at the time as much as those handwritten documents with their many
crossed-out names.

But what struck me also was that these documents contain quite a few pieces
of information that are not in the database, and some of this information is
quite significant. In just one example out of several, one of my
grandmother's uncles is listed in the database with his wife and three
children, but in the original document with five children. Somehow two of
the children were omitted >from the database (possibly >from the printed
books). We would never have known about these children if not for the
original document.

Other details in the documents clarified things that had puzzled me: My
great-great-grandmother's many addresses in the ghetto, it emerged, came
about because she lived first with her eldest son (who was then deported
with his entire family to the Chelmno death camp - I don't know how my
great-great-grandmother avoided being deported with him); then with her
second son (the uncle who is missing >from the database for reasons unknown);
then with her daughter-in-law, the wife of her third son (the son having
been taken away for forced labor), and finally, her last address, the
address at which she died, must have been some sort of hospital or home,
because, unlike the documents for residential buildings, in which families
are grouped by apartment number, here there is simply a long list of people,
all of them with different surnames, with no apartment numbers, and most of
them crossed off and noted as having died on different dates. Even though I
have read up extensively on the Lodz Ghetto, I have never seen that
particular address mentioned as a hospital or home. It was (sadly)
illuminating for me to learn that, after suffering for two years in the
ghetto and seeing several of her children and grandchildren sent to their
deaths at Chelmno and others dying around her, my great-great-grandmother
must have died alone, in what was possibly a makeshift hospital set up to
cope with the overload of sick, starving, dying people in the ghetto.

I never would have found all this if I had not sought out the original
documents, and I have shared this story to show the importance of obtaining
original documents whenever and wherever possible.

I would also like to offer some information of specific interest to those
whose relatives were in the Lodz Ghetto. Because it puzzled me why my
great-great-uncle and his family did not appear in the database, I started
to search the database for some of the other 11 families who are listed in
the original document at the same address. Sure enough, as far as I could
see, most of them do not appear in the database at all, while some do, but
with somewhat different details, probably >from other entries in the registry
books (many people were listed twice or even three times as the books were
updated during the ghetto's four-year lifespan). I believe these particular
pages were probably (accidentally) omitted >from the printed books and
therefore >from the database. If anyone is interested in the following
families, I feel I would be doing a mitzvah to send them copies of the
original pages. Details as follows:

Address: Krzyzowa (Kreuz) 12.
Apt. 1: NAJMAN, Josek, Laja, Rojza, Mendel, Rutka, Abo, Wowa; STRYKOWSKI,
Mojsio.
Apt. 2: PRZYSUCHA, Bluma and Abram.
Apt. 3: CUKIER, Moszek, Fajga, Ruchla, Miriam, Gerszon; GRINBAUM, Rajzla.
Apt. 4: URBACH, Elka, Estera, Sura, Machla.
Apt. 5: ROMANOWICZ, Izrael, Etta-Fryma, Szymon, Etta.
Apt. 6: ABRAMOWICZ, Mojziesz, Gitla, Alta, Ichok.
Apt. 7: RUSS, Pinkus, Ruchla, Sura, Jankiel.
Apt. 8: KACZMAREK, Mendel, Fraidla, Sara, Rachmil.
Apt. 9: GOLDBERG-WALD, Szlama, Fajga, Estera.
Apt. 10: HERSZKOWICZ, Haja, Rochma; BERNCHOLC, Ita, Bronia.
Apt. 11: ROZENBLUM, Rywka, Rojza, Miriam, Menashe.
Apt. 12: (My great-great-uncle) LICHTENSZTAJN, Fajwel, Chana, Hersz.

The document is dated June 16, 1940, and is signed by a Jacob PURMANN (?)
and N. GLIKSMAN, and contains no further information about the fates of the
people mentioned.

All the best,

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.
Researching: BULWAR (Lodz, Krakow); FRENKIEL (Belz, Krakow); KALUSZYNER,
KUSMIERSKI, (Kaluszyn, Lodz); KUZKA, KASZKIET, RZETELNY, WROBEL (Kaluszyn);
KRYSKA, LICHTENSZTAJN (Sieradz, Lodz); WAKS, BEKER, ENGEL (Nowe Miasto nad
Pilica).


Novogrod-Volhynsky, Ukraine (Zvhil) BOF meeting #ukraine

marvintur@...
 

Did anyone attend the Novogrod-Volhynsky, Volhynnia Gubernia, Ukraine
(Zvhil) BOF meeting during the Paris Conference on Monday, July 16 at 10.50
AM?

If so, I would greatly appreciate it if you would contact me directly?

Marvin Turkanis

Zvhil (Novohrad Volynskyy) SIG Town Leader

marvintur@...


Ukraine SIG #Ukraine Novogrod-Volhynsky, Ukraine (Zvhil) BOF meeting #ukraine

marvintur@...
 

Did anyone attend the Novogrod-Volhynsky, Volhynnia Gubernia, Ukraine
(Zvhil) BOF meeting during the Paris Conference on Monday, July 16 at 10.50
AM?

If so, I would greatly appreciate it if you would contact me directly?

Marvin Turkanis

Zvhil (Novohrad Volynskyy) SIG Town Leader

marvintur@...


Paris 2012 - Conference Update for Tuesday Morning July 17th #germany

Jeanette R Rosenberg OBE
 

Dear GerSiggers

Yesterday was a very busy day, especially for GerSIG members. There
was a heavy program and I ran right out of time during the day and
evening. I promise to catch up with what happened yesterday during
the course of today. [Tuesday, July 17]

I'm writing this email as we are just about to start the GerSIG
breakfast. Roger Lustig, Bozena Kubit and I will be answering the
research queries put to us by those attending, so I am sure we will
have some fun! Hopefully we will help some people with their brick
walls too!

There are less sessions of direct GerSIG interest on the agenda for
today, but this afternoon Garri Regev will be reading Martha Levinson
Lev-Zion's talk about the Central Archives for the History of the
Jewish People in Jerusalem, CAHJP has extensive German resources, so
that will be really interesting. Martha, a GerSIG member of many
years is rather unwell at the moment and was unable to come to
conference herself. We all want her to know that we're thinking of her
and that we wish her a speedy recovery.

Other sessions of German SIg interst today are Ralph Bloch's talk
about the Jews of Stuehlingen and Michael Brocke's talk about the
Cohanim and Leviim of Mayence and Worms in the 11-15th centuries.

Mid way through the afternoon today, Gerhard Buck will be delivering
his talk on data and data banks.

More later, people are arriving now for our GerSig Breakfast! Jeanette

Jeanette Rosenberg, GerSig Director, London @JeanetteRRosenbergOBE


German SIG #Germany Paris 2012 - Conference Update for Tuesday Morning July 17th #germany

Jeanette R Rosenberg OBE
 

Dear GerSiggers

Yesterday was a very busy day, especially for GerSIG members. There
was a heavy program and I ran right out of time during the day and
evening. I promise to catch up with what happened yesterday during
the course of today. [Tuesday, July 17]

I'm writing this email as we are just about to start the GerSIG
breakfast. Roger Lustig, Bozena Kubit and I will be answering the
research queries put to us by those attending, so I am sure we will
have some fun! Hopefully we will help some people with their brick
walls too!

There are less sessions of direct GerSIG interest on the agenda for
today, but this afternoon Garri Regev will be reading Martha Levinson
Lev-Zion's talk about the Central Archives for the History of the
Jewish People in Jerusalem, CAHJP has extensive German resources, so
that will be really interesting. Martha, a GerSIG member of many
years is rather unwell at the moment and was unable to come to
conference herself. We all want her to know that we're thinking of her
and that we wish her a speedy recovery.

Other sessions of German SIg interst today are Ralph Bloch's talk
about the Jews of Stuehlingen and Michael Brocke's talk about the
Cohanim and Leviim of Mayence and Worms in the 11-15th centuries.

Mid way through the afternoon today, Gerhard Buck will be delivering
his talk on data and data banks.

More later, people are arriving now for our GerSig Breakfast! Jeanette

Jeanette Rosenberg, GerSig Director, London @JeanetteRRosenbergOBE


Looking for a Yad Vashem POT Submitter #general

George Rothstein
 

I have recently found in the Yad Vashem data base an entire SHENKMAN family
that I believe may be my relatives >from the Disna/Glubokoe/Vilna area. I
would very much like to contact the relative, Brakha (or Barra) Boim, of
this family who submitted the pages of testimony (POT). The testimony is in
Hebrew and was given in 1957 in Jerusalem. Therefore, I think that she lives
or lived in Israel.

Her POTs were for her uncle Barukh (b. 1881, grain merchant), his wife
Khasia (b. 1883), their daughters Hina (b.1904) and Khaia Pesa (b. 1908),
the submitter's uncle Menakhim Mendel (b. 1877, merchant), his wife Sara nee
Finkelshtein (b. 1884), their children Yitzhak (b. 1900?), Hoda (b. 1903?)
and Reiza (b. 1915), the submitter's brother Zelig (b. 1902, merchant), his
wife Braina (b. 1902) and their children Dvora (b. 1932), Sima (b. 1933),
Aba (b. 1935), Yaachov (b. 1936) and Feiga (b. 1938).

If you know of this person or her family or if you have any suggestions
about how I can go about locating them I would be most grateful if you would
contact me.

Thank You,

George Rothstein

Researching SHENKMAN, SVERDLOV, CHEREPACHA, LEVINE, ROTHSTEIN, GREENGLASS


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Looking for a Yad Vashem POT Submitter #general

George Rothstein
 

I have recently found in the Yad Vashem data base an entire SHENKMAN family
that I believe may be my relatives >from the Disna/Glubokoe/Vilna area. I
would very much like to contact the relative, Brakha (or Barra) Boim, of
this family who submitted the pages of testimony (POT). The testimony is in
Hebrew and was given in 1957 in Jerusalem. Therefore, I think that she lives
or lived in Israel.

Her POTs were for her uncle Barukh (b. 1881, grain merchant), his wife
Khasia (b. 1883), their daughters Hina (b.1904) and Khaia Pesa (b. 1908),
the submitter's uncle Menakhim Mendel (b. 1877, merchant), his wife Sara nee
Finkelshtein (b. 1884), their children Yitzhak (b. 1900?), Hoda (b. 1903?)
and Reiza (b. 1915), the submitter's brother Zelig (b. 1902, merchant), his
wife Braina (b. 1902) and their children Dvora (b. 1932), Sima (b. 1933),
Aba (b. 1935), Yaachov (b. 1936) and Feiga (b. 1938).

If you know of this person or her family or if you have any suggestions
about how I can go about locating them I would be most grateful if you would
contact me.

Thank You,

George Rothstein

Researching SHENKMAN, SVERDLOV, CHEREPACHA, LEVINE, ROTHSTEIN, GREENGLASS


Re: Evolution of a Surname: BIALOGURSKI to LEVINSKY #general

Bev Rayburn
 

Regarding changes of name when immigrating

I stumbled across some info on the Internet a couple of years ago that
may explain the name changes for families coming >from Lithuania.

It was an article describing the experiences of families waiting to get
onto a ship. A ticket did not guarantee a specific departure date or ship.
Families would arrive and wait and wait and wait. They could not work
while waiting and it could become challenging to survive the lenghtly
waits. Families became desperate to get on a ship.

Everyone in a family would travel on the passport of the family head. It
was apparently not unusual to "join" a family just to get on the ship.
If a family was given a place the family could grow a bit. They would
appear on the manifest under the surname of the head of the family Which
could explain why sometimes you just can't find someone in the passenger
records.

This solved a mystery for us. We ere given a copy of a letter >from my
husbands Zaida to his cousin. In it he was obviously responding to a
concern raised by his cousin. He said that the cousin should not worry
about the fact he had entered the USA under the name Kopelyansky and that
many others had entered that way. We could not figure out what that meant
as to our knowledge he never used that surname in the USA. This article
gave us a possible explanation for that comment in the letter.

I don't know if I kept the article but if I come across it in my materials
I will post a link.

Bev Rayburn

From: Ricki Zunk <nockbockle@...>
Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2012 13:40:59 -0400

Many years ago, when I was beginning my family research, someone sent me
an email explaining how the people in the BIALOGURSKI branch of our
family (>from Sejny, Suwalki, Lithuania) came to North America and once
here (on on their way here) changed their surname >from BIALOGURSKI to
LEVINSKY or LEVINE or LAVINE. I got that info about 20 years ago. Now,
I cannot find the letter or email anywhere, and sadly my memory is not as
good as it used to be.

Does anyone have a logical explanation for this particular evolution? I
know that names can be changed for all sorts of reasons (or non-reasons),
but the fact that someone actually *knew* the answer all those years ago
makes me all the more anxious to find that info once again.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: Evolution of a Surname: BIALOGURSKI to LEVINSKY #general

Bev Rayburn
 

Regarding changes of name when immigrating

I stumbled across some info on the Internet a couple of years ago that
may explain the name changes for families coming >from Lithuania.

It was an article describing the experiences of families waiting to get
onto a ship. A ticket did not guarantee a specific departure date or ship.
Families would arrive and wait and wait and wait. They could not work
while waiting and it could become challenging to survive the lenghtly
waits. Families became desperate to get on a ship.

Everyone in a family would travel on the passport of the family head. It
was apparently not unusual to "join" a family just to get on the ship.
If a family was given a place the family could grow a bit. They would
appear on the manifest under the surname of the head of the family Which
could explain why sometimes you just can't find someone in the passenger
records.

This solved a mystery for us. We ere given a copy of a letter >from my
husbands Zaida to his cousin. In it he was obviously responding to a
concern raised by his cousin. He said that the cousin should not worry
about the fact he had entered the USA under the name Kopelyansky and that
many others had entered that way. We could not figure out what that meant
as to our knowledge he never used that surname in the USA. This article
gave us a possible explanation for that comment in the letter.

I don't know if I kept the article but if I come across it in my materials
I will post a link.

Bev Rayburn

From: Ricki Zunk <nockbockle@...>
Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2012 13:40:59 -0400

Many years ago, when I was beginning my family research, someone sent me
an email explaining how the people in the BIALOGURSKI branch of our
family (>from Sejny, Suwalki, Lithuania) came to North America and once
here (on on their way here) changed their surname >from BIALOGURSKI to
LEVINSKY or LEVINE or LAVINE. I got that info about 20 years ago. Now,
I cannot find the letter or email anywhere, and sadly my memory is not as
good as it used to be.

Does anyone have a logical explanation for this particular evolution? I
know that names can be changed for all sorts of reasons (or non-reasons),
but the fact that someone actually *knew* the answer all those years ago
makes me all the more anxious to find that info once again.


The importance of original documents #general

Apollo Israel <apollo@...>
 

Dear fellow JewishGenners,

Apologies in advance for this long email, but please bear with me.

Many of us have had the thrill of seeing a relative's name come up in one of
JewishGen's phenomenal databases or in other genealogy websites, and some of
us have taken the next step and ordered the relevant documents to see what
else we can learn. The reason I'm writing today is because, while it seemed
obvious to me to go ahead and order simple records like birth, marriage,
death or immigration/naturalization certificates, for a long time I simply
didn't think to do so for other, less straightforward kinds of records -
like the Holocaust records held by Israel's Yad Vashem, for example. And yet
now that I have finally done so, I have been blown away by what I have
learned. So I'm writing to tell you all to make the effort to get any
original records you can, not just the obvious or easy ones!

To illustrate, I always knew that most of my late grandmother's family had
been killed in the Holocaust, probably in or around Lodz, Poland, where they
lived. I found some of my grandmother's uncles, aunts and cousins listed in
the Lodz Ghetto population register in JewishGen's Holocaust database, and
while I was both thrilled and saddened to see their names and learn their
ages, addresses, occupations and specific fates, I was puzzled because I
couldn't find one particular uncle there, or in any other online Holocaust
source. I was similarly moved to discover that my grandmother's grandmother
had been in the ghetto and had died there in 1942 at the age of 76, but was
puzzled why the database seemed to show her at several different addresses
in the ghetto before her death.

I knew that the database was based on a set of five books printed after the
war, and that those books had in turn been based on the original,
handwritten population registry lists compiled in the ghetto. I learned that
the original lists are in the Polish State Archives in Lodz and that Yad
Vashem has a copy, which is not available online. Recently I decided to
write to Yad Vashem, and the organization very kindly sent me a number of
pages copied >from the original population registry.

I must say that even before I read the documents properly, I was jolted by
seeing the handwritten lists of names, grouped by families according to
apartment numbers in each building, under printed German column headings,
and seeing how many names were simply crossed out with annotations such as
"gest." (the German abbreviation for "died") or "ausg." (deported, in this
case to the Chelmno death camp). I don't think anything I've read in history
books or seen in documentaries or movies has given me a sense of the scale
and horror of the Holocaust and how it must have affected each and every Jew
in Poland at the time as much as those handwritten documents with their many
crossed-out names.

But what struck me also was that these documents contain quite a few pieces
of information that are not in the database, and some of this information is
quite significant. In just one example out of several, one of my
grandmother's uncles is listed in the database with his wife and three
children, but in the original document with five children. Somehow two of
the children were omitted >from the database (possibly >from the printed
books). We would never have known about these children if not for the
original document.

Other details in the documents clarified things that had puzzled me: My
great-great-grandmother's many addresses in the ghetto, it emerged, came
about because she lived first with her eldest son (who was then deported
with his entire family to the Chelmno death camp - I don't know how my
great-great-grandmother avoided being deported with him); then with her
second son (the uncle who is missing >from the database for reasons unknown);
then with her daughter-in-law, the wife of her third son (the son having
been taken away for forced labor), and finally, her last address, the
address at which she died, must have been some sort of hospital or home,
because, unlike the documents for residential buildings, in which families
are grouped by apartment number, here there is simply a long list of people,
all of them with different surnames, with no apartment numbers, and most of
them crossed off and noted as having died on different dates. Even though I
have read up extensively on the Lodz Ghetto, I have never seen that
particular address mentioned as a hospital or home. It was (sadly)
illuminating for me to learn that, after suffering for two years in the
ghetto and seeing several of her children and grandchildren sent to their
deaths at Chelmno and others dying around her, my great-great-grandmother
must have died alone, in what was possibly a makeshift hospital set up to
cope with the overload of sick, starving, dying people in the ghetto.

I never would have found all this if I had not sought out the original
documents, and I have shared this story to show the importance of obtaining
original documents whenever and wherever possible.

I would also like to offer some information of specific interest to those
whose relatives were in the Lodz Ghetto. Because it puzzled me why my
great-great-uncle and his family did not appear in the database, I started
to search the database for some of the other 11 families who are listed in
the original document at the same address. Sure enough, as far as I could
see, most of them do not appear in the database at all, while some do, but
with somewhat different details, probably >from other entries in the registry
books (many people were listed twice or even three times as the books were
updated during the ghetto's four-year lifespan). I believe these particular
pages were probably (accidentally) omitted >from the printed books and
therefore >from the database. If anyone is interested in the following
families, I feel I would be doing a mitzvah to send them copies of the
original pages. Details as follows:

Address: Krzyzowa (Kreuz) 12.
Apt. 1: NAJMAN, Josek, Laja, Rojza, Mendel, Rutka, Abo, Wowa; STRYKOWSKI,
Mojsio.
Apt. 2: PRZYSUCHA, Bluma and Abram.
Apt. 3: CUKIER, Moszek, Fajga, Ruchla, Miriam, Gerszon; GRINBAUM, Rajzla.
Apt. 4: URBACH, Elka, Estera, Sura, Machla.
Apt. 5: ROMANOWICZ, Izrael, Etta-Fryma, Szymon, Etta.
Apt. 6: ABRAMOWICZ, Mojziesz, Gitla, Alta, Ichok.
Apt. 7: RUSS, Pinkus, Ruchla, Sura, Jankiel.
Apt. 8: KACZMAREK, Mendel, Fraidla, Sara, Rachmil.
Apt. 9: GOLDBERG-WALD, Szlama, Fajga, Estera.
Apt. 10: HERSZKOWICZ, Haja, Rochma; BERNCHOLC, Ita, Bronia.
Apt. 11: ROZENBLUM, Rywka, Rojza, Miriam, Menashe.
Apt. 12: (My great-great-uncle) LICHTENSZTAJN, Fajwel, Chana, Hersz.

The document is dated June 16, 1940, and is signed by a Jacob PURMANN (?)
and N. GLIKSMAN, and contains no further information about the fates of the
people mentioned.

All the best,

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.
Researching: BULWAR (Lodz, Krakow); FRENKIEL (Belz, Krakow); KALUSZYNER,
KUSMIERSKI, (Kaluszyn, Lodz); KUZKA, KASZKIET, RZETELNY, WROBEL (Kaluszyn);
KRYSKA, LICHTENSZTAJN (Sieradz, Lodz); WAKS, BEKER, ENGEL (Nowe Miasto nad
Pilica).


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen The importance of original documents #general

Apollo Israel <apollo@...>
 

Dear fellow JewishGenners,

Apologies in advance for this long email, but please bear with me.

Many of us have had the thrill of seeing a relative's name come up in one of
JewishGen's phenomenal databases or in other genealogy websites, and some of
us have taken the next step and ordered the relevant documents to see what
else we can learn. The reason I'm writing today is because, while it seemed
obvious to me to go ahead and order simple records like birth, marriage,
death or immigration/naturalization certificates, for a long time I simply
didn't think to do so for other, less straightforward kinds of records -
like the Holocaust records held by Israel's Yad Vashem, for example. And yet
now that I have finally done so, I have been blown away by what I have
learned. So I'm writing to tell you all to make the effort to get any
original records you can, not just the obvious or easy ones!

To illustrate, I always knew that most of my late grandmother's family had
been killed in the Holocaust, probably in or around Lodz, Poland, where they
lived. I found some of my grandmother's uncles, aunts and cousins listed in
the Lodz Ghetto population register in JewishGen's Holocaust database, and
while I was both thrilled and saddened to see their names and learn their
ages, addresses, occupations and specific fates, I was puzzled because I
couldn't find one particular uncle there, or in any other online Holocaust
source. I was similarly moved to discover that my grandmother's grandmother
had been in the ghetto and had died there in 1942 at the age of 76, but was
puzzled why the database seemed to show her at several different addresses
in the ghetto before her death.

I knew that the database was based on a set of five books printed after the
war, and that those books had in turn been based on the original,
handwritten population registry lists compiled in the ghetto. I learned that
the original lists are in the Polish State Archives in Lodz and that Yad
Vashem has a copy, which is not available online. Recently I decided to
write to Yad Vashem, and the organization very kindly sent me a number of
pages copied >from the original population registry.

I must say that even before I read the documents properly, I was jolted by
seeing the handwritten lists of names, grouped by families according to
apartment numbers in each building, under printed German column headings,
and seeing how many names were simply crossed out with annotations such as
"gest." (the German abbreviation for "died") or "ausg." (deported, in this
case to the Chelmno death camp). I don't think anything I've read in history
books or seen in documentaries or movies has given me a sense of the scale
and horror of the Holocaust and how it must have affected each and every Jew
in Poland at the time as much as those handwritten documents with their many
crossed-out names.

But what struck me also was that these documents contain quite a few pieces
of information that are not in the database, and some of this information is
quite significant. In just one example out of several, one of my
grandmother's uncles is listed in the database with his wife and three
children, but in the original document with five children. Somehow two of
the children were omitted >from the database (possibly >from the printed
books). We would never have known about these children if not for the
original document.

Other details in the documents clarified things that had puzzled me: My
great-great-grandmother's many addresses in the ghetto, it emerged, came
about because she lived first with her eldest son (who was then deported
with his entire family to the Chelmno death camp - I don't know how my
great-great-grandmother avoided being deported with him); then with her
second son (the uncle who is missing >from the database for reasons unknown);
then with her daughter-in-law, the wife of her third son (the son having
been taken away for forced labor), and finally, her last address, the
address at which she died, must have been some sort of hospital or home,
because, unlike the documents for residential buildings, in which families
are grouped by apartment number, here there is simply a long list of people,
all of them with different surnames, with no apartment numbers, and most of
them crossed off and noted as having died on different dates. Even though I
have read up extensively on the Lodz Ghetto, I have never seen that
particular address mentioned as a hospital or home. It was (sadly)
illuminating for me to learn that, after suffering for two years in the
ghetto and seeing several of her children and grandchildren sent to their
deaths at Chelmno and others dying around her, my great-great-grandmother
must have died alone, in what was possibly a makeshift hospital set up to
cope with the overload of sick, starving, dying people in the ghetto.

I never would have found all this if I had not sought out the original
documents, and I have shared this story to show the importance of obtaining
original documents whenever and wherever possible.

I would also like to offer some information of specific interest to those
whose relatives were in the Lodz Ghetto. Because it puzzled me why my
great-great-uncle and his family did not appear in the database, I started
to search the database for some of the other 11 families who are listed in
the original document at the same address. Sure enough, as far as I could
see, most of them do not appear in the database at all, while some do, but
with somewhat different details, probably >from other entries in the registry
books (many people were listed twice or even three times as the books were
updated during the ghetto's four-year lifespan). I believe these particular
pages were probably (accidentally) omitted >from the printed books and
therefore >from the database. If anyone is interested in the following
families, I feel I would be doing a mitzvah to send them copies of the
original pages. Details as follows:

Address: Krzyzowa (Kreuz) 12.
Apt. 1: NAJMAN, Josek, Laja, Rojza, Mendel, Rutka, Abo, Wowa; STRYKOWSKI,
Mojsio.
Apt. 2: PRZYSUCHA, Bluma and Abram.
Apt. 3: CUKIER, Moszek, Fajga, Ruchla, Miriam, Gerszon; GRINBAUM, Rajzla.
Apt. 4: URBACH, Elka, Estera, Sura, Machla.
Apt. 5: ROMANOWICZ, Izrael, Etta-Fryma, Szymon, Etta.
Apt. 6: ABRAMOWICZ, Mojziesz, Gitla, Alta, Ichok.
Apt. 7: RUSS, Pinkus, Ruchla, Sura, Jankiel.
Apt. 8: KACZMAREK, Mendel, Fraidla, Sara, Rachmil.
Apt. 9: GOLDBERG-WALD, Szlama, Fajga, Estera.
Apt. 10: HERSZKOWICZ, Haja, Rochma; BERNCHOLC, Ita, Bronia.
Apt. 11: ROZENBLUM, Rywka, Rojza, Miriam, Menashe.
Apt. 12: (My great-great-uncle) LICHTENSZTAJN, Fajwel, Chana, Hersz.

The document is dated June 16, 1940, and is signed by a Jacob PURMANN (?)
and N. GLIKSMAN, and contains no further information about the fates of the
people mentioned.

All the best,

Miriam Bulwar David-Hay,
Raanana, Israel.
Researching: BULWAR (Lodz, Krakow); FRENKIEL (Belz, Krakow); KALUSZYNER,
KUSMIERSKI, (Kaluszyn, Lodz); KUZKA, KASZKIET, RZETELNY, WROBEL (Kaluszyn);
KRYSKA, LICHTENSZTAJN (Sieradz, Lodz); WAKS, BEKER, ENGEL (Nowe Miasto nad
Pilica).


Searching: ZIRING, Fishel - Rachin, Dolina, Ukraine #general

Jessica Zering
 

Hello all!
I was wondering if any of you knew anything about this man. I believe he is
a great grandfather to me. He lived in, and was probably born in Rachin,
Dolina, Ukraine. He has two children that I know of:

Regina ZIRING, born 1892 in Rachin. She claims Fishel as her father in a
New York Passenger Manifest >from July 23rd, 1910.

Mordche/Moshe ZIRING, born 1890 in Rachin and married to Zlata. They have
a daughter named Malwina. A Yad Vashem form claims Fishel as his father.

I've searched JRI Poland, Yad Vashem, Ancestry, Geni, MyHeritage,
JewishGen, family trees on Ancestry and JewishGen, Jewish Online Burial
Database...pretty much everything.

He also goes by the last names of "Cyryng," "Ziring," and "Tziring." His
first name may also be spelled something like Fiszl or Feishel. Unlike his
children, he was not a Holocaust victim.

If you know anything at all, or if you know of a ZIRING genealogist who
has gone back further then the 1870s, your help would be greatly
appreciated! Thank you!

Jessica Zering
Pullman, WA


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Searching: ZIRING, Fishel - Rachin, Dolina, Ukraine #general

Jessica Zering
 

Hello all!
I was wondering if any of you knew anything about this man. I believe he is
a great grandfather to me. He lived in, and was probably born in Rachin,
Dolina, Ukraine. He has two children that I know of:

Regina ZIRING, born 1892 in Rachin. She claims Fishel as her father in a
New York Passenger Manifest >from July 23rd, 1910.

Mordche/Moshe ZIRING, born 1890 in Rachin and married to Zlata. They have
a daughter named Malwina. A Yad Vashem form claims Fishel as his father.

I've searched JRI Poland, Yad Vashem, Ancestry, Geni, MyHeritage,
JewishGen, family trees on Ancestry and JewishGen, Jewish Online Burial
Database...pretty much everything.

He also goes by the last names of "Cyryng," "Ziring," and "Tziring." His
first name may also be spelled something like Fiszl or Feishel. Unlike his
children, he was not a Holocaust victim.

If you know anything at all, or if you know of a ZIRING genealogist who
has gone back further then the 1870s, your help would be greatly
appreciated! Thank you!

Jessica Zering
Pullman, WA


Paris 2012- End of Tuesday Report #germany

Jeanette R Rosenberg OBE
 

Dear GerSIGgers

Well I don't know where today went, I just looked up and it's just
after midnight Paris time, and I haven't shared today's conference
with you, nor have I told you about our GerSIG events yesterday.

About 12 of us gathered for the GerSiG breakfast at 7.30am this
morning (seems a long time ago now) and Roger and I were able to
share research snippets with those present to hopefully break down
research brick walls. With that perhaps a request to each GerSIGer
who came to the breakfast, please will you write your question and the
advice you received to our GerSIG list, so the answers can be found by
other researchers in future. Thank you.

After breakfast I attended Ralph Bloch's lecture on family
reconstitution in Stuehlingen - on the Swiss- German border.

Today's highlight was the Gala Dinner where Fr. Desbois >from Yachad in
Unum - see www.yahadinunum.org/ delivered a before dinner talk about
the work he and the foundation undertake. Fr Desbois also spoke at the
IAJGS Conference in Philadelphia.

Wednesday's conference program highlights for GerSIGgers include: Dr
Ekkehard Huebschmann's talk about the genealogical significance of old
photos and postcards, and Gerhard Buck's talk on reading old German
script - delivered again by invitation following a first airing last
year in Washington DC. Also, tomorrow afternoon is Martina Werres tak
about the Saxe Archives ad Avraham Malthete's session on Mohel
(circumcision) registers.

I've not forgotten to tell you about the GerSig meeting from
yesterday, but I've left it too later for today to do the subject
justice. It will have to wait for me to sort out my notes to provide
a full report.

It's time to sleep now, so I am up for the last full day of the
conference tomorrow!

Jeanette
Jeanette Rosenberg GerSig Director, now in Paris, France, but usually
in London UK. @JeanetteRRosenbergOBE


Re: First Came "Retroactive Samification" and Now Comes... #general

Jules Levin
 

At 10:31 AM 7/16/2012, Meron LAVIE wrote:
...I may have just discovered...
... Proactive Samification!

By that, I mean that perhaps my great-grandfather already took the name
Samuel in advance of his arrival in the US, maybe because he came through
Scotland and it was just easier giving "Samuel" to the Scottish clerk who
registered him? Can you even imagine hearing "Schleime Meyer" in a heavy
brogue?

I would be interested in hearing if there are any similar stories of
people who experienced Proactive Samification, and perhaps even start a
support group for their families.
For better or worse, there is a false assumption going on here, namely,
that in the old country the Jews lived in a splendid authentic original
Yiddish subculture, and only became assimilated in the New World.
Assimilation was going on rapidly in Russia and all its territories, and
many Jews were very familiar with the Russian and German equivalents of their
Hebrew names, and were not reluctant to use them.

My gf was Yehudah, but was already familiar with Julius and may have already
been using it. The Russian Samuil was known by Jews, and they didn't have
to go to Scotland to learn it. A Scottish clerk hearing "Samuil" would have
written "Samuel" without thinking he was changing the name. Moshe was
already Mauritz in fancy German-speaking households, and only then became
Morris in America. I'll need to see better evidence for Samification
before I believe in it.

Jules Levin
Los Angeles


German SIG #Germany Paris 2012- End of Tuesday Report #germany

Jeanette R Rosenberg OBE
 

Dear GerSIGgers

Well I don't know where today went, I just looked up and it's just
after midnight Paris time, and I haven't shared today's conference
with you, nor have I told you about our GerSIG events yesterday.

About 12 of us gathered for the GerSiG breakfast at 7.30am this
morning (seems a long time ago now) and Roger and I were able to
share research snippets with those present to hopefully break down
research brick walls. With that perhaps a request to each GerSIGer
who came to the breakfast, please will you write your question and the
advice you received to our GerSIG list, so the answers can be found by
other researchers in future. Thank you.

After breakfast I attended Ralph Bloch's lecture on family
reconstitution in Stuehlingen - on the Swiss- German border.

Today's highlight was the Gala Dinner where Fr. Desbois >from Yachad in
Unum - see www.yahadinunum.org/ delivered a before dinner talk about
the work he and the foundation undertake. Fr Desbois also spoke at the
IAJGS Conference in Philadelphia.

Wednesday's conference program highlights for GerSIGgers include: Dr
Ekkehard Huebschmann's talk about the genealogical significance of old
photos and postcards, and Gerhard Buck's talk on reading old German
script - delivered again by invitation following a first airing last
year in Washington DC. Also, tomorrow afternoon is Martina Werres tak
about the Saxe Archives ad Avraham Malthete's session on Mohel
(circumcision) registers.

I've not forgotten to tell you about the GerSig meeting from
yesterday, but I've left it too later for today to do the subject
justice. It will have to wait for me to sort out my notes to provide
a full report.

It's time to sleep now, so I am up for the last full day of the
conference tomorrow!

Jeanette
Jeanette Rosenberg GerSig Director, now in Paris, France, but usually
in London UK. @JeanetteRRosenbergOBE


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Re: First Came "Retroactive Samification" and Now Comes... #general

Jules Levin
 

At 10:31 AM 7/16/2012, Meron LAVIE wrote:
...I may have just discovered...
... Proactive Samification!

By that, I mean that perhaps my great-grandfather already took the name
Samuel in advance of his arrival in the US, maybe because he came through
Scotland and it was just easier giving "Samuel" to the Scottish clerk who
registered him? Can you even imagine hearing "Schleime Meyer" in a heavy
brogue?

I would be interested in hearing if there are any similar stories of
people who experienced Proactive Samification, and perhaps even start a
support group for their families.
For better or worse, there is a false assumption going on here, namely,
that in the old country the Jews lived in a splendid authentic original
Yiddish subculture, and only became assimilated in the New World.
Assimilation was going on rapidly in Russia and all its territories, and
many Jews were very familiar with the Russian and German equivalents of their
Hebrew names, and were not reluctant to use them.

My gf was Yehudah, but was already familiar with Julius and may have already
been using it. The Russian Samuil was known by Jews, and they didn't have
to go to Scotland to learn it. A Scottish clerk hearing "Samuil" would have
written "Samuel" without thinking he was changing the name. Moshe was
already Mauritz in fancy German-speaking households, and only then became
Morris in America. I'll need to see better evidence for Samification
before I believe in it.

Jules Levin
Los Angeles


Isaac NEWMAN #general

Jack Katz
 

Researching Isaac NEWMAN born New York 1923 plus or minus 1 year.
Lived at 345 E Houston when 2 years old,

Jack Katz
London, England

GROSS: Tarnopol, Trembowla, Vienna, NY;
KATZ: Lomazy/Berehovo;
NEUSCHULER: Tarnopol, Trembowla, Vienna;
NEWMAN, NEUMAN: New York;
PREGER: Poland, RIMMER: Bessarabia (?Belz);
SCHAFFER, YANKOVITCH, JANKOVITCH: Dorohoi.


JewishGen Discussion Group #JewishGen Isaac NEWMAN #general

Jack Katz
 

Researching Isaac NEWMAN born New York 1923 plus or minus 1 year.
Lived at 345 E Houston when 2 years old,

Jack Katz
London, England

GROSS: Tarnopol, Trembowla, Vienna, NY;
KATZ: Lomazy/Berehovo;
NEUSCHULER: Tarnopol, Trembowla, Vienna;
NEWMAN, NEUMAN: New York;
PREGER: Poland, RIMMER: Bessarabia (?Belz);
SCHAFFER, YANKOVITCH, JANKOVITCH: Dorohoi.